Traffic map

Daily Archive : Tuesday July 10, 2012

News

  •  
    Lynn Cameron

    Algonquin mom: Leaving disabled woman in Tennessee was best

    A mentally disabled young woman from Algonquin was made a ward of the state of Tennessee after her mother left her there alone last month. Lynn Cameron, 19, was left by her mother, Eva Cameron, on the evening of June 28 at a bar in Caryville, Tenn., said Caryville Assistant Police Chief Stephanie Smith. "(Lynn) wasn't really missing. We knew where she was," her mother said.

  •  

    Naperville restaurant that replaced Show-Me’s folds after 3 months

    The "family-friendly" restaurant that replaced a controversial eatery with scantily attired waitresses has folded after only three months in business. Linebacker Grille replaced Show-Me's restaurant in mid-April, promising a family-oriented dining experience. "They weren't getting the traffic they needed to pay the bills and break even so they had to close the doors. It's a shame," said Mayor...

  •  
    Aric A. Liberati

    Cops: Parolee caught fleeing St. Charles home after break-in

    A parolee with a history of residential burglary convictions was arrested by St. Charles police Monday morning as he fled a home after ransacking it, according to police. Aric A. Liberati, 35, of Aurora, was charged with residential burglary and criminal damage to property.

  •  

    Aurora mine to store water treatment byproduct

    The city of Aurora has found a new home for one of the byproducts created by the city's water production plant. It's just down the road — and under the ground. Lime sludge generated from turning Fox River water into drinking water will be stored in empty underground spaces created by a company that mines limestone from a city of Aurora property, under a lease the city council approved...

  •  
    Joshua Meador

    Car theft suspect arrested in Geneva after manhunt

    A early morning traffic stop turned into a manhunt Tuesday morning as police searched a Geneva neighborhood for a vehicle theft suspect. The 24-year-old man is charged with stealing a vehicle from Union and fleeing police.

  •  

    Police: Batavia man, 20, admits armed robbery attempt

    A 20-year-old Batavia man turned himself in to police Tuesday afternoon and admitted he approached a woman at an ATM while armed with a gun.

  •  
    House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Rep. Dave Camp leads a hearing Tuesday on the implications of the Supreme Court’s ruling the individual mandate in the Affordable Care Act is constitutional.

    GOP offering health care repeal without alternative

    House Republicans generally avoided talk of replacement measures on Tuesday as they mobilized for an election-season vote to repeal the health care law that stands as President Barack Obama's signature domestic accomplishment.

  •  
    Sen. Charles Schumer, of New York, is among Democrats who want to push tax cuts through the Senate for companies that hire new workers, give raises or buy major new equipment this year.

    Congress battles over business tax cuts

    Democrats began trying to push a bill through the Senate Tuesday slicing taxes for businesses that hire new workers and buy major new equipment. They ran into opposition from Republicans who complained the measure was too timid and sought to refocus debate on their economic priorities.

  •  
    Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney works alongside volunteers at Care and Share during his visit to Colorado Springs, Colo., on Tuesday. He helped box food for firefighters and people displaced by the fires that have plagued the state this summer.

    Obama, Romney clash over taxes, outsourcing

    Clashing over the economy, President Barack Obama challenged Mitt Romney to join him in allowing tax hikes for rich Americans like them, needling his Republican rival on Tuesday to "compromise to help the middle class."

  •  
    The family of former Penn State football coach Joe Paterno said Tuesday that Paterno, seen here, did not know former assistant coach Jerry Sandusky was a pedophile and that Sandusky was a “master deceiver.”

    Paternos: Late coach didn’t cover up at Penn State

    Former Penn State football coach Joe Paterno didn't cover up for retired defensive coordinator Jerry Sandusky when he was accused of molesting boys and didn't act to hinder an investigation of him, Paterno's family said Tuesday.

  •  

    Crusin’ Antioch car show comes to Main Street for higher visibility

    If you see 30 to 40 antique cars crusing down Main Street in Antioch on Wednesday, it's no coincidence. The third annual Cruisin' Antioch car show is set for 6 to 8 p.m. between Main and Orchard streets.

  •  
    Willowbrook Wildlife Center in Glen Ellyn is slated for roughly $3.6 million in upgrades, the first phase of a $19.1 million multiyear improvement plan.

    Glen Ellyn wildlife center slated for $3.6 million upgrade

    Willowbrook Wildlife Center in Glen Ellyn is in line for $3.6 million in upgrades, which is part of a larger plan that may cost a total of about $19.1 million or more over the next several years. "It's such a wonderful opportunity for the district to have a facility that will eventually become world-known," Commissioner Mike Formento said.

  •  
    Scott Enke leaves federal court Tuesday in Chicago after chief judge James Holderman sentenced him to community service and a $1,000 fine for contempt.

    Plainfield juror who skipped trial avoids jail

    A traveling salesman from Plainfield who, fearing he was about to lose his biggest client, suddenly left on a business trip to Iowa in the middle of a trial where he was serving as a juror has become a symbol all-too prevalent disregard of the jury service, a federal judge told the man at his sentencing hearing.

  •  

    Fire departments battle brush fire in Carpentersville

    Firefighters from seven departments helped battle a Tuesday afternoon brush fire in Carpentersville's Helm Woods Forest Preserve. The fire burned through a large area of brush, but did not damage any structures or cause any injuries, according to fire officials.

  •  

    State checks for inmates collecting unemployment

    The Illinois Department of Employment Security has started checking the roll of people receiving unemployment benefits to find those who might be ineligible because they're in jail. The department said Tuesday that its checks have so far turned up 420 inmates collecting unemployment, although it's not clear how many were jailed just briefly during that period and potentially still eligible to...

  •  

    Legislation will open electrical aggregation to residents in unincorporated areas

    If you live in an unincorporated area, you've been on the outside looking in as many communities cut deals for cheaper electricity. However, that will change with new legislation allowing townships to pass referendums to create electric aggregation programs for all residents. The bill, SB3170, passed unanimously in both houses and awaits Gov. Pat Quinn's signature.

  •  
    David McSweeney

    Beaubien's candidacy in 52nd House race challenged

    Republican David McSweeney is challenging the petitions of independent candidate Dee Beaubien in the 52nd House District race. He's claiming that Beaubien is ineligible to run as an independent because she signed petitions for twoGOP candidates.

  •  

    Gurnee police special enforcement

    Gurnee police have released results from a special Fourth of July holiday traffic enforcement campaign.

  •  

    Hawthorn Woods Kids Triathlon
    Children ages 9 to 11 living in Hawthorn Woods can enjoy a brisk swim, run, and bike ride Saturday, July, 14, at Hawthorn Woods Kids Triathlon.

  •  

    Lake Villa writer presentation

    Illinois-based independent writer and journalist Derek Monroe will give a video-photo presentation called "Japan: One Year After the Disaster in the Tohoku Region" at the Lake Villa District Library, 1001 E. Grand Ave., on Wednesday at 11:30 a.m.

  •  
    Union Pacific workers clean up debris Monday from the July 4 bridge collapse.

    Coal trains running again after fatal derailment

    Union Pacific says its coal trains are running again on a stretch of track where a July 4 derailment killed a Glenview couple. Burton and Zorine Lindner were driving beneath a rail bridge that collapsed in last week's accident, sending hundreds of tons of coal and rail cars onto the street below.

  •  
    Eugene Saunders

    Wood Dale burglary suspect at large after Lombard manhunt

    An extensive police manhunt for a suspect wanted for a burglary attempt in Wood Dale was called off Tuesday, with the man at large but an alleged accomplice in tow. Police say Eugene L. Saunders, 32, of Chicago fled the Wood Dale burglary scene in a green Chevy Malibu, ran into a moving vehicle in Villa Park, then crashed and flipped his car at St. Charles Road and Crescent Drive in Lombard.

  •  

    Software glitches delay 911 response in Northwest suburbs

    Glitches with a new software program used by Northwest Central Dispatch System for routing emergency calls to fire and police departments caused a 14-minute delay Sunday in the response to a potential heart attack victim in Palatine, Palatine Fire Chief Scott Andersen confirmed. "Absolutely, it's a concern. And, it's a concern for Northwest Central as well."

  •  
    Justin S. Busby

    Oswego man charged with attempted murder in crash into ex, new boyfriend

    An Oswego man, upset about his ex-girlfriend dating another man, deliberately rammed his vehicle into theirs, twice, Monday in Montgomery, according to Kane County court records. He's been charged with attempted murder.

