More photos of suburban Civil War memorabilia

 
Updated 5/30/2011 8:19 AM
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  • A stained-glass window from the late 19th Century at First United Methodist Church of Palatine commemorates soldiers who served in the Civil War.

      A stained-glass window from the late 19th Century at First United Methodist Church of Palatine commemorates soldiers who served in the Civil War. JOE LEWNARD | Staff Photographer

  • Soldiers mustered at the First United Methodist Church of Palatine 150 years ago. The original church is gone.

      Soldiers mustered at the First United Methodist Church of Palatine 150 years ago. The original church is gone. JOE LEWNARD | Staff Photographer

  • First United Methodist Church of Palatine has preserved this late 19th Century window that honors soldiers who served in the Civil War.

      First United Methodist Church of Palatine has preserved this late 19th Century window that honors soldiers who served in the Civil War. JOE LEWNARD | Staff Photographer

  • This is a detail from a stained-glass window at First United Methodist Church of Palatine, which commemorates soldiers who served in the Civil War.

      This is a detail from a stained-glass window at First United Methodist Church of Palatine, which commemorates soldiers who served in the Civil War. JOE LEWNARD | Staff Photographer

  • This is the original muster roll of Palatine and Barrington area men who signed up for the Civil War. It is too fragile to display, so a copy is shown at the Clayson House Museum in Palatine.

      This is the original muster roll of Palatine and Barrington area men who signed up for the Civil War. It is too fragile to display, so a copy is shown at the Clayson House Museum in Palatine. JOE LEWNARD | Staff Photographer

  • About 300 men are listed on the muster roll at the Clayson House Museum in Palatine.

      About 300 men are listed on the muster roll at the Clayson House Museum in Palatine. JOE LEWNARD | Staff Photographer

  • Commemorative cannons honor the men and boys of the Elgin Academy who went to war for the Union.

      Commemorative cannons honor the men and boys of the Elgin Academy who went to war for the Union. John Starks | Staff Photographer

  • The cannons point up to show the North and South are at peace.

      The cannons point up to show the North and South are at peace. John Starks | Staff Photographer

  • Ada Sweet lived with her father at the infamous Camp Douglas prison in Chicago.

    Ada Sweet lived with her father at the infamous Camp Douglas prison in Chicago. Courtesy Lombard Historical Society

  • Gen. Benjamin Sweet of Lombard was one of a series of commanders of Camp Douglas.

    Gen. Benjamin Sweet of Lombard was one of a series of commanders of Camp Douglas. Courtesy Lombard Historical Society

  • Captain Mason Sutherland, shown at the Clayson House Museum in Palatine, organized men from Palatine and Barrington, and died in the war.

      Captain Mason Sutherland, shown at the Clayson House Museum in Palatine, organized men from Palatine and Barrington, and died in the war. JOE LEWNARD | Staff Photographer

  • Louis Bergman wrote to his mother in Palatine from a southern prison camp before he died there. This portrait is at the Clayson House Museum.

      Louis Bergman wrote to his mother in Palatine from a southern prison camp before he died there. This portrait is at the Clayson House Museum. JOE LEWNARD | Staff Photographer

  • Judge James Bradwell organized soldiers in Palatine and worked with his wife to get Mary Todd Lincoln freed from a Batavia mental institution. This portrait is at the Clayson House Museum in Palatine.

      Judge James Bradwell organized soldiers in Palatine and worked with his wife to get Mary Todd Lincoln freed from a Batavia mental institution. This portrait is at the Clayson House Museum in Palatine. JOE LEWNARD | Staff Photographer

  • August Kimmet, who died in 1929, was the longest living Palatine area veteran of the Civil War. The Clayson House Museum in Palatine has this picture.

      August Kimmet, who died in 1929, was the longest living Palatine area veteran of the Civil War. The Clayson House Museum in Palatine has this picture. JOE LEWNARD | Staff Photographer

  • Myra Bradwell, the first woman admitted to the bar in Illinois, was successful in helping Mary Todd Lincoln gain release from a Batavia mental institution. This portrait is at the Clayson House Museum in Palatine.

      Myra Bradwell, the first woman admitted to the bar in Illinois, was successful in helping Mary Todd Lincoln gain release from a Batavia mental institution. This portrait is at the Clayson House Museum in Palatine. JOE LEWNARD | Staff Photographer

  • Annie Laurie, who might have lived with her father, the commander at Camp Douglas in Chicago, became a famous investigative journalist for William Randolph Hearst.

    Annie Laurie, who might have lived with her father, the commander at Camp Douglas in Chicago, became a famous investigative journalist for William Randolph Hearst. Courtesy Lombard Historical Society

While the suburbs suffered no battles in the Civil War that raged for four years beginning 150 years ago, thousands of men and boys, mostly farmers from throughout the area, marched off to fight and left women to pick up the pieces.

Here's photos of some of the souvenirs of those times that remain in the suburbs.