Fittest loser

Daily Archive : Monday November 11, 2013

News

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    Key part of downtown St. Charles project on thin ice

    The developers of arguably the most visible portion of the First Street project yet to be built repeatedly referred to their prime downtown St. Charles land as “a novel that’s not yet written” Monday night. But comments from aldermen indicated they view the project as a five-year horror story with an end they are prepared to write themselves.

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    Sharks in the Shedd Aquarium Wild Reef exhibit. Sharks can get sick just like any other animal, but humans can help them by not polluting the oceans.

    Harm to the oceans can make sharks sick

    Students in Nancy Sullivan’s sixth-grade class at Frederick Nerge Elementary School in Roselle asked, “Do sharks get sick? How? Why?”

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    Judith M. Brawka

    Kane expects high demand for 11/12/13 weddings

    Kane County court officials expect a busy Tuesday, as couples line up to get married on 11-12-13. Several judges have volunteered to perform ceremonies and officials view the afternoon as a way to serve the public. Couples see the consecutive date as good luck and it's also easy to remember.

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    Herschel Luckinbill, U.S. Navy veteran and chairman of the Moving Wall committee in Aurora, moves his hand over every name as he leads the final walk for veterans at the Moving Wall as part of the closing ceremony at West Aurora High School on Monday.

    Moving Wall in Aurora comes to a moving end

    Herschel Luckinbill lingered next to The Moving Wall and looked down at a picture of two young faces, old friends and comrades. “These are my shipmates,” Luckinbill said. “They’re the reason this wall is here.” Monday was the final day for the three-fifths replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial that had been on display near West Aurora High School since Nov. 7.

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    Paul Frisch of Lake Forest clears the snow from his car windows near Cook Park in Libertyville.

    Falling temps, snow create some icy road conditions

    Rain on Monday afternoon turned into the season’s first accumulating snowfall just before rush hour, leading to icy roads in parts of Lake, McHenry and Cook counties

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    Mundelein trustees on Monday night banned the sale of electronic cigarettes to anyone under 18.

    Mundelein restricts electronic cigarette sales

    Effective Tuesday, you have to be 18 or older to buy electronic cigarettes in Mundelein. Village trustees on Monday added rules for the vapor-creating devices to a local, tobacco-related ordinance. The change also makes possession of electronic cigarettes illegal for anyone under 18.

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    Fifth-graders from District 129 in Aurora sing “Thank You, Soldiers” as part of the closing ceremony at the Moving Wall at West Aurora High School on Monday.

    Images: Veterans Day in the Suburbs
    Images from Veterans Day ceremonies in the suburbs of Chicago. From the Moving Wall in Aurora to Ramblin Ray's program in Rosemont, our Nation's bravest were celebrated on their special day.

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    U.S. Sen. Mark Kirk congratulates former U.S. Navy Radio Technician Second Class George Boesen of Arlington Heights on receiving the medals he earned for his service during World War II. Kirk told Boesen he earned the honors “when you saved civilization.”

    Sen. Kirk helps Arlington Heights veteran get medals 67 years later

    Some long overdue honors were presented Monday to Northwest suburban veterans — along with a reminder to thank them everyday — at the Buffalo Grove Park District's annual Veterans Day Celebration. The highlight was Sen. Mark Kirk's presentation of four medals earned during World War II to retired U.S. Navy Radio Technician Second Class George Boesen of Arlington Heights.

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    This aerial photo taken from a Philippine Air Force helicopter shows the devastation caused by Typhoon Haiyan in Tacloban city, Leyte province, central Philippines, Monday.

    Experts: Man, nature share typhoon tragedy blame

    Nature and man together cooked up the disaster in the Philippines. Geography, meteorology, poverty, shoddy construction, a booming population, and, to a much lesser degree, climate change combine to make the Philippines the nation most vulnerable to killer typhoons, according to several scientific studies.And Typhoon Haiyan was one mighty storm.

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    Residents rebuild their homes Monday following Friday’s typhoon Haiyan that lashed Hernani township, Eastern Samar province, central Philippines.

    Desperate survivors seek to flee typhoon zone

    Thousands of typhoon survivors swarmed the airport here on Tuesday seeking a flight out, but only a few hundred made it, leaving behind a shattered, rain-lashed city short of food and water and littered with countless bodies.

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    Thief steals $8,700 in jewelry from Arlington Heights home

    A thief stole an estimated $8,700 in jewelry from an Arlington Heights home on two occasions, police reports state. According to police, the offender or offenders entered the residence in the 2800 block of Country Lake Road between Aug. 15 and Nov. 6 without sings of force and removed the jewelry.

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    Barrington revises two fire-aid agreements

    Barrington trustees Monday approved two of the four automatic-aid agreements they’ve had to revise with neighboring fire departments due to the village’s coming Jan. 1 split from the Barrington Countryside Fire Protection District. The new agreements reached were those with the Lake Zurich and Long Grove departments

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    Malibu Barstow

    St. Charles teen wanted in summer Geneva burglaries

    An 18-year-old from St. Charles is wanted by Geneva police in connection with a series of car burglaries in July. A warrant has been issued for Malibu Barstow, who also has drug charges pending from 2012, according to Kane County court records.

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    A portrait of celebrity chef Charlie Trotter was displayed in the lobby of the Fourth Presbyterian Church during his memorial on Monday in Chicago.

    Chefs pay tribute to Charlie Trotter

    Acclaimed chef Charlie Trotter was remembered Monday for turning Chicago into an international culinary destination, mentoring countless aspiring chefs and even inviting the homeless into his restaurant’s kitchen to sit and eat at one of the most famous tables in the world. Approximately 1,000 people, including renowned chefs from around the United States, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel and a few...

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    Sheriffs win round in court over salaries

    An Illinois appellate court has ruled for county sheriffs who seek to restore salary cuts imposed by state lawmakers. Sheriffs in 101 Illinois counties, but not Cook County, were to receive a $6,500 yearly stipend from state in addition to their county salaries. The legislature allocated only $4,196 for each sheriff in 2010 and 2011.

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    Cedar Street Companies has acquired Manchester Square at Lake Street and Milwaukee Avenue in downtown Libertyville.

    New owner to pursue downtown apartments for Manchester Square in Libertyville

    Chicago-based holding company Cedar Street Companies has acquired the Manchester Square building in downtown Libertyville for $7.15 million. Plans are to build about 30 apartments on the upper floors of the three-story building at Milwaukee Avenue and Lake Street.

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    Boy Scout Josh Brenc stands Monday with James Malone of Wheaton at Wheaton Cemetery. As part of an Eagle Scout project, Brenc has secured a headstone for Malone’s great grandfather, Civil War veteran James Cress.

    Civil War vet finally has headstone thanks to Wheaton Scout

    A Civil War veteran whose gravesite in Wheaton went decades without a headstone is finally getting one, thanks to an young man doing an Eagle Scout project. “I think it’s a very fine thing to do,” said James Malone, the great grandson of Civil War veteran James Cress. “I was very surprised that they did it.”

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    Hoffman Estates recognized for combating childhood obesity

    The National League of Cities recently recognized Hoffman Estates for reaching key health and wellness goals for “Let’s Move! Cities, Towns and Counties,” a component of first lady Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move!” initiative dedicated to combating childhood obesity.

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    Warren-Newport library board vacancy

    Applications are being accepted to fill a vacancy on the Warren-Newport Public Library board. Trustee Mary Ann Bretzlauf recently resigned.

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    Affordable Care Act sessions in Waukegan

    Vista Health System is continuing free and open presentations called “What You Need to Know About the Affordable Care Act” on Nov. 12 and 14 in Waukegan.

