Little City raises more than $735,000 at dinner gala

  • Little City Executive Director Shawn Jeffers, Coleman Foundation Program Officer Rosa Berardi, donor Verne Carson, Little City Chief Philanthropy Officer Ed Hockfield and board Chair Matt Schubert stand with a poster representing the $500,000 grant that was awarded to Little City by the Coleman Foundation.

    Little City Executive Director Shawn Jeffers, Coleman Foundation Program Officer Rosa Berardi, donor Verne Carson, Little City Chief Philanthropy Officer Ed Hockfield and board Chair Matt Schubert stand with a poster representing the $500,000 grant that was awarded to Little City by the Coleman Foundation. Courtesy of Wendy Love

  • Little City participant Andrea Bell poses with her sister Julie Bell at Little City's annual dinner gala fundraiser at Chicago's Field Museum on Sept. 26.

    Little City participant Andrea Bell poses with her sister Julie Bell at Little City's annual dinner gala fundraiser at Chicago's Field Museum on Sept. 26. Courtesy of Wendy Love

 
 

Palatine's Little City raised more than $735,000 at the agency's annual dinner gala fundraiser held at Chicago's Field Museum last week.

More than 350 supporters of Little City dined alongside world-famous Tyrannosaurus rex, Sue, during the gala.

To add to the excitement, Little City, which provides advocacy and services to children and adults with autism and other intellectual and developmental disabilities. announced a $500,000 grant from the Coleman Foundation for the construction of a new children's home.

The event "capped off an especially strong year for Little City with the development of new homes for youth as well as an expansion of the ChildBridge Center for Education therapeutic day school," said Little City Communications Manager Ann Meyer.

The Coleman Foundation grant will go toward the third home in the Duffey Family Children's Village at the Palatine campus.

Meyer says the village's first two homes are already making a difference.

"Each child has his own room, and innovative sensory rooms are designed to serve high-stimulus activities, such as music, crafts and other motor activities, while also adapting to quieter activities like speech therapy and one-on-one instruction," she said.

The black-tie optional gala included a silent auction where guests could bid on work created by Little City artists.

Attendees also had the opportunity to gain private access to the museum's Viking exhibit which is set to leave the museum Oct. 4.