  •  
    PAUL MICHNA/Daily Herald file photo Former Oak Brook Police Officer Stephen Peterson attends an administrative hearing, which ultimately resulted in him losing his job in February 2011. Peterson sued the village and its former police chief Tuesday, claiming there was a conspiracy to ouster him.

    Drew Peterson’s son sues Oak Brook over firing, seeks $2 million

    Drew Peterson's son filed a multimillion-dollar lawsuit Tuesday accusing Oak Brook's former police chief of conspiring with another official to boot him from his job as a police officer after his father's murder case drew negative attention to the upscale community. "He may get his job back in a few years, but in the interim he will lose his house, his wife will leave him, and his dog will be...

  •  
    Howard Richmond

    Aurora pastor back in jail on higher bail

    Aurora pastor Howard Richmond should be able to make it to church this week -- as long as he can come up with $10,000 to get out of jail. A DuPage County judge upped the embattled minister's bail by $100,000 on Tuesday after hearing the latest in a series of charges alleging financial misconduct. "I'm concerned about the continuing allegations," Judge Blanche Hill Fawell said, calling the newest...

  •  
    Chris Hage

    Wheaton man appointed to election panel

    A Wheaton attorney who recently made an unsuccessful bid to become a state representative has been appointed to fill the third and final vacant seat on the DuPage Election Commission. Christopher Hage will finish the remaining term of former election commissioner Rick Carney, who stepped down in May.

  •  
    Rene Santiago

    New principal joins Wood Dale Junior High

    After quickly narrowing him from a pool of about 50 candidates, officials from Wood Dale School Distict 7 named Rene Santiago as the new principal of Wood Dale Junior High School. "He had proven leadership," said Superintendent John Corbett.

  •  

    Kane County Board tries different approach to term lengths

    Kane County officials determined Tuesday which county board seats on the November ballot will be for 2-year terms and which will be 4-year terms. But in doing so, officials also learned they may have broken the law the last time redistricting of the board occurred 10 years ago.

  •  

    Lake County reports first indicator of West Nile virus

    Lake County health authorities on Tuesday reported the first indicator of the presence of West Nile virus. A batch of mosquitoes in Mundelein tested positive for the virus on July 6. The report is a few weeks earlier than a typical year and residents are being cautioned to limit their exposure to mosquitoes.

  •  
    Myles Burton

    Libertyville man gets probation for Elmhurst hate crime

    A Libertyville man convicted of a hate crime for carving racist sentiments onto a ledge at the home of an African-American dorm supervisor at Elmhurst College apologized Tuesday before he was sentenced to probation and community service. "I'm really, really sorry for everybody -- not just (the victim) but everybody in the black community," Myles Burton, 21, said.

  •  
    The village of Wauconda is soliciting proposals from consultants to work on a long-term management plan for Bangs Lake. The plan will address fish stocking, managing invasive weeds, and other issues.

    Wauconda seeks Bangs Lake management plan

    A mild winter and an unusually hot summer have caused problems for Bangs Lake in Wauconda this year, leading village officials to seek some outside help. A large increase in nonnative, invasive plant species has prompted the village to solicit consultants to develop a multiyear lake management plan that could cost the village up to $10,000. The plan will include details on fish stocking, managing...

  •  
    George Filenko

    Police say suspect sought in retaliatory gang shooting in Round Lake Park

    Round Lake Park police are searching for a man suspected in what they say was a gang-related retaliatory shooting Monday night. Police said it stemmed from last year's death of a reputed gang member who was hit by a landscaping brick while in an SUV.

  •  

    Kane County plan to win support for raises on hold

    A Kane County Board vote scheduled for Tuesday to support department head raises given by Board Chairman Karen McConnaughay years ago was delayed in what appears to be an effort to drum up support. But new political tension and legal quirks are arising that further muddy the legal ramifications of the pending lawsuit that is fueling McConnaughay's push for retroactive support of her actions.

  •  
    Gov. Pat Quinn spent four days in Spain at his own expense.

    Quinn says Spain trip was ‘thank you’ to good customer

    Gov. Pat Quinn says his trip to Spain was a way of saying "thanks" to a good customer and building new relationships that could help the Illinois economy. Illinois exports to Spain are up by 29 percent, and Quinn says it's smart to thank such a good business partner.

  •  
    Congressman Jesse Jackson Jr. has been on medical leave for a month. His location and exact medical condition are unknown.

    Gutierrez: Congressman Jackson must give medical update

    Congressman Luis Gutierrez is the latest Illinois politician to call on Congressman Jesse Jackson Jr. to provide more information about a medical condition that's had him on leave for a month. Gutierrez said Tuesday that Jackson has a responsibility to give details.

  •  
    Andre Hromic of Wauconda, left, and Alex Gracanin of Chicago, both 12, splash into the water after going down a slide Tuesday at Barefoot Bay Family Aquatic Center in Mundelein.

    Pool attendance — and revenue — up during heat wave

    Public swimming pools were a popular place for people trying to stay cool in Lake County during last week's heat wave, a Daily Herald survey showed. Attendance figures at some pools were up dramatically for the first week of July, compared to the same period in 2011.

  •  
    Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel

    Chicago mayor’s proposal protects immigrants

    Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel has proposed what he calls an immigrant-friendly ordinance that beefs up existing practices by adding protections for illegal immigrants. It says Chicagoans who are illegal immigrants will be detained only if they're wanted on a warrant by local or federal authorities or if they've been convicted of a serious crime.

  •  

    New medical examiner named in Cook County

    A pathologist who has led death investigations in Florida and Colorado has been named as Cook County's new medical examiner. Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle appointed Dr. Stephen Cina on Tuesday and asked the full board to confirm him to the position.

  •  

    Lawmakers speak out against closing state prisons

    Illinois lawmakers aren't giving up their fight against Gov. Pat Quinn's plan to close prisons and juvenile facilities. Some legislators said Tuesday that they will try to block Quinn's action this fall. And a major state-employees union is urging Quinn to postpone the closures until a final decision can be made.

  •  

    U of I plans faculty raises despite state cuts

    University of Illinois leaders say the school is operating in a tough financial environment, but they plan to give faculty merit-based raises this summer that will average 2.5 percent.

  •  

    UIC names Brookings economist to lead center

    A former Brookings Institution economist has been tapped to direct a public policy research center at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Howard Wial conducted public policy research on urban and regional economies as a Brookings fellow.

  •  

    Retired judge sues over new health care charges

    Last month, Gov. Pat Quinn signed a law that will eliminate reduced or even free health insurance for more than 80,000 retired government employees. Retired judge Gordon Maag wants the law declared unconstitutional. He's also asking that his lawsuit be declared a class-action on behalf of all retirees.

  •  
    The state will help pay for additional lanes on Route 59 in Naperville.

    State plans more construction, easing train congestion

    The state will borrow more money to pay for a variety of road projects and a plan to reduce freight train congestion. This latest phase of the six-year, $31 billion Illinois Jobs Now initiative is expected to create or sustain more than 18,000 jobs.

  •  

    Geneva school board plans to sell site once planned for bus parking

    The Geneva school board Monday started the process of selling 27 acres of land where it once thought it would build a bus facility and sports practice fields.

  •  
    Louis Bianchi

    Employee's federal termination suit against Bianchi dismissed

    A judge has dismissed a federal lawsuit against McHenry County State's Attorney Lou Bianchi by a former assistant state's attorney who alleged he was fired because he testified against Bianchi in a criminal trial.

  •  

    Schaumburg Township assessor says check bills for errors

    Schaumburg Township Assessor John Lawson is encouraging homeowners who've recently received their Cook County tax bills to check for possible errors. Among those found on the bills of residents who've come in to Lawson's office in the past week are the absence of homeowner exemptions, senior exemptions and senior freezes where they ought to be.

  •  
    ComEd crews replace utility poles damaged in the Buffalo Grove brush fire.

    Buffalo Grove residents thankful for response to brush fire

    Buffalo Grove residents are looking over the charred landscape behind their homes Monday and feeling grateful, despite the raging wildfire on Sunday that got within 15 feet of their homes and destroyed the verdant prairie that borders their backyards. "It's OK, no one got hurt, no property got damaged," homeowner Susan Zerin said. "It's bad for the community, but it could have been so much worse."

  •  

    Arsonist sets garbage can fires in Mount Prospect

    Mount Prospect police report eight fires set in or near garbage containers about 4:30 a.m. Saturday. A sofa next to a trash receptacle was set on fire on the 1700 block of Golf Road and garbage containers were set on fire on the 1800 block of Estates Drive, 500 block of Carol Lane, 2000 block of Mark Lane, 2100 block of Haven Drive, 600 block of Crestwood Drive, and 1600 block of Palm Drive.

