Daily Archive : Monday July 23, 2012

News

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    Daily Herald file, 2010 Millburn West School.

    Millburn West to become middle school, Central to become elementary school

    For the first time, all Millburn Elementary District 24 students in the same grade level will attend the same school. Starting this school year, instead of having two K-8 schools, the district will convert Millburn Central to a K-5 elementary school and Millburn West to a 6-8 middle school.

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    Work continues on resurfacing of Route 53 in Addison and Itasca. Here, workers install reinforcements for new pavement north of Army Trail Road.

    Heat delays Route 53 work but not deadline

    The $45.5 million project to reconstruct Route 53 in parts of Addison and Itasca is on pace to meet its latest deadline, despite snags caused by, among other things, extreme heat. The project, overseen by the Illinois Department of Transportation, will rebuild Route 53 — known locally as Rohlwing Road — between Army Trail Road in Addison and the Elgin-O'Hare Expressway in Itasca.

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    The FBI says this image shows Zion resident Larry D. Williams robbing a Waukegan TCF Bank branch inside the Jewel-Osco at 3124 N. Lewis Ave. on Wednesday.

    FBI: Robber told Waukegan teller, 'I will pop you'

    A Zion man has been charged in the robbery of a bank branch inside a Waukegan grocery story. Authorities say he told a teller, "I will pop you," while holding what appeared to be a gun in a plastic bag before fleeing with more than $4,500.

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    Ramp from Tri-State to I-290 closing for repairs

    The Illinois tollway will close one of its most heavily used ramps this weekend for repairs. The ramp takes cars from the southbound Tri-State to the westbound I-290 in Elmhurst.

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    Steven Luellen

    Parolee arrested after police chase in Elgin

    A parolee who was released from jail less than two months ago was arrested Monday after leading Elgin police on a chase during a traffic stop.

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    Mundelein: No chickens, bees in backyards

    Beehives and chicken coops will not be making their way into backyards in Mundelein just yet. A proposed zoning ordinance that would have allowed the animals was tabled at the village's regular meeting Monday in a 4-2 vote. Residents disagreed on the plan. "Ten percent of the population is allergic to bees," one man said. "Mundelein residents could die from anaphylactic shock. Why would we take...

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    Rendering of plans for the Wheeling Town Center

    Wheeling Town Center concept plan approved

    Developers Urban R2 Co. presented a revised plan in Wheeling on Monday that revolved around a large theater company taking would take up more than a fourth of the available retail square footage and serving as the anchor for the anticipated town center on the former Wickes Furniture site along Dundee Road."The biggest challenge was getting an entertainment anchor and we've achieved that and we're...

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    Pat Quinn

    What are Quinn's options on gambling?

    The clock is ticking on gambling expansion. Before the summer is over, Gov. Pat Quinn will almost certainly act on controversial gambling legislation that — if approved — will set up 1,200 slot machines at Arlington Park and five new Illinois casinos, including in Lake County, Chicago and the south suburbs.

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    Geneva school board likely to add 2nd grade section

    Mill Creek Elementary School will likely get a third second-grade classroom this fall, as many parents hoped for, to avoid having 28 and 29 students in a classroom. But it is guaranteed only if current enrollment holds or increases.

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    While growing up, Sally played competitive tennis. She was nationally ranked as a junior, played on the Westlake High School tennis team (pictured here), and led Stanford's tennis team in college.

    Images: Sally Ride 1951-2012
    Sally Ride, the first American woman to fly in space, has died of pancreatic cancer. She was 61.

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    4 plans pitched for Lake Zurich downtown

    Lake Zurich officials are coming closer to finding a development group for their long-delayed downtown redevelopment project. Four groups presented their plans Monday night for Block A — the lakeside space on Main Street across from the promenade — to the village board in a public forum.

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    Sally Ride

    Sally Ride, cosmic trailblazer, dead at 61

    Space used to be a man's world. Then came Sally Ride, who blazed a cosmic trail for U.S. women into orbit. With a pitch perfect name out of a pop song refrain, she joined the select club of American space heroes the public knew by heart: Shepard, Glenn, Armstrong and Aldrin. Ride, the first American woman in orbit, died Monday at age 61.

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    Hoffman Estates to start construction on intersection

    Drivers can expect to see construction of new turn lanes and traffic signals at the intersection of Beverly and Higgins roads in Hoffman Estates soon. The Hoffman Estates village board approved a joint agreement with the Illinois Department of Transportation Monday that sets the village's estimated share of a $786,000 intersection improvement project at $18,400.

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    Prospect Heights Boy Scout pitches cleanup effort to city council

    A local Boy Scout hopes to help clean up a Prospect Heights area cluttered with dead wood and an invasive shrub. Kristine Klingner spoke to the Prospect Heights City Council Monday night about the plan to clear the South Slough near Hillcrest Lake that her son, Kristopher, hopes to carry out in spring of 2013. "People have dumped some of their woods into the forest, adding to the natural...

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    Dist. 300 updates crisis handbook

    Community Unit District 300's crisis handbook has always effectively prepared administrators, staff and students for critical situations and adequately outlined expectations for dealing with incidents such as the death of a student or teacher. But Gary Chester, the district safety officer, said the plan was not clear on what the school or district should do in order to meet the emotional and...

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    Tom Voltaggio

    District 87 may add ads to scoreboards

    A majority of respondents to an online survey favor adding advertising to scoreboards at Glenbard High School District 87 football fields and gymnasiums — but one school board member cautioned Monday that the district should tread lightly. Trustee Tom Voltaggio brought up the controversy over installing lights at Memorial Field in Glen Ellyn. "I think we heard that fairly clearly in the...

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    Hot weather’s effect on trees will cost St. Charles taxpayers

    Bad weather will directly impact St. Charles taxpayers' pocketbooks now that city officials are prepared to spend nearly $122,000 to save hundreds of trees from the consistently hot, dry conditions this summer.

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    Evan Jager sports the same hairstyle now as he did when he won the 3,200-meter run during the state track finals in 2007.

    Jacobs grad Evan Jager says hair stays for Olympics

    Evan Jager, a 2007 Jacobs High School grad, is ready for the Olympics but not ready to cut his hair. He admitted shaving his head could possibly cut seconds from his time in the steeplechase but said, "I think I'm running fast enough to not cut it."

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    In this courtroom sketch, Joel Brodsky, left, attorney for Drew Peterson, second from left, listen as Will County State’s Attorney James Glasgow addresses Judge Edward Burmila during the first day of jury selection in Peterson’s murder trial Monday in Joliet.

    Jurors familiar with Peterson

    Drew Peterson formally introduced himself to would-be jurors Monday in his long-delayed murder trial, but it was clear many of them already were familiar with the former Bolingbrook police sergeant known to make crass jokes in the media. Peterson, 58, is charged with killing his third wife, Kathleen Savio, in 2004.

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    Wood Dale man dies after falling from tree

    A 43-year-old Wood Dale man died early Sunday morning, just hours after falling from a tree in a wooded area, according to the Cook County medical examiner's office.

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    The Gander Mountain store in Aurora, Colo., is where the gunman in Friday’s movie theater shooting allegedly purchased one of his weapons.

    Colorado shooting suspect used Internet for arsenal

    DENVER — In a world where Amazon can track your next book purchase and you must show ID to buy some allergy medicine, James Holmes spent months stockpiling thousands of bullets and head-to-toe ballistic gear without raising any red flags with authorities.

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    Twenty four-year-old Paula Morgan was found dead after an early morning Sunday fire at this home on the 1000 block of South Ahrens Avenue in Lombard.

    Lombard fire victim was devoted to her son

    A woman found dead after a Lombard fire was remembered as a "loving, caring" mother dedicated to her 6-year-old son on Monday as investigators questioned a suspect in the case. Paula Morgan, 24, was pronounced dead after fire tore through the home she shared with her mother and child on the 1000 block of South Ahrens Avenue about 4 a.m. Sunday.

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    Jessica Dunteman, 9, of Big Rock rests with one of her hogs before their turn to show during the first day of the Kane County Fair in St. Charles Wednesday.

    Images: The Best of the 2012 Kane County Fair
    Our best images from the 2012 Kane County Fair in St. Charles.

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    A Gurnee woman was charged by Arlington Heights Police with battery, felony criminal damage to government property, driving under the influence, and traffic violations after she reportedly kicked the rear driver's-side window while sitting in a squad car, struggled during the arrest, and hit an officer in the face.

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    Idea for ECC safety training center gets early OK in Burlington

    Elgin Community College and the village of Burlington are making progress toward the construction of a public safety training facility in Burlington. The village board recently approved prelimary plans for the site off of Plank Road.

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    DuPage board candidate bounced from ballot

    Carol Bartucci's name won't appear on the November ballot as a DuPage County Board candidate because almost all of the 3,330 signatures on her petition were deemed invalid by the county's electoral board. Meanwhile, the DuPage County Election Commission is trying to determine whether it will take further action against the Addison resident.

