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Daily Archive : Monday September 19, 2011

News

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    Prospect Hts. store reopens after crash

    An Indian grocery store in Prospect Heights has reopened after a car went through their storefront Thursday night. A car crashed through the storefront of Prabhu Grocers, on the 1200 block of Elmhurst Road, after the driver told them he accidentally hit the gas instead of the brake around 8 p.m. Thursday, Sept.15.

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    Paolo Presta

    Oprah's dream guy from Hoffman Estates doing talk show

    Paolo Presta says his life was forever changed when Oprah Winfrey showed up in Hoffman Estates and granted him his dream to appear on "Will & Grace." Now, after seven years of living and working in Hollywood, he is starting his own online talk show, "A Spoonful of Paolo." If she hadn't come that day, Presta says he'd still be working the family grocery store.

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    Metra wants passengers to help with its fare-collection campaign.

    Metra urging riders to out cheaters, lax conductors

    Does your fellow Metra traveler fudge the truth on their final destination? Is the conductor lackadaisical about collecting fares? Do tell. Metra has launched a “Be Fair, Pay the Fare” campaign that encourages riders to spill the beans about rule breaking on trains in an effort to recoup every dollar as agency leaders contemplate ticket increases of up to 32 percent in light of a $65...

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    Marlin Simon with A-Midwest Board-up Inc. sweeps up glass after a driver crashed an SUV though the window of H&R Block on Rand Road north of Central Road in Thursday afternoon in Mt. Prospect. The building was unoccupied because it is not tax season.

    Employees luckily away when SUV crashed into Mt. Prospect stores

    Luck was on the side of two employees of a Mount Prospect car rental business Monday afternoon, who happened to head out on a call just minutes before a car crashed straight through the store's wall exactly where the two normally stand.

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    Dawn Patrol: Quick hits as you head out the door

    News you need to know today: Plainfield native wins Emmy, state trooper crashes near Deerfield, slick roads, Sox win, Bears/Cutler get beat up and Justin Rose wins at Cog Hill.

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    “Ferris Bueller's Day Off,” the classic 1986 movie filmed in Chicago, will be the first movie ever shown at Wrigley Field Saturday night, Oct. 1.

    First movie at Wrigley: ‘Ferris Bueller's Day Off'

    “Ferris Bueller's Day Off,” the classic 1986 John Hughes film shot in Chicago and the suburbs, will be the first movie ever shown at Wrigley Field on Saturday night, Oct. 1. The night also will feature a Guiness World Record attempt to have the most people sing “Danke Shoen,” a song Ferris sings in the movie, and there'll be cast look-a-likes and other surprises.

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    Committee questions Itasca home-rule bid

    As Itasca pursues home-rule status in hopes of accesses tied-up tax dollars, a new committee met Monday to help weigh the pros and cons.

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    Residents line up in Des Plaines for the home generator rebate program.

    Des Plaines generator rebate program a hit, but money's gone

    Des Plaines city officials say they ran out of the $22,500 allocated for a home generator rebate program within hours the first day it started. City officials will have to revisit whether to allocate more funds for the program this year and the next.

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    3-year-old Batavia special-needs student left on bus

    A 3-year-old boy was apparently sleeping on the school bus when it stopped to drop off students at a Batavia school, and he was not spotted until the bus arrived at its terminal, according district Superintendent Jack Barshinger.

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    Palatine paints more optimistic financial pictures

    The village of Palatine is finally treading water in terms of its economic health, an improvement considering it had been swimming upstream the past couple years, Village Manager Reid Ottesen said Monday. In the first six months of 2011, revenue exceeded expenses by $8.4 million. “Things appear to have stabilized,” he said.

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    Wheaton downtown group will get public hearing on tax district

    Wheaton city council sets a public hearing on a special taxing district that would fund the Downtown Wheaton Association. If the district is not created, the organization would most likely dissolve, its officials have said.

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    FBI: Carol Stream bank robbed

    The FBI is investigating a bank robbery that occured in Carol Stream Monday night just before the bank closed.

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    Schaumburg prepares new, lower tax levy

    As predicted in the spring, Schaumburg officials are recommending the village’s third property tax levy this fall be reduced by 6.1 percent from last year’s, due to continuing improvements in other revenues like sales tax. “We are doing what we promised we would,” said Village Trustee George Dunham, who chairs Schaumburg’s finance committee.

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    Director shoots, premieres movie in hometown of St. Charles

    Monday night sparked the beginning of the most intense phase of “Munger Mania” in St. Charles as “Munger Road,” a film shot in the city, soon will be released. Nicholas Smith, the film's writer and director, came before the St. Charles city council Monday to thank them for the city’s contributions to making the movie.

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    St. Charles D303 may dump state tests to measure success

    St. Charles Unit District 303 may re-evaluate its measures of student achievement after an eye-opening statistic from Elgin Community College and state test scores not quite as stellar as last year’s. School board members tasked with reviewing test performance numbers learned that about half the students who attend ECC upon graduation find themselves placed in remedial math, reading and English...

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    Gurnee OKs new social media policy

    Gurnee village board trustees Monday night approved a formal policy governing the use of social media such as Facebook and Twitter when communicating with the public. “The village shall strictly prohibit the use of village social media accounts for the purposes of sharing personal opinions, highly subjective information or political campaigning,” the policy states.