  •  
    Associate Cook County Judge James P. Etchingham retired Monday after nearly 18 years on the bench, the last 12 of them at Rolling Meadows 3rd Municipal District courthouse.

    Rolling Meadows judge retires, but not for long

    Cook County Judge James Etchingham retired Monday after nearly 18 years on the bench. Today he goes back to work, practicing law with his brother Joseph Etchingham in their newly established Arlington Heights firm, Etchingham Law. He leaves what he describes as the greatest job in the world, but says such work takes a toll.

  •  

    Northwest suburban police blotter

    A Des Plaines park was vandalized over the July 4 holiday. Vandals broke several tree branches, pulled off the yellow fence covers along the top of a fence at the baseball fields, tipped over bleachers, emptied garbage cans onto the ground, and stole two garbage can lids at Friendship Park, 395 W. Algonquin Road, between 3 p.m. July 3 and 9 a.m. July 5. Loss was estimated at $586.

  •  
    Roger and Diane Ahrens, who own Piece-A-Cake Bakery in East Dundee, were recently named Humanitarians of the Year by Illinois Veterans of Foreign Wars for their work in sending cookies to U.S. troops overseas. Both are Marine Corps veterans.

    Dundee bakers named Humanitarians of the Year

    East Dundee business owners Roger and Diane Ahrens were not looking for recognition when they began "Operation Sweettooth" eight years ago. They wanted to quietly send cookies to U.S. soldiers fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan. The owners of the Piece-A-Cake Bakery on North River Street were named Humanitarians of the Year by members of the Illinois' Veterans of Foreign Wars.

  •  
    Nikita Bailey, 10, of McHenry crosses the finish line in first place in the sack race during the kids jamboree at the Wauconda Rodeo.

    Rope and ride at 49th Wauconda IPRA Championship Rodeo

    The Wauconda Area Chamber of Commerce is hosting its 49th Annual IPRA Championship Rodeo Saturday, July 14, and Sunday, July 15. The rodeo will have live music, food tents, local vendors, and family events in addition to live rodeo shows. Performances from professional rodeo acts will center around six events: saddle bronc riding, bareback bronc riding, bull riding, cowgirl barrell racing, steer...

  •  
    Kathy Ward, center, poses with her husband Larry Ward, left, and their son Kris.

    ‘Selfless’ Cook County assistant public defender dies

    Kathy Ward, a 22-year-veteran of the Cook County Public Defender's Office who colleagues described as a tireless, tenacious advocate for her indigent clients, died Monday after a long illiness.

  •  

    Polish fugitive living in suburbs deported on racketeering charges

    A Polish national living in Arlington Heights was deported and turned over to Polish law enforcement officials Tuesday by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Slawomir Grymuza, 49, was wanted in his home country on racketeering, extortion and battery charges.

  •  
    An Egyptian protester chants pro-Morsi slogans in front of the parliament building in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, July 10, 2012. Egypt’s Islamist-dominated parliament convened Tuesday in defiance of a ruling by the country’s highest court and swiftly voted to seek a legal opinion on the decision that invalidated the chamber over apparent election irregularities.

    Egypt’s legislature convenes despite court ruling
    Associated Press CAIRO — Egypt’s Islamist-dominated parliament opened a new front in the country’s leadership showdowns Tuesday by meeting in defiance of orders that disbanded the chamber and brought President Mohammed Morsi in conflict with both the powerful military and the highest court.

  •  

    Judge OKs rooftop missiles during London Olympics

    LONDON — It has been a tough few months at the pockmarked concrete high-rise known as Fred Wigg Tower. First there was the fire, which left dozens of residents temporarily homeless. Then came the rash of burglaries of fire-damaged apartments. And now the British army will be putting a battery of high-velocity missiles on the roof.

  •  

    Mass. man to plead in plot to blow up Pentagon

    BOSTON — A Massachusetts man charged with plotting to fly remote-controlled model planes packed with explosives into the Pentagon and U.S. Capitol plans to plead guilty to two charges, his lawyers and prosecutors said in a plea agreement filed in federal court Tuesday.

  •  
    Union Pacific workers clean up train debris Monday from the bridge collapse at Shermer and Willow roads in Glenview. The track is now open for service, but no cars will be allowed under the Shermer bridge for an undisclosed amount of time; the bridge is blocked off by stone and dirt.

    Durbin wants feds to check for vulnerable bridges

    Spot federal inspections of railway bridges could improve safety but are costly also, Sen. Dick Durbin says.While at a news conference concerning the federal transportation funding bill, Durbin talked about a railway bridge collapse in Glenview that killed a local couple.

  •  
    Rolling Meadows aldermen are expected to vote tonight whether to move forward with a plan to expand Meacham Road between Algonquin Road and Emerson Avenue. The proposal has met with vocal opposition from residents who don’t want to see the roadway get any larger.

    Vote expected tonight on Meacham Road expansion

    After months of discussion, Rolling Meadows aldermen will vote tonight on the next steps for a possible Meacham Road expansion. Expanding the two-lane stretch of the road running between Algonquin Road and Emerson Avenue has been controversial as officials try to strike a balance between the needs of commuters and those of outspoken residents opposed to more lanes.

  •  

    Feds to reveal likely cause of Michigan oil spill

    DETROIT — Federal investigators are expected to present their findings Tuesday on the likely cause of a pipeline rupture that spilled more than 800,000 gallons of crude oil into a southwestern Michigan river nearly two years ago.

  •  
    President Barack Obama lays out his plan to extend tax cuts for the middle class, during an announcement from the East Room of the White House in Washington, Monday, July 9, 2012.

    In Iowa, Obama to make pitch on tax cuts

    WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama and Republican rival Mitt Romney are clashing in a reinvigorated election-year debate over tax fairness, with both sides claiming their position is best for a struggling middle class.

  •  
    International envoy Kofi Annan, speaks with secretary of Iran’s Supreme National Security Council, Saeed Jalili, unseen, during their meeting in Tehran, Iran, Tuesday, July 10, 2012. Annan said Tuesday that Iran must be “part of the solution” to the bloody crisis in its close ally Syria, and that the Tehran has offered its support to end the conflict.

    Annan in Iraq for talks on peace plan for Syria

    BAGHDAD — International envoy Kofi Annan reached out to Damascus’ regional allies Iran and Iraq on Tuesday in a bid to secure their support for his faltering peace plan to end the 16-month-old Syrian crisis.

  •  

    Alligator bites off swimming teen’s arm in Fla.

    MOORE HAVEN, Fla. — An alligator at least 10 feet long lunged at a teenager swimming in a river and bit off the teen’s right arm below the elbow, state wildlife officials said Tuesday.

  •  
    Scranton Mayor Chris Doherty

    Pa. mayor cuts city workers’ pay to minimum wage

    SCRANTON, Pa. — Unions representing workers in the northeastern Pennsylvania city of Scranton expect to file a federal lawsuit against the city after the mayor abruptly cut their pay to minimum wage.

  •  

    NY bus driver gets probation for duct taping girl

    QUEENSBURY, N.Y. — A former upstate New York school bus driver has been sentenced to three years of probation for placing duct tape over the mouth of a 7-year-old disabled girl.Marjorie Jones also will have to perform 100 hours of community service under a sentence handed down Monday by a town justice in Queensbury, on the southern edge of the Adirondacks.

  •  

    Serbia charges 12 over setting fire to U.S. embassy in 2008

    BELGRADE, Serbia — Serbia charged 12 people accused of setting fire to the U.S. embassy during riots against Kosovo’s independence in 2008.The suspects were charged with committing “grave acts against general security” and violent behavior, Vladimir Djordjevic, a senior official at the prosecutor’s office told The Associated Press on Tuesday.

  •  
    Israel released Mahmud Sarsak, a member of the Palestinian national soccer team who lobbied for his freedom with a hunger strike of more than three months.

    Hunger-striking Palestinian soccer player released

    GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip — Israel released on Tuesday a member of the Palestinian national soccer team who had been held for three years without formal charges and who pushed for his freedom with a hunger strike of more than 90 days.

  •  

    Indiana father admits strapping kids to car hood

    FORT WAYNE, Ind. — A northern Indiana man has pleaded guilty to several charges after driving three blocks with four children strapped to his car’s hood while he was intoxicated.