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    Barrington’s inaugural Summerfest July 27-28

    In conjunction with the annual Barrington Sidewalk Sale Days which runs from July 26 to 28, McGonigal's Pub is adding to Barrington's downtown entertainment experience by sponsoring the Barrington Summerfest. This two-day event is scheduled for Friday, July 27 and Saturday, July 28 and will feature live music, food, drinks and family fun.

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    Maritza Padilla-Gomez, an Army specialist and former Round Lake Beach resident, who was killed July 13 in a traffic accident in Georgia.

    22-year-old former Round Lake Beach resident killed in crash

    Services will be held this week for Maritza Padilla-Gomez, 22, an Army specialist and former Round Lake Beach resident, who was killed in a traffic accident in Georgia. Padilla-Gomez, a soldier stationed at Fort Benning, Ga., was one of two soldiers killed July 13 in a three-vehicle accident in eastern Georgia about 50 miles west of Augusta, according to the Georgia Department of Public Safety.

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    Two men grabbed a 22- karat gold rope style necklace from one woman's neck and two 22-karat gold necklaces from a second woman on the sidewalk on the 900 block of Pacific Avenue around 7:55 p.m. July 17 in Hoffman Estates. According to reports, the men pushed one of the women to the ground and pulled her necklaces from her neck.

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    Elgin police expected to get raise

    Elgin Police Department union members approved a new contract that includes raises and lasts for two years, following up on last year's zero percentage raise deal. Now it's up to the City Council to give final approval, which should come during Wednesday's meeting.

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    Burglars pried a kitchen window, ransacked the dining room and master bedroom and stole jewelry valued at $3,360 out of a home for sale on the 1500 block of North Pendleton Court between 11 a.m. July 9 and 1:40 a..m. July 13.

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    Thieves cut the locks on four bicycles in a rack at a condominium complex on the 900 block of East Old Willow Road in Prospect Heights between 2:25 and 2:35 a.m. July 11 and stole a red 6-speed bike, a green 6-speed bike, a white 6-speed bike and a black bicycle. Value was estimated at $410.

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    Judge says Kane, sheriff guilty in retaliation case

    A judge has found Kane County and the Kane County Sheriff's Department guilty of unfair labor practice for its treatment of the court security officers' union president.

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    Children’s advocate says Penn State should focus on healing victims

    With so much attention on sanctions against Penn State and its football program, it's important not to overlook the victims. "Obscured in all of this is kids do recover from being abused, if they get some help and the proper support," said Mark Parr, executive director of the Children's Advocacy Center in Hoffman Estates. "But it's got to be made accessible to the victims in a timely way and I...

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    Rollins closure extended

    The railroad crossing at Rollins Road west of Route 83 in Round Lake Beach will remain closed for two more days until the morning of Thursday, July 26.

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    CASA Lake County swears in new advocates

    CASA Lake County has announced the July 19 swearing in of seven women and men as advocates and as officers of the Lake County Juvenile Court.

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    Police, Crime Stoppers seek tips in Lake County hit-and-run

    Lake County Crime Stoppers officials said they will distribute fliers and will run a booth with the Lake County Sheriff's Office during the Lake County Fair to continue publicizing the fatal hit-and-run crash that killed Gabriella Drozdz, 18, of Lake Zurich a year ago.

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    Carpentersville might weigh in on FOIA opinion

    Carpentersville trustees Tuesday are scheduled to vote on whether they should support another town's fight to keep private the messages that public officials send at meetings on their personal electronic devices.

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    EIU, faculty reach tentative contract deal

    Eastern Illinois University and its faculty union have reached a tentative labor agreement that will go up for a vote after the faculty returns to campus for the fall semester. The four-year agreement includes a 1.5 percent annual salary increase

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    The courtroom where suspect James Holmes made his first appearance this morning.

    Colorado shooting suspect dazed in court

    The Colorado movie theater shooting suspect showed little emotion as he made his first court appearance handcuffed with reddish orange hair. The suspect was wide-eyed, frowning and unshaven as he sat staring down. At one point he closed his eyes as a judge spoke.He appeared after being accused of the shooting rampage at a Colorado movie theater that killed 12 people and injured 58 others.

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    Court: School graduations in church crossed line

    A federal appeals court says a pair of southeastern Wisconsin high schools violated the U.S. Constitution when they held graduations in a church. An anonymous group of students and parents challenged Brookfield Central and Brookfield East's use of Elmbrook Church for graduations, arguing the ceremonies violated the separation of church and state.

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    Former Chicago police Cmdr. Jon Burge was convicted in 2010 of lying about the torture of suspects and is serving 4½ years in prison.

    Chicago may settle 2 suits in police torture case

    A Chicago City Council committee has signed off on settlements in two lawsuits filed by men who allege they were victims of police torture during the tenure of former Chicago Police Cmdr. Jon Burge.

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    Michael Hogan resigned as University of Illinois president under pressure from faculty unhappy over his management style and plans for the university. He became a history professor when his resignation as president took effect at the end of June but is first spending a year on sabbatical.

    Hogan to be top-paid employee at UIS

    Former University of Illinois President Michael Hogan's new $285,100 professor's salary makes him the highest-paid employee on the school's Springfield campus, including the chancellor and vice president.

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    Horses graze at the ranch owned by Rita Crundwell outside of Dixon on April 20. Crundwell has pleaded not guilty to charges alleging she stole more than $53 million from the small northern Illinois city to pay for a lavish lifestyle and create a horse-breeding operation.

    Dixon’s indicted ex-comptroller’s 400 horses to be sold

    Prosecutors say more than 400 horses that belong to a former city comptroller in Dixon accused of stealing millions in public money will be sold by Sept. 30.

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    This undated photo provided by the Larimer family shows John Larimer. Relatives have identified Larimer, a U.S. Navy sailor, as one of the victims killed by a gunman at a showing of the new Batman movie July 20, 2012, in Aurora, Colo.

    Algonquin woman says theater victim from Crystal Lake saved her life

    An Algonquin woman who was in the Colorado movie theater where a gunman opened fire killing 12 people says John Larimer of Crystal Lake saved her life by taking a bullet for her that night. She told WBBM Newsradio that Larimer “held my head, and protected my whole body with his, and saved me.”

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    Employees at Sensata Technologies in Freeport on June 18 protest the loss of employment to oversees workers. Sensata is owned by Bain Capital, the firm presidential candidate Mitt Romney once led. Employees have appealed to Romney to intervene and have also tried to get President Barack Obama involved, too, suggesting the two debate at the site in town where Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas once tangled.

    Why a blue-collar Illinois town wants to host a presidential debate

    Since early 2011, Cheryl Randecker and her co-workers have known their jobs making electronic sensors at a factory in Freeport would be lost to China. Some even were asked to train their replacements, who were flown in from overseas. But with the presidential election campaign in full swing, workers at the Sensata Technologies plant came up with a novel idea, a Hail Mary pass to save their jobs:...

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    Illinois power broker William Cellini arrives at the federal building Nov. 1, 2011, in Chicago to hear the verdict in his corruption trial. On Monday, Cellini’s attorneys filed paperwork saying the once-powerful Illinois political player should get probation for his role in the scheme. Federal prosecutors want to sentence the Springfield Republican to up to eight years for conspiring to commit extortion and soliciting a bribe.

    Cellini’s lawyers want lesser sentence

    William Cellini's lawyers argued Monday that the once-powerful Illinois political player should get probation for his role in a scheme to try to get a campaign donation from a Hollywood producer. "Rather than take an honest look at the post-trial landscape and evaluate what might be a just and equitable sentence for the 77-year-old Cellini, the government shrouds itself in bombastic drama about...

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    Quin passes stiffer penalties for misusing disability placard

    Gov. Pat Quinn signed two measures Monday designed to stop people from misusing parking placards meant for the disabled. "Citizens brought the issue forward. They spoke to the press, (which) at its very best, wrote stories about abuse of placards," Quinn said. Misusing parking placards meant for people with disabilities "is really just plain wrong," he said.

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    An expert summoned by concerned residents determined Monday these swans are safe in a pond at Steeple Chase Golf Club in Mundelein.

    Concern for swans brings expert to Mundelein golf course

    Concern over pond conditions for two wild swans living at Mundelein's Steeplechase Golf Club prompted nearby residents to summon an expert to survey the situation Monday. North Barrington-based Knox Swan and Dog donated its services at the 203-acre course. Company owner Bob Knox said despite the drought, the water is deep enough for the swans.

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    James R. Starr

    Round Lake Park traffic stop nets man wanted on Arizona parole violation

    Round Lake Park police say a routine traffic stop led to the arrest of a convicted sex offender who was wanted in Arizona on a parole violation in a separate case. James R. Starr, 43, of the 2300 block of Route 12 in Spring Grove, is being held in the Lake County jail awaiting extradition to Arizona.