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    James F. Jackson

    Man pleads innocent to thefts from Lisle library

    A 43-year-old Glen Ellyn man on Monday denied using his job as a custodian to steal thousands of books, DVDs and other materials from the Lisle Public Library. James F. Jackson, of the 300 block of Spruce Lane, pleaded innocent to five counts of theft during a brief court appearance.

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    Barbara Bradley stocks shelves at the new Wheeling food pantry.

    New food pantry open in Wheeling

    As area food pantries struggle to stay open, the Rotary Club of Wheeling, the village of Wheeling and other organizations have teamed up to open one. A new pantry opened last week at a Wheeling Police Department substation at 101 N. Wolf Road as a project of the Rotary Club, OMNI Youth Services, St. Joseph the Worker Church, Wheeling High School, and Wheeling Township Elementary District 21.

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    In this 1955 file photo, entertainer Bob Hope, right, and his wife Dolores attend the premiere of Hope's movie “The Seven Little Foys” at a Paramount Theater in Los Angeles.

    Dolores Hope, wife of Bob Hope, dies

    Dolores Hope, the sultry-voiced songstress who was married to Bob Hope for 69 years and sometimes sang on his shows for U.S. troops and on his television specials, has died at age 102.

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    ASSOCIATED PRESS Artist Tom Wilson Jr. draws a Ziggy cartoon celebrating the strip's 35th anniversary at his home in Loveland, Ohio, in 2006.

    Ziggy creator Tom Wilson Sr. dies

    Tom Wilson Sr., the creator of the hard-luck comic strip character Ziggy, has died, his family said Monday. He was 80.

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    The 826 people who formed the letters “CASA” on the Stevenson High School football field Saturday evening in an attempt to set the world record for largest glow stick design as part of the school's Spirit Fest annual fundraiser.

    Stevenson High hopes charity event nets second Guinness record

    For the second straight year, Stevenson High School students and staffers believe an activity connected with the annual Spirit Fest fundraiser has set a world record. An estimated 826 people took to the Stevenson High football field on Saturday night with luminescent tubes to form what organizers think is the world's largest glow stick design.

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    Fixtures on sale at closed Arlington Hts. hotel

    The sale of fixtures and furniture at the former Sheraton Chicago Northwest Hotel in Arlington Heights will begin at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 20. Items range from sleigh beds, desks and chairs to gym equipment, chandeliers, pianos and kitchen equipment.

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    Grayslake District 46 budget hearing:

    Grayslake Elementary District 46 board members will host a budget hearing for the public at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday.

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    Join a Girl Scout troop

    The Vernon Hills/Hawthorn District 73 community is hosting a Girl Scout information night from 7 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 21 in the Townline Elementary School cafeteria, 430 Aspen Drive, Vernon Hills.

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    Skeet shooting for Grayslake youth:

    The Oasis community youth center in Grayslake will host a skeet-shooting fundraiser.

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    FILE - In this May 8, 2009 file photo, former Bolingbrook, Ill., police sergeant Drew Peterson yells to reporters as he arrives at the Will County Courthouse in Joliet, Ill. A state appellate court on Tuesday, July 26, 2011 refused to overturn a Will County judge's decision barring prosecutors from using some hearsay, or second hand, evidence against former Bolingbrook police Sgt. Drew Peterson. Peterson is charged with first-degree murder in the 2004 slaying of third wife Kathleen Savio. He also is a suspect in the 2007 disappearance of his fourth wife, Stacy Peterson. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green, File)

    Court: Drew Peterson must stay in jail

    The Illinois Supreme Court says Drew Peterson must stay in jail while the former police officer fights charges that he murdered his third wife.

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    Island Lake committee meets Saturday

    Island Lake’s lake management committee will meet Saturday to discuss weed control, a bass fishing tournament and other issues.

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    Two charged in string of Asian store burglaries

    Two men who initially drew police attention after being caught urinating behind a Mount Prospect strip mall have been charged as a result of a multijurisdictional investigation into 40 burglaries at mostly Asian food stores in the Northwest suburbs and Chicago.

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    Mary Ellen Hogan decided against renewing a three-year lease to keep her Urban Harvest shop open in Arlington Heights and is pursuing a new job instead.

    Arlington Heights’ Urban Harvest closing shop Sept. 30

    Urban Harvest, a fixture in downtown Arlington Heights for 11 years, will close at the end of the month. Owner Mary Ellen Hogan said she is closing the shop to take a “dream job” with a wine marketing company in Lake Bluff.

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    Kane committee: Demolish old jail, think big for new site

    A Kane County committee studying uses for the shuttered jail off Fabyan Parkway and the now-closed Settler’s Hill landfill hopes to have a proposal by next May. In the meantime, the committee wants to demolish the old jail and relocate the Kane County Diagnostic Center and a fleet maintenance garage.

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    Randy Ramey

    Ramey to run for Senate

    State Rep. Randy Ramey said Monday that he’ll make a bid for the Illinois Senate in 2012 instead of an effort for re-election to the House.

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    Town hall meeting to cover District 68 finances

    Lowering the amount asked in property taxes is expected to be among the items for discussion Thursday as Green Oaks-based Oak Grove District 68 hosts a town hall meeting on finances.