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    District 50 family math night

    Woodland Elementary West School’s math specialists will host Family Math Night at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 13, at the school, 17371 W. Gages Lake Road, Gages Lake.

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    Veterans stand at attention during the playing of Taps at Monday’ Veterans Day ceremony at the Lindenhurst Municipal Center and Veterans Memorial. The ceremony honored veterans and their families and featured several speakers, including Capt. R. Scott Laedlein, commanding officer of Navy Operational Support Command for Chicago.

    Veterans brave the cold and snow to be honored in Lindenhurst

    The rain, cold and snow couldn’t dampen the honors for nearly 150 people celebrating Veterans Day in Lindenhurst on Monday. However, the miserable weather did force the annual ceremony to be moved from outside at the veterans war memorial to inside the village’s public works garage at 2301 Sand Lake Road.

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    U-46 high schools to produce programs for district radio station

    For the first time since it's inception in 1950, Elgin Area School District U-46's WEPS 88.9 FM radio station will broadcast programming produced by students from the district's five high schools and the alternative program at Gifford Street High School. U-46 is hosting an open house to relaunch the station from 5 to 7 p.m. Tuesday at Gifford Street High School, 46 S. Gifford St., Elgin. WEPS is...

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    World War II veteran Charles F. “Chick” Bruns, of Champaign, Ill., looks at the medals and patches from his years in the Army. Bruns wrote a “blog” during World War II that is only now being published with the help of a website created by his son.

    Illinois man’s World War II diary gets life online

    Veteran Charles F. “Chick” Bruns of Champaign wrote a “blog” during World War II. Only now is it being published. And with the help of a website created by his son, readers can follow along — 70 years later — with daily entries in his diary, as his unit served in north Africa and Europe, until the war’s end.

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    Enrollment counselor Kenya Williams helps Jerome Davis Jr. 36, sign up for Medicaid last week at the Westside Health Authority in Chicago. For Davis, an unemployed construction worker, expansion of Medicaid means he’ll be able to see a doctor without fear of medical bills he can’t pay.

    Food stamp outreach boosting Illinois Medicaid

    Although only a few hundred middle-class Illinois residents were able to sign up for health insurance last month on the crippled federal HealthCare.gov website, the poor appear to be having an easier time enrolling in an expansion of Medicaid — and are doing so by the thousands.

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    The Veterans Cash lottery ticket earmarks proceeds to veterans. Gov. Pat Quinn’s administration says more than $11 million has been awarded over the years to more than 210 veterans’ organizations statewide.

    Quinn promotes veterans lottery ticket

    Gov. Pat Quinn took part Monday in a rare fly-around tour to highlight a new Illinois Lottery ticket benefiting the state’s veterans. The governor announced the new $2 Veterans Cash ticket at the Hope Manor Apartments — a supportive housing project for homeless veterans — in Chicago on Monday, followed by stops in Peoria, Milan and Rockford.

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    Man dies after falling off truck at Woodfield Mall

    A Maywood man unloading boxes at Woodfield Mall died Sunday afternoon after falling from a truck lift gate, authorities said. Eric Terrell died from multiple injuries caused by the fall and being crushed by the falling boxes. His death was ruled accidental.

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    Fitch downgrades Chicago bond ratings

    Fitch Ratings has downgraded the credit worthiness of Chicago’s bond debt because of its public pension problems. Fitch dropped the rating from AA- to A- on $8 billion in general obligation bonds, backed by property taxes. It also dropped the rating on $497 million in sales tax bonds.

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    Benjamin C. Ruiz, 44, of Aurora, was charged with driving under the influence of alcohol, aggravated fleeing, resisting arrest and reckless driving after a traffic stop at 12:11 a.m. Nov. 2 at Clark and Fifth streets near Aurora, according a sheriff’s report.

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    Residents of five Arlington Heights subdivisions have joined together in asking village leaders to continue a program that held homeowners pay to treat ash trees in hopes of fending off the deadly emerald ash borer.

    Arlington Heights neighbors form emerald ash borer coalition

    Residents of five Arlington Heights subdivisions have joined together to ask the village to continue reimbursing them for half the costs of treating ash trees to fight off infestation from the deadly emerald ash borer. Only five of 2,760 trees treated through the program have died.

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    Seneca L. Davis

    Feds seeking suspects in Round Lake Park attack on football fan

    U.S. marshals are hunting for two suspects believed to have fled Illinois after participating in a beating and robbery of a man lured to wtach a Bears game at a Round Lake Park home last week, authorities said.

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    Mount Prospect launches 17th annual Toys for Kids

    Donations are now being accepted for the Mount Prospect Fire Department’s 17th annual Toys for Kids drive. This year, Toys for Kids is expected to benefit approximately 350 children in 120 families.

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    John Kelly, who served alongside Medal of Honor recipient James Howard Monroe in the Vietnam War, speaks at a Veterans Day Assembly Monday at Monroe Middle School in Wheaton. Kelly said the school’s namesake, who was killed while saving two fellow soldiers, was smart, funny and highly respected among members of his company.

    Wheaton school remembers Medal of Honor recipient

    It’s been more than 46 years since Army Pfc. James Howard Monroe of Wheaton died saving the lives of two fellow soldiers in Vietnam. But for John Kelly, who fought alongside Monroe, the memory of his friend’s brave and selfless act is still fresh. On Monday, the 67-year-old Chicago man visited James Howard Monroe Middle School to give students some insight about the Wheaton school’s namesake. The...

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    The site of the Cheeseburger in Paradise restaurant in Algonquin Commons is being reborn as a Fuddruckers.

    Algonquin’s Cheeseburger in Paradise to be reborn as Fuddruckers

    Fans of Cheeseburger in Paradise, which recently closed in Algonquin Commons, won't have to wait long to get another burger fix. Fuddruckers, owned by the same parent company, is slated to open in the same location along Randall Road, company officials say.

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    Keller eighth-graders Morgan Krug, left, and Keneni Godana help Rotary member and District 54 Assistant Superintendent Pete Hannigan stock shelves, as they get ready to open the food pantry.

    District 54, Rotary open second food pantry in a local school

    Schaumburg Township Elementary District 54, a group of students and the Hoffman Estates/Schaumburg Rotary Club have done it again — a second school-based food pantry has opened, this time in Keller Jr. High. “I like being part of something bigger than myself," said eighth-grader Keneni Godana.

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    Randi Zuckerberg, who worked six years as marketing director at her brother's company, Facebook, will be signing copies of her books for children and adults at 7 p.m. Thursday at Anderson's Bookshop in Naperville.

    Randi Zuckerberg of Facebook fame coming to Naperville

    She worked as marketing director for six years at her brother's company Facebook, and now, author and production company leader Randi Zuckerberg is coming to Naperville. Zuckerberg will sign copies of her new children's book, “Dot,” and her new title for adults “Dot Complicated: Untangling our Wired Lives” during a 7 p.m. appearance Thursday at Anderson's Bookshop, 123 W.

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    A total of 2,562 runners participated in Sunday's inaugural Edward Hospital Marathon and Half Marathon. Organizers called the event a “roaring success” and said they're already planning for next year with a tentative race date of Nov. 9.

    Naperville Marathon organizers looking to make event even bigger

    With their inaugural race behind them, organizers of the Edward Hospital Naperville Marathon and Half Marathon already are thinking about making their next one even bigger. They'd like to increase the size of the event that attracted more than 2,500 runners to Naperville on Sunday and develop the race into a true destination for endurance athletes across America.

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    This is a 1979 file image of Skylab, at the end of its mission in 1979 when it crashed back to Earth. Skylab was the first United States manned space station and was launched on May 14, 1973. It is now regarded as one of the best-known of falling satellites, re-entering the atmosphere in 1979. About 82 tons hit the Earth — some of it in Australia and the rest falling into the Indian Ocean.