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    Schaumburg Village Trustee George Dunham

    Schaumburg rethinks rejection of electricity aggregation

    Schaumburg is having second thoughts about putting a referendum for electricity aggregation on the November ballot, after deciding to forgo the measure approved in many other suburbs. On Tuesday, village board members will consider a recommendation by its Finance, Legal and General Government Committee to direct staff to begin preparing the documentation for a referendum.

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    Puerto Rican cultural items will be for sale during the 41st annual Aurora Puerto Rican Heritage Festival, which runs 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday, July 28, and 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday, July 29.

    Aurora Puerto Rican fest adds talent contest

    The addition of a new feature to the 41st annual Aurora Puerto Rican Heritage Festival came out of necessity. Organizers needed more performers to take the stage, but couldn't afford to pay any more musical acts. "I thought How about we just get our own people together and fill the gaps between performers,'" organizer Mirna Lopez-Freitag said. And Aurora's Got Talent...

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    2006: Hot temperatures do little to discourage the midway crowd.

    Memories and new adventures await when DuPage County Fair opens

    There's hardly anything more American than apple pie, fireworks or a hot summer day spent at the county fair. The nostalgia practically knocks you off your feet — commence the childhood memories of your father taking you by the hand as you hold cotton candy in the other, or of the Ferris wheel that seemed like it touched heaven. And the beautiful thing about the county fair is that it...

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    Fire protection district will update conditions Aug. 1

    The Fox River and Countryside Fire/Rescue District has banned outdoor burning in Wayne, Campton and St. Charles townships, and also in the villages of Wayne and Campton Hills. The fire chief said fireworks have also caused several recent fires that threatened homes.

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    Armed police officers patrol at Stratford station near the Olympic Park on Monday in London. The city will host the 2012 Summer Olympics which opens Friday.

    G4S replaced for Newcastle Olympic security

    The security firm G4S will no longer be providing protection at the Olympic stadium in Newcastle, city officials said Monday, citing concerns over the troubled company's shortfall in recruiting guards.

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    A firefighter tries to extinguish a wildfire by a house in La Jonquera, near the border with France, Spain, Sunday.

    2 dead in seaside cliff fall fleeing Spain fire

    As a wildfire closed in on them, five members of a vacationing French family abandoned their car and stumbled through thick smoke down a steep hillside in a desperate bid to reach the waters of the Mediterranean. Instead of a beach, they found themselves at the edge of a cliff with no choice but to fall or jump.

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    In this Oct. 22, 2011 file photo, Penn State coach Joe Paterno walks off the field after warmups before an NCAA college football game against Northwestern in Evanston.

    Penn State football slammed with NCAA sanctions

    Penn State football was all but dismantled Monday by an NCAA ruling that wiped away 14 years of coach Joe Paterno's victories and imposed a mountain of fines and penalties, crippling a program whose pedophile assistant coach spent years molesting children, sometimes on school property.

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    Philippe Moreau, left, and Karen Clementi of Deuchler Environmental take algae samples earlier this month from the Fox River near Fabyan Forest Preserve in Geneva. They were one of several crews working as part of a low-flow study of the Fox River conducted by the Illinois State Water Survey. They had been waiting six years for the water level to be low enough to conduct the study.

    Drought a boon for Fox River pollution study

    The drought is proving advntageous for studying the effects of runoff on the health of the Fox River, as researchers can finally see what happens under low-flow conditions. They've been waiting at least five years for this.

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    Investigators are trying to figure out what caused a deadly fire at a home in Lombard.

    Woman, 24, ID’d after fatal Lombard fire

    Investigators are trying to figure out what caused a deadly fire at a home in Lombard.The home is boarded up after siding melted, the garage was burned out, and debris was scattered throughout the lawn.The state’s attorney’s office is now involved in the case, and police are being very tight-lipped.

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    Philly to retry priest after abuse trial deadlock

    Philadelphia prosecutors will retry an ousted priest on an attempted rape charge after a jury deadlock. The Rev. James Brennan says the decision reopens wounds that were starting to heal.

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    NASA says test flight of new heat shield a success

    ATLANTIC, Va. — NASA says an experimental heat shield for future spacecraft landings has successfully survived a test launch that brought it through the earth’s atmosphere at speeds of up to 7,600 mph.

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    Police seek paddleboater for info on missing Iowa cousins

    Investigators searching for two missing Iowa cousins say they want to interview a person who was paddleboating on a lake near where they disappeared 10 days ago.

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    Police: Ariz. girls could face false report charge

    Prosecutors are expected to decide this week whether to file charges against two Arizona sisters who police say called them claiming to be a missing Arizona girl. The 9-year-old and 11-year-old girls were arrested over the weekend on suspicion of false reporting to authorities.

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    Lupe Diaz, right, sister of Manuel Diaz, gets a hug from Theresa Smith during a protest in front of the Anaheim Police Department Sunday in Anaheim, Calif. Manuel Diaz, an allegedly unarmed man, was shot by Anaheim Police on Saturday, The Orange County Register reports. Smith said her son was also killed by police two years ago.

    Calif. police shooting stirs protests for a 2nd night

    An Anaheim officer-involved shooting that left an unarmed man dead and led to a violent clash between witnesses and police has stirred anger for a second night. Protesters gathered near the shooting scene Sunday night and expressed their outrage by setting fire to a Dumpster and moving it into the street numerous times as police monitored the scene from a helicopter.

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    Vehicles destroyed in a flood pile up in a ditch in Fangshan district of Beijing, China. As China’s flood-ravaged capital dealt with the aftermath of the heaviest rain in six decades Monday, including the deaths of 37 people, questions were being raised about whether the city’s push for modernization came at the expense of basic infrastructure such as drainage networks.

    Beijing rains kill 37, raise infrastructure debate

    BEIJING — As China’s flood-ravaged capital dealt with the aftermath of the heaviest rain in six decades Monday, including the deaths of 37 people, questions were being raised about whether the city’s push for modernization came at the expense of basic infrastructure such as drainage networks.

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    Hundreds of protesters march toward the Philippine Congress to coincide with the third State of the Nation address of Philippine President Benigno Aquino III Monday, northeast of Manila, Philippines.

    Philippines to boost defense, won’t yield to China

    President Benigno Aquino III said Monday that the Philippines won't back down from a South China Sea dispute with China and that his country's military would soon get dozens of new aircraft and ships for maritime defense.

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    Joan Walters studies a letter written to Abraham Lincoln as she transcribes it at the Papers of Abraham Lincoln at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library in Springfield, Ill. Walters said the letters all have varying degrees of grammar, punctuation and shorthand, as evidenced by the greeting, “Hon Abram Lincoln.”

    Volunteers transcribe Lincoln letters

    Joan Walters calls it "the best history class I've ever had in my entire life."Walters, a former budget director and public aid chief in the Gov. Jim Edgar administration, began April 3 to transcribe letters both to and from Abraham Lincoln as a volunteer with The Papers of Abraham Lincoln project.

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    Egypt allowing Palestinians freer entry

    Egyptian and Palestinian officials say Egypt is allowing freer entry for Palestinians into the country, in an unprecedented move that eases long held travel restrictions particularly on Gazans but caused confusion among security agencies there.

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    Flames ravage the forest near the highway in La Jonquera, near the border with France, Spain, Sunday.

    2 jump to death in the sea fleeing Spain fire

    A vacationing French family of five jumped off a seaside cliff in a desperate attempt to escape a raging wildfire, with the father and one of his children plummeting some 165 feet to their deaths, authorities said Monday. Flames forced the family and about 150 other tourists out of their cars Sunday night as most were returning home to France.

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    Ailing crane that became nuisance is on the mend

    An ailing sandhill crane that became a pest in a southern Indiana subdivision after being left behind by its flock is now on the mend at a wildlife rehabilitation center.

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    2 officers injured in W. Ind. shooting standoff

    Indiana State Police say a state trooper and a deputy town marshal were slightly injured when a man fired shots at officers responding to a domestic battery call in western Indiana.

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    Oshkosh EAA grounds a sea of Cessnas, Bonanzas, Piper Cubs

    The fields around the Experimental Aircraft Association's AirVenture have become a sea of Cessnas, Bonanzas, Piper Cubs and Mooneys.

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    Boy, 10, accidentally shot to death by sister, 7

    Authorities in southern Illinois are investigating the death of a 10-year-old boy who was accidentally shot by his 7-year-old sister.

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    Plane carrying 4 lands safely on S. Calif. freeway

    Authorities say a plane carrying four people that landed on a Southern California freeway ran out of gas. The 1968 Piper landed safely at about 11:30 p.m. Sunday on the southbound lanes of Interstate 15 in Escondido.

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    Anne Marie Hochhalter, 30, bottom, a paralyzed victim of the Columbine High School tragedy more than 12 years ago, and her friend Roxy Chesser, 30, second from right, attend a prayer vigil Sunday in Aurora, Colo., held to remember the lost and injured in Friday’s mass shooting at a movie theater.

    Vigil for Colo. victims draws Columbine survivor

    Anne Marie Hochhalter sat in the front row of a vigil for the victims of the Colorado theater massacre. Her connections to those wounded in the attack early Friday at an Aurora movie theater was closer than most. Paralyzed in the 1999 Columbine massacre, the 30-year-old Hochhalter said she can offer a little hope to the victims' loved ones and the survivors.

