Aurora drinking water safe after diesel spill

  • About 1,400 gallons of fuel spilled early Wednesday morning from the Federal Aviation Administration facility in Aurora into the Fox River, but authorities say tests have shown no indication of diesel fuel in the city's water treatment system.

      About 1,400 gallons of fuel spilled early Wednesday morning from the Federal Aviation Administration facility in Aurora into the Fox River, but authorities say tests have shown no indication of diesel fuel in the city's water treatment system. Daniel White | Staff Photographer

  • Diesel fuel that spilled into the Fox River early Wednesday morning was cleared by Thursday morning. Water tests have remained in the normal winter range after the spill and Aurora's drinking water is safe, authorities said.

      Diesel fuel that spilled into the Fox River early Wednesday morning was cleared by Thursday morning. Water tests have remained in the normal winter range after the spill and Aurora's drinking water is safe, authorities said. Daniel White | Staff Photographer

 
 
Updated 12/31/2011 4:27 PM

No abnormalities have been detected in Aurora's drinking water supply after about 1,400 gallons of diesel fuel spilled into the Fox River early Wednesday morning, authorities said Saturday.

There is no indication any diesel fuel has entered the city's water treatment system after the spill, which began with a malfunctioning fuel storage tank at the Federal Aviation Administration facility, 619 W. Indian Trail.

 

While the spill originated near Aurora's water treatment plant, the discharge occurred on the west side of the river, opposite the plant. The river's natural flow contained the fuel to the west side, away from the water treatment intake system.

Not a single result recorded after the spill from various tests during treatment has been outside normal winter ranges, according to a statement from city spokesman Dan Ferrelli. The water's temperature, pH, turbidity and other qualities are monitored constantly. The system is designed to detect and filter foreign substances and set off an alarm if such substances are causing abnormal test results, the statement said.

Raw river water also is tested before it enters the treatment system.

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