    Satellite hits Atlantic — but what about next one?

    This time it splashed down in the Atlantic Ocean — but what about next time? The European Space Agency says one of its research satellites re-entered the Earth’s atmosphere early Monday on an orbit that passed over Siberia, the western Pacific Ocean, the eastern Indian Ocean and Antarctica.

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    Richard Overton, the oldest living WWII veteran, center, is assisted during a Veterans Day ceremony, attended by President Barack Obama on Monday at Arlington National Cemetery.

    Obama pays tribute to 107-year-old WWII veteran

    President Barack Obama on Monday paid tribute to those who have served in the nation’s military, including one of the nation’s oldest veterans, 107-year-old Richard Overton.

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    The most recent effort of the Winston Campus Elementary Make A Difference Club is to gather leftover Halloween candy and redirect it to those serving our country.

    Winston Campus Elementary students making a difference

    Palatine’s Winston Campus Elementary has done a “spooktacular” job of embracing the Halloween spirit while serving others. The school’s Make a Difference Club members want to make a difference in their school and community as well as nationally, and they've done so by collecting costumes for those in need and by gathering leftover Halloween candy for soliders.

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    North Central awarded federal grant to help East Aurora schools

    North Central College will use its participation in a $4.6 million fkederal School Leadership grant to help prepare future principals to benefit children in East Aurora Elementary District 131.

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    Northrop-Grumman employee honored
    Diane LaFortune, a digital technology manager for Northrop Grumman in Rolling Meadows, received a Society of Women Engineers' Emerging Leader award for her active engagement in engineering and outstanding technical accomplishments.

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    Outrun the chill with a 5K run and warm up afterward with a chili lunch on Saturday, Dec. 7, when the Schaumburg Park District hosts its annual 5K Chilly Chili Race at Schaumburg Golf Club.

    5K Chilly Chili Race Dec. 7 in Schaumburg

    Outrun the chill with a 5K run and warm up afterward with a chili lunch! Schaumburg Park District’s annual 5K Chilly Chili Race will begin at 10 a.m., Saturday, Dec. 7, at Schaumburg Golf Club, 401 N. Roselle Road.

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    Geneva school board might set tentative property tax levy

    A look ahead to tonight's Geneva school board meeting during which the 2013 property tax levy will be discussed.

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    Geneva considers revising downtown plan for riverside housing

    On Monday, the Geneva City Council committee of the whole will discuss whether to amend its vision of having multifamily housing on the east side of the Fox River, at the request of landowners who don't want it. The council will alsohear a proposal from a firm that wants to install a solar-energy facility and sell electricity from it to the city.

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    Winfield keeps village attorney despite opposition

    Winfield Village President Erik Spande led a successful push to switch law firms — and in the process keep the town’s attorney — despite warnings the decision could hamper efforts to unite the two political factions on the village board. Spande last week got help from his three political allies on the seven-member village board to secure the votes he needed to hire Robbins, Schwartz, Nicholas,...

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    Chicago Bears quarterback Jay Cutler is slow to get up during the Bears 21-19 loss Sunday against the Detroit Lions at Soldier Field. Cutler would ultimately leave the game, and the Bears would leave their first place ranking behind.

    Weekend in Review: Nurses save runner; stolen puppies found
    What you may have missed over the weekend: Nurses running in Naperville marathon help save another runner; 2 puppies stolen from Bolingrbook, Naperville stores found; Arlington Heights fire victim's husband tells her story; McHenry girl hurt in hit-and-run; detours begin for Rollins/Rt. 83 interchange; suburban Filipinos wait for word on family after typhoon; Hawks beat the Oilers; and Bears lose...

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    Dawn Patrol: Filipinos worry after storm; detours begin on Rollins

    Dawn Patrol: Suburban Filipinos pray for typhoon victims. Detours begin today for Rollins Road improvements. Naperville runners sweep city’s first marathon. Puppies stolen from Bolingbrook, Naperville found near St. Louis. Arlington Hts. fire victim’s husband tells her story. Questionable decisions big part of Bears’ loss to Lions. Blackhawks edge Oilers 5-4.

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    Downtown plan comes before Wheaton City Council

    City council members on Monday night will receive the final draft version of the Wheaton Downtown Strategic and Streetscape Plan, a $64 million plan two years in the making. The focus of city officials and professional planners hired to devise the plan was to keep the downtown area a vital place to work, shop, play and live for the next 20 years.

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    Plans to save the 144-year-old Joel Wiant House in West Chicago have yet to be finalized.

    West Chicago reviewing pact to fix historic house

    More than a month after West Chicago City Council members signed off on a plan to save a 144-year-old house, officials are yet to finalize the agreement. Officials said the city council’s development committee on Monday night is expected to review the proposed contract that would allow the West Chicago Community Center to proceed with its planned restoration of the Joel Wiant House at 151 W.

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    District 41 to vote on project to build new classrooms

    \The Glen Ellyn Elementary District 41 school board is expected to decide Monday night whether to pursue a $15.6 million project to improve facilities. The board will decide whether to seek bids on a plan to add four flexible classrooms each at Franklin, Lincoln, Churchill and Forest Glen schools.

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    John Euwema

    Man due in DuPage County court on judge stalking charge

    A man accused of stalking a DuPage County judge will appear in court this week for a possible bond hearing. Last week, Judge John Kinsella recused himself from the case of John Euwema, who is charged with stalking Kinsella's colleague, Judge Kathryn Creswell.

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    The Naperville Healing Field on Rotary Hill was a sea of red, white and blue Sunday as the city honored veterans with a Veterans Day Ceremony.

    Veterans Day events in the suburbs
    Ceremonies and memorials are scheduled across the suburbs to mark Veterans Day. Here's a list of events happening in the area today.

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    Bullying victim friends group walks from Chicago to N.J.

    The family of the Rutgers University student whose suicide sparked a national conversation about the treatment of young gay people paid their first visit Sunday to the bridge where he took his life. Members of Tyler Clementi’s family crossed The George Washington Bridge to New York City to help raise awareness about the dangers of bullying.

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    Sixth-grader Tesandra Phillips, left, searches for music as instructional technology coach Christine Edwards assists Jaquai Seaton, Quajai Seaton and Mark Sutherland in editing footage for the class’ ì12 Powerful Wordsî film at French Academy in Decatur.

    French students put memory to music

    Some people find it easier to remember things when they’re set to music. That’s certainly the case with Keosha Barber, a sixth-grader in Tami Roberts’ class at French Academy. “I can only do it with the song,” Keosha said with a chuckle, and then sang the song her class used to help them remember the “12 powerful words” critical to successful schoolwork: trace, analyze, infer, evaluate,...

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    Chicago man gets 95 years for robbery

    Cook County prosecutors say a 30-year-old Chicago man has been sentenced to 95 years in prison in connection with a 2009 robbery near a convenience store. Prosecutors say Regalardo Smith shot two people and severely injured a 16-year-old in the robbery on Chicago’s West Side. Smith was convicted of felony counts of armed robbery, aggravated battery with a firearm, vehicular invasion and armed...

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    The Naperville Healing Field on Rotary Hill was a sea of red, white and blue Sunday as the city honored veterans with a Veteran’s Day Ceremony in 2012.

    Illinois marks Veterans Day with ceremonies

    Ceremonies and memorials are scheduled across Illinois to mark Veterans’ Day. In Chicago four-star Gen. Robert Cone will speak at the city’s Veterans’ Day ceremony. Cone is the commander over the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command. The event is scheduled for Monday morning at Soldier Field. Other cities, including Aurora, plan Veterans’ Day parades. In Springfield the parade will go to the...

