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Daily Archive : Wednesday June 25, 2014

News

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    ECC wins four major ICCTA awards

    The Illinois Community College Trustees Association honored Elgin Community College with four out of eight major awards at a banquet in Springfield on Friday, June 6.

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    North Aurora man seriously injured in motorcycle collision

    Two motorcycles crashed into each other in the village of Virgil Wednesday afternoon, seriously injuring a North Aurora man, police said. The driver of the first motorcycle was airlifted to Good Samaritan Hospital in Downers Grove with potentially life-threatening injuries.

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    Primrose Farm’s Brett Garrett, left, director of development, and Justin Sikora, agricultural interpreter, take the cows out after milking Wednesday at the farm in St. Charles. The living history farm offers tours and hands-on activities about life on a mid-20th-century dairy farm.

    Life on the farm at Primrose

    Several people head to Primrose Farm in St. Charles to experience life on the farm in the mid-20th century.

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    Josephine Dale

    Police seek help finding missing Lombard womaan

    Lombard police are asking for help finding a missing 89-year-old woman with early signs of dementia.

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    Elgin Mayor David Kaptain and the rest of the city council honored 27 new U.S. citizens Wednesday during the annual new citizen recognition ceremony at the Centre of Elgin. Those honored either live, work or took citizenship classes in Elgin. The ceremony usually takes place around July 4.

    Elgin City Council honors 27 new U.S. citizens

    The Elgin City Council recognized 27 new citizens Wednesday, marking the 16th annual such ceremony that typically takes place around the Fourth of July. All of the new citizens either live, work or have taken citizenship classes in Elgin. Centro de Informacion Executive Director Jaime Garcia, a naturalized citizen himself, introduced the new citizens to the city council.

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    Wilmette resident Paul M. Daugerdas stops to talk with the media after a federal judge sentenced him to 15 years in prison Wednesday in New York.

    Chicago-area lawyer sent to prison for 15 years

    A Chicago-area lawyer and accountant labeled by the government as history’s most prolific and unrepentant tax cheat was sentenced Wednesday to 15 years in prison, and the judge bemoaned the “incredible greed” of some of America’s wealthiest people for taking advantage of the tax shelters he peddled.

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    Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn, left, is running for re-election against Republican Bruce Rauner.

    Rauner proposes ending some corporate tax breaks

    Republican gubernatorial candidate Bruce Rauner called Wednesday for ending certain corporate tax breaks and “special deals” he says are unfair to Illinois’ working families. The wealthy Winnetka businessman ripped Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn for allowing tax incentives for companies that later laid off workers and tax “loopholes” for the oil industry and people...

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    Carol Stephens of Park Ridge got kids to wiggle, giggle, hop and stomp as she brought her sing a long music and movement activities to the Grayslake Public Library Wednesday night.

    (No heading)
    Paws to Sing: Macaroni Soup program at GRayslake Public Library staring at 6:30pm. Wiggle, giggle, hop, stomp. Celebrate with us and sing along as we join Carol Stephens for music and movement activities for kids. We'll be outdoors for this performance so you can sing and dance too! This is a free family concert to be held on the front lawn. Come early, bring a family picnic, and enjoy some...

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    A former gasoline station, which has recently be used for storage, is in a neighborhood along West Main Street in Batavia that city officials believe could be revitalized with the help of tax-increment financing.

    Batavia officials suggest redevelopment for west side neighborhood

    An aged industrial area on the west side of Batavia, plus the residential and commercial properties around it, could see change to include multifamily residential and commercial under a proposal city officials are floating. "A city is a changing organism over time," administrator Bill McGrath said.

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    Jax and Heather Collins get married at the Salt Lake County clerk’s office in Salt Lake City on Dec. 23, 2013. A federal appeals court on Wednesday ruled for the first time that states must allow gay couples to marry, finding the Constitution protects same-sex relationships.

    Federal appeals court: Gays have right to marry

    A federal appeals court ruled Wednesday that states must allow gay couples to marry, finding the Constitution protects same-sex relationships and putting a remarkable legal winning streak across the country one step closer to the U.S. Supreme Court. The three-judge panel in Denver ruled 2-1 that states cannot deprive people of the fundamental right to marry simply because they want to be wedded...

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    Demolition of the historic Busse building in Mount Prospect will take about a month.

    Historic Busse building in Mount Prospect to be razed

    The Busse building in downtown Mount Prospect cannot be saved, and the whole thing will be demolished over the next month, village officials said. A devastating fire ravaged the building in February. “The building was a total loss,” the village's Dave Strahl said. “I’m sure from a financial standpoint it wasn’t viable based on the age and the damage.”

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    U.S. Sen. Thad Cochran, a Mississippi Republican, addresses supporters and volunteers at his runoff election victory party Tuesday in Jackson, Miss. Cochran defeated state Tea Party-backed Sen. Chris McDaniel.

    Some in GOP say expanding voter base helps party

    National Republican leaders trying to appeal to non-white voters are cringing over Senate candidate Chris McDaniel’s complaints that Democrats — most of whom are black in Mississippi — voted in the state’s GOP Senate runoff and helped six-term incumbent Thad Cochran capture the party nomination.

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    Speaker of the House John Boehner said Wednesday that the Republican-controlled House will file an election-year lawsuit accusing President Barack Obama of failing to carry out the laws passed by Congress. He provided no details of the specific claims to be made in the suit.

    Boehner says House plans to sue Obama

    The House will vote next month on legislation authorizing a campaign-season lawsuit accusing President Barack Obama of failing to carry out the laws passed by Congress, Speaker John Boehner announced on Wednesday. In a memo distributed to House members, Boehner accused Obama of “aggressive unilateralism.”

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    Grace and Steve Leseth were rescued from their pontoon boat Wednesday afternoon under the Algonquin Road bridge by the Algonquin-Lake in the Hills Fire Protection District.

    Two people, dog rescued from Fox River in Algonquin

    Firefighters from the Algonquin-Lake in the Hills Fire Protection District rescued two people and a dog after their boat got stuck under an Algonquin bridge Wednesday afternoon, officials said. Firefighters rescued the group by putting them in another boat “It looked dramatic for a few seconds, but it was pretty routine,” Fire Chief Peter Van Dorp said.

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    The developer behind the rejected Catherine Alice Gardens apartments for residents with disabilities in Palatine is asking a judge to reverse his earlier decision dismissing their lawsuit against the village. The case returns to court July 16.

    Court battle continues over Palatine apartments for disabled

    The village of Palatine will be back before a Cook County judge next month contesting a lawsuit filed against them by the developer of a proposed apartment building for people with disabilities. In March, Cook County Judge Neil H. Cohen granted the village’s motion to dismiss the case, but the developer is asking the judge to reconsider his decision.

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    Wauconda’s mayor has a reserved parking space behind the village hall.

    Wauconda leaders calling dibs on village hall parking spots

    If you're one of the people who's surreptitiously been parking in the spots reserved for the mayor and trustees at Wauconda's village hall, your impersonation days may soon be over. Officials are considering formal rules that save those spots for the town's elected leaders.

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    The latest rendering for the proposed Wheeling Town Center, which village officials say is doomed if other governing bodies sue to overturn two tax increment financing districts.

    With Town Center on the line, Wheeling makes final offer

    Wheeling has made a “very, very generous” — and final — offer to the four government bodies threatening to sue if the village board establishes two new tax increment financing districts, Village President Dean Argiris said this week. He said if the parties sue, the Town Center project in Wheeling is doomed.

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    San Francisco Giants pitcher Tim Lincecum is embraced by catcher Hector Sanchez after throwing a no-hitter against the San Diego Padres on Wednesday. Lincecum threw his second career no-hitter. San Francisco won 4-0.

    Giants’ Lincecum pitches 2nd no-hitter vs Padres

    Tim Lincecum pitched his second no-hitter against the San Diego Padres in less than a year, allowing only one runner Wednesday and leading the San Francisco Giants to a 4-0 win. Lincecum totally shut down the weakest-hitting team in the majors, striking out six and walking one. "I didn't feel like my stuff was great," he said. No matter, Lincecum retired the final 23 batters after walking Chase...