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    Carpentersville trustee wants to give voters more power

    Carpentersville village board members should not have the authority to establish or raise fees, increase the tax levy or create tax increment financing districts without voter approval, Village Trustee Doug Marks says. He has drafted an ordinance that, if approved, would repeal that aspect of home rule and give voters the ability to decide taxing matters through a ballot question. Trustees will...

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    Too much on technology in Wheaton schools?

    A new information system at Wheaton Warrenville Unit District 200 has one board member crying foul because he says the district's spending on technology is too high. However, school officials say the upgrades to the new system make life easier for teachers and administrators.

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    Alzheimer’s event Sept. 21 in Arlington Hts.

    Church Creek in Arlington Heights will host “Resources to Remember,” an event for caregivers and families of Alzheimer’s patients, from 3:30-6 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 21.

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    Frank Descetto

    Carol Stream man pleads innocent in sex case

    A Carol Stream man accused of soliciting undercover police officers for sex with a minor pleaded innocent Monday to the charges against him.

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    Lisa Madigan

    Madigan hosts ‘scam class’ in Arlington Hts.

    Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan will be in Arlington Heights Wednesday, Sept. 21, to educate seniors about common scams that steal their money. The event is 10-11:30 a.m. at the Arlington Heights Senior Center, 1801 W. Central Road.

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    Schaumburg traffic campaign leads to arrests, citations

    Schaumburg police made two DUI arrests and issued 26 speeding citations, 12 seat belt violations, 18 insurance violations and 41 tickets for other moving and equipment violations during a Labor Day traffic enforcement campaign.

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    Waukegan man gets jail in home burglaries

    A Waukegan man will spend the next three years in jail when he is not undergoing drug treatment after he admitted his involvement in a pair of house burglaries Monday. Jesse Kutinac, 21, pleaded guilty to residential burglary during a hearing before Lake County Circuit Judge Fred Foreman.

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    Superintendent Scott Thompson is exploring starting an educational farm on 40 acres that Palatine Township Elementary District 15 owns along Ela Road in Inverness.

    Palatine Dist. 15 exploring educational farm in Inverness

    Hoping to teach students about healthy and sustainable eating, and that food doesn't originate from the “shelves at Jewel,” Palatine Township Elementary District 15 Superintendent Scott Thompson is talking about starting an educational farm on 40 acres of district-owned land in Inverness. “I think it’s really a cutting-edge kind of thing in education,” Thompson said.

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    Aurora man dies after motorcycle crash

    A 23-year-old Aurora man has died from injuries suffered in a motorcycle crash last week, according to police.

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    Chemotherapy took her hair, but Mount Prospect native Judy Fabjance never lost her sense of humor. The longtime Second City teacher, writer and performer shares a smile here with her daughter, Daphne.

    Second City pals are first-rate support for Mount Prospect cancer sufferer

    There's no people like show people for Second City's Judy Fabjance. In the Mount Prospect native's fight against breast cancer, she continues to get help from an ensemble that includes Tina Fey, Stephen Colbert and others.

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    Hoffman Estates branch pickup resumes Monday

    The village of Hoffman Estates’ free curbside branch pickup program starts again on Monday, Sept. 26. Public works crews request that branches are stacked at the curbside by 7 a.m. on the first day of pickup. The village also will be giving away wood chips at its public works facility.

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    Police briefs

    A Texas woman who recently moved to Illinois to join her husband suspects that while she was in jail, her cousin used her debit card without her permission and made $1,491.74 in unauthorized transactions, with more pending, police said.

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    Pablo Galeana-Rueda

    Prison terms for $1 million pot bust in North Aurora

    Two of three people arrested in January 2011 in connection with a bust of 50 pounds of high grade marijuana on Interstate 88 are going to prison. One man got eight years and another- this one from Elgin - will be sentenced in January 2012. A third defendant is due in court this week.

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    Kiwanis Club of Elgin to distribute peanuts
    The Kiwanis Club of Elgin will be raising funds through its annual Peanut Day promotion Friday, Sept. 23. Members in red vests will be standing on street corners and in front of community stores.

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    Schaumburg library encourages library card sign-up

    To celebrate National Library Card Sign-up Month, the Schaumburg Township District Library (STDL) has a small gift for all those who sign up for a library card or update the information on their current card throughout September.

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    Work by Elgin folk artist Chris Robinson will be one of the highlights of the 29th annual Autumn Country Folk Art Festival Sept. 23-25.

    Kane County folk art festival draws popular artists
    Work by Elgin folk artist Chris Robinson will be among the most popular on display at the 29th annual Autumn Country Folk Art Festival Friday, Sept. 23, to Sunday, Sept. 25, at the Kane County Fairgrounds in St. Charles. The annual event draws the best of the best in the country folk art medium.

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    Jose Padilla

    Appeals court: 17 years too lenient for terror suspect

    The 17-year prison sentence imposed on convicted terrorism plotter Jose Padilla is far too lenient for someone who trained to kill at an al-Qaida camp and also has a long, violent criminal history, a federal appeals court ruled Monday as it threw out the sentence. Padilla was arrested at O'Hare International Airport in 2002.

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    Jereme Richmond was arrested on Monday in Waukegan related to battery and gun charges.