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    The RTA is hoping a lawsuit can stop what it calls tax havens in downstate Illinois.

    Is RTA's $1.6 million fight against tax havens a good bet?

    It seemed a no-brainer back in 2011 when the RTA sued Channahon and Kankakee, claiming the towns were cheating the six-county region out of millions by operating tax havens for corporations and retailers. So far, though, the agency has spent more than $1.6 million fighting the good fight, according to a recent Freedom of Information Act Request, on a case legal experts say is no slam dunk for the...

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    Roger Budny of Naperville relaxes during a yoga class for veterans at Judd Kendall VFW Post 3873 in Naperville. Volunteer instructor Dana Fish recently started offering yoga for veterans through Connected Warriors, a nonprofit organization that makes the physical and emotional benefits of yoga available to those who have served.

    Veterans reap benefits of Naperville yoga classes

    Army veteran Rich Goulet’s wife had been bugging him to try yoga, thinking it would help with his back pain. He thought it was for hippies. But a couple weeks ago, yoga in Naperville became something for veterans, too, as volunteer instructor Dana Fish began offering free classes through the nonprofit Connected Warriors. “One of the important things is it’s yoga being done with...

Sports

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    St. Charles East boys basketball coach Patrick Woods watches his players during the first day of practice Monday.

    St. Charles East starts life without Stephens

    It's the time of year where expectations are always lofty in high school gymnasiums across the state of Illinois. I'm not sure if Monday afternoon's weather was a cruel practical joke or not but it's also the time of year where snow can begin to cover the ground. Monday marked the first official day of high school boys basketball practice.

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    Angela Schmiederer

    Iowa catches Schmiederer’s fancy

    Hersey standout catcher Angela Schmiederer has played softball on both coasts with her Illinois Chill travel team. When she gets to college, she will be based in the Midwest. A little over a month ago, Schmiederer made her decision to commit to the University of Iowa.

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    Curtis Granderson

    Granderson, Saltalamacchia on Sox' radar?

    Baseball's general manager meetings opened Monday as the rumor season officially opened. White Sox beat writer Scot Gregor looks at two possible additions — Curtis Granderson and Jarrod Saltalamacchia.

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    Detroit Lions quarterback Matthew Stafford celebrates Sunday as he walks off the field after the Lions’ 21-19 win over the Bears at Soldier Field.

    Alone in first, Lions choosing words carefully

    Detroit coach Jim Schwartz is brushing off any talk of his team’s position in the standings. The Lions won at Soldier Field on Sunday to take over sole possession of first place in the NFC North. With a favorable-looking schedule and generally good health, Detroit has a good chance to win its first division title since the 1993 season — but there’s still a lot of football to be played.

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    Quarterback Jordan Lynch and the Northern Illinois Huskies are not about to look past Wednesday night's big home game against Ball State.

    BCS? NIU's focus entirely on Ball State

    While it's tempting to focus on non-AQ rival Fresno and wonder about AAC leader UCF, NIU can't afford any BCS thoughts right now. The Huskies have three tough games remaining, beginning with Ball State at home Wednesday night. Northern Illinois jumped up to No. 15 in the BCS on Sunday — after having the weekend off — moving three places forward from last week, when they fell one spot following a 63-19 victory over UMass.

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    Tampa Bay Buccaneers tackle Donald Penn spikes the ball after catching a 1-yard touchdown pass against the Miami Dolphins on Monday at home.

    Buccaneers hang on for first win

    Tampa Bay’s status as the NFL’s only winless team didn’t last long. Rookie Mike Glennon threw a 1-yard touchdown pass to tackle Donald Penn and led a long fourth-quarter TD drive to put the Buccaneers ahead for good in a 22-19 victory over the embattled Miami Dolphins on Monday night.

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    The Bulls’ Derrick Rose shoots over Cleveland’s Andrew Bynum during the first half Monday night at the United Center. Rose sat out the final three minutes of the Bulls’ victory after suffering a hamstring injury.

    Hamstring injury no concern to Bulls, Rose

    The Bulls used a late 13-2 run to secure a 96-81 victory over Cleveland on Monday at the United Center. They improved to 3-3 on the season, but it was tough to ignore that moment with 3:15 left when Derrick Rose went to the bench with a hamstring injury.

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    Irving has nothing but respect for Bulls’ Rose

    Even though he waited a long time for this matchup, Cleveland guard Kyrie Irving was low-key before his first NBA game against Derrick Rose. Because of injuries to both players, Irving and Rose didn’t play against each other the past two seasons.

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    The Blackhawks’ Brandon Saad celebrates after scoring a goal in Sunday’s 5-4 victory over the Edmonton Oilers at the United Center.

    Blackhawks’ top line clicking right along

    The Blackhawks' top line of Jonathan Toews, Patrick Sharp and Marian Hossa has led the way recently, and on Monday Sharp was named the NHL’s third star of the week for collecting 7 points in three games.

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    Bulls point guard Derrick Rose drives past Cleveland Cavaliers point guard Kyrie Irving during Monday’s second half at United Center.

    Rose departs Bulls win with hamstring injury

    Derrick Rose grimaced after he drove down the lane for a twisting layup with 3:39 left in Monday's game against Cleveland. He remained in the game for a short time before he was pulled for Kirk Hinrich, and a trainer then attended to the 2011 NBA MVP at the end of the bench. "It's just a minor sprain," Rose said. "Nothing bad."

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    Mundelein’s McDonald figures in Augustana’s tennis success

    After putting together a tremendous fall season, the Augustana women’s tennis program picked up some regional rankings heading into the spring. Third-year head coach Jon Miedema’s team finished the fall with a perfect 11-0 overall record and a 6-0 mark in the College Conference of Illinois and Wisconsin. As a team Augustana is currently ranked 16th in the NCAA Division III’s Central Region, one spot ahead of Wheaton, which defeated the Vikings by 2 points at the CCIW tournament this fall. Helping the Vikings to their success has been sophomore Aileen McDonald. The Mundelein High School graduate compiled a 12-2 record while playing with senior Kim Sawyer at No. 2 doubles. They also won the CCIW title.

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    Turpel, Harper to host Illinois Central

    New coach Jenny Turpel is confident things will be less turbulent in the upcoming days for the Harper College women’s basketball program. After a strange off-season that saw former coach Nicole Jones leave the program at the beginning of the first semester, along with the cancellation of Monday’s practice before an important early season test, a little more normalcy would be welcomed by Turpel. Harper (0-2) is scheduled to play its home opener against Illinois Central College, ranked No. 2 in the NJCAA Division II poll, at 5 p.m. Tuesday.

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    Novak Djokovic of Serbia holds up the ATP World Tour Finals tennis trophy as he poses for photographers after defeating Rafael Nadal of Spain at the O2 Arena in London, Monday, Nov. 11, 2013.