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    A Canada lynx heads into the Rio Grande National Forest after being released near Creede, Colo., in 2005. The U.S. government declared the snow-loving big cats a threatened species across the Lower 48 states in 2000.

    Judge sets 2018 deadline for effort to save lynx

    A federal judge on Wednesday set a 2018 deadline for the government to complete a long-delayed recovery plan for imperiled Canada lynx in the Lower 48 states. Wildlife advocates had asked U.S. District Judge Donald Molloy to push the government into faster action on the snow-loving big cats, which were added to the list of threatened species in 2000.

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    Rob Russell

    Kane County morgue mold might have simple fix

    The mold that shuttered the Kane County morgue recentlyk is not dangerous, according to test results board Chairman Chris Lauzen sought separate from Coroner Rob Russell. Russell has not yet announced his test results, but the morgue remains closed with services being provided by DuPage County. The costs of that arrangement are not fully known, but Lauzen said Wednesday it may be worth seeing if...

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    Prized cars lie in a sinkhole that opened up in the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, Ky., on Feb. 12. The sinkhole that swallowed eight cars at the has become such an attraction that officials want to preserve it.

    Corvette museum likely to keep part of sinkhole

    A massive sinkhole that swallowed eight prized sports cars at the National Corvette Museum has become such a popular attraction that officials want to preserve it — and may even put one or two of the crumpled cars back inside the hole.

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    Oakton Community College closed July 7

    The Des Plaines and Skokie campuses of Oakton Community College will be closed Monday, July 7, in observance of Independence Day, officials said.

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    Body of Wheaton woman found in river

    The body of a Wheaton woman missing since a weekend boating accident on the Illinois River has been found, Grundy County coroner’s officials said. Emily Anne Hendricks, 24, was pronounced dead at about 12:35 p.m. Wednesday.

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    Body of Naperville man discovered in Illinois River

    A Naperville man who disappeared while swimming in the Illinois River on Sunday has been found. Alberto Rodriquez Jr., 35, entered the river from an anchored boat near Illini State Park to cool off and was swept down river.

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    The former Brainerd Building, which opened as Libertyville Township High School in 1917, is headed for demolition. So is the adjoining Jackson Gym.

    Libertyville’s Brainerd buildings could be demolished in October

    The buildings on what once was Libertyville High School’s Brainerd Avenue campus could face the wrecking ball in October, officials said this week. Bids and cost estimates are pending.

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    Heather Nogaj, left, and owner/cake designer Tammy Montesinos have opened Sweet T’s Bakery and Cake Studio in Arlington Heights.

    Suburban baker opens Sweet T’s cake shop in Arlington Hts.

    To Tammy Montesinos, baking a cake is more than just mixing together flour, eggs and sugar. “A cake is a memory you’re building for people,” said Montesinos, who is bringing those memories, and herrecipes, to her new shop, Sweet T’s Bakery & Cake Studio in downtown Arlington Heights.

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    Harvey accused of fraudulent bond offering

    A federal judge issued an emergency order Wednesday to stop South suburban Harvey from marketing a bond sale to potential investors after the Securities and Exchange Commission claimed the city had a history of fraudulently diverting funds.

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    The pilot of a hot-air balloon that landed in the Sun City neighborhood in Huntley early Tuesday might face penalties, the police chief said Wednesday.

    Charges against hot-air balloon pilot in Huntley possible

    Huntley Police Chief John Perkins said Wednesday a hot-air balloon pilot’s decision to land in a residential neighborhood was “irresponsible” and could result in charges against the pilot. The balloon carrying four people took off from a Hampshire airport and landed at 7:27 a.m. Tuesday in the middle of an intersection at Songbird Lane and Windy Prairie Drive in the Sun City...

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    Associated Press Sen. Kirk Dillard, shown on the Senate floor, is the new RTA chairman.

    RTA board elects Kirk Dillard to lead agency

    The RTA board picked state Sen. Kirk Dillard as its new leader Wednesday. Dillard commutes from Hinsdale to his law office in Chicago using Metra and has said he understands transit from a city and suburban perspective. “I understand closely what it’s like to be a suburbanite dependent on Metra and Pace,” Dillard said.

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    Charity scammers target Fox River Grove neighborhood

    The Fox River Grove Police Department is warning residents of charity scammers who have been making the rounds in the village. Earlier this month, a group of people falsely identifying themselves as fundraisers for Crystal Lake-based charity Andrea Lynn Cancer Fund canvassed a Fox River Grove neighborhood soliciting donations, Police Chief Ron Lukasik said.

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    Mundelein pageants on Sunday:

    Girls and young women will compete in the annual Mundelein pageants Sunday. The Little Miss, Junior Miss and Miss Mundelein pageants all will be held the same night, rather than on consecutive nights.

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    State Sen. Matt Murphy, left, talks about Gov. Pat Quinn’s anti violence program as state Rep. Ron Sandack listens during a news conference Wednesday in Chicago.

    Murphy wants Quinn to testify on anti-violence program

    State Sen. Matt Murphy of Palatine called Wednesday for Gov. Pat Quinn to testify before a legislative commission over a scandal-plagued anti-violence program the same day a published report showed the Quinn initiative gave money to a nonexistent program that claimed to help former inmates.

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    Record number of ash trees chopped in Barrington

    The village of Barrington has cut down more ash trees infested with the emerald ash borer this year than any other on record. Mark Werksman, the village public works director, said 550 trees have been chopped down so far in 2014 and there will be more removed before the year is done. In 2013, 128 trees were removed and in 2012 there were 39.

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    Elk Grove hires assistant village manager

    Elk Grove Village has hired a new assistant village manager to replace Joe Carey, who left to become assistant village manager/director of community development in Vernon Hills.

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    Island Lake board meets:

    The Island Lake village board will meet today to discuss increasing fines for people who don’t cut their grass, an appointment to the lake management committee and other business.

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    Storm debris collection:

    Because of the recent weather-related damage in Wauconda, the local public works department will collect debris from trees and bushes through Monday, June 30.

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    Libertyville history on display:

    Photos of the people, businesses and the key issues and events in Libertyville over 100 years will be on display in the foyer at St. Lawrence Church, 125 W. Church St., for three days each in June, July and August to coordinate with local events.

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    Quinn signs bill to let psychologists prescribe medication

    Gov. Pat Quinn has signed off on a measure that allows psychologists in Illinois to prescribe medication to patients. Psychologists have to receive specific training for prescription-writing privileges and be required to work with a coordinating physician.

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    This is one of the 13 baby massasauga rattlesnakes born at Lincoln Park Zoo in Chicago.

    Endangered snakes born at Lincoln Park Zoo

    Chicago’s Lincoln Park Zoo has announced the birth of 13 rattlesnakes that are an endangered species in Illinois.

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    The Supreme Court ruled Aereo has to pay broadcasters when it takes television programs from the airwaves and allows subscribers to watch them on smartphones and other portable devices.

    Justices rule for broadcasters in fight with Internet TV service

    The Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that a startup Internet company has to pay broadcasters when it takes television programs from the airwaves and allows subscribers to watch them on smartphones and other portable devices. The justices said by a 6-3 vote that Aereo Inc. is violating the broadcasters’ copyrights by taking the signals for free. The ruling preserves the ability of the...

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    Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel listens during a city council meeting Wednesday During the meeting, the council approved an ordinance that dramatically limits where gun stores can operate and requires them to videotape every purchase to prevent one person from buying a gun for another.

    Chicago passes strict gun store law

    The Chicago City Council, forced by a federal judge to allow gun sales in the city, approved an ordinance Wednesday that dramatically limits where those stores can open and puts owners on alert that the city will be looking over their shoulders every time they sell a gun.

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    Coroner: Body found in forest preserve is missing Gurnee man

    The body found last week in a Lake County forest preserve has been identified as that of a missing Gurnee man, authorities said Wednesday. Lake County Coroner Thomas Rudd said DNA testing proved the victim was Andy Adler, 57, who disappeared after a June 8 bike ride.

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    Illinois historic sites planning to reduce hours

    Illinois’ historic sites aren’t expected to close because of budget cuts but are planning to curtail visiting hours after Labor Day.

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    “Star Wars” creator George Lucas has selected Chicago as the site of his museum of art and movie memorabilia.

