Lots of possibilities at Mill Race in Geneva

  • The falling-apart Mill Race Inn building is on the Fox River on the east side of Geneva.

      The falling-apart Mill Race Inn building is on the Fox River on the east side of Geneva. John Starks | Staff Photographer

  • A view from across the river of the falling-apart Mill Race Inn building in Geneva.

      A view from across the river of the falling-apart Mill Race Inn building in Geneva. John Starks | Staff Photographer

 
 
Posted9/22/2015 1:00 AM

You have to use your imagination a little bit -- or maybe it would be easier to get your hands on some initial concept drawings from Shodeen Construction -- in thinking about what could unfold on the quickly deteriorating Mill Race Inn location on Geneva's east side.

Shodeen has been talking to the owner of Geneva Cycle Shop in order to get that property in the future, so we know the entire corner at State and Route 25 will likely become a townhouse complex.

 

That's a good idea, as it doesn't seem likely that an attempt for some sort of retail or restaurant setting would draw much attention, considering how much retail focus in Geneva remains west of the Fox River.

But here's another idea to consider: If some people living in townhouses at that location were also commuters using the Metra station, it would be great to put a small pedestrian bridge across the lagoon, where the former gazebo now sits. That would allow people to walk across and quickly make their way to the larger bridge on the south side of Island Park to get across the river, over the government center path and to the train station.

When the weather is good, I'd take that option over parking in the station garage and fooling with the traffic when you get home.

Also, it would potentially be a much longer walk over the State Street bridge to Third Street to the station without something across the lagoon.

The timetable for such a change at Mill Race? We'd guess in four to five years. But keep that crossing bridge in mind.

Some long rides

Those who take long bike rides on a regular basis may not be too intimidated by this, but 40- or 62-mile rides sure sound challenging.

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The Special Olympics Illinois stands to benefit from those who sign up for the 24th Pumpkin Pedal Bike Tour on Sunday, Oct. 4, starting at Sycamore Speedway in Maple Park.

Riders can choose a 10-, 20- or 26-mile route on the Great Western Trail, or those aforementioned longer road rides.

Registration begins at 7:30 a.m. and bicyclists can take off any time between 7:45 and 10 a.m. Organizers clear all of the routes by 3 p.m.

If I could sing

Those of us who can't carry a tune to save our lives sometimes fantasize about being a great singer. Would I be a rock star, or a crooner from the 1960s?

Actually, it would be quite pleasant to just say I could at least sing at a church. Alas, I cannot. But others certainly can.

Thus, it is with the slightest tinge of envy that I mention that St. Charles Episcopal Church has started a new choral scholars program.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

It sounds quite lofty, but basically the choral scholars serve as section leaders in the parish choir. They practice on Wednesday nights and sing on Sunday mornings.

Those interested in the program should contact Mike Downey, director of music, at (815) 723-1996 for an interview.

I'm not a member at that church, so that would likely rule me out. Oh, that's right, I can't sing either.

What's that?

The Kane County Farm Bureau says that, among other things, September is Papaya Month. And I'm thinking, I'm not entirely sure what papaya is.

Hopefully, those that do gave papaya its proper recognition this month.

Mr. Postman plays

Jim Freedlund of Batavia is about ready to hang up his mail bag, after 42 years of service with the Batavia Post Office. His last day in the world of mail delivery is Oct. 2.

About the only thing Freedlund has done longer is play the guitar.

So it is somewhat fitting that he'll be doing that with many of his former bandmates on Saturday night at Kiss the Sky. They made up the band Gross National Product, which was popular in these parts during the 1960s and 1970s.

The show starts at 7:15 p.m.

Will he have a farewell song for the post office on the song list this time around?

dheun@sbcglobal.net

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