  •  

    Pa. man scheduled for plea in SUV on runway case

    PHILADELPHIA — A man accused of crashing his vehicle through a fence and racing down a runway at Philadelphia International Airport is expected to plead guilty to federal charges.Court documents say Kenneth Mazik is scheduled to plead guilty Tuesday to charges stemming from his March 1 arrest following a tarmac police chase at speeds of more than 100 mph.

  •  

    Girl hiding in closet calls police about burglars

    FREMONT, Calif. — A 12-year-old girl hiding in a closet telephoned police about two burglars ransacking her Northern California home.The San Jose Mercury News says officers arrived at the Fremont home in minutes, but the intruders had already left. There are no arrests.The girl wasn’t hurt.

  •  

    US Attorney General to speak at NAACP convention

    HOUSTON — U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder is scheduled to speak at the NAACP convention in Houston. That’s as the group launches a battle against voter ID laws that they contend will reverse gains made during the tumultuous civil rights era.

  •  
    David Bowman, president of the Decatur Area Rabbit Breeders Association, talks about the specifics of breeding rabbits for fun, profit and meat during a workshop at the University of Illinois Extension Office in Decatur.

    Bunny: It's what's for dinner

    Buck rabbit sounds like he's dropped into our world from some strange and alternate bunny universe. He's a breed called Californian, white with dark ears, weighs a hefty 11 pounds and has no pet name, only the designation 17SB tattooed into his left ear. He's well-fed and watered, lives in a Decatur "rabbitry," a kind of caged futuristic bunny condominium with flush toilets, and has a very active...

  •  

    Judge to sentence juror for missing day on jury

    A federal judge is scheduled to sentence a medical-devices salesman for contempt after he left on a business trip to Iowa during a trial at which he was serving as a juror. The chief judge at the U.S. District Court in Chicago on Tuesday could send Scott Enke to jail for up to three days.

  •  

    Wausau businessman charged with embezzlement

    A Wausau business owner is charged with embezzling more than $1 million from mortgage clients. Fifty-two-year-old Jay Fischer faces 25 charges, including racketeering, embezzlement and tax crimes. Court documents say Fischer owned Valley Title and worked with clients to refinance their mortgages.

  •  

    Parents of drowned toddler accused of endangerment

    The parents of an Illinois toddler who drowned in a lake were charged with child endangerment Monday, accused of allowing the boy and his twin brother to routinely wander from home through a basement window and having them live in what one prosecutor called "filth and squalor."

  •  

    Illinois State Fair has discount ticket for rides

    It's the last week for a deal on the Illinois State Fair carnival ride Mega Pass. The Mega Pass is good for an unlimited number of rides on the Adventure Village and Carnival Midway attractions during the fair in Springfield. The discounted price of $55 is available now. But, after Saturday, the price goes up to $65.

  •  

    Lawyer for Dwyane Wade’s wife wants out of case

    The child custody battle between Miami Heat star Dwyane Wade and his ex-wife took another twist with the 12th lawyer to represent Siohvaughn Funches-Wade asking to leave the case.Attorney Michael Haber filed a motion on Monday saying his relationship with Funches-Wade has reached a point where he can no longer represent her.

  •  
    Festival-goers can hear a couple of bands each day of the celebration, including some that have been crowd-pleasers in the past, such as Infinity and 7th Heaven. “We really just tried to get a nice variety that appeals to the people of Glendale Heights,” said Marge Linnane, a member of the Founder’s Day committee that organizes the festival.

    Glendale Heights Fest reaches out to every corner of community

    Glendale Heights Fest began in 1983 as a test run for the next year's celebration of the 25th anniversary of the village's incorporation. It started out with a five-ride carnival, a car show and fireworks, all on a much smaller scale than the festival's current attractions. "It was such a big success, and every year it gets bigger and better," said Marge Linnane, member of the Founder's Day...

  •  
    While suburban kids sometimes get help from parents on the playground, kids in Peru are climbing by themselves to the top of trees to pick mangos. In our desire to help and protect our children are we curbing their independence?

    Could the key to helping your kids be not helping your kids?

    Suburban parents add to those studies showing American children are more "helpless" than those of other countries. But it's not so easy to raise independent, free-range kids with just the right amount of pushing and protecting.

  •  

    Dawn Patrol: Gymnast’s Olympic sendoff; repeat Elmhurst bank robber

    Sen. Durbin calls for inspection of vulnerable rail bridges. Fires forced Pingree Grove to cancel fireworks finale. Boy, 12, falls three stories from Gurnee balcony. Aurora gymnast gets a sendoff to Olympics. Man robs Elmhurst bank for second time. Carol Stream inches closer to approving video gambling. Youkilis namd AL Player of the Week.

  •  
    Elaine Nekritz

    Nekritz: Pension reform might wait until lame duck session

    Illinois state Rep. Elaine Nekritz doesn't expect lawmakers to act on pension reform until after the Nov. 6 general election, though Gov. Pat Quinn said they should be ready to return to Springfield this summer to work on the contentious issue.

  •  

    Palatine officials likely to approve new TIF district

    The Palatine council sometime next month is expected to approve a new tax increment financing district aimed at spurring redevelopment in the area of Rand and Lake-Cook roads. Deputy Village manager Mike Jacobs said at a public hearing Monday that the aim is to "reduce or eliminate the conditions that qualify the district as blighted, help strengthen the commercial corridor along Rand Road (and)...

Sports

  •  
    The National League's Pablo Sandoval, of the San Francisco Giants, right, celebrates with teammates after their 8-0 win over the American League in the MLB All-Star baseball game.

    Sandoval, Cabrera turn All-Star game into NL romp

    Pablo Sandoval and Melky Cabrera turned the All-Star game into a Giant blowout. Flashing their bright orange spikes and booming bats, the San Francisco sluggers keyed a five-run blitz against Justin Verlander in the first inning that sent the National League to an 8-0 romp over the American League on Tuesday night. "San Francisco Giants show," Matt Kemp of the rival Dodgers said during the game.

  •  

    Chelios’ son giving Blackhawks a shot

    There will always be a strong connection between the Blackhawks and the last name of Chelios. So when Jake Chelios turned down a third straight invitation to the Red Wings' developmental camp to take a test run with the Hawks, it opened a lot of eyes on both sides of Lake Michigan. "The last 12 years I've worn red and white when I've been going to games so it's nice to come back here where I grew up," said the 21-year-old Chelios, who will be a junior at Michigan State. Tim Sassone has that and more on prospects camp in this Blackhawks report.

  •  
    Kyle Korver’s future with the Bulls remains up in the air.

    Bulls’ depth starting to take a hit

    Look at the payroll and the Bulls appear to have a “Big Four” to compete with Miami’s Power Trio and whatever sort of superteam is being built in Brooklyn.The Bulls have four players due to make at least $11 million next season: Derrick Rose, Carlos Boozer, Luol Deng and Joakim Noah.The thing is, the Bulls delivered the best regular-season record in the NBA the past two years not with a circle of stars but one superstar (Rose, obviously) and the league’s deepest team.The depth is taking a hit this summer, though. The Bulls parted ways with Ronnie Brewer and C.J. Watson on Tuesday. Wednesday, backup center Omer Asik is expected to sign a hefty offer sheet from the Houston Rockets that includes a third-year salary of $14.9 million.Kyle Korver has a different timeline than Brewer and Watson, so no decision on his future was made Tuesday. Korver will get $500,000 regardless, and if he plays for the Bulls next season, he will be paid $5 million.A league source suggested Korver’s future with the Bulls may depend on whether the team matches the Asik offer.The only member of the “Bench Mob” who figures to return for sure is forward Taj Gibson. But he’s in the final year of his rookie-scale contract and can become a restricted free agent next summer.Brewer ($4.37 million) and Watson ($3.2 million) had nonguaranteed deals for the coming season. With the Bulls bumping up against the luxury tax, they amounted to a luxury the team couldn’t afford to keep.During an appearance on WMVP’s “Waddle and Silvy Show,” Brewer said the Bulls didn’t rule out re-signing him at a smaller salary. The Bulls can sign free agents using only the league’s minimum salary, and if Brewer would take that they’d gladly re-sign him.But with so many teams with cap room left to spend, he figures to get a better offer. The Bulls are counting on second-year forward Jimmy Butler to fill Brewer’s defensive role.“I liked the situation I was in with the Bulls,” Brewer said in the radio interview. “I feel like we have a great team. The chemistry was bar none compared to the other teams I’ve been on. We’ve had a lot of success. We’ve won a lot of games in the regular season and had some kind of success in the playoffs.”NBA teams can officially sign free agents beginning Wednesday. So far, the Bulls have agreed to bring back veteran guard Kirk Hinrich, who was traded to Washington two years ago, for a reported two years and $6 million.With Asik and Korver in limbo, Hinrich gives the Bulls just eight players on the roster, so there is work to be done. Among the free agents thought to be receiving interest from the Bulls are Suns guard Michael Redd, Nets forward Gerald Green and Jazz guard C.J. Miles.CSN Chicago reported that point guards Jonny Flynn and Marcus Banks will join the Bulls for rookie-free agent camp at the Berto Center. Flynn was the No. 6 overall pick in the 2009 draft out of Syracuse but has been disappointing in three seasons with Minnesota, Houston and Portland.Banks, 30, spent eight years in the NBA, mostly as a backup, and played in the D-league last season.Flynn and Banks are not expected to play for the Bulls’ summer-league team in Las Vegas. That squad is expected to include former Illinois guard Demetri McCamey.The Bulls will play the first of five games at the Las Vegas Summer League on July 17 against Boston.mmcgraw@dailyherald.com

  •  
    Warren boys basketball coach Chuck Ramsey directs his team during Saturday’s High School Hoops Showdown game at the Sears Centre in Hoffman Estates.