    Chicago mayor: George Lucas museum boon for city

    Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel says “Star Wars” creator George Lucas’ decision to build his museum of art and movie memorabilia will give the city a museum campus as impressive as the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.

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    Exonerated men will be paid $40 million settlement

    Five men convicted and later cleared of the 1991 rape and murder of a South suburban girl have reached a $40 million settlement in a lawsuit against the Illinois State Police, their attorneys said Wednesday.

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    State says Waukegan Harbor clean enough for dredging

    Illinois officials are asking the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to lift restrictions on dredging in Waukegan Harbor that were put in place to avoid stirring up contaminated sediment.

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    Stephen S. Potisuk, 59, of St. Charles, was charged with aggravated battery of a police officer, aggravated battery of an EMT and aggravated resisting arrest at 9:54 p.m. June 19, according to a sheriff’s report. He is accused of pushing and shoving medics and sheriff’s deputies who responded to the 44W100 block of Empire Road to treat a patient who subsequently refused to be...

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    State Sen. Kirk Dillard, a Hinsdale Republican, will leave the Illinois Senate at the end of July. He talks with state Sens. Pam Althoff, a McHenry Republican, and Michael Connelly, a Lisle Republican, on the floor of the Senate Wednesday.

    RTA start means Senate end for Dillard

    The start of state Sen. Kirk Dillard’s term as chairman of the RTA will signal the earlier than expected end to his more than 20 year career in the Illinois Senate. Dillard will step down from his Senate seat in late July before his Aug. 1 RTA starting date.

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    Guitarist John Primer and The Real Deal Blues Band played the Chicago blues during Events on the Plaza outdoor concert Tuesday night at Independence Grove near Libertyville. The legendary blues man has played his electric slide guitar with Muddy Waters, Junior Wells, Willie Dixon and Magic Slim.

    Legendary guitarist John Primer entertains at Independence Grove

    Guitarist John Primer and The Real Deal Blues Band played the Chicago blues during Events on the Plaza outdoor concert Tuesday night at Independence Grove near Libertyville. The legendary blues man has played his electric slide guitar with Muddy Waters, Junior Wells, Willie Dixon and Magic Slim.

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    Forest View High 40th reunion

    The 40th reunion of Forest View High School’s Class of 1974 is set for Saturday, July 19, on the rooftop at Durty Nellie’s in Palatine.

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    A Kurdish peshmerga fighter takes his position on the front line with militants from the al-Qaida-inspired Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) 62 miles south of the oil rich province of Kirkuk, northern Iraq, Wednesday. A defiant Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki rejected calls Wednesday for an interim “national salvation government” intended to undermine the Sunni insurgency by presenting a unified front among Iraq’s three main groups, calling it a “coup against the constitution.”

    Kerry issues warning after Syria bombs Iraq

    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry warned Mideast nations on Wednesday against taking new military action in Iraq that might heighten sectarian divisions, after Syria launched airstrikes across the border and Iran flew surveillance drones over the neighboring country.

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    Police may not generally search the cellphones of people they arrest without first getting search warrants, the Supreme Court ruled Wednesday. The court said cellphones are powerful devices unlike anything else police may find on someone they arrest.

    Supreme Court: ‘Get a warrant’ to search cellphones

    In an emphatic defense of privacy in the digital age, a unanimous Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that police generally may not search the cellphones of people they arrest without first getting search warrants.

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    Levert Jones

    Prison sentence stands in Oak Brook armed robbery

    A Detroit man serving an eight-year prison sentence for the armed robbery of an Oakbrook Center jewelry store may have come to grips with the seriousness of his crime, but it won’t help shorten his sentence. DuPage Judge Blanche Hill Fawell refused Wednesday to reconsider the sentence she first handed down in December to 25-year-old Levert Jones.

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    District 41 moving to increase Internet safety

    Glen Ellyn Elementary District 41 is buying a new Internet filter to better prevent students from accessing inappropriate content — including pornography — while at school. The school board on Monday agreed to spend $33,000 to buy the necessary hardware and software along with three years of licensing and support for a Smoothwall content filter. The decision comes after officials...

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    The fight against gyspy moths, insects that threaten the health of oaks and other trees, is expected to resume June 30 in forest preserves around DuPage County.

    DuPage County resumes battle against gypsy moths

    The annual fight against gypsy moths, whose caterpillars can defoliate oaks and other trees, is set to begin next week in DuPage County’s forest preserves. Forest preserve officials say the Illinois Department of Agriculture is expected to spray for the moths beginning June 30 in the southeastern and northwestern part of the county.

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    Sarah Orleans says she is working to build new exhibits and partnerships as President and CEO of the DuPage Children’s Museum.

    DuPage Children’s Museum leader building exhibits, partnerships

    The new leader of the DuPage Children's Museum is well-versed in educational theory, sciences, finances and leadership, but she knows what really matters at a museum for kids: fun. “Learning is a byproduct of having fun,” said Sarah Orleans, who took over in February as the museum's president and CEO. “It becomes a byproduct of getting children excited about their own ideas,...

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    Algonquin man killed in motorcycle crash in Marseilles

    An Algonquin man was killed when he crashed a mtorcycle into a guardrail in north central lllinois, authorities said. Douglas A. Peters, 43, died following the crash Saturday night.

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    An 82-year-old steel truss bridge featured in the opening credits of “The Sopranos” and in Orson Welles’ 1938 broadcast of “War of the Worlds” is now the second bridge for which New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie’s administration is facing an investigation.

    AP: Christie faces another bridge probe

    An 82-year-old steel truss bridge featured in the opening credits of “The Sopranos” and in Orson Welles’ 1938 broadcast of “War of the Worlds” is now the second bridge for which Gov. Chris Christie’s administration is facing an investigation. Officials are investigating whether $1.8 billion in funding to overhaul the decaying Pulaski Skyway was...

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    Housing study to focus on conditions, opportunities in Round Lake area

    The four Round Lake communities and Hainesville will work with the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning on a yearlong housing analysis. "They want to see them (recommendations) as actionable steps," said Maggie Morales, manager of community engagement at the Lake County Community Foundation, which made the application to the agency for staff assistance.

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    Rolling Meadows residents lobby for street repairs

    Forty residents of Rolling Meadows' Fairfax Village neighborhood attended the city council meeting Tuesday to support calls for repairing their streets. Mayor Tom Rooney said after the meeting that there is a good chance the project will be funded, perhaps as soon as next year.

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    Court sides with employees in retirement fund case

    The Supreme Court says a lawsuit can proceed against Fifth Third Bancorp that accused management of irresponsibly investing employee retirement money in the bank’s then-failing stock.

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    With an image of the former World Trade Center seen through the reflective windows of the National Sept. 11 Memorial Museum, some of the first public visitors can be seen arriving at the site. Organizers say more than 300,000 people have visited the Sept. 11 museum since it opened little more than a month ago, and that has exceeded their expectations.

    9/11 museum counts 300K visitors since May opening

    More than 300,000 people have visited the Sept. 11 museum since it opened little more than a month ago, exceeding expectations, officials said this week. Organizers see it as a strong start for the ground zero museum, which had faced questions about its $24 ticket price.

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    Central American migrants hang out around the northbound freight train they had been traveling on, after it suffered a minor derailment in a remote wooded area outside Reforma de Pineda, Chiapas state, Mexico. The train remained stuck for a day and a half, exposing the migrants to the possibility of attacks by criminal gangs. The Beta squad, a governmental group dedicated to the protection of migrants, brought water to the stranded travelers and offered medical care.

    What drives migrants to head to the U.S.?

    The number of unaccompanied minors detained on the U.S. border has more than tripled since 2011. Children are also widely believed to be crossing with their parents in rising numbers, although the Obama administration has not released year-by-year figures. The crisis has sparked weeks of bitter political debate inside the U.S., with the administration saying crime is driving migrants north and...

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    Demonstrators dressed as mime artists hold placards which read “no to the euthanasia of elderly people, solidarity is urgent”, at Trocadero plaza in Paris, Tuesday June 24, 2014.