    Judge again denies Richmond travel request

    A Lake County judge refused for the second time Monday to allow former Waukegan basketball standout Jereme Richmond to travel outside the state while he is on bond for a pair of felony charges. Richmond’s attorney, Lawrence Wade, said his client has an opportunity to participate in a “workout” session with other prospective NBA players Oct. 1 in Los Angles.

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    One injured in crash on Naper Blvd.

    One person was injured in a single car accident on Naper Blvd. in Naperville early Monday.

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    Chairman Ben Bernanke seems to shrug off dissent within the Federal Reserve and has maintained his course.

    Bernanke tolerating dissent but pushing past it

    For someone known as a consensus builder, Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke sure generates -- and shrugs off a lot of dissent.

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    Court reinstates $675,000 damages for downloading

    An appeals court reinstated a $675,000 verdict against a Boston University student who illegally downloaded 30 songs and shared them on the Internet, but left the door open for the trial judge to reduce the award again.

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    The eaglets rescued this summer from Mooseheart

    Rescued Batavia-area eaglets to be released

    Officials say eaglets whose nest was destroyed months ago in a storm will be released at Starved Rock State Park.

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    Equipment that collects and digitizes measurements as part of the USArray project to measure the movement of the earth will be installed at Ryerson Woods near Riverwoods.

    Seismograph installed at Lake County preserve

    In a field near the old visitors center at Ryerson Woods in southeast Lake County, equipment is being installed as part of a nationwide project that has piqued the interest of those who study the earth. A seismic station that measures how the ground moves, will be set seven feet below the surface as the next wave in the USArray, a 10-year continental-scale seismic observatory.

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    Dist. 204 teachers voting on evaluations

    Teachers in Indian Prairie District 204 will vote Thursday on whether to accept changes in the way they are evaluated. The state is mandating the changes, which require teachers to be evaluated with one of four ratings: excellent; proficient; needs improvement; and unsatisfactory. The district has not used such measures in the past, Superintendent Kathy Birkett said.

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    Balconies are proposed for the luxury apartments at Arlington Downs in Arlington Heights.

    Arlington Heights to review details of Sheraton plan

    Curious about what developers want to do with the old Sheraton Chicago Northwest hotel next to the Arlington Park racetrack? Details of the new Arlington Downs will emerge Wednesday, Sept. 21 at the Arlington Heights village hall, where developers will talk about the luxury apartments they want to build out of the old hotel.

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    Michael J. Morgan, 40, of Winthrop Harbor has been arrested by Antioch police and charged with 2) counts of theft by deception, class four felony, punishable by 1-3 yrs in prison upon conviction (2) counts of Disorderly Conduct.

    Antioch mayor helps police track down scam suspect

    A Winthrop Harbor man who police say has been pulling scams in Antioch was arrested with a little help from Mayor Larry Hanson. Michael J. Morgan, 40, has been charged with two counts of theft by deception and two counts of disorderly conduct following his arrest, Antioch Police Chief Craig Somerville said.

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    Go green in your community:
    A workshop for landscape companies, turf managers, homeowner associations and municipalities will be offered 8 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 13 at the College of Lake County in Gryaslake.

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    City Limits Harley-Davidson in Palatine holds celebration

    City Limits Harley-Davidson will hold its official grand opening celebration Saturday, Sept. 17, at the new dealership, 2015 N. Rand Road, Palatine. The festivities will include a pig roast, beverages, live band, photos on Harleys, test rides and a simulation bike.

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    FBI: violent crime down by 6 percent last year

    The FBI says that violent crime dropped 6 percent in 2010, marking the fourth straight year of declines. And property crime also was down for the eighth straight year, falling 2.7 percent.

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    James D. Kisla

    Lisle man pleads innocent in DUI pedestrian fatality

    A 51-year-old man accused in a fatal Fourth of July weekend crash in Lisle pleaded innocent Monday to charges that he was driving while impaired. James D. Kisla of Lisle denied in court that he was driving under the influence of alcohol and painkillers on July 3 when his vehicle struck 69-year-old Donna Early of Naperville, who died hours later at a hospital.

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    Young birders may be rarer than a mockingbird in Illinois, Jeff Reiter says, but they’re certainly enthusiastic.

    Birders can help kids take an interest in hobby

    Our Jeff Reiter believes kids and birds are a good fit. It’s fun to see kids get excited about sights and sounds most of us take for granted, he says. The key is to keep them interested by offering more opportunities for birding and steady encouragement as they explore the hobby.

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    SciTech Hands On Museum in Aurora has launched SciTech Discovery Preschool, an education program that draws heavily on the museum’s exhibits and resources to give children an early start in subjects relating to science, technology, engineering and math.

    Aurora’s SciTech museum preschool encourages children to explore how and why

    For all of nature’s littlest scientists, a new preschool at SciTech Hands on Museum in Aurora may help satiate some of those endless whys and hows. The SciTech Discovery Preschool offers programs for children ages 3, 4 and 5 with an age-appropriate focus on science. “I have never met a preschool-age child who isn’t fascinated by science,” said Cheryl Newman, the...

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    Caroline Kennedy

    Kennedy book-signing postponed
    Caroline Kennedy has postponed her book-signing event on Wednesday, Sept. 21, at Naperville's North Central College, in the wake of her cousin Kara Kennedy's death.

