Fox Lake students learn how to be heroes every day

 
By Gilbert R. Boucher II
gboucher@dailyherald.com
Updated 11/24/2015 6:09 PM
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  • Author Tim Shoemaker speaks to students about being a hero Tuesday at Stanton School in Fox Lake. Shoemaker writes mystery books intended for middle school students.

      Author Tim Shoemaker speaks to students about being a hero Tuesday at Stanton School in Fox Lake. Shoemaker writes mystery books intended for middle school students. Gilbert R. Boucher II | Staff Photographer

  • Middle school students listen to author Tim Shoemaker as he speaks about being a hero Tuesday at Stanton School in Fox Lake. Shoemaker writes mystery books intended for middle school students.

      Middle school students listen to author Tim Shoemaker as he speaks about being a hero Tuesday at Stanton School in Fox Lake. Shoemaker writes mystery books intended for middle school students. Gilbert R. Boucher II | Staff Photographer

  • Fifth grader Landon Schultz laughs after participating in a demonstration with author Tim Shoemaker, who spoke with students Tuesday at Stanton School in Fox Lake. Shoemaker writes mystery books intended for middle school students.

      Fifth grader Landon Schultz laughs after participating in a demonstration with author Tim Shoemaker, who spoke with students Tuesday at Stanton School in Fox Lake. Shoemaker writes mystery books intended for middle school students. Gilbert R. Boucher II | Staff Photographer

Heroes aren't only found on movie and television screens, or even just in the pages of his books, author Tim Shoemaker told students Tuesday at Stanton School in Fox Lake on Tuesday.

Instead, the writer from Rolling Meadows told nearly 170 middle school students that they also could be heroes through the little things they do daily.

"My target age is the middle grades, and I love writing for that age," Shoemaker said. "We are coming here to talk a little bit about writing, but more importantly, before that, what it takes to be a hero in everyday life. Every kid wants to be a hero. But often they think it has to be some great big thing that they do. In reality, it is the small things that make a big difference."

Shoemaker is an author of 11 books, including his current mystery series, "The Code of Silence," based on characters making good decisions in crisis situations.

To show the importance of good decisions, Shoemaker had fifth grader Landon Schultz toss a beanbag into a bucket first normally, and then while blindfolded and disoriented. The display showed how making better decisions can minimize hardships.

"I think he's amazing and I loved his book," seventh grader Tylee Lewis said as she held an autographed copy of "Code of Silence." "I read his book and was really excited about it. I think it's thrilling to see that anyone can be a hero. It's really cool."

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