    Former Warren coach Chuck Ramsey to lead CLC men’s team

    The former Warren boys head coach, who decided to end his career at the school in March after nearly four decades on the staff, will now go to those same high school games with something else on his mind: recruiting.

  •  
    The relentless booing of the Yankees’ Robinson Cano by Kansas City fans during the All-Star Home Run Derby on Monday night drew national attention, and in some places scorn.

    Cano reception during Home Run Derby causes stir

    KANSAS CITY, Mo. — The relentless booing of the Yankees’ Robinson Cano by Kansas City fans during the All-Star Home Run Derby on Monday night drew national attention, and in some places scorn.Fans were upset after the captain of the American League squad said he would choose a hometown player for his four-man team, but instead bypassed Royals star Billy Butler and went with Prince Fielder of the Tigers, Mark Trumbo of the Angels and Jose Bautista of the Blue Jays. Fielder won the competition, and the AL routed the National League. Cano wound up going 0 for 10, though, and each failure was met by cheers. Cano brushed off the cold reception, but others weren’t so kind to Kansas City. Several national TV broadcasters, radio hosts and columnists called the fans everything from “jerks” to “classless.”“Robinson Cano certainly picked people he thought should be on there,” Commissioner Bud Selig told the Baseball Writers’ Association of America on Tuesday. “While I understand Kansas City and I understand the whole Billy Butler thing, I really felt very badly last night.”Union head Michael Weiner thought the level of jeering was not justified.“It struck me that it moved a little bit past traditional, good-natured booing, particularly for an event like that, and got into another area,” Weiner said. “But Robinson Cano grew up in the Dominican Republic, plays in the Bronx, plays for the Yankees. He’s going to be fine.”Cano said that he was prepared for a frigid reception, even though it appeared to rattle him every time his father, Jose, delivered a pitch that he popped up, fouled off or grounded out.Yankees teammates Curtis Granderson and CC Sabathia even interrupted the proceedings to give father and son and a pep talk, but it didn’t do a whole lot of good.“It was interesting,” Granderson said. “It was one of those things where once it started, everyone else caught on, and the performance that Robbie was able to do just added to it. But it’s like Robinson said, we’re the Yankees, we get booed all the time.”The booing didn’t stop on Tuesday night, either. While fans cheered every other player during pregame introductions — including fellow Yankees Derek Jeter and Granderson — they still jeered Cano when he trotted out from the home dugout.Yankees star Alex Rodriguez sent Cano a text message of encouragement Monday night — “He said, you know, he’s a guy that’s looking out for me,” Cano said — and many others came to his defense.“I’m sure it happens in every ballpark, where there’s the hometown guy didn’t make it, and in Robbie’s defense, it’s hard to pick three guys,” White Sox slugger Adam Dunn said. “It would be hard, man, and it’s kind of a tough spot to be put in.”Brewers outfielder Ryan Braun questioned the practice of having players pick the teams.“I understand why they have a captain, but I also feel like it puts guys in uncomfortable positions,” he said, adding that he’s certain David Wright of the Mets will be chosen next year, when the All-Star game is played at Citi Field in New York. “You don’t want to deal with what Robinson dealt with,” Braun said.The passionate reaction by Royals fans created plenty of drama, though, particularly in an event that often becomes stale by the time the first round grinds to a conclusion.Viewership for ESPN was up 3 percent over last year, and in New York, there was a 10 percent increase as hometown fans tuned in to see Cano flame out. There were more than 800,000 Twitter and Facebook comments throughout the night, twice the volume of last year, and Twitter’s top 10 trends worldwide were related to the derby when the final round began.“Kansas City fans are better than that, but I don’t get on them,” said Chris Berman, who called the derby for ESPN. “I get it, but the three guys he picked were the three top guys.”

  •  
    White Sox general Manager Kenny Williams takes a breather as he watches batting practice before a game against the Cubs last month at U.S. Cellular Field.

    Sox GM Williams not done dealing

    If the White Sox are to hang onto their Central Division lead, they are going to need a lot of luck or a little more help in their rotation because there are so many unknowns at the moment. That means GM Ken Williams is still looking for arms.

  •  
    There’s not much going on this off-season for Blackhawks general manager Stan Bowman, or the Bulls either, for that matter.

    All’s quiet these days with Bulls, Blackhawks

    As the Bulls make relatively inconsequential roster moves this week, it seems that they and the Blackhawks are in danger of turning the United Center into the third Dakota. It's early, of course. The Bulls still might stumble upon a star player who provides hope, and the Hawks still might get lucky by having their season canceled by a labor dispute.

  •  

    Bears put single-game tickets on sale Friday

    The Chicago Bears have announced that individual-game tickets will go on sale through Ticketmaster at 11 a.m. Friday.

  •  
    AJ Allmendinger helps push his car down pit row Friday during qualifying for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series auto race at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach, Fla. NASCAR has temporarily suspended Allmendinger after he failed a drug test.

    Allmendinger denies knowingly taking banned drug

    Eager to resolve his suspension for a failed drug test, AJ Allmendinger said Tuesday that he has formally asked NASCAR to test his second urine sample and insisted that he would never "knowingly" take a prohibited substance. Allmendinger was informed hours before Saturday night's race at Daytona he had failed a random June 29 drug test. NASCAR does not disclose what substance was found, and Allmendinger and Penske Racing have not revealed details.

  •  
    Forward Darren Haydar has been re-signed by the Chicago Wolves for the 2012-13 season. Haydar has scored 50 or more points in each of his 10 seasons as a pro.

    10-year veteran Haydar returning to Wolves

    After topping the 50-point mark for the 10th time, forward Darren Haydar is returning to Wolves next season. Haydar, a popular 32-year-old AHL star, ranked first on the Wolves with 36 assists, shared second with 21 goals, and ranked second onthe team with 57 points in 70 outings last season. Haydar's 21 goals marked his ninth 20-plus goal campaign in his 10 pro seasons.

  •  
    Former Penn State president Graham Spanier told investigators hired by the university that he was never informed that former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky was spotted molesting a boy in a school shower, his lawyers said Tuesday as they rebutted reports that indicate the deposed official could have tried to cover up the abuse that ultimately led to coach Joe Paterno’s firing.

    PSU report on sex-abuse scandal due out Thursday

    An internal investigation into whether football coach Joe Paterno and other Penn State officials helped cover up reports that Jerry Sandusky was molesting children in the school's locker rooms will be released Thursday, officials said Tuesday. The report, commissioned by school trustees following the former assistant football coach's arrest last year, is expected to reveal how the university treated Sandusky after fielding complaints about his encounters with young boys in 1998 and 2001.

  •  

    Cubs, White Sox city series to be smaller next year

    The number of games between interleague rivals such as the Yankees and Mets, Cubs and White Sox, and Dodgers and Angels will be reduced under Major League Baseball's new schedule format for 2013.

  •  
    Lance Armstrong is asking a federal court to block the latest doping charges against him. The seven-time Tour de France winner filed a lawsuit in Austin, Texas, on Monday. Through his attorneys, he argues the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency violates the constitutional rights of athletes when it brings charges against them, and that USADA should not be allowed to pursue charges Armstrong used performance-enhancing drugs during his career.