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    Defenders to show documentary on global warming at MCC
    The Environmental Defenders of McHenry County will host a free showing of the 2007 documentary “Everything’s Cool” at 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 22, at McHenry County College’s Conference Center, 8900 Route 14, in Crystal Lake.

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    Teachers at the One Hope United Aurora Early Learning Center participate in a team-building exercise before the center opened Sept. 7, using chairs and desks meant for much smaller students. Staff members are taught to treat every child — down to the smallest infant — with respect to set them up for a lifetime of learning.

    Aurora Early Learning Center fosters respect, love of education

    The new Aurora Early Learning Center is home to chairs small enough to seat 6-month-olds, computer desks meant for preschoolers and plenty of multicultural dolls and books, but nothing to restrict a child’s free motion inside a classroom. "It's all part of the healthy lifestyles education," said Kate Currin, communications director for One Hope United.

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    Local writers to read at Barrington library cafe

    Local writers will read their original poems, stories and memoirs from 7-9 p.m. Friday, Sept. 23, at the Barrington Area Library, 505 N. Northwest Hwy., Barrington.

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    Olivia Carlson shows the winning design she entered in the Naperville Public Library Children’s Card Contest.

    Naperville fifth-grader wins library card design contest

    Olivia Carlson, a fifth-grader at Brookdale Elementary School, is the winner of Naperville Publc Library Children's Card Contest. Cards with Olivia's design will debut in November during Young Readers Week.

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    Elgin High’s Parent University focuses on ninth grade
    Elgin High School is offering its seventh Parent University for Elgin High parents of ninth-graders. It will be held in sessions from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, Sept. 24, at the school, 1200 Maroon Drive.

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    Gunmen from Congo kill 36 at pub in Burundi

    BUJUMBURA, Burundi — Armed men from Congo burst into a pub in the central African nation of Burundi and killed 36 people, an official said Monday. One wounded man said an attacker yelled: “Make sure there’s no survivors.”

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    Court extends Norway killer’s detention, isolation

    OSLO, Norway — A Norwegian court has ruled that confessed mass killer Anders Behring Breivik must remain in pretrial detention for eight weeks, four of them in solitary confinement.Judge Anne Margrethe Lund announced the decision after a closed hearing Monday attended by the 32-year-old right-wing extremist.

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    No death penalty in ’09 Iraq deaths

    A military judge has recommended that an Army sergeant accused of killing U.S. military personnel at a mental health clinic on a base in Iraq in May 2009 should not face a possible death sentence because he is mentally ill. Col. James Pohl said in his recommendation issued Friday that Sgt. John Russell’s serious mental illness makes execution an inappropriate punishment.

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    Dan Cronin

    End of gravy train causes DuPage County employees to retire

    DuPage County has made signifigant changes to time-off benefits that officials believe caused an exodus of employees. “There’s a reason why more than 100 employees have left,” DuPage County Board Chairman Dan Cronin said. “I think it’s because of the policies. We were talking about reforming and changing the employee benefit packages and scaling them back.”

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    Tim Cunningham looks at the soles of his feet shortly after crossing the finish line Sunday to win the 26.2 mile Fox Valley Marathon. He ran the entire race without shoes. He is from Virginia and represents Clowns Without Borders USA, a group that raises money to supply shoes to children who live in refugee camps and conflict zones around the world. He is a professional clown and has run five marathons this year in bare feet.

    Fox Valley Marathon Race
    The Fox Valley Marathon Races started at 7 a.m Sunday in St. Charles under a rainbow and competitors in the marathon followed the Fox River to Aurora and back before finishing in the rain. Last year’s marathon was the first in the Fox Valley in more than 30 years. More than 2,000 runners raced Sunday in either a half marathon, 20 mile race, full marathon or a kid's race.

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    Ind. cities facing changes in state gun laws

    Police and a gun-rights expert say a man who caused a commotion by carrying a holstered handgun on his hip at Evansville’s zoo was within his rights under Indiana law, which now largely prohibits local governments from limiting gun possession.

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    SeaWorld fights fine over trainer’s death

    SeaWorld Orlando and government attorneys are in a Florida courtroom fighting over citations the theme park was issued following the death of a trainer who was grabbed by a killer whale and dragged under water last year. The weeklong hearing starts Monday in a courtroom in Sanford, an Orlando suburb.

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    Death toll from Himalayan quake rises to 50

    GAUHATI, India — Rescue workers used shovels and their bare hands to pull bodies from the debris of collapsed buildings Monday, as the death toll from an earthquake that hit northeast India, Nepal and Tibet rose to 50.At least 25 people died in the northeastern Indian state of Sikkim after the 6.9 magnitude quake hit the region Sunday evening, police said.

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    Patient Ed Larson spoke about the how the plane crash Friday at the Reno Air Races happened in front of him during a news conference at a hospital in Reno, Nev., Sunday. The plane crash killed nine people, including pilot Jimmy Leeward, authorities say.

    Calm chaos followed Nevada air show disaster

    Amid the horrific aftermath of the nation's deadliest air racing disaster Friday in Reno, Nev., a crash that killed nine and sent about 70 people to Reno-area hospitals, a sort of calm pervaded. Witnesses were spattered with blood, yet video of the scene shows paramedics, police and spectators attending to the wounded with a control that seems contradictory to the devastation.