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    2nd bear seen at Pa. mall where another got stuck

    Officials say a second bear has been spotted at a suburban Pittsburgh mall where another bear was captured after getting stuck inside a department store. The latest bear first emerged near an Olive Garden restaurant at the Pittsburgh Mills mall in Frazer around 11:45 p.m. Saturday. That was less than two hours after officials tranquilized a smaller bear that had gotten inside a Sears store.

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    A single-vehicle crash in rural South Texas Sunday killed at least 13 people and injured 10 others, all passengers in the truck.

    Authorities: 13 dead after truck crashes in Texas

    Investigators say a single-vehicle wreck in rural South Texas has left 13 people dead and 10 hurt. At least 23 people were crammed into the bed and cab of the pickup truck when it veered off a highway and crashed into trees Sunday evening in Berclair, about 100 miles southeast of San Antonio.

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    The house of a man and a woman whose decapitated bodies were pulled from the Detroit River and a creek in Detroit is shown in Allen Park, Mich., Friday.

    Man due in court charged with dismembering Mich. couple

    A 39-year-old man is due in court Monday, charged with shooting a couple with whom he was staying in suburban Detroit, chopping off their heads, hands and feet and dumping their bodies in a river.

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    Cargill Beef recalls 30,000 pounds of ground beef

    Hannaford Supermarkets is alerting consumers that Cargill Beef is voluntarily recalling 29,339 pounds of ground beef that may contain salmonella. The 85-percent-lean ground beef was produced at Cargill's plant in Wyalusing, Pa., on May 25, and repackaged for sale to consumers by customers of the Maine-based grocery chain.

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    John Larimer, killed in the Aurora, Colo., shootings, was a Crystal Lake South High School graduate with a good sense of right and wrong, friends and family say.

    Weekend in review: Crystal Lake sailor killed in Colorado

    Crystal Lake community remembers sailor killed in Aurora, Colorado, shooting. A Cary native and Lake Bluff resident carried teen out of Colorado theater. Ron Santo is inducted into baseball's Hall of Fame. Derailments are a fact of life in the suburbs. Divorce expo coming to Naperville. Video shows beating at Lisle store.

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    Debbie McCann, whose mother survived the Oct. 25, 1952, Argyle Hotel fire, speaks at the graveside ceremony for John Minich, the firefighter who died after saving her mother, at All Saints Cemetery in Des Plaines. Cemetery employee John Stewart is on the left.

    Firefighter recognized in Des Plaines almost 60 years after his death

    No one knows how John Minich ended up in a grave with no headstone in All Saints Cemetery in Des Plaines but that is rectified now. The Chicago firefighter died almost 60 years ago, collapsing after rescuing a very pregnant woman from a residential hotel fire on the North Side. Debbie McCann was born 12 days later and grew up hearing her mother talk about how she wouldn't be alive without Minich.

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    Rail cars burn after a hazardous materials spill caused by a derailment in Tiskilwa in October.

    Most derailments are harmless. But what about the one that isn't?

    Railroads in Illinois carried 437.1 million tons of freight in 2009, of which 7 percent or 30.6 million tons were classified as hazardous materials. Most of it makes the trip safely, but what happens when trains containing hazardous materials derail? “Bad things can leak out and go into the groundwater. These are real issues if a tanker car catches fire,” said Northwestern University...

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    Dawn Patrol: Santo in Hall; latest from Colorado

    Algonquin woman says Crystal Lake native killed in Aurora, Colo., shooting had shielded her from gunfire. Ron Santo is in baseball's Hall of Fame. Naperville to host a divorce expo. Top 10 finalists in Suburban Chicago's Got Talent put on a show in Arlington Heights.

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    Chris Heidorn

    Milton Twp. debate: Political crony or valued employee?

    Is Ralph Hinkle a dedicated township employee who's transformed a fledgling emergency response program into an army of hundreds of lifesaving volunteers? Or is he a patronage worker who campaigned for GOP candidates on township time and took advantage of his government credit card and cellphone? Local Republicans — including a former gubernatorial candidate — are fighting about...

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    John Lenz, 6, of Maple Park attacks his strawberry ice cream cone during the first day of the Kane County Fair in St. Charles Wednesday. He’s a 4-H member who showed sheep earlier in the day.

    Images: The Week in Pictures
    This edition of The Week In Pictures features festivals, concerts, hot weather and the Kane County Fair.

Sports

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    White Sox first baseman Paul Konerko, catcher A.J. Pierzynski and shortstop Alexei Ramirez celebrate Monday night’s victory. Konerko got the offense rolling with a 3-run homer in the first inning

    White Sox relocate the power switch

    The White Sox did just about everything right in Monday night's 7-4 win over the Twins in front of a big crowd at U.S. Cellular Field. Paul Konerko, Adam Dunn and Alex Rios homered, starter Gavin Floyd pitched well in his return from the disabled list and the defense turned 5 double plays.

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    Los Angeles pitcher Chad Billingsley allowed a run and four hits in six innings Monday in St. Louis to win for the first time since June 10.

    Billingsley comes off DL to beat Cardinals 5-3

    Chad Billingsley returned from the disabled list with a strong outing that ended a five-start losing streak and Luis Cruz hit a three-run homer as the Los Angeles Dodgers beat the St. Louis Cardinals 5-3 Monday night in 101-degree heat for their fifth straight victory.

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    The ball ricochets off Rangers starting pitcher Scott Feldman for a single by Boston’s Jacoby Ellsbury during the third inning Monday in Arlington, Texas.

    Feldman delivers for Rangers in 9-1 win over Red Sox

    Scott Feldman, starting after Roy Oswalt was scratched with back tightness, threw seven strong innings to lead the Texas Rangers to a 9-1 victory over the Boston Red Sox on Monday night.

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    Ryan Dempster

    Dempster to Atlanta? Not so fast

    It’s most likely a matter of when, not if, the Cubs will trade ace pitcher Ryan Dempster. That “when” was not Monday, at least not technically. A flurry of Internet and Twitter activity dominated the afternoon and the Atlanta Braves’ website reported that the Cubs and the Braves had agreed to trade Dempster to Atlanta — but it hasn't happened yet.

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    Alabama running back Trent Richardson, right, was selected by the Cleveland Browns as the third pick overall in the NFL draft in April.

    Browns sign RB Trent Richardson

    On the eve of Cleveland's rookies reporting to training camp, the Browns signed running back Trent Richardson to a four-year, $20.5 million contract and can now turn their attention to getting a deal done with quarterback Brandon Weeden.

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    Washington’s Bryce Harper hits a tiebreaking RBI single in the 10th inning against the Mets Monday night in New York.

    Harper’s HR, key single in 10th lift Nats over Mets

    Bryce Harper homered his first time up in New York, then hit a tiebreaking single to key a six-run burst in the 10th that sent the Washington Nationals over the Mets 8-2 Monday night.

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    Marlins starting pitcher Josh Johnson retired the first 14 batters he faced before Atlanta’s Brian McCann singled in the fifth inning Monday night in Miami.

    Johnson, Bonifacio lead Marlins over Braves 2-1

    Josh Johnson pitched six scoreless innings and Emilio Bonifacio homered to lead the Florida Marlins to a 2-1 win over the Atlanta Braves on Monday night.

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    White Sox first baseman Paul Konerko (14), catcher A.J. Pierzynski and shortstop Alexei Ramirez celebrate the White Sox’s 7-4 win Monday over the Minnesota Twins at U.S. Cellular Field.

    Sox give Floyd 3 homers, victory

    Paul Konerko and Alex Rios also homered off Twins left-hander Francisco Liriano to help the White Sox win in their first home game following a 3-7 road trip after the All-Star break that knocked them out of first place in the AL Central.

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    Oakland’s Jemile Weeks (19), Yoenis Cespedes (52) and Coco Crisp celebrate a 2-1 victory over New York on Saturday at home. The low-budget A’s swept the four-game series against the $200 million Yankees.

    Oakland A’s playing ‘Moneyball’ again

    Baseball's most frugal franchise is becoming a must-see attraction again. The Oakland A's are a majors-best 14-2 in July and coming off a stunning four-game sweep of the high-priced New York Yankees to move into a tie for the final American League wild card spot.

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    The Phillies swarm around Ty Wigginton after his sacrifice fly scored Erik Kratz in the bottom of the ninth inning Monday night to beat Milwaukee.

    Phillies rally to beat Brewers

    Ty Wigginton hit a sacrifice fly to cap a four-run rally in the ninth inning against Francisco Rodriguez and lift the Philadelphia Phillies to a 7-6 victory over the Milwaukee Brewers on Monday night.

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    White Sox starting pitcher John Danks delivers during the second inning of a baseball game against the Baltimore Orioles on Tuesday, April 17, 2012, in Chicago.