    Djokovic beats Nadal to win ATP Finals

    LONDON — Novak Djokovic remains the man to beat on indoor courts.The defending champion made quick work of top-ranked Rafael Nadal 6-3, 6-4 to win the ATP World Tour Finals on Monday, extending his winning streak to 22 matches and claiming the elite season-ending title for the third time.Djokovic, who has not lost a match since his defeat to Nadal in the U.S. Open final, returned superbly from the start to move his Spanish rival around the court and prevent him from dictating the points.Nadal hit only nine winners and was broken three times. Nadal and Djokovic have been dominant this season. Nadal replaced Djokovic for the No. 1 ranking last month, but the Serbian player proved again he still has the upper hand on hard courts by extending his head-to-head winning record to 13-7 on that surface.Djokovic took an impressive start, hitting powerful groundstrokes to keep Nadal well behind his baseline while limiting his own mistakes. Returning well, the Serb made the most of two of Nadal’s backhand errors to break in the second game. He had another chance in the fourth game after Nadal double-faulted, but a superb defensive play from the Serb ended with a shanked backhand.Nadal got into the match from that point. He put Djokovic under pressure with his huge forehands in the next game and two unforced errors from the Serb allowed him to break back then even at 3-3.But Nadal faltered in his next service game as he served a double fault at 30-30. After a stunning exchange, Djokovic broke for a 5-3 edge following a series of volleys at the net. Standing in the middle of the court, the Serb opened his arms and screamed as the crowd erupted in cheers and greeted the players with a standing ovation.Djokovic then benefited from a fortunate net cord and made sure he hit three good serves to seal the set on his first occasion with an ace.Looking confident, Djokovic raised his game further in the second set, pinpointing his shots on the lines after breaking in the third game of the second set.The Spaniard saved two match points and kept encouraging himself until the end, but a final forehand that was too long gave Djokovic the title.Also Monday, David Marrero and Fernando Verdasco defeated top-ranked Mike and Bob Bryan 7-5, 6-7 (3), 10-7 to win the doubles title.The sixth-seeded Spaniards claimed their first win over the American twins in their fourth attempt, preventing the Bryans from claiming a fourth title at the year-end elite tournament.It is the second year in a row that a Spanish duo won the doubles in London. Marcel Granollers and Marc Lopez won last season.The Bryans have finished No. 1 for a fifth straight year and a record ninth time overall. They have won 11 titles this season, including the Australian Open, French Open and Wimbledon.

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    One thing about Bears quarterback Jay Cutler, there’s never a dull moment.

    Good or bad, Bears’ Cutler demands our attention

    Jay Cutler always manages to make things interesting, for better or worse. Everything with the Bears revolves around him, as it does all quarterbacks, but in his case more so even though he has accomplished so little during his career.

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    Bears quarterbacks Josh McCown (12) and Jay Cutler confer on the sideline Sunday.

    McCown gets the call Sunday for Bears

    Backup quarterback Josh McCown has played well enough in three games this season that the Bears won't have to alter their game plan when he gets his second start Sunday in place of injured Jay Cutler.

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    Detroit Lions wide receiver Calvin Johnson is taken down by Bears cornerback Charles Tillman during the Bears 21-19 loss to the Detroit Lions at Soldier Field, Sunday. Tillman injured a triceps in the game and will miss the rest of the regular season.

    Bears’ Tillman out for season; Cutler out Sunday

    The fallout from the 21-19 loss to the Detroit Lions continued with the depressing injury news Monday that quarterback Jay Cutler will not play Sunday against the Baltimore Ravens and that two-time Pro Bowl cornerback Charles Tillman won’t play again this season unless the Bears make the playoffs.

  •  
    Miami Marlins starting pitcher received 26 of 30 first-place votes for NL Rookie of the Year.

    Fernandez, Myers named Rookies of the Year

    Jose Fernandez of the Miami Marlins and Wil Myers of the Tampa Bay Rays have been selected baseball’s Rookies of the Year. Fernandez stood out in a deep National League class and is one of three finalists for the NL Cy Young Award. Myers took home the American League prize after putting up impressive offensive numbers in barely half a season.

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    Nebraska running back Ameer Abdullah celebrates after scoring in the fourth quarter of Saturday’s road win over Michigan.

    Nebraska offense able to rely on Abdullah

    In a season when injuries have afflicted almost every position group on offense, Nebraska has been able to count on Ameer Abdullah. The junior is on pace to deliver one of the greatest seasons by a running back in Cornhuskers history.

  •  
    Nebraska quarterback Taylor Martinez has been limited to four games this season.

    Nebraska QB’s father says injury ‘can’t be toughed out’

    It appears Nebraska’s Taylor Martinez has played his last snap for the Cornhuskers. Martinez’s father, Casey Martinez, wrote in an email to The Associated Press on Monday night that the senior quarterback has a “debilitating injury” near the ball of his left foot that could take until February or March to heal fully.

  •  
    America’s Jesse Owens, center, salutes during the presentation of his gold medal for the long jump during the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin.

    Gold medal won by Jesse Owens to be sold

    One of the four Olympic gold medals won by track and field star Jesse Owens at the 1936 Berlin Games is set to go on the auction block. SCP Auctions says the medal could sell for upward of $1 million in the online auction that runs from Nov. 20-Dec. 7.

  •  
    Wisconsin’s James White, right, gets past Brigham Young’s Robertson Daniel during the second half of Saturday’s game in Madison. Wisconsin won 27-17.

    Wisconsin on outside looking in at BCS

    No. 17 Wisconsin has won four straight games and has a record to be proud of in November dating back to 2006. It might not matter much in the BCS bowl race this season. The Badgers are 22nd in the latest BCS standings.

  •  
    Hailey Cnota

    More depth a plus for Judson

    Second-year Judson University women’s basketball coach Kristi Cirone won’t have to worry about depth this season. Cirone is excited about the talent she has up and down her roster as Judson looks to improve on last year’s 9-22 overall mark (4 conference wins).

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    Hampshire graduate Jen Dumoulin (10) will be a key player for the Elgin Community College women’s basketball team this season.

    Elgin CC hoping to maintain tradition

    Just because the Elgin Community College women’s basketball team roster has virtually all new players on it doesn’t mean the expectations are any lower. The Spartans return no starters and only 3 players from last year’s team that won Illinois Skyway Collegiate Conference and Region IV titles and advanced to the NJCAA Division II nationals. It was the first time an ECC basketball team qualified for a national postseason tournament.

  •  
    Ohio State wide receiver Evan Spencer thinks the No. 3 Buckeyes are better than No. 1 Alabama and No. 2 Florida State.

    Ohio State WR: Buckeyes would wipe field with 'Bama, FSU

    Ohio State wide receiver Evan Spencer made it clear Monday that he believes the Buckeyes are better than No. 3. Spencer had a chance to watch two-time defending national champion Alabama and second-ranked Florida State last weekend while the Buckeyes had an open date. “I guess I'm a little biased but I think we'd wipe the field with both of them,” said Spencer with a chuckle.

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    Duke’s Jabari Parker blocks a shot during the second half of Friday’s game against Davidson in Durham, N.C. Duke won 111-77.

    Champions Classic has 4 of top 5 teams

    With the college basketball season only a few days old, the No. 2 Michigan State Spartans face top-ranked Kentucky and its latest group of freshman phenoms Tuesday in the Champions Classic in Chicago. Not only is it the earliest meeting of 1 vs. 2 — and the first since 2008 — but with No. 4 Duke playing fifth-ranked Kansas in the second game, the tournament might very well be a sneak preview of this season’s Final Four.

  •  
    Michigan head coach Brady Hoke looks up at the scoreboard during the fourth quarter of Saturday’s loss to Nebraska in Ann Arbor, Mich.

    Michigan coach aiming for 10-win season

    Michigan had hoped to close the regular season well enough to earn a shot at playing for the Big Ten title. Officially, that can’t happen now, so the Wolverines (6-3, 2-3 Big Ten) have adjusted their ultimate goal this year with the conference championship out of reach. “You got a chance to win 10 football games, that opportunity is out there,” coach Brady Hoke said Monday. “And, that’s always been a little bit of a benchmark.”

  •  
    Undeveloped land stands in the area where a new suburban stadium will be built for the Atlanta Braves.

    Braves planning new suburban stadium in 2017

    Just 17 years after it opened, it looks as though Turner Field is headed for extinction, like so many sports facilities in Atlanta. In a stunning announcement, the Braves said Monday they are moving to a new 42,000-seat, $672 million stadium about 10 miles from downtown in suburban Cobb County.