    Beyond cure? Europe euthanasia rulings sear debate

    A French doctor was acquitted Wednesday of poisoning charges after giving lethal injections to seven terminally ill patients, and Britain’s Supreme Court said an assisted-suicide ban is incompatible with human rights, fueling the arguments of those who say the duty of doctors is to end the suffering of those beyond treatment. The rulings cast new light on the legal struggle over medical...

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    Speaker of Federation Council members Valentina Matviyenko speaks to the media after the voting in the Russian parliament’s upper chamber in Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, June 25, 2014. On Russian President Vladimir Putin’s demand, the upper house of Russian parliament on Wednesday canceled a resolution allowing the use of military in Ukraine.

    Russia annuls sanction for use of force in Ukraine

    On Russian President Vladimir Putin’s demand, the upper house of the Russian parliament on Wednesday canceled a resolution allowing the use of military in Ukraine, a move intended to show Moscow’s eagerness to de-escalate tensions and avoid a new round of Western sanctions. Putin had said his request, made a day earlier, was intended to help support the peace process in Ukraine,...

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    The Obama administration is reaching back to an Iraq War program as a guide to keep disgruntled Sunnis from joining a rampant new insurgency. U.S. officials hope to persuade Sunni militiamen known as Sahwa, or Awakening Councils, to fight back against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant as they did nearly 10 years ago against al-Qaida.

    In Iraq, former militia program eyed for new fight

    They were known as the Sahwa, or the Awakening Councils — Sunni militiamen who took extraordinary risks to side with U.S. troops in the fight against al-Qaida during the Iraq War. Once heralded as a pivotal step in the defeat of the bloody insurgency, the Sahwa later were pushed aside by Iraq’s Shiite-led government. Now, the Obama administration is looking at the Sahwa as a model...

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    U.S. Sen. Thad Cochran, R-Miss., addresses supporters and volunteers at his runoff election victory party Tuesday, June 24, 2014, at the Mississippi Children’s Museum in Jackson, Miss. Cochran defeated state Sen. Chris McDaniel of Ellisville, in a primary runoff for the GOP nomination for senate.

    Cochran win in Miss. a blow to Tea Party movement

    The Washington establishment delivered a punch to the gut of the Tea Party movement Tuesday as Mississippi Republican Sen. Thad Cochran, a mainstream conservative with more than 40 years congressional experience, narrowly turned back a challenge from state Sen. Chris McDaniel. Outside conservative organizations and Tea Party groups had invested millions in Mississippi in hopes of knocking out...

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    Kentucky man admits role in Illinois bank holdup

    EAST ST. LOUIS, Ill. — A Kentucky man faces up to two decades in federal prison now that he has admitted in court that he robbed a southern Illinois bank last year.Twenty-eight-year-old Casey Allen Heflin of Boaz, Kentucky, pleaded guilty Monday in U.S. District Court in Benton.

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    Milwaukee, green group giving away 1,000 trees

    MILWAUKEE — A group that works toward sustainable-energy practices is teaming up with the city of Milwaukee to give away as many as 1,000 trees this weekend.

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    Some Milwaukee owned lots could sell for $1

    MILWAUKEE — Milwaukee’s common council has approved a plan to sell some city-owned lots that are vacant for $1.The city has 2,700 vacant residential lots and the legislation approved Tuesday involves about 15 percent of those on the north side. The $1 cost would be offered to adjacent property owners if the buyer lives in the city.

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    Alvarez defends decision to charge witness

    Cook County State’s Attorney Anita Alvarez has assured several prominent jurists that she won’t jump to charge any witnesses who later recant their testimony.The Chicago Sun-Times reports her assurance came in a recent letter responding to criticism that her office chose to charge a witness who claimed he lied at a murder trial.

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    Lindenwood University to open Collinsville campus

    COLLINSVILLE, Ill. — The southwestern Illinois city of Collinsville is getting a satellite college campus this fall.The Belleville News-Democrat reports that Lindenwood University in Belleville will open the new campus in 15,000 square feet of leased space that will include seven classrooms, science lab, computer lab, lounge and office space.

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    Organic farmers may get reimbursed for credentials

    SPRINGFIELD — Organic farmers in Illinois will be reimbursed for part of the cost of their federal certification. The Illinois Department of Agriculture announced Tuesday it will receive $271,800 from the federal government to reimburse organic growers and handlers who receive or renew certification this year.

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    Woman gets 7 years in identity-theft case

    HARRISBURG, Ill. — A southern Illinois woman has been sentenced to seven years in prison for stealing the identity of a 72-year-old woman in her care.WSIL-TV reports that 46-year-old Kimberly Ital of Harrisburg also was ordered Tuesday by a Saline County Circuit Court judge to pay $52,000 in restitution.

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    U of I’s Graduate College names interim dean

    CHAMPAIGN — Education Professor Sarah T. Lubienski has been named the interim dean ‘designate’ of the University of Illinois’ Graduate College.

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    Chicago, AFSCME give details of contract agreement

    The 3,400 Chicago municipal workers represented by the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees will receive 2 percent pay increases for each of its five years.Members of the union voted Tuesday to ratify the contract, which took two years to negotiate. The agreement is retroactive to July 1, 2012 and runs until June 30, 2017.

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    Man who drove into pond, died, had medical problem

    FORT WAYNE, Ind. — A northeastern Indiana coroner says a man who died after he drove his van into a pond had been stricken with a sudden medical problem just before the accident.But the Allen County coroner’s office didn’t say Tuesday what specific medical crisis 32-year-old Elijah M. Tanner suffered June 5 before his van entered the post.

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    Ground broken on housing for homeless veterans

    TERRE HAUTE, Ind. — Crews have broken ground on the first phase of a new western Indiana housing project designed specifically to house the region’s homeless, disabled veterans.

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    Northern Indiana city designated dark sky site

    BEVERLY SHORES, Ind. — An international group is recognizing a small northern Indiana city for its efforts to limit light pollution along Lake Michigan.

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    Houchin picked to chair Indiana prosecutors group

    INDIANAPOLIS — The Indiana Prosecuting Attorneys Council has picked Washington County prosecutor Dustin Houchin to lead its board of directors.The group announced Tuesday that Houchin would replace outgoing chairman Jarrod Holtsclaw of Greene County. The group also elected its other officers from the ranks of county prosecutors at its summer conference this week.

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    Dense fog advisory in Chicago area

    A fog warning remains in effect for the Chicago area until 9 a.m., meteorologist said.

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    Murna Hansemann’s Elgin garden will be featured in the Fox Valley Garden Walk.

    Six Elgin gardens featured in Fox Valley Garden Walk

    The gardens have been chosen and the plans are set for the sixth Fox Valley Garden Walk. From 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, June 28, visitors can admire the beauty of various gardens found at homes on the “Gold Coast” and the east side of Elgin.

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    Dawn Patrol: Funnel clouds over DuPage; Chicago wins museum

    Funnel clouds over DuPage County not tornadoes. 'Star Wars' creator selects Chicago for museum. McHenry man dies when dump truck runs over him. Three Aurora men injured in Sunday shooting. Batavia Dist. 101 school lunch prices again going up. Cubs' Arrieta perfect through 6. White Sox beat Orioles 4-2 to end 5-game skid.

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    A new concrete slab is being constructed on the west side of Oakton Community College’s new Science and Health Careers Center. The old slab, now demolished, was cracking.

    Oakton replacing slab that cracked

    Crews are constructing a new concrete slab to replace one that was cracking at the site of Oakton Community College’s new $39 million Science and Health Careers Center in Des Plaines. The new slab is expected to be complete by November, according to Oakton President Margaret Lee.

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    Kane County nearly ready for medical marijuana businesses

    Kane County is just a couple of weeks away from finalizing regulations that would oversee medical marijuana businesses in unincorporated areas. “There are some people looking at Kane County. But with these rules, I think we're ahead of the game in the event a proposal would come forward," committee member Mike Donahue said.

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    The Lutheran Home's new MyRehab Center opens Wednesday at the Arlington Heights facility. The center is the first of a three-part, $64 million project to modernize and renovate Lutheran Home.

