3 things to know about the Republican convention Tuesday

  • Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump waves as he leaves the stage during the Republican National Convention.

    Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump waves as he leaves the stage during the Republican National Convention. Associated Press

  • Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey greets delegates on the floor during the opening day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland.

    Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey greets delegates on the floor during the opening day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland. Associated Press

 
 
Updated 7/19/2016 2:10 PM

The Republican National Convention in Cleveland holds its second night of action today. Here's what you should know if you're planning to watch.

• It's tonight that Donald Trump is nominated as Republicans' candidate for president as delegates participate in a roll call of the states. He'll accept the nomination Thursday in a speech that could be seen as a tone-setter for the campaign. Events kick off at 4:30 p.m. today and will be carried live online, then more widely on TV later in the evening.

 

• Among the prime-time speakers are former Trump opponents Chris Christie and Ben Carson; daughter Tiffany Trump and son Donald Trump Jr., Ultimate Fighting Championship President Dana White and golfer Natalie Gulbis. Last night's keynote by Melania Trump has drawn attention for including several lines that also showed up in Michelle Obama's 2008 convention speech. Will any of the speakers address the controversy tonight?

• The Illinois delegation at breakfast heard from some of the state's top-ranking officials who made the trip to Cleveland, U.S. Reps. Peter Roskam of Wheaton and Randy Hultgren of Plano. The surprise drop-in guest was former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski. Roskam said last week he felt it was important to go and take an optimistic message to the delegates. "We have a lot to be thankful for in the United States, and we have incredible challenges in the United States. And that we ought not be despondent," Roskam said. "But instead, we should say we as a generation can rise to the challenges that are presented before us."

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