Breaking News Bar
updated: 1/17/2012 3:45 PM

Fox Lake D114 puts tax rate referendum on the ballot

hello
Success - Article sent! close
 
 

Fox Lake Elementary District 114 voters will decide in March whether to support a 25-cent tax rate request that would generate $3.75 million in revenue for the district.

District officials say the choice is one of approving the question to maintain the current tax rate and keep existing class sizes and programs, or oppose it and lower taxes and face the prospect of cutbacks.

Order Reprint Print Article
 
Interested in reusing this article?
Custom reprints are a powerful and strategic way to share your article with customers, employees and prospects.
The YGS Group provides digital and printed reprint services for Daily Herald. Complete the form to the right and a reprint consultant will contact you to discuss how you can reuse this article.
Need more information about reprints? Visit our Reprints Section for more details.

Contact information ( * required )

Success - request sent close

"We aren't asking for more money or to raise taxes," Superintendent John Donnellan said. "We are asking that residents keep the tax rate where it's at in order for us to maintain our current class sizes and programs."

The referendum question on the March 20 ballot mirrors one that voters approved in March 2006 for a 25-cent tax rate hike to generate $3.75 million of additional revenue to the district.

At that time, District 114 officials said a defeat at the polls would mean the district would have to cut programs, teachers, and school hours by 50 minutes per day.

That 25-cent tax rate increase is set to retire in 2012, Donnellan said, and would result in a property tax reduction. He said the owner of a $200,000 home would pay about $166 less in property taxes to the school district if that money is not replaced.

However, the district is asking voters to maintain the rate approved in 2006 for another five years, allowing the district to pull another $3.75 million for the working cash fund.

"We are just asking taxpayers to allow us to keep what they already authorized six years ago," he said. "We haven't put a list of potential cuts together yet, but it's safe to say that if the referendum fails, the district will turn in a balanced budget and cuts will have to be made. That means programs will be cut and class sizes will go up."

He said it's unclear when a detailed list of possible cuts would be discussed by district officials.

"We are attempting to think positive right now and we haven't gone over a list of cuts that will be necessary in case the referendum isn't approved," Donnellan said. "But, it's something we will be looking at in the coming months."

Share this page
Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.
    help here