    White Sox’ GM sees Danks as key ‘addition’

    Injured starting pitcher John Danks has been playing long toss with no soreness in his shoulder. Danks is scheduled to throw on the side Tuesday, and White Sox general manager Kenny Williams is hoping to have the left-hander back in the rotation in late August.

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    White Sox’ GM could be done dealing

    White Sox general manager Kenny Williams has already added Kevin Youkilis and Brett Myers in trades. He is always looking to wheel and deal, but Williams is not likely to make any more moves before the July 31 nonwaiver deadline.

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    The Indians’ Johnny Damon keeps his eyes on a fly ball hit by the Orioles’ Wilson Betemit in the fifth inning Monday in Cleveland.

    Indians avoid 4-game sweep by beating Orioles 3-1

    Justin Masterson, supported by three double plays, pitched 7 1-3 strong innings to help the Indians beat the Baltimore Orioles 3-1 on Monday night and avoid a four-game sweep.

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    Sauer blanks Boomers 3-0

    Schaumburg Boomers baseball coverage

  •  
    NCAA President Mark Emmert handed down an unprecedented series of penalties Monday morning to Penn State, including a $60 million fine and the loss of all coach Joe Paterno's victories from 1998-2011, in the wake of the Jerry Sandusky child sex abuse scandal.

    Penn State marches on, and Ventura needs to step it up

    Even though some may say the penalty seems harsh for Penn State, Mike North says the football program and the school will move forward and continue. There's too much money at stake. And with the board still in place, North asks this question: how much was Penn State really punished? Check out North's perspective, and why he says the White Sox need manager Robin Ventura to do a better job than he did last week.

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    Dragons drop Cougars 5-1

    Justin Trapp cracked a leadoff home run, but the Kane County Cougars wouldn't score again in a 5-1 loss to the Dayton Dragons on Monday night at Fifth Third Field. Stalin Gerson (5-7) coughed up his league-high 20th home run when Trapp took him deep to give the Cougars (50-50, 16-14) a quick 1-0 lead.

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    Cubs starting pitcher Jeff Samardzija throws Monday against the Pittsburgh Pirates in the third inning at PNC Park.

    Samardzija leads Cubs to 2-0 win over Pirates

    Jeff Samardzija gave up one hit over eight innings and Alfonso Soriano hit two run-scoring doubles as the Chicago Cubs cooled off the Pittsburgh Pirates 2-0 on Monday night.

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    Bartosz, Montini stifle Jacobs in Lawler Classic

    Montini's improbable baseball run became much more possible on Monday.The Broncos handed Jacobs only its third summer loss with a 5-1 victory in the Phil Lawler Classic at Naperville's North Central College.Montini (17-10) advances in the winner's bracket of the double-elimination tournament to face St. Laurence, a 5-4 nine-inning winner over Crystal Lake South, at 10 a.m. Tuesday at Benedictine University in Lisle. A win over St. Laurence automatically pushes Montini into Wednesday's state semifinals.

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    The legacy of the late Penn State football coach Joe Paterno took another big hit Monday with the announcement of NCAA sanctions.

    Reflections on a weekend of bad news

    A certain old-time lyric seemed relevant the past few days. "The world is a bad place ... a bad place ... a terrible place to live." It began echoing Friday morning with the news that a young man shot up moviegoers in Colorado. It proceeded through Monday morning when NCAA sanctions against Penn State reminded of the school's horrific child-rape scandal.

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    It's official: free agent guard Kirk Hinrich has signed a deal to play for the Chicago Bulls next season.

    Hinrich officially on board as Bulls add shooter

    After working out a deal to send Kyle Korver to Atlanta and then scouring the NBA market for big men, the Bulls finally got around to closing their long-awaited deal to bring free agent guard Kirk Hinrich back to Chicago. The deal is believed to be worth $6 million over two years, which is the most the Bulls can offer using their mid-level exception.

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    Mariners outfielder Ichiro Suzuki has spent his entire major-league career in Seattle — until now.

    Ichiro goes to New York

    The New York Yankees acquired outfielder Ichiro Suzuki Monday in a trade with the Seattle Mariners. Suzuki, 38, has played his entire 12-year Major League Baseball career with the Mariners. The first Japan-born player in the majors is a 10-time All Star with a .322 career batting average, 1,176 runs and 99 home runs.

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    Mike North video: Historic collapse at the British Open

    Mike North talks about Ernie Els winning the British Open after an historic collapse by Adam Scott in the final four holes on Sunday.

Business

  •  
    Abt Electronics co-President Mike Abt with the Olympic torch runs on the streets of Luton, England.

    Abt executive runs with Olympic torch in England

    Kukec's People features Abt Electronic's co-President Mike Abt, who was one of the runners with the Olympic torch. It's now on display at the Glenview store.

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    DeVry expects revenue shortfall, plans 570 job cuts

    Facing falling enrollment and rising expenses, Downers Grove-based DeVry Inc. plans to cut about 570 jobs because it expects fourth-quarter earnings to be lower than expected, the for-profit educational firm said Monday in a filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

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    Journalists work at the Stock Exchange in Madrid Monday. The Bank of Spain said the country’s recession-plagued economy contracted 0.4 percent in the second quarter, a performance even worse than in the first three months of the year.

    2nd triple-digit loss for Dow in 2 days

    Fear that Spain may need a bailout sent its borrowing costs soaring, the euro to a two-year low against the dollar and stocks around the world tumbling as investors pulled back Monday from all manner of risk.

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    McDonald’s Corp., which has thrived in recent years by emphasizing affordability and rolling out popular new menu items, is starting to show signs of tear from the volatile global economy.

    McDonald’s hit by slowing sales, strong dollar

    McDonald's Corp., which has thrived in recent years by emphasizing affordability and rolling out popular new menu items, is starting to show signs of tear from the volatile global economy.The world's biggest hamburger chain said Monday that its net income fell 4 percent in the second quarter as a result of the strong dollar and increasingly budget-conscious consumers. Suggesting more challenges ahead

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    With fuel costs rising once again, airlines are expected to start a round of fare hikes.

    More airfare increases on the way

    Get ready to spend more on travel. Airlines are raising ticket prices again after a long lull that coincided with falling fuel costs.

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    This file photo shows June Lockhart, who starred in the TV series “Lassie,” from 1958 to 1964 and co-star Jon Provost who co-stared as Timmy Martin on the series from 1957-1964.

    DreamWorks buys Classic Media for $155 million

    DreamWorks Animation SKG on Monday said it has agreed to buy Classic Media, custodian of a library of movies and TV series that includes "Casper the Friendly Ghost," "Lassie," "Rocky & Bullwinkle," and "The Lone Ranger."

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    A man stands in front of the stock exchange market building in Milan, Italy. Italy’s market watchdog on Monday imposed a week-long ban on the short-selling of financial stocks as the Milan index plunged amid fears that if Spain needs a bailout, Italy could be next.

    Europe shaken by fear Spain will need full bailout

    Europe is on the brink again. The region's debt crisis flared on Monday as fears intensified that Spain would be next in line for a government bailout.

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    Nexen chief executive Kevin Reinhart addresses the company’s annual meeting in Calgary, Alberta, on April 25. Oil and gas producer Nexen Inc. has agreed to be acquired by China National Offshore Oil Company for $15.1 billion.

    Chinese oil giant to buy Canada’s Nexen

    China moved Monday toward its biggest overseas energy acquisition, with Chinese offshore oil and gas giant CNOOC Ltd. saying it has agreed to buy Canadian producer Nexen Inc. for $15.1 billion.

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    Zurich Insurance to add 150 jobs in Chicago

    Schaumburg-based Zurich Insurance plans to add 150 jobs to its workforce in Chicago.Zurich is a commercial property-casualty insurance provider that already has 350 employees in the city.Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel announced the additional jobs Monday. In a statement, Emanuel says Chicago is an attractive location for employers and has a highly skilled workforce.

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    Rose Paving donates $5K to Cancer Support Center

    Bridgeview-baed Rose Paving Co. has donated $5,000 to the Cancer Support Center, a place of help, hope and healing in the Chicago southland.

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    Medline acquires Perrigo business

    Mundelinea-based Medline Industries Inc. said it will acquire some key assets of Perrigo Co.'s personal hygiene business. Terms of the acquisition were not announced.

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    Z Trim Holdings opens industrial ingredients division
    Mundelein-based Z Trim Holdings Inc. said it has created an industrial ingredients division to address a broad range of new markets.As many of today's ingredients, such as guar gum, CMC, xanthan gum and modified food starches, are used in both food and industrial applications, Z Trim Holdings has developed a line of industrial ingredients stemming from its patented and proprietary technologies. Specifically, Z Trim Holdings, Inc. believes that it can provide products to help alleviate the pressures caused by the global shortage of guar gum.

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    CCU donates $3,000 to People Lending Assistance Network

    Consumers Credit Union recently donated $3,000 in support of People Lending Assistance Network, 1892 Nicole Ave. in Round Lake Beach.

