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posted: 8/29/2013 4:40 AM

This time, secure our borders first

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This time, secure our borders first

Mexican cartels now supply over 90 percent of the narcotics in Chicago, the third-largest city in the United States, street gangs vying for turf to sell drugs, kill each other, and bystanders caught in the crossfire.

Why secure the border first?

In 1986 the Simpson-Mazzoli Act was signed by President Ronald Reagan; it granted amnesty to the then 3 million illegal immigrants, and promised border enforcement. The amnesty came, but the enforcement never did. To avoid repeating this mistake we should secure the border first, then when it is completed then on that day give probationary legal status to the 11 million illegal immigrants, thus giving an incentive to speedy completion of "border security."

Who should decide when the borders are secure?

The governors of the border states should be the ones to decide when their borders are secure, not Homeland Security, or President Barack Obama, since neither have been willing to admit there is still a problem.

Example: Wed. May 11, 2011. El Paso, Texas -- In search of Hispanic votes, and a long shot immigration overhaul President Barack Obama on Tuesday stood at the U.S. Mexico border for the first time since winning the White House in 2008, and declared, "it's more secure than ever". He mocked GOP lawmakers for blocking immigration reform over border security alone, saying, "They won't be happy until they get a moat with alligators".

Why should securing the border come before immigration reform?

Protecting America, and the American people, and most of all our children, should, and must come first, by stopping the inflow of drugs. It's time to put America first.

Jeanette Corrigan

Glen Ellyn

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