    MyRehab short-term facility opening at Arlington Heights Lutheran Home

    The first of a three-part, $64 million expansion and reconstruction at Arlington Heights-based Lutheran Home will open Wednesday and start taking patients early next month. MyRehab is a 78-room short-term rehabilitation facility for patients recovering from falls, surgery, pneumonia or any other condition that requires additional medical attention after a hospital stay, officials said.

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    For the first time in recent years, Arlington Lakes Golf Course in Arlington Heights turned a profit this year.

    Publicly owned golf courses losing money, and taxpayers pay

    A confluence of the economic downturn, declining interest in the sport, poor weather and a glut of course options has put many publicly owned and government-operated golf courses in the red -- and suburban taxpayers pay. “There are too many golf courses and not enough golfers,” said Michael Miller, executive director of the Illinois PGA. “For the health of the industry, some of...

Sports

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    Schurtz, Skoug make coaches’ all-state team

    Rolling Meadows’ Erik Schurtz and Libertyville’s Evan Skoug have received final accolades for their 2014 prep baseball seasons. The Daily Herald all-area selections were named to the Illinois High School Baseball Coaches Association Class 4A all-state team. They will be honored at the Chicago White Sox game on July 21.

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    White Sox pitcher Javy Guerra pauses in front of the mound after giving up a grand slam to Baltimore Orioles’ Nelson Cruz, at right, to tie the game in the eighth inning, Wednesday. The Sox went on to lose 5-4 in the 12th.

    Pen implodes, Sox lose 5-4 in 12th

    White Sox fans were angry with manager Robin Ventura Wednesday night after his team couldn't hold a 4-0 lead in the eighth inning. Naturally, Ventura's decision making with the pitching staff was the chief topic of complaint.

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    Overtime suits Fire just fine

    The Chicago Fire seems to have found a way to win: Avoid 90-minute games.

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    These are possible picks for the NBA Draft, June Looking back more than a year, this NBA draft was supposed to be special. It might be, but the projected No. 1 pick, Kansas center Joel Embiid, threw a wrench into the selection process by suffering a stress fracture in his foot, roughly four months after having his college career cut short by a stress fracture in his back., 2014 in New York. Top row from left are Jordan Adams, UCLA; Kyle Anderson, UCLA; Semaj Christon, Xavier; Jordan Clarkson, Missouri; Clint Capela, Chalon (France) and Cleanthony Early, Wichita State. Bottom from left are Joel Embiid, Kansas; Tyler Ennis, Syracuse; Dante Exum, Australia; Aaron Gordon, Arizona, Jerami Grant, Syracuse and P.J. Hairston, Texas Legends. (AP Photo)

    Embiid's injury throws wrench into the NBA draft

    This year's NBA Draft was supposed to be special. It still might be, but there are plenty of question at the top. Meanwhile, the Bulls will decide how to best utilize picks No. 16 and 19 while also trying to clear cap space to make a run at Carmelo Anthony.

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    Mike McGraw’s 2014 NBA Mock Draft
    Mike McGraw, who has been the Bulls beat writer since 1999, offers this prediction for the first round of the 2014 NBA draft:No. Team Player Ht Pos School / Country1. Cleveland Andrew Wiggins 6-8 SF Kansas2. Milwaukee Jabari Parker 6-8 SF Duke3. Philadelphia Dante Exum 6-4 PG Australia4. Orlando Aaron Gordon 6-9 PF Arizona5. Utah Noah Vonleh 6-9 C Indiana6. Boston Joel Embiid 7-0 C Kansas7. L.A. Lakers Marcus Smart 6-3 PG Oklahoma St.8. Sacramento Elfrid Payton 6-4 PG Louisiana Lafayette9. Charlotte Nik Stauskas 6-6 SG Michigan10. Philadelphia Julius Randle 6-9 PF Kentucky11. Denver Doug McDermott 6-8 SF Creighton12. Orlando Zach LaVine 6-6 SG UCLA13. Minnesota Gary Harris 6-4 SG Michigan St.14. Phoenix Adreian Payne 6-10 PF Michigan St.15. Atlanta Kyle Anderson 6-8 SF UCLA16. Bulls Dario Saric 6-10 SF Croatia17. Boston Jordan Clarkson 6-5 PG Missouri18. Phoenix James Young 6-7 SF Kentucky19. Bulls Shabazz Napier 6-1 PG Connecticut20. Toronto Tyler Ennis 6-2 PG Syracuse21. Oklahoma City Rodney Hood 6-8 SF Duke22. Memphis T.J. Warren 6-8 SF North Carolina St.23. Utah Glenn Robinson III 6-7 SF Michigan24. Charlotte Jusuf Nurkic 6-11 C Bosnia25. Houston Jarnell Stokes 6-8 PF Tennessee26. Miami Walter Tavares 7-3 C Cape Verde27. Phoenix P.J. Hairston 6-5 SG Texas Legends28. L.A. Clippers K.J. McDaniels 6-6 SF Clemson29. Oklahoma City Bogdan Bogdanovich 6-6 SG Serbia30. San Antonio Mitch McGary 6-10 C Michigan

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    Grizzlies knock off Boomers

    The host Gateway Grizzlies jumped out to an early 4-0 lead en route to a 7-3 triumph over the Schaumburg Boomers in Frontier League action Wednesday.

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    Edwin Jackson turned in another uninspiring performance Wednesday night for the Cubs as they fell 4-1 to the Cincinnati Reds at chilly Wrigley Field. The 30-year-old right-hander lasted just 5⅓ innings and gave up 6 hits and 4 runs as his record fell to 5-8 with a 5.22 ERA. Jackson walked four and was consistently behind hitters all night.

    Jackson can’t get on track, Cubs fall 4-1

    Of all the acquisitions made by Cubs president Theo Epstein and GM Jed Hoyer, pitcher Edwin Jackson is probably the most maddening. Consistency has eluded Jackson in his one-plus seasons with the Cubs, and so it was again in Wednesday night's 4-1 loss to the Reds.

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    Timber Rattlers hold off Cougars 3-2

    Jacob Rogers came oh-so-close to giving the Kane County Cougars another dramatic home victory, but the Wisconsin Timber Rattlers held on to win 3-2 Wednesday afternoon at Fifth Third Bank Ballpark in Geneva.

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    Chicago Sky’s Elena Delle Donne, right, keeps the ball ahead of Connecticut Sun’s Kelsey Griffin, left, during the first half of a WNBA basketball game, Wednesday, June 25, 2014, in Uncasville, Conn. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill)

    Thomas leads Sun past Sky, 79-69
    Rookie Alyssa Thomas scored 12 of her 23 points in the third quarter and had 11 rebounds to lead the Connecticut Sun to their sixth straight victory, 79-69 over the Sky on Wednesday night.It was Thomas eighth start, and her minutes have increased with starting guard Allison Hightower out with a sprained knee.”

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    For the Saturday doubleheader, the Cubs will go with right-hander Dallas Beeler, who will be called up from Class AAA Iowa. It will be Beeler’s major-league debut.

    Cubs calling up right-hander Beeler for Saturday doubleheader

    The Cubs made somewhat of a surprise announcement Wedensday when manager Rick Renteria said right-hander Dallas Beeler will come up from Class AAA Iowa and start the first game of Saturday's day-night doubleader against the National at Wrigley Field. It will be Beeler's major-league debut.

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    Color me skeptical on Chicago River catfish

    The Chicago River is surely less polluted than in the past, but that doesn't make it a great sportfishing option. The release of catfish fingerlings should provide some indication about the overall water quality of the drainage system, but columnist Mike Jackson isn't convinced it will prove much.

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    Ecuador's Enner Valencia, bottom, and France's Paul Pogba challenge for the ball during the group E World Cup soccer match between Ecuador and France at the Maracana stadium in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Wednesday, June 25, 2014. (AP Photo/David Vincent)

    France clinches top spot in Group E; Ecuador out

    France drew 0-0 with 10-man Ecuador to advance to the second round of the World Cup on Wednesday, while the South Americans will be going home from the tournament.In the other final Group E game, Switzerland defeated 3-0 Honduras to finish in second place and join France in the knockout stages.

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    Goalkeeper Tim Howard and his United States teammates play their third first-round World Cup Group G match today against Portugal.