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    Soldier who died while scuba diving laid to rest

    TOMAH, Wis. — A Wisconsin soldier who died while scuba diving in Hawaii will be buried Monday in Tomah with military honors.

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    Siblings face charges in Chicago robberies

    A Lemont woman who was charged with her brother in a string of armed robberies in Chicago has been ordered held in lieu of $2 million bail. Twenty-eight-year-old Jaclyn Madera appeared in bond court Sunday. She and her brother 36-year-old Steven Madera were accused of using a fake gun to hold up women who were standing alone.

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    Woman dies in the fatal fire in Oconto County

    COLEMAN, Wis. — Officials in Oconto County say there’s no apparent connection between a two house fires on Rost Lake on Saturday, including one in which a woman died.Brazeau Fire Chief John Fetterly tells the Green Bay Press-Gazette that investigators haven’t determined the cause of either one, but they don’t appear suspicious.

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    Inmate who escaped in Indy recaptured in Iowa

    INDIANAPOLIS — Authorities say a Marion County Jail inmate who escaped from a work detail has been captured in Iowa.Indianapolis authorities say 21-year-old Cody Thurman was arrested early Sunday in Andrew, Iowa, after a bar owner became suspicious and alerted police. Thurman was being held by authorities in Belleview, Iowa, awaiting extradition to Indiana.

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    Madison homicide victim identified

    MADISON, Wis. — The Dane County medical examiner’s office is identifying the man shot on Thursday in what police are calling a drug deal that turned violent.He’s 24-year-old Michael James Keith of Madison. The medical examiner’s office is calling the death a homicide. Keith died Friday at the University of Wisconsin Hospital in Madison.

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    A gunman killed his wife at their Lakeland, Fla., home and then burst through the front door of a nearby church on Sunday, wounding a pastor and associate pastor before parishioners tackled him, authorities and relatives said.

    Fla. man shoots church pastors, kills wife

    As the Lakeland, Fla., congregation bowed their heads and prayed Sunday, a former church member stormed into the church and opened fire, shooting and wounding the pastor and associate pastor from behind before he was wrestled to the ground. Earlier, Jeremiah Fogle shot his wife to death at his house, where he had started his own church, authorities and relatives said. They did not know what led...

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    Some Ill. driver’s ed cars have low crash ratings

    Many Illinois students are learning to drive in cars that have low crash-test ratings as school districts put a bigger priority on cost and fuel mileage.The Chicago Tribune reported Sunday (http://trib.in/qDQN94 ) that it analyzed safety data on about 1,300 driver’s ed cars in nearly 60 districts.

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    Chicago group to host Dick Cheney for book chat

    The Union League Club of Chicago’s author’s group is hosting the event Monday in downtown. It includes questions from the audience. The book is called “In My Time: A Personal and Political Memoir” and was a collaboration with his daughter, Liz Cheney. The autobiography has revived debate over the rationale to attack Iraq in 2003 and the cost in American lives and dollars.

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    Vigil set for teen athlete who was struck by car

    FRANKFORT — A candlelight vigil has been planned for a high school freshman cross-country athlete who died after being hit by car while running in a suburban Chicago forest preserve. Fourteen-year-old Patrick Mizwicki is being remembered as a polite young man with a big heart who was loved by his teammates.

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    ACLU of Indiana hires new fundraising director

    INDIANAPOLIS — The American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana has hired an Indianapolis man to oversee the civil rights group’s fundraising efforts.

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    Police arrest 18-year-old in NW Ind. woman’s death

    Police have arrested an 18-year-old man who investigators believe is responsible for the death of a young Portage, Ind., woman whose body was found by searchers over the weekend in northwestern Indiana.

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    Turkish navy to escort offshore fuel research

    ANKARA, Turkey — Turkey’s energy minister says that if Cyprus starts to drill for oil and gas off its shores, Turkey will launch a similar exploration within a week under the protection of Turkish warships.Taner Yildiz told reporters Monday that Turkish navy would “obviously” escort the research ship that would look for oil and gas in the Mediterranean.

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    UK police arrest 7 in anti-terror operation

    LONDON — British police say they have arrested seven people as part of a large intelligence-led anti terror operation.

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    Calif. police catch parolee suspected in rampage

    SAN JOSE, Calif. — Police on Sunday night captured a parolee who is the prime suspect in a violent crime spree that included the kidnapping and killing of a woman and the shooting of a man at a gas station, authorities said.

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    Pro-regime forces kill 20 in Yemen’s capital
    Associated PressSANAA, Yemen — Medical officials in Yemen say at least 20 people have been killed by snipers and other pro-regime forces in the capital, Sanaa.Monday’s killings take to nearly 50 the number of people killed by government forces and snipers since Sunday night. It is the bloodiest assault in months on demonstrators calling for the president’s ouster.

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    Paula Matzek

    Park Ridge, Wheeling, Schaumburg and Arlington volunteeers honored

    HandsOn Suburban Chicago, the organization formerly called the Volunteer Centerof Northwest Suburban Chicago, has four very special seniors they'd like you to meet -- people who use their life experiences to the benefit of others, and who get a lot of good feeling because of it.

