Lake Zurich firefighters save ducklings from storm drain

  • A Facebook post about Lake Zurich firefighters rescuing seven ducklings from a storm sewer has reached more than 45,000 people, an official said.

    A Facebook post about Lake Zurich firefighters rescuing seven ducklings from a storm sewer has reached more than 45,000 people, an official said. Courtesy of Lake Zurich Fire Rescue department

  • Lake Zurich firefighters rescued seven ducklings from a storm sewer Thursday and are getting kudos for it on social media, an official said.

    Lake Zurich firefighters rescued seven ducklings from a storm sewer Thursday and are getting kudos for it on social media, an official said. Courtesy of Lake Zurich Fire Rescue Department

  • Lake Zurich firefighters rescued seven ducklings from a storm sewer Thursday. Photos of the rescue are a big hit on social media, an official said.

    Lake Zurich firefighters rescued seven ducklings from a storm sewer Thursday. Photos of the rescue are a big hit on social media, an official said. Courtesy of Lake Zurich Fire Rescue Department

 
 
Updated 4/30/2016 4:49 PM

When it comes to rescuing, no creature is too small for Lake Zurich firefighters -- whether it's a cat in a tree, deer on ice, or duckling in a pipe.

A Lake Zurich Fire Rescue Department engine crew was dispatched Thursday morning to the scene of one such mishap for a brood of ducklings that had fallen down a storm drain near some Rand Road businesses.

 

Using a small net borrowed from a nearby public works crew, the firefighters rescued seven ducklings from the storm sewer, Fire Chief John Malcolm said Saturday.

"They tried to locate where the mother was," said Malcolm, adding she was last spotted going through a fence into a field near the drain.

The ducklings now are being cared for at a wildlife rescue facility in Wauconda, he said.

Firefighter/paramedics Jeff Wascow, Jeremy Holden and Doug Erb may not get commendations for the rescue, but they have received plenty of kudos on social media. The department's Facebook post about the rescue so far has reached more than 45,000 people, Malcolm said.

Malcolm said wildlife rescues are not uncommon and anytime a call comes in involving a creature in distress, firefighters respond with gusto.

"It's a credit to the firefighters that were on that call ... for being resourceful to do what they need to do to safely remove the ducklings," Malcolm said. "Anytime somebody calls us, we'll do what we can to respond, to see if we can assist. That's what we're there for. There's really no question."

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