    Americans as underdogs a different dynamic

    The United States normally is under immense pressure to be the best at everything and cure all the world's problems. In that context, it's kind of refreshing for the U.S. soccer team to be underdogs in the World Cup.

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    FILE - This June 13, 2014 file photo shows Los Angeles Kings right wing Marian Gaborik, of Slovakia, carrying the Stanley Cup after beating the New York Rangers in the NHL Stanley Cup Final in Los Angeles. Gaborik agreed Wednesday June 25, 2014, to a seven-year deal to stay with the Kings. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, file)

    LA Kings re-sign Marian Gaborik to 7-year deal

    Marian Gaborik spent the last few months living at the beach and scoring clutch goals for the eventual Stanley Cup champions.The star left wing saw absolutely no reason to wake up from his dream life with the Los Angeles Kings.Gaborik agreed to a seven-year deal Wednesday to stay with the Kings, passing on the financial possibilities of unrestricted free agency to stay with the champs.

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    Bosnia’s Avdija Vrsajevic (2) celebrates with teammate Vedad Ibisevic after scoring his team’s third goal Wednesday during a Group F World Cup match against Iran at the Arena Fonte Nova in Salvador, Brazil.

    Bosnia beats Iran 3-1 in Group F at World Cup

    Bosnia-Herzegovina ended Iran’s hopes of advancing to the knockout stages with a 3-1 victory in Group F on Wednesday, registering its first World Cup win in the process. The Bosnians took a commanding 2-0 lead with goals from Edin Dzeko in the 23rd and Miralem Pjanic in the 53rd before Iran hit back in a desperate late bid to qualify for the second round.

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    Argentina’s Lionel Messi applauds Wednesday after being replaced after scoring two goals for his side during a Group F World Cup match against Nigeria at the Estadio Beira-Rio in Porto Alegre, Brazil.

    Argentina beats Nigeria 3-2 as both teams advance

    Argentina beat Nigeria 3-2 in their last World Cup group match on Wednesday, with Lionel Messi and Ahmed Musa scoring two goals each before Marcos Rojo kneed in the winner. Argentina won Group F while Nigeria also advanced despite the loss, becoming the first African team in the round of 16 in Brazil.

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    Uruguay’s Luis Suarez could be kicked out of the World Cup following his alleged biting of Italian defender Giorgio Chiellini.

    Suarez facing big financial hit from alleged bite

    Luis Suarez faces a financial hit following his alleged biting of Italian defender Giorgio Chiellini. Existing sponsorship deals could be ripped up, while future endorsements could be put in jeopardy. Already, two of his sponsors — 888poker and Adidas — have hinted that they may tear up their deals with Suarez.

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    Uruguay’s Luis Suarez holds his teeth after running into Italy’s Giorgio Chiellini’s shoulder Tuesday during a Group D World Cup soccer match at the Arena das Dunas in Natal, Brazil.

    Suarez dilemma: FIFA opens case on bite incident

    Luis Suarez could become just as awkward for football’s international organizers to handle as he has been for rival teams at the World Cup. The Uruguay forward’s alleged bite into the left shoulder of Italy defender Giorgio Chiellini in a crucial group-stage game has hit a raw nerve at a tournament which has been characterized by a high quality of football and entertainment.

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    Argentina’s Lionel Messi, right, kicks a ball during a training session at the Beira-Rio Stadium in Porto Alegre, Brazil, Tuesday, June 24, 2014. Argentina plays in group F of the 2014 soccer World Cup. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)

    World Cup: What to watch Wednesday

    It’s Day Three of the in-or-out matches of the World Cup, with six teams battling for three places in the knockout stages. Here are the things to watch for Wednesday.

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    Brazilians are closely following every team Mick Jagger supports with an eye for mocking the alleged spell he casts on every team he picks. Brazilian media has taken to calling his pick, Jagger’s “pe frio,” a term describing the bad luck he brings teams that translates literally as “cold foot.”

    Brazil mocks Mick Jagger as World Cup jinx

    Mick Jagger can’t get no satisfaction from soccer fans in Brazil. In what’s becoming something of a World Cup tradition, Brazilians are closely following every team the 70-year-old rock star supports with an eye at mocking him for apparently casting bad spells on his picks. Italy was the latest victim of the Jagger jinx. At a concert in Rome Saturday night, Jagger predicted that four-time World Cup champion Italy would pull off a clutch victory over Uruguay to advance. The Italians lost 1-0 Tuesday and were headed home.

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    Norwegian wins bet on Suarez World Cup bite

    Uruguay striker Luis Suarez’s practice of biting opponents seems to be a safe bet. More than 150 people across Europe put money down that he would do it again during the World Cup, and raked in winnings 175-fold, a Swedish gambling company said on Wednesday.

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    Mike North video: Tiger Woods Returns
    Even though Mike North has been critical of Tiger Woods in the past, he knows golf needs Tiger for better ratings.

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    Kristufek’s Arlington selections for June 26

    Joe Kristufek's selections for June 26 racing at Arlington International.

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    Tiger Woods was back in action Tuesday as he practiced at the Quicken Loans National golf tournament in Bethesda, Md.

    Woods says he’s ahead of schedule and without pain

    Tiger Woods returns to golf with big hopes, realistic expectations and no pain for the first time in nearly two years. Woods made his first public appearance in golf shoes since he walked gingerly off the golf course at Doral on March 9 with back pain that first presented itself in August 2012.

Business

  •  
    The U.S. stock market inched modestly higher Wednesday, recovering more than half of what it lost the day before, as investors were able to set aside two disappointing economic reports

    Stocks edge higher despite economic data

    The U.S. stock market inched modestly higher Wednesday, recovering more than half of what it lost the day before, as investors were able to set aside two disappointing economic reports. CBS and other broadcasters rose after the Supreme Court ruled in favor of them over a startup Internet company in a closely watched copyright case.

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    North Chicago-based AbbVie said its $46.5 billion bid for Shire Plc offers “compelling” value to the drugmaker’s shareholders as the company begins campaigning in favor of the deal.

    AbbVie cites tax break as a Shire deal motivator

    North Chicago-based drugmaker AbbVie sees a compelling tax break behind its roughly $46 billion bid to buy British counterpart Shire, and it expects the deal to expand Shire’s global reach as well. Leaders of the company laid out the reasoning behind their unsolicited, cash-and-stock offer during a Wednesday call with analysts two days after Shire PLC explained why it wasn’t interested in the deal.

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    Orders for U.S. durable goods tumbled 1 percent in May as demand for military equipment fell sharply. But excluding defense-related goods, orders actually rose, and orders in a key category that signals business investment also increased.

    Orders for U.S. durable goods drop 1 percent in May

    Orders for U.S. durable goods tumbled 1 percent in May as demand for military equipment fell sharply. But excluding defense-related goods, orders actually rose, and orders in a key category that signals business investment also increased.

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    Barnes & Noble is going to split its retail and Nook Media businesses into two separate public companies as it looks to boost shareholder value.

    Barnes & Noble to separate retail, Nook Media

    Barnes & Noble is going to split its retail and Nook Media businesses into two separate public companies as it looks to boost shareholder value. The company’s retail business includes its bookstores and BN.com businesses. Nook Media, in which Microsoft Corp. is an investor, houses the digital and college businesses of Barnes & Noble.

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    The U.S. economy shrank at a steep annual rate of 2.9 percent in the January-March quarter as a harsh winter contributed to the biggest contraction since the depths of the recession five years ago. But the setback is widely thought to be temporary, with growth rebounding solidly since spring.

    U.S. economy shrank at steep 2.9 percent rate in Q1

    The U.S. economy shrank at a steep annual rate of 2.9 percent in the January-March quarter as a harsh winter contributed to the biggest contraction since the depths of the recession five years ago. But the setback is widely thought to be temporary, with growth rebounding solidly since spring.

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    Monsanto said its earnings fell more than 5 percent in the third fiscal quarter on lower sales of biotech seeds, but its performance still topped Wall Street estimates and the company raised its 2014 outlook. It also announced plans to repurchase $10 billion in shares.

    Monsanto earnings dip on lower biotech seed sales

    Monsanto said its earnings fell more than 5 percent in the third fiscal quarter on lower sales of biotech seeds, but its performance still topped Wall Street estimates and the company raised its 2014 outlook. It also announced plans to repurchase $10 billion in shares.