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    Minnesota’s Joe Mauer, with highlighter coloring his fingernails to show signs to the pitcher, won three Gold Gloves as a catcher.

    Twins moving Mauer to first base

    Joe Mauer will move from catcher to first base on a full-time basis for the Minnesota Twins, hoping to avoid a repeat of the concussion that cut short his 2013 season. The Twins announced the switch on Monday for the 30-year-old Mauer, who missed the last six weeks of the schedule recovering from his head injury.

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    New York Jets tight end Kellen Winslow served a suspension for violating the NFL’s policy on performance-enhancing substances

    Jets move TE Winslow back to active roster

    The New York Jets have reinstated tight end Kellen Winslow Jr., to the active roster, and he will be available to play Sunday against the Buffalo Bills.

  •  
    The NFL suspended Vikings receiver Jerome Simpson for three games last year for violating the league’s substance abuse policy, and his DUI case has again been placed under review by the league.

    Simpson says he’s sorry for DUI arrest

    Minnesota Vikings wide receiver Jerome Simpson says he’s sorry for the negative attention brought to the organization over the weekend after his arrest on suspicion of drunken driving. His status for Sunday's game against Seattle is uncertain.

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    Tennessee Titans quarterback Jake Locker, left, watches from the sideline as he talks with fellow quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick in the fourth quarter of Sunday’s loss to Jacksonville.

    Titans QB Locker out for season

    Titans quarterback Jake Locker will miss the rest of the season with a Lisfranc injury to his right foot that may need surgery.

  •  
    Stan Musial’s personally owned 1948 Bowman rookie baseball card sold for $11,950 at auction. Musial died in January at age 92.

    Musial memorabilia auction nets $1.2 million

    Hundreds of bidders, most presumably St. Louis Cardinals fans, now own a piece of Stan Musial’s life after an online auction of his possessions. Officials with Heritage Auctions of Dallas said Monday that winning bids for the monthlong auction totaled $1.2 million, far more than expected.

  •  
    Cyclist Lance Armstrong was stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and banned for life last year.

    Door open for Armstrong, anti-doping boss says

    Lance Armstrong must cooperate fully if he wants to win back some of his reputation and help cycling recover from its drug-stained past, the head of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency said. There has been speculation that Armstrong may seek to lessen his sanction in return for helping USADA’s ongoing investigation into doping in cycling.

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    Dallas Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo sits on the bench Sunday during the second half against the New Orleans Saints in New Orleans.

    Cowboys take humbling loss to Saints into bye week

    Maybe Rob Ryan wasn’t the problem for the Dallas defense. Even Cowboys owner Jerry Jones seems willing to acknowledge as much after New Orleans torched his team for a franchise record in yards allowed. It was the second time that’s happened in the past three weeks under Monte Kiffin, who replaced Ryan when Jones fired him 10 months ago.

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    Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning throws a pass Sunday during the second half against the San Diego Chargers in San Diego.

    Source: MRI shows no new damage on Manning’s ankle

    A person with knowledge of the results says Peyton Manning’s MRI showed aggravation of his right ankle that is not expected to keep the Broncos quarterback out of next Sunday’s game against Kansas City. The person spoke to The Associated Press on the condition of anonymity because the team hasn’t addressed the issue. Interim coach Jack Del Rio meets with the media Monday afternoon.

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    Indianapolis Colts quarterback Andrew Luck, left, talks Sunday with tight end Coby Fleener in the final minutes of the second half of an NFL football game against the St. Louis Rams in Indianapolis, Sunday, Nov. 10, 2013. The Rams defeated the Colts 38-8.(AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

    Colts don’t have time to dwell on latest loss

    Chuck Pagano was just as disgusted with the game tape he watched Monday morning as he was with the Colts’ live performance Sunday afternoon. But the Colts can’t worry about the past now —certainly not with a Thursday night game at Tennessee. “When you’re out there on the field and you make a great play, that’s fine. You’ve got to put that play behind you. When you go out there and you stub your toe and you make a bad play, you’ve got to put it behind you,” defensive end Cory Redding said.

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    Michigan State’s Branden Dawson dunks over McNeese State’s Kevin Hardy Friday during the second half in East Lansing, Mich.

    Kentucky, Michigan State stay 1-2 in AP poll

    Kentucky and Michigan State held the top spots in The Associated Press’ first regular-season college basketball poll, setting up the first No. 1 vs. No. 2 matchup in five years. The Wildcats held the same three-point advantage over the Spartans from the preseason Top 25 on Monday, and they will meet Tuesday night in Chicago.

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    Mike North Video: Two reasons Bears lost to Lions
    The Chicago Bears lost Sunday against the Detroit Lions because Jay Cutler was hurt and Mel Tucker, defensive coordinator, single covered wide receiver Calvin "Megatron" Johnson.

  •  
    Chicago Fire goalkeeper Sean Johnson will join the U.S. National Team for friendlies against Scotland and Austria.

    Fire goalkeeper added to USA roster

    Chicago Fire goalkeeper Sean Johnson has been selected by United States Men’s National Team for the upcoming international friendlies against Scotland and Austria, club officials announced Monday.

Business

  •  
    Senate Appropriations Committee Chair Barbara Mikulski of Maryland, flanked by Senate Majority Whip Richard Durbin of Illinois, left, and Sen. Charles Schumer, speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington.

    Automatic spending cuts would bite more in 2014
    The first year of the automatic federal spending cuts didn’t live up to the dire predictions from the Obama administration and others who warned of sweeping furloughs and big disruptions of government services. But the second round is going to be a lot worse, lawmakers and budget experts say.

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    U.S. stocks rose Monday, with the Dow Jones Industrial Average extending a record, as investors awaited retailer earnings reports to gauge the strength of consumer demand and the likelihood of cuts to monetary stimulus.

    Dow Jones average reaches another record high

    The Dow Jones industrial average rose to another all-time high on Wall Street Monday. The market edged higher from Friday, when it got a lift from an unexpectedly strong U.S. jobs report for October. The surge in hiring made investors more optimistic that the U.S. economy is getting stronger.

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    Lawmakers eye tax break to take over vacant buildings

    Some Illinois lawmakers want to offer tax incentives to companies if they agree to take over certain abandoned state facilities. A measure that was approved in the Senate but has yet to be considered in the House would give private investors an income tax credit in exchange for refurbishing a former state facility.

  •  
    Caitlin McGurk holds up a cartoon titled “Terry and the Pirates” by Milton Caniff at the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum in Columbus, Ohio.

    Comics lovers will be drawn to Ohio museum

    There is a place where Snoopy frolics carefree with the scandalous Yellow Kid, where Pogo the possum philosophizes alongside Calvin and Hobbes. It’s a place where Beetle Bailey loafs with Garfield the cat, while Krazy Kat takes another brick to the noggin, and brooding heroes battle dark forces on the pages of fat graphic novels. That doesn’t even begin to describe everything that’s going on behind the walls of the new Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum on the Ohio State University campus.

  •  
    A worker places a package in the correct shipping area at an Amazon.com fulfillment center, in Goodyear, Ariz. Amazon is teaming with the U.S. Postal Service to deliver packages on Sundays.

    Amazon, U.S. Postal Service will deliver on Sundays
    Amazon is teaming up with the U.S. Postal Service to deliver packages on Sundays. The Seattle company says Sunday delivery will be available this week to customers in the New York and Los Angeles metropolitan areas. Amazon and the Postal Service plan to roll out service to “a large portion of the U.S. population” next year."