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    Rivers Casino in Des Plaines has been the highest grossing casino in the state since it opened last July. City officials fear that could be in jeopardy, however, if the state moves forward with a proposed gambling expansion.

    Rivers Casino enjoys a year at the top

    After a year in business, the Rivers Casino in Des Plaines is still at the top of its game as the highest grossing casino in the state, exceeding expectations by collecting $393 million in adjusted gross receipts. "The first year was a very big success," said Rivers General Manager Bill Keena. "The number of patrons coming here has exceeded what we thought we were going to do."

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    Protesters shout slogans to demonstrate against the country’s near 25 percent unemployment rate and stinging austerity measures introduced by the government, in Madrid, Spain.

    Spain under more acute market pressure

    The financial pressure on recession-hit Spain ratcheted up further Monday to a level that saw other European countries need a financial bailout.The yield on Spain's benchmark ten-year bond spiked 0.23 percentage points to 7.46 percent, further evidence that investors are skeptical about the Spanish government's ability to get a handle on its debts at a time of recession and sky-high unemployment. Worries over the financial health of the Spanish regions have contributed to the latest spike too.

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    Bottles of Heineken NV beer and Asia Pacific Breweries Ltd.’s Tiger beer at a store in Beijing, China.

    Asia Pacific Breweries surges on Heineken bid

    Asia Pacific Breweries Ltd. surged to a record in Singapore trading after Heineken NV, the world's third-biggest brewer, offered as much as $6 billion for full control of the maker of Tiger beer.Asia Pacific Breweries rose as much as 18 percent to S$49.50 before closing up 15 percent at S$48.49. Fraser and Neave Ltd., or F&N, which owns a 40 percent stake in the beer maker, gained 4.2 percent to S$7.92. The stocks were suspended from trade on July 20.

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    UK hacking scandal spreads, 100-plus new claims

    The police investigation spawned by last year's phone hacking scandal has spread to new U.K. tabloids, with detectives now seeking information from the Trinity Mirror PLC newspaper group as well as Britain's Express Newspapers, a senior Scotland Yard official said Monday.

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    Genesee & Wyoming plans $1.39B RailAmerica deal

    Genesee & Wyoming says it will buy fellow regional railroad operator RailAmerica for about $1.39 billion in cash.The Greenwich, Conn., company will pay $27.50 for each share of RailAmerica Inc., which is based in Jacksonville, Fla.The price represents a premium of nearly 11 percent over RailAmerica's closing price of $24.81 on Friday.

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    Russia’s Aeroflot to suspend flights to Damascus

    Russia's flagship airline Aeroflot says it is suspending flights to Syria's capital Damascus next month. State-controlled Aeroflot has four flights to Damascus and is the only Russian airline currently operating direct Moscow-Damascus flights. The company's spokeswoman Irina Dannenberg said Monday that Aeroflot will suspend the flights Aug. 6 for commercial reasons.

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    People walk by an electronic stock board of a securities firm in Tokyo Monday.

    Spanish bailout fears stalk markets

    Growing fears that Spain will need to be bailed out hit markets hard Monday, sending stocks around the world sharply lower and the euro down to a fresh two-year low against the dollar.With the yield on Spain's benchmark 10-year bond well above 7 percent, investors are appear to be resigned to prospect of the euro area's fourth-largest economy needing a financial rescue like Greece, Ireland and Portugal.

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    Abu Dhabi’s Mubadala to drill for oil in Thailand

    Abu Dhabi's state-backed Mubadala Petroleum says it and its partners plan to begin developing an oil field in the northern Gulf of Thailand. Mubadala said Monday it hopes to begin production from the Manora field in early 2014, with peak production of 15,000 barrels a day within a few months of operation. The project is expected to cost $246 million.The offshore field was discovered in 2009.

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    Samsung, Google, Apple, World Digital: Intellectual Property

    Procter & Gamble Co., the world's largest consumer-products company, sued a manufacturer of private-label products for patent infringement.The suit, filed July 20 in federal court in Cincinnati, accused Team Technologies Inc., of Morristown, Tennessee, of infringing three patents related to tooth-whitening products.

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    Bank of America Corp., the lender targeting $8 billion in expense cuts, reduced its automated teller network almost 9 percent this year by yanking most of the devices deployed at U.S. gas stations and malls.

    BofA withdraws 9% of atms from malls, gas stations to cut costs

    Bank of America Corp., the lender targeting $8 billion in expense cuts, reduced its automated teller network almost 9 percent this year by yanking most of the devices deployed at U.S. gas stations and malls.The bank's total number of ATMs fell by 1,536 in the first half, a record decline, leaving it with 16,220 as of June 30, the Charlotte, North Carolina-based firm said last week. Bank of America didn't renew deals to place its machines at sites owned by Simon Property Group Inc., the biggest U.S. shopping mall owner, and gas station operator Valero Energy Corp., said Anne Pace, a spokeswoman for the bank.

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    Soft game sales weigh on Hasbro’s 2Q earnings

    Toy maker Hasbro Inc. says its second-quarter net income dropped 25 percent on the stronger dollar and weak game sales. But its earnings still beat analysts' expectations. A shift in consumer spending from board games to smartphones and tablets has been hurting the maker of Scrabble, Monopoly and other classic games. Its revenue fell 11 percent in the latest quarter, missing Wall Street expectations.

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    Oil falls to near $89 amid Europe, China jitters

    The price of oil sank toward $89 a barrel Monday as a flare-up in Europe's debt crisis and concern over Chinese economic growth suggested demand for crude will weaken.The benchmark crude futures contract for September delivery was down $2.55 at $89.28 a barrel by late morning European time in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The August contract, which expired Friday, ended down $1.22 at $91.44 per barrel in New York.

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    Husband wife photographic team Gail and Dale Horn of Hawthorn Woods recently started an upscale cutting-edge photography on metal business.

    Hawthorn Woods couple launch cutting-edge photography business
    "A long hard journey traveled together is far more rewarding than a simple shortcut encountered by one," is the philosophy of a Hawthorn Woods entrepreneur starting a new business with her husband.

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    Small businesses have intriguing healthcare choices

    Small businesses have intriguing healthcare choices, according to Small Business Columnist Jim Kendall. He says there are some interesting strategic benefit options that have gotten lost in the bluster surrounding Obamacare, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Abigail Gehring hangs laundry outside her home in West Brattleboro, Vt. Gehring is the author and editor of several books on green living skills, including “The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Country Living” and “The Homesteading Handbook,” both from Skyhorse Publishing.

    Ditching the dryer: Tips for airing clean laundry

    Think clotheslines are a relic of a bygone era, a time when our grandmothers slaved over their dainties with stiff birch-wood pins? Think again. Hanging clothes is hot, due in no small part to the rising costs of, well, everything. Between soaring utility bills, concerns for the environment and a growing interest in traditional home arts, forgoing the dryer is the newest (oldest) way to tackle laundry.

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    Abigail Daley runs in the Naked Foot 5K.

    Barefoot runners picking up the pace

    Nearly three years after it was reignited by the remarkable book "Born to Run," barefoot running is less a fad than a realistic alternative to traditional running shoes for people who have struggled with lower-leg injuries. Minimalist shoes are not for everyone, probably not even for most of us, but the anecdotal evidence of their place in the world of running is hard to deny.

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    A volunteer walks past the Olympic Stadium at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London. The opening ceremonies of the Olympic Games are scheduled for Friday.

