Probation, evaluation in 2012 Elgin animal cruelty case

 
By Harry Hitzeman\
Legal Affairs Writer
hhitzeman@dailyherald.com
Updated 9/11/2014 5:36 PM
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  • William Tinkler

    William Tinkler

  • Dozens of cat carcasses and bodies of other animals were found in a van on the 200 block of Villa Street in Elgin on Sept. 26, 2012. William Tinkler, 62, pleaded guilty this week to animal neglect in exchange for prosecutors dismissing animal cruelty charges.

    Dozens of cat carcasses and bodies of other animals were found in a van on the 200 block of Villa Street in Elgin on Sept. 26, 2012. William Tinkler, 62, pleaded guilty this week to animal neglect in exchange for prosecutors dismissing animal cruelty charges. Daily Herald file photo

An Elgin man whose rented home was littered with dozens of decaying animal carcasses two years ago pleaded guilty to neglecting three cats and violating laws on the disposal of dead animals.

William Tinker, 62, of the 200 block of Villa Street, also must get an evaluation at the Kane County Diagnostic Center and cannot own any pets during his 18-month probation period, which ends in March 2016, according to court records and Kane County prosecutors.

In exchange for the guilty plea to three counts of Violating Owners Duties and the Dead Animal Disposal Act, Kane County prosecutors dismissed four misdemeanor animal cruelty charges against Tinkler and another charge.

Tinkler also is prohibited from owning other pets while he's on probation.

He is due back in court next March for an update on his compliance with recommendations from the evaluation.

Tinkler was arrested on Sept. 26, 2012, after authorities found the animal carcasses in a van at a home he rented on Villa Street.

Authorities also seized four cats, which were later forfeited after Tinkler missed a court appearance.

His case was set for trial this month, but prosecutors hoped to introduce evidence of previous neglect from an Elgin police visit on Dec. 20, 2006.

In court documents, Kane County Assistant State's Attorney Amy Ballard said police found at least 30 cats in Tinkler's home, many of which had missing hair, discharge coming from their eyes, and open sores. At least 20 litter boxes were found in the home, but none contained litter.

"Evidence of the conditions of the home and animals in 2006 that still existed in 2012 at the time of the offense show an ongoing/permanency of poor conditions making the determination of the violation of his duties more probable," Ballard wrote.

Instead of fighting to keep that evidence out of his trial, Tinkler pleaded guilty Tuesday, with Judge Thomas Stanfa accepting the plea.

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