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    Cecilia Abadie, founder of 33 Labs, uses a pair of Google Glass as she registers for Google I/O 2014 at the Moscone Center in San Francisco, Tuesday, June 24, 2014.

    Google to show off smart home gadgets, wearables

    An Android update, wearable gadgets and so-called smart home devices are just some of the innovations Google is likely to show off at its two-day developer conference, which begins Wednesday in San Francisco. In recent years, the conference has focused on smartphones and tablets, but this year Google’s Android operating system is expected to stretch — into cars, homes and smartwatches.

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    On Friday, Ukraine will sign a sweeping economic and trade agreement with the European Union. Yet the agreement is far more than just fine print for experts — it is the catalyst of a revolution that killed scores of Ukrainians and toppled the political system.

    Ukraine to sign EU deal that sparked revolution

    On Friday, Ukraine will sign a sweeping economic and trade agreement with the European Union, a 1,200-page telephone book of a document crammed with rules on everything from turkeys to tulips, cheese to machinery. Yet the agreement is far more than just fine print for experts — it was the catalyst of a revolution that killed scores of Ukrainians and toppled a president. The hope now is it that it will spark another kind of revolution, this one in Ukraine’s corrupt, underperforming economy.

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    The United States and its European allies are finalizing a package of sanctions on Russia’s key economic sectors that could be levied as early as this week, though the package might be delayed because of positive signals from Russian President Vladimir Putin.

    Officials: Sanctions on Russia could be delayed

    Sanctions aimed at key economic sectors in Russia because of its threatening moves in Ukraine might be delayed because of positive signals from Russian President Vladimir Putin, according to Obama administration officials.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Cut back Johnson Blue geranium after flowering for nicer, more compact foliage the rest of the season.

    Keep your perennials blooming all season long

    When we are walking down the aisles of our favorite garden center, it’s hard to resist the flowering perennials. Here are a few maintenance tips you can easily use to keep your perennials looking good the whole season.

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    Michael Cera plays Warren, an aimless, pot-smoking, 19-year-old slouching toward self-awareness in Steppenwolf Theatre’s pre-Broadway production of Kenneth Lonergan’s “This is Our Youth.”

    Michael Cera steals Steppenwolf’s ‘Youth’

    Those who came of age in the '80s will no doubt recognize the aimless, young adults in “This is Our Youth,” Kenneth Lonergan’s relentlessly authentic coming-of-age drama in a Steppenwolf Theatre revival. Some may even recognize themselves in this play, which stars the talented trio of Michael Cera, Kieran Culkin and Tavi Gevinson.

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    Diane Sawyer is stepping down as ABC’s evening news anchor, to be replaced by David Muir. The network said Sawyer will concentrate on interviews and specials.

    Muir replacing Sawyer at ABC’s ‘World News’

    ABC News is making a generational change at the top of its evening newscast, replacing Diane Sawyer with 40-year-old understudy David Muir in an attempt to take a run at longtime ratings leader Brian Williams at NBC’s “Nightly News.” ABC also announced Wednesday that George Stephanopoulos will add the role of chief anchor for live news events and election nights to his current jobs as “Good Morning America” co-host and host of the Sunday-morning “This Week” political show.

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    Eli Wallach, the raspy-voiced character actor who starred in dozens of movies and Broadway plays over a remarkable and enduring career, died Monday of natural causes. He was 98.

    Eli Wallach, veteran character actor, dies at 98

    Eli Wallach, the raspy-voiced character actor who starred in dozens of movies and Broadway plays over a remarkable and enduring career and earned film immortality as a conniving, quick-on-the-draw bandit in the classic Western “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly,” has died. He was 98.

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    Jelena Lukic of Elk Grove Village enjoys playing pool outdoors at Gnarly J's in Downers Grove.

    Sand volleyball, outdoor patio give Gnarly J's a laid-back feel

    New owners took over North Beach's former digs in Downers Grove in September, transforming the beach-themed spot on Butterfield Road into a laidback hangout called Gnarly J's. Here you'll find everyone from hipsters to bikers mingling while playing pool, sand volleyball or bags or watching games and enjoying the upgraded food and beer offerings.

  •  
    Judges Diana Martinez, left, Beth Waller, John Flamini and Barbara Vitello gave performance advice to the Top 20 contestants Sunday for Suburban Chicago's Got Talent at the Prairie Center for the Arts in Schaumburg.

    Vote for your Suburban Chicago's Got Talent favorites

    See videos of the Top 20 finalists of Suburban Chicago's Got Talent and vote for your Fan Favorite at dailyherald.com. Voting goes through Sunday, and the contestant with the most votes will be guaranteed a spot in the next round of competition, the Top 15, which is set for Sunday, July 13, at the Prairie Center for the Arts in Schaumburg. Suburban Chicago's Got Talent is a talent competition co-sponsored by the Daily Herald, the Arlington Heights Chamber of Commerce and the Prairie Center.

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    Producers of the NBC weight-loss competition series “The Biggest Loser” released a statement Wednesday saying that Jillian Michaels will not be returning for season 16 this fall.

    NBC: Jillian Michaels exiting ‘Biggest Loser’

    Jillian Michaels is exiting “The Biggest Loser,” NBC and the producer of the weight-loss competition series said Wednesday. In a statement, the network and production company Shine America said they and trainer Michaels have decided to part ways, and she won’t be back on “Biggest Loser” this fall.

  •  
    He didn’t fly first class and his hotels weren’t five-star. Still, when Chris Brown was moved from a Los Angeles jail to Washington for what was to have been the start of his trial on an assault charge, the cost to taxpayers was more than $4,000.

    Getting Chris Brown to D.C. trial cost taxpayers more than $4K

    He didn’t fly first class and his hotels weren’t five-star. Still, when singer Chris Brown was moved from a Los Angeles jail to Washington, D.C., for what was to have been the start of his trial on an assault charge, the cost to taxpayers was more than $4,000.

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    3T group members from left, Taj, TJ and Taryll, nephews of the late Michael Jackson, say they are ready to take up the pop superstar’s legacy, ending a 15-year hiatus prolonged by his dispute with Sony and untimely death.

    3T ending hiatus to take up Michael Jackson legacy

    Michael Jackson’s nephews and heirs to his musical talent say they are ready to take up the pop superstar’s legacy, ending a 15-year hiatus prolonged by his dispute with Sony and untimely death. Taj, TJ and Taryll Jackson, sons of Tito, one of the original Jackson Five, are preparing for a European tour this fall and are working on a new album, they said in an interview on the sidelines of Milan Fashion Week, which ended Tuesday.

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    Paul McCartney: Feeling better, ready to tour

    Paul McCartney says he’s feeling fab and ready to rock and roll. The 72-year-old former Beatle posted a brief YouTube video Tuesday night saying he’s recovered from a virus that forced him to cancel shows in Japan and South Korea, and delay the opening of a U.S. tour.

  •  
    Gary Oldman has apologized for defending fellow actors Mel Gibson and Alec Baldwin from critics of their controversial remarks about Jews and gays.

    Oldman apologizes for defending Gibson and Baldwin

    Gary Oldman has apologized for defending fellow actors Mel Gibson and Alec Baldwin from critics of their controversial remarks about Jews and gays. “I am deeply remorseful that comments I recently made in the Playboy interview were offensive to many Jewish people,” Oldman wrote in an open letter to the Anti-Defamation League late Tuesday. “Upon reading my comments in print — I see how insensitive they may be, and how they may indeed contribute to the furtherance of a false stereotype.”

  •  

    Dining events: Celebrate 15 years of Wildfire
    Wildfire Lincolnshire celebrates 15 years with specials from its original 1999 menu; Mojo’s east coast eats opens in Downers Grove; Olive Garden offers summer seasonal favorites.

  •  

    Night life events: Go country after dark at Arlington International

    Tuck the horses into bed and party into the night starting at 6 p.m. Friday, June 27, at Arlington International Racecourse’s Miller Lite Party in the Park After Dark — Country Night. For $25, enjoy a three-hour open Miller and Coors draft beer bar with branded beer mugs, as well as dancing, live music and giveaways.

