A look at the impacts of Illinois' budget impasse

  • FILE - In this Jan. 11, 2016 file photo, Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner talks to The Associated Press at the Executive Mansion in Springfield, Ill., on the eve of the one-year anniversary of his taking office. Rauner is scheduled to give his second State of the State address Wednesday, Jan. 27 while there still is no budget deal for the year that began July 1.

    FILE - In this Jan. 11, 2016 file photo, Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner talks to The Associated Press at the Executive Mansion in Springfield, Ill., on the eve of the one-year anniversary of his taking office. Rauner is scheduled to give his second State of the State address Wednesday, Jan. 27 while there still is no budget deal for the year that began July 1. Associated Press

  • Illinois AFL-CIO President Michael Carrigan introduces union members Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2016, in Springfield, Ill., who contend that Gov. Bruce Rauner’s political agenda to curb union power would hurt working families. Speaking were a professor, a painter, a teacher, a fire fighter, a steel worker, and others. Rauner is scheduled to give his second State of the State address Wednesday while there still is no budget deal for the year that began July 1.

    Illinois AFL-CIO President Michael Carrigan introduces union members Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2016, in Springfield, Ill., who contend that Gov. Bruce Rauner’s political agenda to curb union power would hurt working families. Speaking were a professor, a painter, a teacher, a fire fighter, a steel worker, and others. Rauner is scheduled to give his second State of the State address Wednesday while there still is no budget deal for the year that began July 1. Associated Press

 
 
Posted1/27/2016 7:00 AM

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. -- Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner is delivering his second State of the State address Wednesday during one of the most tumultuous times for Illinois in recent history.

The seven-month budget standoff with Democrats who control the Legislature has caused cuts to social services and higher-education programs and plunged the state further into debt. Neither side is budging. Democrats say a tax increase is necessary to close a multibillion budget hole. Rauner maintains he won't support a tax increase without reforms he wants, including imposing term limits, limiting the power of unions and making it easier for businesses to operate in Illinois.

 

While the stalemate continues, here's a look at its consequences.

___

SOCIAL SAFETY NET PROGRAMS

Homeless shelters, mental help counseling and in-home care for seniors are among the 30 programs Lutheran Social Services is closing because of $6 million in overdue bills from the state, the 149-year-old agency announced Friday. The agency also is laying off 750 employees - about 43 percent of its staff. The programs closing served 4,700 people.

Around the state, hundreds of human services agencies have made cuts and the future looks dire, according to a survey released Tuesday by the United Way of Illinois. It found that 85 percent of 444 agencies it queried this month have reduced the number of clients they serve since July, when the state's annual budget should've taken effect. The agencies provide an array of services, including emergency housing, aid for disabled children, home-delivered meals for seniors and employment training.

Chicago advocates pushed lawmakers ahead of Wednesday's address to consider long-term impacts. Erie Neighborhood House, which helps low-income families, laid off staff and cut technology and afterschool programs affecting at least 250 people.

"In this time in our city, in our state, those children, those youth and those adults need to have a place to be able to go," said executive director Celena Roldan.

by signing up you agree to our terms of service
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

___

SUPPORT FOR COLLEGES

The presidents of nine Illinois public universities said in a letter to Rauner last week that the state's higher education system will be damaged beyond repair if a budget isn't approved soon. The letter said there may be closings when funds for several universities and community colleges run out.

The University of Illinois has had to use $671 million from its cash reserves to make up for the funding it hasn't received from the state.

And this week, Eastern Illinois University was the latest to feel the repercussions from the budget deadlock, with school President David Glassman telling employees in a letter there will be delays in maintenance and repairs, cuts to all non-instructional equipment purchases, and no reimbursement for travel. Glassman said in the letter that layoffs and furloughs are possible.

At Chicago State University, a predominantly black school on Chicago's South Side, officials announced last week they won't have money to pay employees by March.

Meanwhile, low-income students who rely on the Illinois' Monetary Award Program grants to pay tuition won't be getting that help this spring.

___

MORE DEBT

Even without a budget, the state has continued to operate - and spend - because of court orders to keep some essential services running. That's increasing the state's debt because the spending is based on revenue levels from last year, when the individual Illinois income tax rate was at 5 percent, not the current rate of 3.75 percent. A recent report from the Governor's Office of Management and Budget says if the current spending levels continue without new taxes or the Legislature cutting spending the deficit for the fiscal year ending in June will be $4.6 billion.

___

Associated Press writers John O'Connor in Springfield, and Sara Burnett and Sophia Tareen in Chicago contributed to this report.

0 Comments
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 
Article Comments
Attention: We are experiencing technical difficulties with our Facebook Comments module at this time. Comments will remain disabled until we are able to resolve the problem. We apologize for the interruption. We invite you to engage with our content and talk with other commenters on our Daily Herald Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/DailyHeraldFans/. Thank you.