Lake County students learn about interrogation, crime scene analysis during Law Day event

 
 
Updated 4/29/2016 7:34 PM
hello
  • Jacob Idlas, an assistant Lake County public defender, left, and Joseph Fusz, a private attorney with the Law Offices of David Del Re, argue a mock case in front of Lake County Judge David P. Brodsky during Law Day at the Lake County courthouse Friday.

      Jacob Idlas, an assistant Lake County public defender, left, and Joseph Fusz, a private attorney with the Law Offices of David Del Re, argue a mock case in front of Lake County Judge David P. Brodsky during Law Day at the Lake County courthouse Friday. Lee Filas | Staff Photographer

About 300 students from throughout Lake County learned about interrogation techniques, Miranda laws, and pathology Friday during "Law Day" at the Lake County courthouse.

Students from Antioch, Grant Stevenson, Lake Zurich and Waukegan high schools and the Lake County High School Technology Campus took part in the annual event, said Diane Flory, the assistant director of judicial operations for the 19th Judicial Circuit Court of Lake County.

Students attended seminars on the process that sentences felons to prison, on what to watch out for on social media, how crime scene investigations and suspect interrogations are completed, and what happens during a pathology investigation.

They also toured the Lake County jail and coroner's office, Flory said.

"Law Day is one of the highlights of the year for our courthouse," Chief Judge Jorge Ortiz said. "We are honored to welcome students, teachers and parents as we celebrate the rule of law through this wonderful educational program."

Volunteers from the Lake County Bar Association, the Lake County state's attorney's office, the Lake County public defender's office, the Lake County sheriff's office and the Lake County coroner's office took part in the event.

"The entire legal community takes pride in teaching students the differing aspects of the legal system," Ortiz said. "Teaching students to have respect for the law is vital to our democratic way of life."

Article Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.