    3 Armstrong associates get lifetime USADA bans

    With Lance Armstrong still digging in for a legal fight, the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency on Tuesday issued lifetime sports bans to three former staff members and consultants on Armstrong's winning Tour de France teams for doping violations.

  •  
    News reports name Remy Di Gregorio as the Tour de France rider who was taken for questioning by French police from the Cofidis team hotel Tuesday morning in a doping related case.

    Tour rider Di Gregorio arrested in doping probe

    The longtime problem of doping hit the Tour de France head on Tuesday when a French rider was arrested at his team hotel and suspended by his team. Police made their move on the Tour's first rest day in arresting Cofidis cyclist Remy Di Gregorio, with judicial officials saying two other people suspected of supplying the Frenchman with banned substances were also arrested — one along with the rider in Bourg-en-Bresse, and another in Marseille.

  •  
    San Antonio Silver Stars point guard Becky Hammon may have been hemmed in here by a pair of Indiana Fever defenders, but she contributed 19 points in helping the Stars decisively beat Indiana on July 5, 88-72.

    Chicago Sky scouting report

    One streak will be ending as the hottest team in the WNBA takes on one of the coldest. The Silver Stars have won seven straight games, best in the league. The Sky is on a two-game skid, but has also lost six of its last seven games.

  •  
    This undated photo provided by Heritage Auctions of Dallas, shows some of the more than 700 well-preserved 1910 baseball cards found in the attic of a house in Defiance, Ohio. The best of the bunch — 37 cards — are expected to bring a total of $500,000 when they are sold at auction in August during the National Sports Collectors Convention in Baltimore.

    Baseball cards in Ohio attic might fetch millions

    Karl Kissner picked up a soot-covered cardboard box that had been under a wooden dollhouse in his grandfather's attic. Taking a look inside, he saw hundreds of baseball cards bundled with twine. They were smaller than the ones he was used to seeing. But some of the names were familiar: Hall of Famers Ty Cobb, Cy Young and Honus Wagner. "It's like finding the Mona Lisa in the attic," Kissner said.

  •  
    PGA Tour veteran Steve Stricker, a two-time USA Ryder Cup player, will be trying to win his fourth straight John Deere Classic championship this week at TPC Deere Run in Silvis, Ill.

    Will Stricker slam his way to golf history?

    Call it the Stricker Slam. That's the piece of golf history that Steve Stricker will go after beginning Thursday in the PGA Tour's John Deere Classic at TPC Deere Run in Silvis, Ill., on the outskirts of Moline. In the last 140 years, only four players have won any big pro tournament four straight times. Stricker would become the fifth if he continues his reign at the $4.6 million JDC — the only PGA Tour stop in Illinois in 2012. Daly Herald golf columnist Len Ziehm previews that event, plus the upcoming Illinois Open and other golf news and notes in this week's column.

  •  
    Prince Fielder of the Detroit Tigers poses with his children Jaden, left, and Haven after winning Monday’s All-Star Home Run Derby in Kansas City, Mo.

    Tigers’ Prince Fielder wins MLB’s Home Run Derby

    Prince Fielder made a splash at the All-Star Home Run Derby. Eight of them. The Detroit slugger joined Ken Griffey Jr. as the only players to win multiple titles, thrilling the crowd at Kauffman Stadium with several shots into the right-field fountain and beating Toronto's Jose Bautista 12-7 in the final Monday night.

  •  
    The New York Yankees have asked Reggie Jackson to stay away from the team after he made pointed comments about Alex Rodriguez.

    Yankees tell Reggie to steer clear

    The Yankees want Reggie Jackson to steer clear of the clubhouse and team events following his pointed remarks about Alex Rodriguez and several former stars, a person familiar with the situation told The Associated Press on Monday.

  •  
    In this file photo, Lance Armstrong competes in this year’s Ironman Panama 70.3. triathlon in Panama City, Panama. The seven-time Tour de France winner Monday filed a lawsuit in Austin, Texas, arguing the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency violates the constitutional rights of athletes when it brings charges against them.

    Armstrong sues to block doping charges

    Lance Armstrong is going to federal court in the fight to save his seven Tour de France titles and his reputation as one of the greatest cyclists ever.

Business

  •  
    Spain’s Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy, left, and Economy Minister Luis de Guindos pose during the official opening of the new headquarters of the Inter-American Development Bank in Madrid.

    Euro finance ministers agree Spain bank aid terms

    Euro area finance ministers agreed early Tuesday on the terms of a bailout for Spain's troubled banks, saying that the first $36.88 billion in aid can be ready by the end of this month.The finance ministers for the 17 countries that use the euro as their official currency will return to Brussels on July 20 to finalize the agreement, having first obtained the approval of their governments or parliaments, eurozone chief Jean-Claude Juncker said.

  •  
    New Schaumburg Business Association President Kaili Harding speaks Tuesday during the association’s monthly Good Morning Schaumburg breakfast. Harding took over as the association’s president last month.

    New president aims to boost SBA’s voice in government

    Though the economy has changed since the Schaumburg Business Association was created in 2001, the organization's new president believes its role remains the same. "You join because you want to network, promote business, advocate, show commitment and be a part of something larger," Kaili Harding said.

  •  
    Robert S. Kapito, center, president of the global investment management company BlackRock, leaves after ringing the New York Stock Exchange opening bell to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the creation of the first fixed income exchange traded funds, including iShares, Tuesday.

    Stocks fall for a fourth day as tech profits slump

    Stocks fell for the fourth straight day Tuesday following a profit slump at technology companies and a steep decline in oil prices, which sent energy stocks sharply lower.

  •  

    United announces new flights from O’Hare

    United Airlines said Tuesday it will begin new service to points in the U.S., Canada, Mexico and the Caribbean. Daily flights to Monterrey, Mexico, will begin Dec. 19 after the airline gets government approval. Daily United Express service will also link Chicago with Thunder Bay, Ontario, beginning Feb. 14.

  •  

    Mt. Prospect roundtable on July 19

    The next Mt. Prospect business roundtable will be held July 19, an open forum for potential, new and existing businesses in the village , and a continuation of the Entrepreneur's Cafe series of meetings that have been held throughout 2012. Topics at this event will be social media, marketing and cross-promotions.

  •  
    Beverly Wyse, Boeing Commercial Airplanes’ 737 vice president and general manager, stands in front of a projected image of the new 737 MAX airplane during a briefing ahead of the Farnborough International Airshow.

    Boeing lands another airshow deal

    Boeing Co. and archrival Airbus were caught in a fierce dogfight for orders at the Farnborough Airshow on Tuesday, with both aircraft manufacturers unveiling multi-billion deals — crucial at a time of global economic unease.

  •  
    Settlement of a trademark battle in China has cleared the way for Apple to begin sales of the iPad there later this month.

    Apple will start selling iPad in China

    Apple will start selling the iPad in China on July 20 after paying $60 million to settle a dispute over the ownership of the tablet computer's name.

  •  
    Scranton Mayor Chris Doherty speaks during a debate between the four Democratic candidates for Pennsylvania governor in Harrisburg, Pa. Unions representing workers in the northeastern Pennsylvania city expect to file a federal lawsuit against the city after Doherty abruptly cut their pay to minimum wage last week.

    Pa. mayor cuts city workers’ pay to minimum wage

    The fiscal and political crisis in nearly-broke northeastern Pennsylvania city of Scranton was expected to deepen Tuesday as public employee unions said they would seek to hold the mayor in contempt of court after he defied a judge and slashed workers' pay to minimum wage.

  •  
    Former Barclays Chief Executive Bob Diamond leaves after giving evidence to the Treasury Select Committee at Portcullis House, central London Wednesday July 4, 2012. Diamond said Wednesday that his bank illegally reported low borrowing rates in October 2008 because other banks were reporting even lower ones, making Barclays look bad and threatening efforts to attract investment from Qatar.

    U.S. Congress conducting rate-fixing inquiries

    Two congressional committees are raising questions about what U.S. regulators knew concerning allegations that a key global interest rate was being manipulated.The chairman of a House Financial Services oversight subcommittee has asked the Federal Reserve Bank of New York to provide transcripts of discussions between Fed officials and the British bank Barclays regarding the setting of interest rates from September 2007 to November 2009. The New York Fed said it would comply with the request.

  •  

    Criminal probe led gov’t to change release of data

    Federal criminal and civil investigators looked into possible leaks of economic data that the government provides early to news organizations, according to a report posted Tuesday on the Labor Department's website. The Securities and Exchange Commission, the FBI and the Labor Department's inspector general are among the authorities that looked into the possible leaks, the report says. It's unclear whether any of the probes are continuing or have resulted in any charges. The FBI did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

  •  
    Paraguay’s Ambassador to the Organization of American States (OAS) Bernardino Hugo Saguier , left, talks to OAS Secretary General Jose Miguel Insulza, right, prior to the start of a special session about the political crisis in Paraguay, Tuesday.