  •  

    Gogo unveils in-flight text and talk technology

    In flight connectivity provider, Itasca-based Gogo has unveiled its new Text & Talk technology for commercial airline passengers. The new technology uses Gogo’s in-flight Wi-Fi system to allow passengers to send text messages and make phone calls using their own smartphone much like they do on the ground.

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    MacLean-Fogg expands Mundelein facility

    Mundelein-based Maclean-Fogg Component Solutions has invested in new machining equipment that expands the Fastener Components division’s manufacturing capabilities at the company’s Mundelein facility.

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    Tasty Catering rebrands, adds wedding division

    Elk Grove Village-based Tasty Catering Monday unveiled its rebrand, complete with a new logo and redesigned website. The company’s rebranding also includes the addition of wedding catering as well as a full-service approach to catered events. Tasty Catering now specializes in full-service catering for corporate, social, picnics, weddings and special events.

  •  
    World War II veteran George Houcin of Waukegan, at left, and Jesse Jarrett, general manager of the Culver’s restaurant in Zion, return from a Honor Flight trip to see the World War II Memorial in Washington, D.C.

    Zion restaurant manager, customer bond during Honor Flight

    Kukec's People features a manager of a Culver's restaurant in Zion, who encouraged a vet from Waukegan to go on the Honor Flight to see the World War II memorial. The vet went on one condition, that the manager comes, too. Together, they took a whirlwind trip into the past.

  •  
    The Illinois Legislature wrapped up its official 2013 calendar last week after voting to legalize gay marriage, but it made little progress on fixing the state’s pension crisis, gun control, ethics reform and other parts of Gov. Pat Quinn’s agenda.

    Lawmakers leave many Quinn priorities unresolved

    The Illinois Legislature wrapped up its official 2013 calendar last week after voting to legalize gay marriage, but it made little progress on fixing the state’s pension crisis, gun control, ethics reform and other parts of Gov. Pat Quinn’s agenda. Shortly after lawmakers sent Quinn a bill allowing Illinois to join 14 other states and hold same-sex weddings as early as next summer, they abruptly ended their fall veto session with much unfinished business as the 2014 primary elections begin to heat up.

  •  
    Chicago authorities say they’re cracking down on the illegal sale of cigarettes.

    Chicago to crack down on illegal cigarettes

    Chicago authorities say they’re cracking down on the illegal sale of cigarettes. The Chicago Department of Business Affairs and Consumer Protection made the announcement. Officials say they department will increase the size of its special enforcement unit by 50 percent next year.

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    U.S., Europe resume talks on new trade pact
    The United States and the European Union, which already enjoy the world’s biggest business relationship, resumed talks Monday on a deal to further grow two-way trade and investment. The negotiations are taking place against the backdrop of European pique over reported U.S. electronic espionage, and were delayed due to the U.S. government shutdown. But officials for both sides said the benefits of the proposed Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership are too great for the talks to be affected.

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    IA wind turbine, named Fukushima Mirai, about 20 kilometers off the coast of Naraha, Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan.

    Japan starts up offshore wind farm near Fukushima

    Japan switched on the first turbine at a wind farm 20 kilometers (12 miles) off the coast of Fukushima on Monday, feeding electricity to the grid tethered to the tsunami-crippled nuclear plant onshore.The wind farm near the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant is to eventually have a generation capacity of 1 gigawatt from 143 turbines, though its significance is not limited to the energy it will produce.

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    Chinese policemen stand guard as visitors head to Tiananmen Square during a gathering of the 205-member Central Committee’s third annual plenum in Beijing Saturday. Reform advocates are looking to China’s leaders to launch a new era of change by giving entrepreneurs a bigger role in the state-dominated economy and farmers more control over land at a policymaking conference that opened Saturday.

    Long silent, China’s entrepreneurs push for change

    As Chinese career trajectories go, wealthy businesswoman Wang Ying’s has taken an unusual turn. She quit her job as head of a private equity fund to become a full-time political critic. Wang, who was a low-profile member of China’s business elite for years, is now a leading voice among entrepreneurs troubled by the growing ranks of business owners who have suffered under the government’s authoritarian excesses and by signs Beijing wants to further tighten its controls on society.

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    Carl Icahn

    Transocean agrees to deal with Icahn

    Oil driller Transocean has agreed to a deal with billionaire investor Carl Icahn after a months-long proxy fight. The company said Monday that it has agreed to support a dividend of $3 per share and reduce the size of its board. It is also looking to

  •  
    The Tyrannosaurus rex dinosaur Sue.

    Chicago Field Museum’s dinosaur to get cleaning

    The Field Museum’s famous Tyrannosaurus rex dinosaur skeleton, Sue, is getting ready for the holidays. One of the 67-million-year-old dinosaur’s twice yearly cleanings will happen Tuesday morning at the Chicago museum. That’s when geologist Bill Simpson plans to ride a lift around the dinosaur fossil.

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    Name in the ‘from line’ matters in email marketing

    The subject line isn’t what gets your email opened. The from line matters more — assuming that your email list is properly put together, according to Small Business Columnist Jim Kendall.

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    Jen Fisher Books recently opened at 100 E. Irving Park Road in Roselle.

    Jen Fisher Books in Roselle combines books and art

    Jen Fisher Books is a bookstore dealing in used books, original art, notecards and bookmarks. We talk to the owner about her dream in launching the business.

Life & Entertainment

  •  

    Short & Sweet critic Sarah Pouls reviews Wicked

    Critic for the day, Sarah Pouls of Schaumburg, reviews Wicked. A recent graduate of Augustana College, Pouls draws upon her experience as a theater minor to critique the show.

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    Kellie Pickler, “The Woman I Am”

    Kellie Pickler continues evolution on latest LP

    Kellie Pickler, on her new album “The Woman I Am,” merges the tradition-minded sound of her previous album with contemporary country touches in a manner that proves how well the two can blend and still speak to the modern world. Continuing to mature into a top-class country singer, the former “American Idol” competitor has grown from a competent interpreter of others’ songs into an artist with her own vision and style.

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    Men can join the “Movember” movement and grow a mustache in November to support the fight against prostate and testicular cancers.

    Your health: Grow a mustache in fight against cancers
    If you notice more men with mustaches this month, the reason might be “Movember,” a global campaign that encourages men to grow mustaches in November to support the fight against prostate and testicular cancers.

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    Toby McKeehan, a popular Christian musician who performs as TobyMac, will headline Sears Centre Arena in Hoffman Estates on Nov. 23.

    Christian pop music star TobyMac talks early inspirations, rising profile

    Toby McKeehan stands as arguably the biggest star in Christian pop music. Better known as TobyMac, his Hits Deep Tour brings him to the Sears Centre Arena in Hoffman Estates Nov. 23. “I want to draw people in because they love the music,” McKeehan says. “And if they hear something in it that's for them, it makes me happy."

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    Actor Joshua Malina, who plays U.S. attorney David Rosen on “Scandal,” relishes having a presence on Twitter. His tweets can range from biting to witty to (as he described them in a recent interview) “self-promotion and dumb jokes.”

    ‘Scandal’ star enjoys giving good tweet

    It’s not coincidental that the stars of “Scandal” live tweet during episodes. They’re encouraged to do so. When several of the show’s actors recently visited New York to promote the premiere of season three, ABC made sure to book Kerry Washington on a return flight to Los Angeles that offered Wi-Fi. Other cast members had their trips extended so they could be available on the social networking site.

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    “General Hospital” actors Kelly Monaco, center, with, clockwise from front row left, Tyler Christopher, Roger Howarth, Executive Producer Frank Valenti, Jason Thompson and Sean Blakemore in New York. The popular daytime drama celebrates it’s 50th anniversary this year.

