The Latest: Rauner rips Democrats on Illinois budget tour

  • In this Tuesday, May 31, 2016 photo, Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner speaks to reporters outside his office at the Illinois State Capitol in Springfield, Ill. After finishing another legislative session without agreeing on a budget, Rauner and Illinois’ ruling Democrats left the state Capitol Tuesday looking to November when they’ll try to convince voters the other side is to blame for the state’s enormous fiscal mess. But there’s huge political risk for both sides leading up to the general election.

    In this Tuesday, May 31, 2016 photo, Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner speaks to reporters outside his office at the Illinois State Capitol in Springfield, Ill. After finishing another legislative session without agreeing on a budget, Rauner and Illinois’ ruling Democrats left the state Capitol Tuesday looking to November when they’ll try to convince voters the other side is to blame for the state’s enormous fiscal mess. But there’s huge political risk for both sides leading up to the general election. Associated Press

  • In this Tuesday, May 17, 2016 photo, Illinois Speaker of the House Michael Madigan, D-Chicago, speaks to lawmakers while on the House floor during session at the Illinois State Capitol in Springfield, Ill. After finishing another legislative session without agreeing on a budget, Gov. Bruce Rauner and Illinois’ ruling Democrats left a chaotic night on Tuesday, May 31,  looking to November when they’ll try to convince voters the other side is to blame for the state’s enormous fiscal mess. But there’s huge political risk for both sides leading up to the general election.

    In this Tuesday, May 17, 2016 photo, Illinois Speaker of the House Michael Madigan, D-Chicago, speaks to lawmakers while on the House floor during session at the Illinois State Capitol in Springfield, Ill. After finishing another legislative session without agreeing on a budget, Gov. Bruce Rauner and Illinois’ ruling Democrats left a chaotic night on Tuesday, May 31, looking to November when they’ll try to convince voters the other side is to blame for the state’s enormous fiscal mess. But there’s huge political risk for both sides leading up to the general election. Associated Press

  • In this Tuesday, May 17, 2016 photo, Illinois Senate President John Cullerton, D-Chicago, speaks to reporters outside Gov. Bruce Rauner's office at the Illinois State Capitol in Springfield, Ill. After failing again to approve a state spending plan, Rauner and Democratic leaders in the Illiniois Legislature look to move past a chaotic night and convince voters the other side is to blame for the state's enormous mess. But there's huge political risk for both sides leading up to the November election.

    In this Tuesday, May 17, 2016 photo, Illinois Senate President John Cullerton, D-Chicago, speaks to reporters outside Gov. Bruce Rauner's office at the Illinois State Capitol in Springfield, Ill. After failing again to approve a state spending plan, Rauner and Democratic leaders in the Illiniois Legislature look to move past a chaotic night and convince voters the other side is to blame for the state's enormous mess. But there's huge political risk for both sides leading up to the November election. Associated Press

  • In this Tuesday, May 31, 2016 photo, Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner, surrounded by fellow Republican lawmakers, speaks to reporters outside his office at the Illinois State Capitol in Springfield, Ill. After finishing another legislative session without agreeing on a budget, Rauner and Illinois’ ruling Democrats left the state Capitol Tuesday looking to November when they’ll try to convince voters the other side is to blame for the state’s enormous fiscal mess. But there's huge political risk for both sides leading up to the November election.

    In this Tuesday, May 31, 2016 photo, Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner, surrounded by fellow Republican lawmakers, speaks to reporters outside his office at the Illinois State Capitol in Springfield, Ill. After finishing another legislative session without agreeing on a budget, Rauner and Illinois’ ruling Democrats left the state Capitol Tuesday looking to November when they’ll try to convince voters the other side is to blame for the state’s enormous fiscal mess. But there's huge political risk for both sides leading up to the November election. Associated Press

  • In this Tuesday, May 31, 2016 photo, Illinois lawmakers press ahead on the last day of the spring legislative session inside the Illinois State Capitol in Springfield, Ill. After failing again to approve a state spending plan, Rauner and Democratic leaders in the Illiniois Legislature look to move past a chaotic night and convince voters the other side is to blame for the state's enormous mess. But there's huge political risk for both sides leading up to the November election.

    In this Tuesday, May 31, 2016 photo, Illinois lawmakers press ahead on the last day of the spring legislative session inside the Illinois State Capitol in Springfield, Ill. After failing again to approve a state spending plan, Rauner and Democratic leaders in the Illiniois Legislature look to move past a chaotic night and convince voters the other side is to blame for the state's enormous mess. But there's huge political risk for both sides leading up to the November election. Associated Press

 
 
Updated 6/1/2016 12:55 PM

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. -- The Latest on the failure of Illinois lawmakers and the governor to end the state budget standoff (all times local):

1:55 p.m.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

Gov. Bruce Rauner is using a statewide, campaign-style tour to rip Democrats who control the Illinois Legislature for failing to approve a state budget.

The Republican governor appeared with a GOP candidate for state Senate on Wednesday at the Vienna Correctional Center in southern Illinois.

He says Democratic House Speaker Michael Madigan has controlled Illinois for 30 years and the state has huge deficits and billions in debt.

Madigan and Senate President John Cullerton argue Rauner's yearlong insistence on passing pro-business legislation and curbing union power is the reason for the 11-month budget impasse.

Lawmakers adjourned their spring session late Tuesday without agreeing on a budget for the second straight year. That's put schools and universities in danger of closing and could lead to cuts in critical state services.

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12:55 p.m.

University of Illinois President Timothy Killeen says that the prospect of another year with limited or no state funding makes him "gravely concerned" the school may have to lay off employees or cut course offerings.

Lawmakers adjourned Tuesday without agreeing on a budget for either the current fiscal year or the one that will begin next month.

Killeen stressed that the university is not in danger of closing a campus. Another state school, Chicago State University, faced the possibility of closure this spring and laid off a third of its employees.

But Killeen said "all options are on the table" at the University of Illinois if it continues to live without public funding.

Already the university is preparing to lay off an unspecified number of its non-teaching workers this summer.

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8:35 a.m.

Bruce Rauner is setting off on a five-stop tour around the state to discuss the 11-month budget standoff between the Republican governor and Democratic lawmakers.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

Illinois was poised to enter a second year without a budget after lawmakers finished their legislative session Tuesday without agreement on a spending plan.

Rauner proposed a last-minute, short-term budget to give the state some near-term stability. But that failed to gain traction with Democrats, who have opposed the governor's yearlong insistence on passing pro-business legislation and curbing the power of unions.

The governor's Wednesday tour will pass through Alton, Vienna, Mahomet, Quincy and Pekin.

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12:40 a.m.

Illinois lawmakers finished their spring session without a budget and with little hope that the Democrats' 11-month standoff with Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner over a spending plan will end any time soon.

Democrats who control both chambers of the Legislature spent the last chaotic hours of the session Tuesday trying to rush bills to the finish line and failed to come up with a viable budget proposal.

The Senate overwhelmingly rejected the House's $40 billion budget plan that was out-of-balance by $7 billion. Shortly thereafter, the House returned the favor and defeated the Senate's $16 billion education budget by a large margin.

Democrats say they'll work with Rauner to find a short-term budget that gets the state to the end of the year. Rauner called the session a "stunning failure."

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