    Few secrets surrounding Olympic opener

    LONDON — The London Olympics opening ceremony will be a grand spectacle — but will it be a surprise?In a word, no.Director Danny Boyle wants the details to stay secret and games chief Sebastian Coe has pleaded for insiders to stop leaking details of the extravaganza. But in the age of camera phones and social media, with 10,000 performers in the ceremony, thousands of Olympic security and staff and more than 10,000 journalists already at the Olympic Park, not much can be kept out of the public domain.“Part of the modern world means you can’t really do that,” Boyle acknowledged about keeping secrets as he showed journalists a mock-up of the set for the opening scene of the ceremony, weeks before the event.So, a spoiler alert: Stop reading now if you want Friday’s opening ceremony to be a surprise. Stop, stop, stop.But if you are as irresistibly curious as the rest of us, well, prepare for everything from James Bond to Lord Voldemort to a spoonful of sugar.Boyle has revealed only selected details about the show, But since the performers started rehearsals in June at the Olympic Stadium — and an army of journalists started arriving to cover the July 27-Aug. 12 games — a trickle of details about the 27 million pound ($42 million) opening ceremony has become a torrent.The leaks became too much for Coe, who tweeted: “Share the frustration of volunteer performers and the public at Opening Ceremony being unofficially trailed. Let’s (hash) savethesurprise.”His imploring hashtag fell on deaf ears. Still more information emerged.So what do we know?The ceremony’s theme is “Isles of Wonder,” inspired by William Shakespeare’s play about shipwrecked castaways, “The Tempest.” An actor is due to recite Caliban’s speech, the one that runs “Be not afeard; the isle is full of noises.” Mark Rylance, who had been due to perform the lines, pulled out after the death of his stepdaughter. Kenneth Branagh is rumored to be his replacement.Despite Boyle’s enchanted-island inspiration, few expect the man who depicted Scottish heroin addicts in “Trainspotting” and Indian slum dwellers in “Slumdog Millionaire” to deliver a sanitized image of Britain.It sounds more like Isles of Wonder and Woe — with a big dash of British whimsy thrown in.Boyle has said the show is “trying to show the best of us, but we’re also trying to show many, many different things about our country.”The ceremony will open at 9 p.m. with the sound of a 27-ton bell — the largest harmonically tuned bell in the world — forged at London’s 442-year-old Whitechapel Bell Foundry, which made London’s Big Ben and Philadelphia’s Liberty Bell. A prerecorded segment has been filmed inside Buckingham Palace, reportedly involving Queen Elizabeth II and Daniel Craig as secret agent James Bond. If rumor is to be believed, a stuntman dressed as 007 will parachute into the stadium to start the show.The opening sequence will evoke a pastoral idyll, the “green and pleasant land” described in William Blake’s poem “Jerusalem,” which has been set to music and is regarded as England’s unofficial national anthem. There’s a meadow, livestock, a farmer plowing his field, a cricket match — and, in a nod to Britain’s plethora of rural summer music festivals, a mosh pit.Boyle hasn’t disclosed what comes next, but has said the ceremony will depict Britain’s past, present and future for a global television audience estimated at 1 billion. In addition to the athletes and performers, some 60,000 spectators will be in the stadium, including political leaders from around the world. U.S. first lady Michelle Obama and her daughters and a sprinkling of European and celebrity royalty will be among those attending.Aerial photographs of the set for the second section of the show depict dark buildings and smokestacks with the River Thames running through it. This is the other side of the country described in “Jerusalem” — a land of “dark satanic mills.”

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    Singer Mariah Carey will be joining the cast of “American Idol.”

    ‘American Idol’ adds Mariah Carey

    Fox says Mariah Carey is joining "American Idol" as a new judge.Fox entertainment chief Kevin Reilly announced her signing to a meeting of the Television Critics Association on Monday, and then put Carey on speaker phone to confirm the deal. "I am so excited to be joining American Idol,"' she said. "This kind of all just happened really quickly."

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    Secretive girlfriend a sign of deeper problems

    Q. My girlfriend has secrecy issues. She rarely tells me what she is doing or has done. If I ask her a question, she will analyze my words and tell me I did not ask in the correct way so she won’t answer. I then change the question, but she tells me only the first question counts. Then she gets angry and I apologize because I don’t want to have an argument over something not worth it. All this happens over the phone because I am in the States and she is in Asia. (I plan to move to her city soon.)She says she has obsessive-compulsive disorder so I have to be careful what I say. Once her OCD kicks in, it takes her a long time to be happy again, so I always end up acquiescing.She also won’t tell her family anything. I decided to talk to her about it, so I mentioned wanting to talk about our last phone conversation. She immediately got upset and told me she thought we had a good conversation, but now I am making it unpleasant and maybe we should have not talked. I had to change the subject. If I had told her my true feelings, she would have gotten angry and not spoken to me for a week.I love my girlfriend so I always end up apologizing, but I really think I am not doing the right thing by letting this issue pass by. Even when I am with her, she gives me the silent treatment when she does not want to answer questions. Am I letting her bully me? I feel like a puppy that wants 100 percent affirmation.H.A. When is feeling bad not a sign of something important?With columns on a similar topic June 1 and 10, this is Chapter 3 of “The Blind Men and the Elephant” and the elephant is abuse.The prior columns involved jealousy and criticism as forms of control. Granted, your story has Asia and purported OCD to help people say, “Whew, that’s not me” … nevertheless, you’ve spelled out exactly how a person uses emotional volatility as a weapon in a relationship.Every eggshell-walk sounds the same: You ... “apologize because I don’t want to have an argument”; “have to be careful what I say”; “always end up acquiescing”; “had to change the subject”; “always end up apologizing.” And builds up to this:“If I had told her my true feelings, she would have gotten angry and not spoken to me for a week.”Surely you’re more than a biped engine of appeasement? Yet you apparently can’t even express your true feelings, much less offer ideas, crack jokes, make thoughtful observations, show vulnerability, express doubts, have a bad day, need her support, or, heavens to SpongeBob, misspeak occasionally. Where is your license to be you?You say you love your girlfriend, and I can only take you at your word. What is clear, though — crystal — is that with her, you don’t love yourself.That’s a problem you don’t relocate overseas to amplify. It’s one you take to the best local counseling you can manage. You’re living the peril of seeking affirmation from others, instead of from within; it’s like binding your wrists and then handing over the string.Ÿ Email Carolyn at tellmewashpost.com, follow her on Facebook at www.facebook.com/carolyn.hax or chat with her online at noon Eastern time each Friday at www.washingtonpost.com.© 2012 The Washington Post

  •  
    “The Trust” by Norb Vonnegut

    High finance proves to be dangerous in 'The Trust'

    Wall Street insider Grove O'Rourke knows all about the dangers of the nation's center of finance. As a top producer with a brokerage firm where he accounts for millions of dollars, he must also deal with cutthroat internal manipulations and the push to get the upper hand. In Norb Vonnegut's "The Trust," O'Rourke gets a more direct taste of danger when he heads to Charleston, S.C., to fulfill an old friend's last request.

  •  
    Give the oven, and yourself, a break and serve Peach Brulee Ice Cream Pie to guests this summer.

    Warming up to ice cream pies

    Organizing the sweet course for a recent family gathering got me thinking about infusing fun into the usual summer dessert offerings. Warm weather immediately brought cool thoughts of ice cream pies to mind.

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    Peach Brulee Ice Cream Pie
    Peach Brulee Ice Cream Pie

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    Kate, Duchess of Cambridge, will be on hand to watch gymnastics and synchronized swimming at the Olympics.

    Britain’s young royals to attend Olympic events

    Attention Harry hunters: Britain's young royals will be out and about in force during the London Olympics. The royals' Clarence House announced Monday what events Prince Charles, his wife Camilla, Prince William and his wife Kate and Prince Harry will attend.

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    Fans of British singer songwriter Amy Winehouse lights a candle and leaves flowers for her outside her house in London on the first anniversary of her death.

    Family, fans remember Amy Winehouse a year later

    Singer Amy Winehouse's father says it's tough dealing with the loss of his daughter, but he's happy she is having a helpful impact on the world through the foundation named after her. Amy Winehouse died on July 23, 2011 at her London home from accidental alcohol poisoning at age 27.

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    Spencer Cootware receives a medical tattoo about his aorta from artist Shane Williams at the Body Branding Tattoo shop in Naples, Fla.

    Tattoos replacing medical-alert bracelets for some

    Jimbo Carriero is among a growing number of people who want a more permanent medical alert. The Canadian Medical Association Journal reported that medical tattooing appears to be increasing, partly because the often-pricey medical alert bracelets can be lost or broken, some people prefer tattoos, and others can't wear jewelry at work. The journal detailed tattoos for diabetes, blood types and end-of-life wishes.

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    “The Dark Knight Rises” was on track to earn $160 million, which would be a record for 2-D films, over the weekend following a mass shooting at a Colorado screening of the Batman film.

    ‘Dark Knight Rises’ reportedly earns $160 million

    "The Dark Knight Rises" was on track to earn $160 million, which would be a record for 2-D films, over the weekend following a mass shooting at a Colorado screening of the Batman film. Sony, Fox, Disney, Paramount, Universal and Lionsgate joined "Dark Knight Rises" distributor Warner Bros in publicly withholding their usual revenue reports out of respect for the victims and their families.

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    Katherine Jackson, the mother of Michael Jackson and guardian of his three children, is safe and with a family member in Arizona, authorities said late Sunday, one day after another relative reported her missing.

    Sheriff: Katherine Jackson is safe, with family

    Katherine Jackson, the mother of Michael Jackson and guardian of his three children, is safe and with a family member in Arizona, authorities said late Sunday, one day after another relative reported her missing. Katherine Jackson is with her daughter Rebbie in Arizona, following a doctor's orders to "de-stress" and stay away from the phone and computers, her son Jermaine Jackson said in a statement late Sunday.

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    Camille Eiseman and Terry Tank, billed as Faith and Whiskey, from Crystal Lake, perform for judges and an audience as one of the top 10 acts in the Suburban Chicago's Got Talent competition Sunday evening at the Metropolis Performing Arts Centre in Arlington Heights.

    Suburban Chicago finalists bring out even more talent to vie for top 5

    The top 10 finalists in the Suburban Chicago's Got Talent competition tried to kick their games up a notch on Sunday. They came up with new material. They sang and played harder. All in an effort to move on to the next round, in which only five finalists will perform. The performances took place at Metropolis Performing Arts Centre in downtown Arlington Heights in front of a packed house and a panel of four judges.