    50 years looks good on ABC’s ‘General Hospital’

    A few years ago, ABC’s “General Hospital” was in trouble. Then in February 2012, “One Life to Live” executive producer Frank Valentini and head writer Ron Carlivati joined “GH.” “We were all worried and we had a right to be worried. The show was in a very dark place and Ron and I managed to come in and shake it up,” Valentini said.

  •  
    NBC News president Steve Capus is collaborating with two political pros on an awareness campaign for Yes, the band that enthralled him when he attended their concert as a 16-year-old in Philadelphia in 1979.

    Former NBC news chief now a Yes man

    For eight years as NBC News president, Steve Capus worried about Brian Williams, the “Today” show and rapid changes in the news industry. Now he’s taking time for a passion project: getting Yes into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

  •  
    Fashion designer Georgina Chapman studied costume design with the intent of one day dressing actors in their movies. Her career took a slight turn when she and partner Keren Craig launched the fashion label Marchesa in 2004. Now their gowns are often worn by actressí at red carpet and award ceremonies for their movies.

    Georgina Chapman on fashion, film, ‘Runway’

    Georgina Chapman studied costume design in college with the hope of one day seeing her creations in the movies. That dream took a slight turn when she launched the fashion label Marchesa in 2004 with partner Keren Craig. Now, their designs are frequently worn by actresses at red-carpet movie premieres and award ceremonies.

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    There has been a fivefold increase since 2000 in the number of serious elbow and shoulder injuries among youth baseball and softball players, according to the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine.

    Injuries explode as youths specialize in a single sport

    As more and more kids play the same sport year-round from an early age, they are increasingly vulnerable to injury.A report this year by the sports medicine department at Loyola University of Chicago found that “kids are twice as likely to get hurt if they play just one sport as those who play multiple sports.”

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    Sports injuries by the numbers
    By the numbers 30 million: Children and adolescents who participate in youth sports in the United States3.5 million: Children under age 14 who receive medical treatment for sports injuries each year 2 million: Injuries sustained annually by U.S. high school athletes 500,000: Annual doctor visits by U.S. high school athletes 30,000: U.S. high school athletes hospitalized each year 50: Percentage of all sports injuries to middle school and high school students attributed to overuse 45: Percentage of players ages 13 and 14 who will have arm pain during a single youth baseball season 40: Percentage of all sports-related injuries (treated in hospitals) sustained by children ages 5 to 14 5: Since 2000, there has been a fivefold increase in the number of serious shoulder and elbow injuries among youth baseball and softball players.Sources: www.stopsportsinjuries.org and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  •  
    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 9 percent of U.S. children ages 5 to 17 had received diagnoses of ADHD as of 2009.

    Diagnosing ADHD is anything but an exact science

    Why is it still so hard to diagnose ADHD? Among those given the diagnosis, a small minority suffers extreme symptoms, and in those cases, diagnosis is fairly straightforward. But for the vast majority of children who are not so severely affected or who only partially fit the criteria, symptoms are often blurred, making it much more difficult to assess the disorder.

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    Food challenge is reliable way to test for allergies

    Q: Last month I broke out in hives after eating oysters. I had a blood test, which came back negative for a shellfish allergy. Why does my doctor still want me to do a food challenge?

  •  
    1969 Pontiac Firebird 400

    Pontiac owners travels by air, sea to secure 1969 Firebird

    There’s no bound a classic car enthusiast won’t scale in the pursuit of his or her perfect ride. Mitch Sexner’s journey took him by air, by land and by water before he secured this 1969 Pontiac Firebird convertible.

Discuss

  •  

    Each has responsibility for health insurance
    A Schaumburg letter to the editor: But there is absolutely no doubt that a youngster is going to get injured or sick or pregnant unpredictably. Why would someone think that they do not have the responsibility to meet their obligations at the emergency room, hospitalization, doctor’s fees, etc.?

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    An honor for Wrigley in spite of the Cubs
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: Rolling Stone magazine recently named Wrigley Field the second best “rock stadium” in the United States. You’ll get no arguments from Cubs fans. The Cubs have been getting “rocked” at Wrigley Field for many years!

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    President lied to us about health care
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: I am angry that President Obama clearly lied to us, the American public, when he said we could keep our health plans if we like them. We now know that this was nothing more than a boldfaced lie.

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    Do your homework on Medicare plans
    A letter to the editor: Choosing a Medicare plan can be confusing, challenging and time consuming. But the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services makes it easier for beneficiaries to navigate the Medicare landscape by rating the health plans.

  •  

    Logic not strong suit among Illinois leaders
    A letter to the editor:The state of Illinois has predictably legalized same-sex marriage, which officially declares that homosexual and heterosexual unions enjoy equal legal status and marriage is no longer restricted to male with female. But merely calling an orange an apple doesn’t change the taste of the fruit.

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    Don’t blame Obamacare criticism on racism
    A Mettawa letter to the editor: Now that some aspects of Obamacare are becoming reality, prior supporters and even participants in its creation are expressing doubts about its ability to deliver services as promised.

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    Can’t something be done about skunks?
    Letter to the editor: Barbara Ann Kohn of Palatine says skunks have at times made her home virtually uninhabitable and asks, can't something be done?

  •  

    ‘North Pole’ a great day for children
    Letter to the editor: Charles Severns is excited to be a part of another Operation North Pole this year - a great day for children.

  •  

    No garden plots at Frontier Park, please
    Letter to the editor: Charles Fredericks ofArlington Heights is strognly opposed to having garden plots at Frontier Park.

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    Grateful for help with GEM project
    To the editor: Cynthia Greenwood reports that Southminster Presbyterian's community project was a big success - in no small part thanks to the local businesses that donated supplies or sold them at low cost.

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    Has forest district gotten off course?
    Has forest district gotten off course?Walking through the forest preserves on a sunny day, it is easy to understand why people have supported multiple referendums to purchase and preserve natural areas. But it is not enough to vote for preservation; you have to insist on it.In Kane County, a number of issues have raised the question of “mission drift” from the original intent of the Downstate Forest Preserve Act of 1913 to preserve natural forests in their natural state. Roughly a third of the forest preserve district’s holdings do not meet the definition of natural lands. Instead, we have stadiums, golf courses, ice rinks, and athletic fields. Leases and IGA’s with other agencies have turned over use of some “preserved” land for parks, Frisbee golf courses, community gardens, and a model airplane field, among others. These have little connection to the core mission of the district, which is to preserve the nature of Kane County.The district also has been generous with taxpayer money. The recent donation of $2 million to Aurora for the construction of a pedestrian bridge in the new River Edge Park has received very little scrutiny or news coverage. How and why was money intended for preservation used for a development project not even on forest preserve district land? The meeting minutes where that agreement was originally approved in February 2010 show no discussion and no dissent. A $2 million expenditure merits a substantial discussion.The Elgin Area League of Women Voters has posted the 2013 Kane County Forest Preserve District Study on their website at http://lwvelginarea.org/. If you support our forest preserves, read the report and then ask your elected representative why the KCFPD should be functioning as a park district or a land bank for other agencies. Then vote accordingly in the next election.Carol GromSleepy Hollow

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    Fifty years to finish Elgin-O’Hare?
    A Bensenville letter to the editor: Really, Mr. Cronin, you consider taking 50 years to finally break ground for the Elgin-O’Hare Western Access project making history? I guess, in a sense, it is because that will mean anything that takes less time will really be history?

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    Twisting the knife in small businesses
    A Glen Ellyn letter to the editor: As though the last five years haven’t been challenging and difficult enough for small business in Illinois. Each complicated government fee and regulation further twists the knife in the belly of small business.

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