  •  
    MTV will reprise its former “Total Request Live” countdown show for a day with breakthrough pop singer Ariana Grande. The network announced Wednesday it will bring back the series on July 2.

    MTV bringing ‘TRL’ back for 1 day with Grande

    MTV will reprise its former “Total Request Live” countdown show for a day with breakthrough pop singer Ariana Grande. The network announced Wednesday it will bring back the series July 2. The 20-year-old will perform her latest hit on “Total Ariana Live,” debut her follow-up single and discuss her upcoming sophomore album.

  •  
    Dave Eggers is deeply pessimistic in “Your Fathers, Where Are They? And The Prophets, Do They Live Forever?”

    Eggers’ ‘Fathers’ an angry take on changing world

    Dave Eggers is angry. A writer both beloved and criticized for his distinctly sentimental bursts appears to be seething, worried about crumbling institutions, lost privacy, diminished intimacy and humanity in general. At least, that’s the impression left after digesting Eggers’ new, characteristically inventive novel, “Your Fathers, Where Are They? And the Prophets, Do They Live Forever?” It is a frothing, angry, mournful meditation on what is slipping away as America plows on into the 21st century.

  •  
    This white chiffon overlay tank top is one of the wardrobe essentials for summer, according to Dana Avidan-Cohn, a senior editor at InStyle magazine.

    Chunky slides and white shirts made new for summer

    What’s hot for summer? Chunky slides, wide pants and white shirts reinvented. The season, it seems, isn’t cluttered with neons and bright prints in apparel, said Dana Avidan-Cohn, a senior editor at InStyle magazine. Florals and gingham popped up on runways, but she’s feeling more classic touches in solids made modern for summer’s easy living.

  •  
    Eric Meredith, cheese ager for Wegmans in Pittsford, N.Y., inspects cheese at the company’s new cheese “cave,” a high-tech building with seven rooms for ripening cheese.

    To meet a cheese challenge, Wegmans caves

    The Wegmans 1916 Aged Goat Cheese is smooth, silky, a little grassy but not at all punctuated by the sharp tang that turns off so many people from other goat’s milk varieties. Dairy perfection has been achieved thanks to Eric Meredith, the recently anointed affineur (cheese ager), and his new toy, a 12,000-plus-square-foot cheese cave building not far from Wegmans company headquarters outside Rochester, N.Y.

  •  
    Artist Gregg Moore, left, and chef Pierre Calmels sit at a table set with Moore’s fine ceramic pottery for a show called “Heirloom” in Philadelphia. Calmels serves a seven-course, $150 dinner called “Table d’Hote” at the museum using Moore’s pottery.

    Dinner at the museum: Real meal on fine ceramics

    Five nights a week at the Philadelphia Art Alliance, 16 people sit down to dinner. They’re in the exhibit space, at a long pine farmhouse table set all day long with platters, bowls and vases made by a ceramic artist. The seven-course meal, which costs $150 a person, was created to showcase pottery by artist Gregg Moore, and the meal has drawn rave reviews from foodies. The art, Moore says, is created by the experience: the food, ceramics, museum space and people who dine there together.

  •  
    Cocoa powder and mini chocolate chips make this zucchini bread doubly satisfying.

    Lean and lovin’ it: CSA puts fresh surprise in every box

    Don Mauer joined a community supported agriculture service this spring and loves the challenge of using up the close-to-organic fruits and vegetables. See what he does when confronted by a box full of zucchini.

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    Cocoa powder and mini chocolate chips make this zucchini bread doubly satisfying.

    Double Chocolate Zucchini Bread
    Don Mauer's Double Chocolate Zucchini Bread is a delicious, healthful way to enjoy summer squash.

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    Get the pantry stocked for ice cream season with a variety of supplies like, ice cream waffle cones and bowls, from top left clockwise, sandwich cookies, assorted nuts, dried pineapple, granola, Haagen-Dazs ice cream, chocolate sauce, raspberries, maraschino cherries, strawberries and Talenti gelato, honey and Breyers real fruit topping.

    Kick off ice cream season with crazy concoctions

    Ready to move beyond basic vanilla or chocolate this ice cream season? Much as we love those classics, with so many crazy — and crazy delicious — flavor combinations flooding the freezer aisle of the supermarket, it’s hard to resist making some big, boldly flavored frozen concoctions of our own.

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    Bee Sting Parfait

    Bee Sting Parfait
    Bee Hive Parfait is a fun frozen treat for summer.

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    Stawberry Elderflower Frappe

    Strawberry Elderflower Frappe
    Strawberry Elderflower Frappe is an adult way to enjoy strawberry ice cream.

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    Salted Caramel Malted Mocha Ice Cream Cake

    Salted Caramel Malted Mocha Ice Cream Cake
    Salted Caramel Malted Mocha Ice Cream Cake takes ice cream enjoyment to new levels.

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    You can get an $8 coupon toward the cost of a ticket to “Transformers: Age of Extinction” if you purchase a digital or physical copy of one of the previous installments in the franchise.

    Robots, roller coasters and nostalgia

    Wanna see giant robots? Sean has found a deal for you. How does an $8 coupon to see the new "Transformers" movie sound? Or, wanna relive the fun parks of your youth? Sean has found a TV show for you.

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    Mustard and sorghum, a molasses-like sweetner, give grilled pork a wonderfully rich flavor.

    Mustard, sorghum add layers of flavor to pork

    Elizabeth Karmel has created a quick cooking pork dish that is reminiscent of her grandmother's recipe, but meets her modern day schedule. The mustard-sorghum mop takes this easy grilled weeknight pork tenderloin from ordinary to extraordinary! A mop is a thin basting sauce that is “mopped” or dabbed on the food as it cooks.

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    Mustard and sorghum, a molasses-like sweetner, give grilled pork a wonderfully rich flavor.

    Pork Tenderloin With Mustard-Sorghum Mop
    A sorghum mop to add layers of flavor to pork tenderloin

Discuss

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    Editorial: Metra should get on board with Ventra

    A Daily Herald editorial says Metra should have a greater sense of urgency about integrating the Ventra payment card with Pace and CTA.

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    The enigmatic war

    Columnist Richard Cohen: This is a splendid time to remember the First World War. It started 100 years ago this month with the June 28 shooting of the Austrian archduke and his wife. By the end of the summer, much of Europe was engaged in a war that lasted about four years, toppled four empires, precipitated the communist revolution, created by fiat the modern Middle East, recognized Zionism, made the U.S. a world power and cost the lives of about 10 million fighting men. Historians are still trying to figure out what happened.

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    Suburban Chicago’s schools: Not as good as parents think

    Guest Columnist Lance Izumi: Are Illinois’ public schools that serve many middle-class children performing well? Their parents think so. But many of these schools are not as good as they think.

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    Let’s stop and think before we act
    A Wheeling letter to the editor: If I ruled the world, (or America or Illinois), whenever any politician opened his or her mouth to propose a new law or idea, he or she would have to explain and prove why “this is good for America” before any discussion or news proliferation could begin.

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    Personal stories of Holocaust valuable
    A Rolling Meadows letter to the editor: My mother-in-law once belonged to a large, happy and prosperous family. She’d been an attorney, married to her first husband, a hospital administrator. They had a baby daughter whom they adored. Her parents disappeared first. They were arrested walking down the street, imprisoned and executed. Her husband was killed next, followed by her brother.

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    Thanks for success of Libertyville Days
    A Libertyville letter to the editor: On behalf of the Libertyville Civic Center Foundation I would like to give a huge thank you to all of the community members, sponsors, hard-working volunteers and vendors that have assisted us in putting on another incredibly joyous and successful Libertyville Days Festival.

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    Misrepresentations border on treason
    A Kildeer letter to the editor: Each day for many years I have read the Fence Post. The comments therein never cease to amaze me, made by people who do not keep themselves properly informed or have forgotten the evolution of our political history.

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    Holocaust education still relevant, needed
    A Buffalo Grove letter to the editor: Article: “Remember the Past, Transform the Future” is the vision statement of the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center. This message to all visitors, old and young alike, has relevance and meaning today as it did so many years ago.

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