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    Underactive thyroid may mimic symptoms of aging

    Fatigue, weight gain, hair loss and decreases in memory are, for many people, attributed to symptoms of aging. However, aging may not be the cause. These symptoms may be the result of an underactive thyroid gland or hypothyroidism.

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    Experts question prostate screenings, but men, doctors may reject advice

    Despite expert recommendations, many men may continue to undergo routine prostate cancer screenings. Recent studies suggest the tests do more harm than good, but the mentality of curing cancer now seems to outweigh the logic for many men and doctors.

  •  

    Prostate cancer surgery fails to lower death rate in study

    Surgery to treat early prostate cancer failed to reduce deaths over a 10-year period, according to one of the first rigorous studies to compare surgery with observation in American men with localized prostate cancer. The U.S.-funded study assigned 731 men across the country with early prostate cancer to have the gland surgically removed or be observed without any attempt at curative treatment. Ten years later, 47 percent of men in the surgery group had died, mostly from other diseases, versus 49.9 percent who were just watched, results published in the New England Journal of Medicine found.

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    Good eating habits learned early prevent later obesity

    All the talk about childhood obesity is not just media hype. The number of children who are overweight or obese is increasing at an alarming rate. These kids are at much higher risk for developing serious health problems as adults — high blood pressure, heart disease and Type 2 diabetes. Good eating habits will help your kids avoid obesity.

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    Breast-feeding may help women fight obesity years later

    Breast-feeding may help mothers reduce the risk of obesity later in life, according to a study of 740,000 post-menopausal women in the U.K. For every six months women breast-fed, their body mass index was 0.22, or 1 percent, lower, even decades after giving birth, according to the research, which was published in the International Journal of Obesity. The observation was made across socioeconomic groups and regardless of the number of children the women had.

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    Mixed advice on prostate cancer tests

    There's more advice on the contentious issue of prostate cancer screening: A leading group of cancer specialists says the decision hinges in part on a man's life expectancy. Doctors should discuss the possible pros and cons of those PSA blood tests with men expected to live longer than another 10 years, the American Society of Clinical Oncology has recommended.

  •  
    A Kentucky Fried Chicken employee uses tongs to hold up a sample of the company’s trans fat-free Extra Crispy fried chicken in New York. New York City has hard evidence that its ban on trans fat in restaurant food made a meaningful dent in people’s consumption of the artery clogger and wasn’t just replaced with another bad fat.

    Trans fat ban makes fast food a little healthier

    Turns out it's possible to make a fast-food lunch a bit healthier even without skipping the fries. New York City now has hard evidence that its ban on trans fat in restaurant food made a meaningful dent in people's consumption of the artery clogger and wasn't just replaced with another bad fat.

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    Keeping your insides functioning properly is essential to feeling good and being healthy.

    How to keep your insides working properly

    For your body to perform at its best, you must eat the right types of foods and you must be able to properly digest and absorb those foods.

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    Sunset Runner

    Does extreme distance running go too far?

    In most every part of modern life — in how much we eat, sleep, work and play — moderation is the mantra. And in recent years, that mantra has extended to exercise. Science is increasingly telling us that we need to work out only a few hours a week to fight heart disease and cancer and aging in general. But don't try to tell Joanna Reuland that running 10 miles a week is all she needs. "I've always got my shoes with me in case there's time for a short run," said Reuland, 25. "It's not something that I have to do — it's something that I love to do."

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    A new study suggests that extra time in the womb may result in more brain development and could perhaps lead to better academic test scores later.

    Early full-term babies may face school woes later

    Even for infants born full-term, a little more time in the womb may matter. The extra time results in more brain development, and a study suggests perhaps better scores on academic tests, too. Full-term is generally between 37 weeks and 41 weeks; newborns born before 37 weeks are called premature and are known to face increased chances for health and developmental problems.

  •  
    Julian Sellers and his wife, Barbara, have chronicled the history of their bungalow, the natural environment surrounding it and the people who lived in it, since it was built in 1926.

    Who lived here? How to dig up your house's history

    The construction of Julian Sellers' bungalow in St. Paul, Minn., was started in 1926 and finished in early 1927. The builder was a Swedish immigrant. The family who first lived there included a married couple, their 6-year-old daughter and the wife's mother. Sellers learned all this by sorting through building permits, tax records, city directories, maps, old newspapers on microfilm and more.

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    Jim M’Lady timeline
    Timeline for car dealer Jim M'Lady.

  •  
    A Nissan Maxima outside the M’Lady Nissan dealership in Crystal Lake.

    M’Lady now No. 1 seller of Nissans

    M'Lady Nissan is currently the No. 1 Nissan store in Illinois as well a top seller in the six-state Midwest regional. It is 45th in sales in the nation.

Discuss

  •  

    Editorial: Restrict public pensions to retirees

    Laws that allowing the public pension system to be gamed must change, a Daily Herald editorial says: Pensions should be for retirement, period.

  •  

    In memory of a brave and intrepid pioneer

    Columnist Eugene Robinson : Bill Raspberry wore his eminence well. In a city full of preening, self-centered journalistic royalty, he was a warm and generous prince who never deluded himself into thinking he knew all the answers. He is desperately missed.

  •  

    Are some in GOP ready to deal on taxes?

    Columnist Froma Harrop: Not all Republicans are as courageous as Coburn in actually naming tax breaks that need to go. Every goody in the tax code has lobbyists standing guard.

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    She strikes gold at local farmers market
    Letter to the editor: Audrey Beauvais had a delightful time at the Arlington Hts. farmers market last weekend, sampling cheeses, and selecting just picked vegetables to take home. "The price per pound is slightly higher than at the supermarket, but the improved flavor makes it easier to eat more veggies," she writes.

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    Always a marine, even out of uniform
    Letter to the editor: A simple act of kindness by a Marine took Maureen Hellman by surprise recently in Arlington Heights. "God bless our armed forces; even out of uniform, they serve and protect every aspect of our lives," she writes.

  •  

    Say a prayer that firefighters stay safe
    Letter to the editor: No "thank you," could adequately express the gratitude Judy and Dominick Menotti feel for the firefighters and paramedics who fought the fire that destroyed their home April 18. "Their concern for us was overwhelming," they w rite. "Their concern for our neighbors, their properties and everyone's well-being was beyond anything (we) could imagine."

  •  

    How you play, not whether you win, is what counts
    Letter to the editor: Judy Collins of Arlington Hts. discusses the Coach/Adviser Code of Conduct recently enacted by the District 214 school board. "For everyone involved, we need to remember some words that we all learned a long time ago: It's not about the win, but how the game was played," she writes.

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    Arlington Hts.: Treat trees for EAB now
    Letter to the editor: If you think you are hot now, writes Christine Sacks, wait until 13,000 of ash trees are chopped down in Arlington Heights. "The solution? Treat your ash trees for EAB now! Even without quantity pricing, prices are lower, averaging $100 per tree," she writes.

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    Elk Grove Library residents victims of taxation without representation
    Letter to the editor: Gary Parrin, who lives on the east side of Elk Grove Village, says its unconscionable that two Elk Grove library trustees live on the west side of town -- outside the Elk Grove Library taxing district -- and yet they can vote on matters that affect the true library taxpayers.

  •  

    Move Philhaven to site on Dundee Rd.
    Letter to the editor: Jim Scanlan is glad the Wheeling Village Board rejected Philhaven at the current location, and says the perfect location is on Dundee Road between Northgate and Wolf." There is plenty of vacant land ... public transit is available with the Metra station a short walk," he writes.

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    Advance this clean energy project
    An Aurora letter to the editor: The Chicago Clean Energy is a $3 billion private investment in the state. It will generate more than $10 billion in public revenues, create thousands of jobs in northeastern and southern Illinois and demonstrate leadership in clean energy technology.

  •  

    Gas plant unfairly burdens consumers
    A letter to the editor: The Citizens Utility Board isn't absolutely opposed to the Leucadia project, but it is simply unfair to slam suburban, Central and Southern Illinois with all the costs of this project.

  •  

    Commit to funds for the most vulnerable
    An Elk Grove Village letter to the editor: Advocacy and politics have reduced specialized care, leading to long waiting lists and predictable tragedies. Sometimes tragedy is at the hands of stressed out, overwrought family caregivers — often elderly parents caring for middle-aged children.

  •  

    Let’s give equal time to divisiveness
    A Lake Barrington letter to the editor: Since Obama has thrown down the divisive gauntlet, and the liberal media have chosen once again to avoid any possible degree of fair and unbiased reporting, I recommend a new campaign fund be launched, called "Whites for Romney."

  •  

    Ryan budget short on compassion
    A Buffalo Grove letter to the editor: The deficit was largely caused by two unpaid wars and tax cuts for the wealthy nearly 11 years, with few jobs to show from the "job creators."

  •  

    We all are going to pay dearly
    A Buffalo Grove letter to the editor: Does anyone know what the cost per person would be if the unfunded pension liability of $83 billion is divided by the 2010 population census of 12,830,632?

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