  •  
    Several Libertyville Elementary District 70 teachers were honored for their leadership skills recently at a school board meeting. Described as “teachers of teachers,” they were recognized for helping their colleagues and serving on the Strategic Plan committee.

    Libertyville District 70 honors teachers
    During a recent school board meeting, Libertyville Elementary District 70 honored several teachers who helped develop curriculum and professional programs during the school year.

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    Lake Villa resident Lori Eby, right, is awarded a scholarship by Blind Service Association President Professor Ann Lousin at BSA’s recent annual meeting.

    Lake Villa student receives scholarship
    Lake Villa resident Lori Eby was awarded a scholarship by the Blind Service Association at BSA’s recent annual meeting.

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    Conference Sept. 23-24 for Lake, McHenry veterans

    The Lake-McHenry Veterans and Family Services program is answering the call to help the newest generation of veterans, through the help of a federal grant awarded to the Lake County Health Department and the McHenry County Mental Health Board.

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    Hayden Jones returns a Geneva shot shot during the St. Charles East Mary Carlson Varsity Invitational in St. Charles Saturday, September 10, 2011.

    Images: Pictures of the Week
    This installment of the Week in Pictures photo gallery features images from around the Chicago suburbs including festivals, September 11 tributes, and football.

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    Poll: 2 in 10 Americans think they'll be millionaires

    Who believes they'll be a millionaire? About two in 10 Americans, who are less optimistic than Australians but more optimistic than Britons about becoming wealthy in the next ten years, according to a new AP-CNBC poll.

Sports

  •  
    Barrington’s Lauren Shectman, right, attempts a kill as Fremd’s Nicole Obos defends at the net during Tuesday’s game.

    Practice keeps Barrington perfect in West

    Even during a practice 40 minutes before Tuesday’s match, Barrington outside hitter Peyton Lang could tell her team was ready for Fremd. “We had a real good practice on Monday with a lot of energy,” said the 6-foot-1 junior. “Our passing was good, our hitting was great. Everything was good. Then in our practice before the match (on Tuesday) you could see we were all excited and really ready to go.” The Fillies exploded to an 11-1 lead and never looked back in a 25-11, 25-14 victory over Fremd.

  •  
    Luke Donald, the No. 1 golfer in the world, believes there are several good choices in the Chicago area to host the 2013 BMW. Donald favors Conway Farms Golf Club in Lake Forest. The former Northwestern star is a member at the private club.

    Signs point to North suburbs landing BMW in 2013

    An announcement won't likely come for a few weeks, but the BMW Championship figures to be played in the north suburbs when it returns to the Chicago area in 2013, and Luke Donald, the world's No. 1-ranked player, is pulling for Conway Farms Golf Club, a private facility in Lake Forest.

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    St. Charles East sophomore TC Hull celebrates his goal against Burlington Central Monday with teammate Michael Macek, right, at the St. Charles East invitational.

    St. Charles E. hands Burlington 1st loss

    St. Charles East (4-4) came out with a big flourish to open the second half though, scoring four times in less than 12 minutes, and cruised the rest of the way to a 4-0 boys soccer victory over Burlington Central.

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    Lakes runs past Antioch, Round Lake

    Lakes swept the top six places to get wins over Antioch (15-47) and Round Lake (15-50) in girls cross country on Monday.

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    Stevenson nets victory No. 10

    Stevenson won its 10th match of the season by topping Buffalo Grove on Monday in a nonconference girls vollebyall contest.

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    Monday’s girls volleyball scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Monday's girls volleyball matches, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s girls tennis scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Monday's girls tennis meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s girls golf scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Monday's girls golf meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s girls cross country scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Monday's girls cross country meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s boys golf scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Monday's boys golf meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s boys cross country scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Monday's boys cross country meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Immaculate Conception stops Wheaton Academy

    Immaculate Conception beat Wheaton Academy 25-22, 25-15 in a Suburban Christian Conference Gold match Monday in Elmhurst.

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    The ascent continues for Glenbard West

    Glenbard West is 20-1, and already won three tournaments. Could a 30-win season and regional title be next? It's possible, but first up is a big home match tonight against defending state champion Lyons Township.

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    Wallace engineers big debut at MIT

    Talk about making a grand entrance for your team. Former Fremd all-area running back Justin Wallace rushed for 170 yards and 1 touchdown for Massachusetts Institute of Technology in his first collegiate game as the Engineers scored 28 first-half points en route to a 35-13 victory over Becker College.

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    Girls volleyball/Top 20
    Here is the latest Top 20 rankings of girls volleyball teams in the Daily Herald area.

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    Cubs catcher Geovany Soto hits his second 2-run homer of the game Monday night. He also had an RBI single to drive in all 5 runs in a 5-2 victory over the Brewers at Wrigley Field.

    Cubs’ scouting director Wilken will be back

    - Scouting director Tim Wilken, responsible for the Cubs’ amateur drafts since 2006, was informed over the weekend that he will be back, at least to fulfill his contract, which runs through 2012.

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    Cubs relief pitcher Kerry Wood has a tear in his left knee and will have arthroscopic surgery after the season.

