'Cool insects' delight kids at Naperville museum

 
Daily Herald report
Updated 1/29/2016 4:38 PM
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  • Abigail Leadaman, 3, gets a close-up look at a hissing cockroach Friday during an exotic bug exhibit at the DuPage Children's Museum in Naperville.

      Abigail Leadaman, 3, gets a close-up look at a hissing cockroach Friday during an exotic bug exhibit at the DuPage Children's Museum in Naperville. Bev Horne | Staff Photographer

  • Thomas Dobrinska, technical director and board certified entomologist with Anderson Pest Solutions, shows off a giant vinegarroon to Krista Gentler and her son Colin, 2, of Naperville. "We like bringing the cool insects; we're not necessarily bringing the pests," Dobrinska said. "These are the ones that we're actually trying to protect."

      Thomas Dobrinska, technical director and board certified entomologist with Anderson Pest Solutions, shows off a giant vinegarroon to Krista Gentler and her son Colin, 2, of Naperville. "We like bringing the cool insects; we're not necessarily bringing the pests," Dobrinska said. "These are the ones that we're actually trying to protect." Bev Horne | Staff Photographer

  • A giant vinegarroon was one of the exotic bugs on display Friday at the DuPage Children's Museum in Naperville.

      A giant vinegarroon was one of the exotic bugs on display Friday at the DuPage Children's Museum in Naperville. Bev Horne | Staff Photographer

  • A twig-mimic preying mantis shows off for visitors Friday during an exotic bug exhibit from Anderson Pest Solutions at the DuPage Children's Museum in Naperville.

      A twig-mimic preying mantis shows off for visitors Friday during an exotic bug exhibit from Anderson Pest Solutions at the DuPage Children's Museum in Naperville. Bev Horne | Staff Photographer

Cockroaches hissed, a mantis preyed and giant vinegarroons did whatever it is they do Friday as Anderson Pest Solutions exhibited exotic bugs at the DuPage Children's Museum in Naperville.

Parents took their tots to see the unusual display of insects that aren't necessarily pests, but are just as large and "almost scary," said Sue Kessler, a floor leader at the museum.

Kids got to go hands-on with the insects, holding a variety of bugs while the creatures crawled from palm to palm.

"He likes me," 3-year-old Abigail Leadaman said while she got a close look at a hissing cockroach.

Kessler said the insect zoo visits the museum at 301 N. Washington St. once a month, bringing the creepy, crawly side of science to life.

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