    OAS chief says Paraguay should not be suspended

    The Organization of American States should not suspend Paraguay for impeaching its president because doing so would only isolate the country and create more problems, the group's secretary general said Friday.Jose Miguel Insulza made the announcement after a fact-finding mission to Paraguay's capital, Asuncion, where he met with supporters of ousted President Fernando Lugo as well as the political opponents who voted him out of office for "poor performance" last month.

  •  

    Jefferies doesn’t expect loss tied to Peregrine

    Jefferies says it's liquidated most of its positions in brokerage firm Peregrine Financial Group and does not expect to incur a loss associated with the troubled firm.

  •  
    Comcast is selling its stake in A&E Television Networks to Disney and Hearst.

    Comcast sells A&E stake to Disney, Hearst

    Comcast's NBCUniversal is selling its stake in A&E Television Networks to Disney and Hearst for $3.03 billion in cash.

  •  
    The 2013 Chevrolet Malibu Eco is introduced at the New York International Auto Show last April. Chevrolet is trying to pull more customers into its dealerships this summer by offering a money-back guarantee on new cars and trucks.

    Chevy offers money-back guarantee on new vehicles

    Chevrolet is trying to pull more customers into its dealerships this summer by offering a money-back guarantee on new cars and trucks.

  •  

    Closes: Finding new tenant a priority
    The Arlington Theaters — Arlington Heights’ only cinema — closed Sunday after negotiations for a new lease and the opportunity to upgrade the theater for the digital age fell through, said the theater’s director of operations.The closure affected 25 workers, said John Scaletta, who also is on the Arlington Heights village board.Scaletta said he had been negotiating for about a year to renew the lease and install digital technology upgrades “in order to compete on a level playing ground” with other upgraded cinemas. But the negotiations fell through and the movie house was forced to close, he said.“This has been a very, very tough situation for me, and I feel very bad for the staff and the community,” Scaletta said. Hollywood has been phasing out film in recent years, so celluloid is nearly extinct. And many suburban theaters nationwide are faced with some difficult and expensive upgrade decisions in the next 18 months, as Hollywood makes its final digital transformation. All movies coming out of Hollywood studios by late 2013 are expected to be fully digital and will require digital projectors and other equipment to display them in movie theaters, experts said.The Arlington Theaters was the first tenant to open in 1999 at 53 S. Evergreen Ave. inside the Arlington Town Square, a downtown shopping district with a mix of shops and restaurants. They include Ann Taylor Loft, Bath & Body Works, Starbucks, Panera Bread, California Pizza Kitchen, JoS. A. Bank Clothiers and Noodles & Company, among others. The property beneath the shopping district had seen its own share of troubles, including a foreclosure case in 2010.At that time, 29 investment firms that backed Arlington Town Square were sued for missing payments on a $19.8 million mortgage. The foreclosure case was filed in Cook County circuit court by WBCMT 2000-C33 Evergreen Avenue LLC, an affiliate of Miami Beach, Fla.-based LNR Partners Inc., the real estate firm and special servicer for the holder of the loan.The 29 investment firms all had “Arlington Town Square LLC” in their titles preceded by a different name or other identifier. A search of state records had shown those firms consisted of more than 50 individuals, family trusts and companies based in California, Idaho, New Mexico, Wisconsin, West Virginia, Hawaii, Florida, Tennessee and Utah.LNR Partners, which still handles the property, referred comments on Monday to its local management firm, Oak Brook-based Edgemark Asset Management LLC, which did not immediately return phone calls.Still, the village aims to fill the vacancy as soon as possible, said Charles Perkins, Arlington Heights director of planning and community development. “We’re making it a priority to find a replacement tenant and hope to get this resolved soon,” Perkins said. “The restaurants and retailers depended on the traffic generated by the theater, so it will be greatly missed. And the theater also held various fundraisers there, so its reach goes well beyond its economic value.”The Dunton House restaurant, 11 W. Davis in Arlington Heights, often drew business from the movie crowd just a short distance away and had posted on its Facebook page about the theater’s closure. “It’s really sad to see such a nice meeting place and theater close,” said Nancy Tsapralis, who owns the Dunton House with husband, Bill Tsapralis. “Everyone will suffer from it.”Closes: Village says finding new tenant a priority

  •  

    Survey: Small business optimism sinks in June

    The economy and uncertain political climate are making small business owners less optimistic, and hesitant to expand. The National Federation of Independent Business says its index of small business owners' sentiment fell 3 points in June to 91.4 after edging lower in May.

  •  

    Report: Some lose homes over as little as $400

    The elderly and other vulnerable homeowners are losing their homes because they owe as little as a few hundred dollars in back taxes, according to a report from a consumer group. Outdated state laws allow big banks and other investors to reap windfall profits by buying the houses for a pittance and reselling them, the National Consumer Law Center said in a report being released Tuesday.

  •  

    Senate Democrats pushing tax cuts for business

    Democrats want to push tax cuts through the Senate for companies that hire new workers, give raises or buy major new equipment this year. With neither party eager to let the other claim campaign-season victories, the ultimate fate of the roughly $29 billion legislation seems dubious. Debate was to begin Tuesday, though it was possible Republicans would use procedural blockades to quickly derail the measure.

  •  
    Ten-year-old Jacob Mosbacher guides a tractor through a bean field on his grandparents' property near Fults, Ill.

    Parents defend putting children to work on farms

    As he watched his 10-year-old son ease a tractor across a soybean field, Dennis Mosbacher acknowledged the risks of farming.But Mosbacher said the U.S. Labor Department was misguided in its attempts to protect children from farm accidents and he's relieved the agency dropped its plans this spring and has promised not to take up the matter again."You can't make a rule to stop every accident," Mosbacher said.

  •  

    Ahead of the Bell: Job Openings survey

    The government on Tuesday will report on JOLTS, the Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey, for May. The JOLTs report measures gross job gains, compared with the monthly jobs reports which are net figures calculated after subtracting layoffs and quits.

  •  
    An investor gestures in front of the stock price monitor at a private securities company Monday .

    Global stocks wary on China trade, Europe talks

    Stock markets showed tentative signs of recovery Tuesday in spite of weak trade figures from China and nervousness over European finance ministers' progress at a meeting focused on easing Spain's banking crisis. In early trading in Europe, Britain's FTSE 100 was up 0.6 percent 5,663.38. France's CAC-40 was up 1.05 percent at 3,190.27 while Germany's DAX was also up 0.9 percent at 6,446.29. Futures augured slight gains on Wall Street. Dow futures were up 0.22 percent at 12,713 and S&P 500 futures were up slightly, 0.16 percent, at 1,351.30.

  •  
    Tanker trucks take on loads of gasoline and diesel fuel at Arkansas Terminaling and Trading Inc., in North Little Rock, Ark., before making daily deliveries to retailers.

    Oil drops to near $85 as China trade growth slows

    Oil dropped to near $85 a barrel Tuesday after weak Chinese trade figures suggested the economic slowdown in the world's second-largest crude consumer is deepening. China said Tuesday that June imports increased 6.3 percent, which was less than analyst forecasts and down by half from May's growth rate while export growth declined to 11.3 percent from 15.3 percent in May.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Fresh or canned apricots star in this recipe that features just five ingredients.

    Long days call for short recipes; 5 recipes with 5 ingredients

    On long, hot summer days no on wants to spend any more time in the store or in the kitchen than they need to. In that spirit, we pored through our cache of new cookbooks in a search for simplicity.

  •  

    Grilled Provolone With Blood Orange Reduction
    Grilled Provolone with Blood Orange Reduction

  •  

    Carrot-Raspberry Salad
    Carrot and Raspberry Salad

  •  
    Actor Peter O’Toole announced Tuesday he will retire from films and stage. “The heart of it has gone out of me,” he said, adding, “it won’t come back.”

    Peter O’Toole retires with ‘dry-eyed farewell’

    Peter O'Toole is retiring from show business, saying he no longer has the heart for it and that it's time to "chuck in the sponge." O'Toole, who turns 80 on Aug. 2, said in a statement Tuesday that his career onstage and screen fulfilled him emotionally and financially and put him in the company of fine people.

  •  

    Dining events: Chick-fil-A welcomes cow costumes Friday

    Show some cow love and moooooooove on over to Chick-fil-A in a head-to-hoof cow costume and earn a free meal Friday, July 13 — otherwise known as Cow Appreciation Day. Too chicken to go full cow? Wear a few spots and receive a complimentary entree. Stop in breakfast, lunch or dinner.

  •  
    “Boss” actor and former radio DJ Doug James, of Park Ridge, clowns around with Mario Van Peebles, right, one of the show’s directors, while filming the second season this summer in Chicago.

    Radio DJ reinvents himself as ‘Boss’ actor

    On "Boss," Doug James' character is listed as "Grey Haired Man" in the credits. But his small role is prominent, landing him in most of the Season 1 episodes and a few Season 2 shows. The voiceover legend and former Chicago DJ, who lives in Park Ridge, is now a successful actor.

  •  
    Fresh or canned apricots star in this recipe that features just five ingredients.

    Baked Fruit Brioche
    3 slices (1-inch thick) from a loaf of brioche (4¾ ounces total); may substitute 3 medium croissants, cut in half horizontally3 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature cup apricot jam1-2 cans (14 ounces each) apricot halves in light syrup (or any sliced fresh stone fruit in season)1 tablespoon sugar, preferably superfineHeat oven to 400 degrees.Cut each slice of brioche in half to make 6 pieces and butter generously on both sides. Lay the slices in an ovenproof dish just large enough to hold them, and spread them with the apricot jam.Drain the canned apricot halves, reserving some of the syrup, and lay them cut side down on the bread, about 3 halves per piece. Drizzle with 2 tablespoons of the reserved apricot syrup and sprinkle with the sugar. Bake 15-20 minutes, until the bread is slightly crisped and browned at the edges. Serve hot. Serve plain or with creme fraiche, vanilla ice cream or lightly whipped heavy cream on the side.Cook’s notes: We found Euro Classic Imports Authentic French Brioche at Whole Foods Market. To make this with fresh fruit, cut the fruit into quarter-inch-thick slices. Use the slices to cover the buttered, jammed bread pieces. Top with the sugar and bake as directed.Serves six.Nutrition values per serving: 220 calories, 8 g fat (5 g saturated), 35 g carbohydrates, 2 g fiber, 2 g protein, 35 mg cholesterol, 100 mg sodium.Adapted from “Home at 7, Dinner at 8” by Sophie Wright (Kyle, 2011)

  •  
    Jennifer Hudson will perform at Taste of Chicago on July 11.

    Listen up at Taste of Chicago

    Whether you like pop, rock, R&B or alternative, the taste buds for your ears are in for a treat at this year's Taste of Chicago July 11-15.

  •  
    It was announced Tuesday that Darryl “DMC” McDaniels, center, and Joseph “DJ Run” Simmons, the surviving members of Run-DMC, will reunite at the Fun Fun Fun Fest in Austin, Texas on Nov. 2-4. Simmons retired from the group after Jason “Jam Master Jay” Mizell, left, was shot to death in 2002.

    Run-DMC announces reunion at Fun Fun Fest

    They haven't performed together in over a decade, but the surviving members of Run-DMC are set to reunite this fall at the Fun Fun Fun Fest in Austin, Texas.

  •  
    Blair Peters of Batavia, 20, makes lemon cookies dipped in white chocolate.

    Cook of the Week: College student inspired by children's book

    Blair Peters started baking when she was 4 or 5 years old. She and her brother Reed, now 19, would help their mom, Jan, make breads, cupcakes and cookies. One of the recipes they often made together was bread that came from the pages of one of Blair's books. "We baked bread a lot because there was a children's book called Possum Bread' or something like that. It had lots of illustrations of woodland creatures that baked bread."

  •  

    Spike Lee putting together Michael Jackson doc

    Spike Lee worked with Michael Jackson and considered him a friend, but the director says even he learned a lot combing through footage of the icon for a planned documentary about the singer's "Bad" album. Lee calls it a "treasure chest of findings."

  •  
    Blake Shelton, left, and Michael Buble on the set of NBC’s “The Voice” in Los Angeles. Michael Buble will act as adviser to Blake Sheltonís team of contestants.

    Michael Buble joins Blake Shelton’s ‘Voice’ team

    NBC says "The Voice" is teaming a crooner and a country singer for the show's new season. The network said Monday that Michael Buble will serve as adviser to coach Blake Shelton's team of contestants when the singing contest returns in September.

  •  

    Award-Winning Chocolate-Covered High-Hat Cupcakes
    Award-Winning Chocolate-Covered Hi-Hats Cupcakes: Blair Peters

  •  
    Spider-Man flies into action in “The Amazing Spider-Man,” which lets gamers swing between the skyscrapers of Manhattan.

    'Spider-Man' game loses to 'Lego Batman'

    Fans have been hoping that a new movie Spidey might reinvigorate the video-game franchise. But while the developer has given "The Amazing Spider-Man" some new tricks, it still feels a little threadbare. Batman fans, on the other hand, will enjoy "Lego Batman 2: DC Super Heroes," a more lighthearted, family-friendly romp.

  •  
    Oak Street Beach Cafe will again have grilled lobster tails on its menu for Taste of Chicago 2012.

    Pop-ups, celebrity chef dinners spice up Taste of Chicago

    Taste of Chicago may be shorter this year, but organizers promise that what the 32nd annual feastival lacks in days will be offset by exciting features as they attempt to lure crowds back to its tables. “This year we're adding experiences that are hard to come by,” said Taste manager Mary Slowik. Shortened from 10 to five days, 2012's festival runs July 11 to 15 in Grant Park.

  •  
    “Bloodline” by James Rollins

    'Bloodline' is filled with action and thrills

    Cutting-edge science and political intrigue are mixed with action and thrills in "Bloodline," the latest Sigma Force novel from James Rollins. A young pregnant woman named Amanda and her husband, Mack, are hiding from their pursuers on a vessel on the far side of the world. Unfortunately, they are discovered. Amanda watches in horror as her husband literally loses his head. She's kidnapped, but quickly realizes she's not the target: It's her unborn child.

  •  

    2012 Taste of Chicago restaurants

    The Taste of Chicago may be shorter this year, but the list of participating restaurants is no less delicious.

  •  
    Joshua Whitaker competed in bronco riding during a previous edition of the IPRA Rodeo hosted by the Wauconda Chamber of Commerce at the Golden Oaks rodeo grounds.

    Best bets: Broncos, Barry and Broadway

    Broncos will buck and lassos will fly at the annual IPRA Wauconda Rodeo this weekend. For something a little more polished, see Barry Manilow croon to the crowds Friday and Saturday nights. And if you have the kids with you, the American Girls Dinner and cruise departs Sunday night for some daughter bonding time on the high seas (or Lake Michigan).

Discuss

  •  

    Words vs. deeds

    Columnist Kathleen Parker: South Carolina politics never fails to amuse — and bemuse. A recent ethics imbroglio between Republican Gov. Nikki Haley and GOP activist John Rainey is a case in point.

  •  

    Lessons learned in golf games with Dad
    A Buffalo Grove letter to the editor: My dad constantly preached that you can tell a lot about someone's personality by how they act on the golf course:

  •  

    Legal gay marriage would be a mistake
    A Buffalo Grove letter to the editor: Research has shown that children do far better when blessed with both father and mother. That alone makes any drastic change a huge step in the wrong direction.

  •  

    FairTax is the only fair tax
    A Huntley letter to the editor: The FairTax system is a bill, languishing in the House Ways and Means Committee. Unless the entire bill becomes common knowledge, it will never get a fair hearing. Those who oppose it want to mischaracterize it, so even if the committee did hold a hearing it would be futile.

  •  

    ComEd did great job restoring power
    A Gilberts letter to the editor: We just wanted to give a shout out to the ComEd team that addressed the downed wire and subsequent fire damage in Gilberts on July 4. ComEd worked well into the night in the heat to make the area safe and restore power to some of the homes — and they were back again in the very early morning hours to finish the job.

  •  

    Obama a no-show on 4th? Must be un-American
    An Elgin letter to the editor: I thought the July 4 birthday show from Washington was beautiful and patriotic. How come the president could not come out and wish America a happy birthday? Without a doubt he really must dislike America.

  •  

    A tax plan all can get behind
    A Glendale Heights letter to the editor: Being a conservative Republican, I would never have thought that I would suggest a new tax. However I have a recommendation to, help solve the federal and state budget deficits.

«Jun

Jul 2012

Aug»
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31 1 2 3 4