    Knee injury ends Wood’s season

    Cubs reliever Kerry Wood will miss the final nine games of the season because of a meniscus tear in his left knee. Wood said he will undergo arthroscopic surgery shortly after the season ends. He also said he will either pitch for the Cubs or not pitch at all next year.

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    Connie Ellett of Hampshire hits in the second fairway during golf action at the Elgin Country Club Invitational Monday afternoon. Ellett won the individual championship with a 35.

    Hampshire’s Ellett takes Elgin CC title

    Hampshire senior Connie Ellett took first place overall in the Elgin Country Club girls golf invite Monday, shooting an even-par 35. It was the second year in a row that a member of the Ellett family brought home the first place medal; Connie’s older sister Taylor, now golfing for the NIU Huskies, won it last year.

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    Girls volleyball/Fox Valley roundup

    A roundup of girls volleyball games Monday in the Fox Valley.

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    Boys soccer/Fox Valley roundup

    Hampshire 2, Marian Central 1: Jose Hernandez and Robert Lucio scored goals for Hampshire with Ismael Morales and Jared Butler providing the assists. Bryan Contreras had 9 saves for the Whip-Purs (3-7) in the nonconference win.Elgin 1, Glenbard North 1: Jesus Marron scored off a Jon Sandoval assist as Elgin (6-3-3) tied Glenbard North in the St. Charles East tournament. Tony Benitez had 11 saves for the Maroons.Christian Liberty 4, St. Edward 0: Matt Hesch had 11 saves in goal but the Green Wave (2-11-1 couldn’t find the back of the net in this nonconference loss.Harvest Christian 4, Cornerstone Christian 0: Connor Kearns scored twice and Dan Turpin and Zach Harbaugh added single goals to lead the Lions to a win.

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    South Elgin’s Owens wins again

    South Elgin’s Xavier Owens, fresh off the championship of the Dundee-Crown Invitational on Saturday, fired a 69 at Bartlett Hills Monday to win the Elgin Invitational, his fourth invite title of the season.

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    Chicago Cubs catcher Geovany Soto, left, celebrates with teammate relief pitcher Carlos Marmol, the Cubs’ 5-2 win over the Milwaukee Brewers, as Brewers third base coach Ed Sedar heads back to the dugout after a baseball game Monday, Sept. 19, 2011, in Chicago.

    Soto’s homers lead Cubs over Brewers

    Geovany Soto hit two two-run homers and drove in all the Cubs’ runs in a 5-2 victory over the Milwaukee Brewers on Monday night.

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    Forte also at risk with Bears’ depth a question

    Great teams need great depth to make it through an NFL season. The Bears got by on luck last year, but this year they'll need depth to survive. When they were tested Sunday, it wasn't there.

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    Bears quarterback Jay Cutler lies on the turf as tackle Gabe Carimi approaches Sunday against the Saints in New Orleans. Carimi later left the game with a sprained knee as the Saints won 30-13.

    Bears hobbled by rash of injuries

    Injuries have left the Bears short-handed, but they hope to get some starters back this week.

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    Veteran defenseman Sean O’Donnell, one of the newest members of the Blackhawks, played for the Philadelphia Flyers last season.

    Experienced O’Donnell ready to pitch in for Hawks

    Defenseman Sean O'Donnell, who turns 40 next month, says he will do whatever he can to be a leader for young Blackhawks teammates such as 20-year-old Nick Leddy.

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    Boys soccer/Top 20
    Here's the latest look at the boys soccer top 20 of teams in the Daily Herald circulation area.

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    Lake Zurich’s Arends strolls onto Indiana’s roster

    Kate Arends, a four-year varsity soccer player at Lake Zurich, received interest from several schools to play college soccer. But she always wanted a degree from Indiana University, so that’s where she decided to go for academics. In early August, she was invited by Hoosiers coach Mick Lyon to try out with the Indiana varsity players during their two-a-day sessions. By the end of the second day, Lyon offered Arends a walk-on position.

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    Ray Emery

    Ray Emery battles for Hawks’ backup goalie berth

    Rookie Alexander Salak is confident in his battle with veteran Ray Emery to be the Blackhawks' backup goalie.

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    White Sox scouting report
    Scouting report: White Sox vs. Indians

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    Driver Tony Stewart celebrates as he climbs out of his race car after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series auto race Monday at Chicagoland Speedway in Joliet.

    Stewart starts Chase with win at Chicagoland

    Winless no more. Tony Stewart, who four days ago minimized his chances for a third Sprint Cup title, outlasted the field in Monday’s rain-delayed Geico 400 at Chicagoland Speedway. Stewart crossed the stripe .941 seconds ahead of hard-charging Kevin Harvick to win his first race of the season and the 40th of his career.

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    Glenbard West good on ground, in air

    In its first three games, Glenbard West (4-0, 2-0 West Suburban Silver Conference) had little trouble piling on the points with its running attack that averages nearly 300 yards per game. In Saturday’s 45-14 win over Hinsdale Central (2-2, 0-2), the Hilltoppers added something scary: a consistent passing game. Senior quarterback Justice Odom enjoyed his best effort of the season while completing 7 of 12 passes for 183 yards and 2 touchdowns.

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    Film study pays dividends for Batavia

    Students of the game: Batavia is off to a fast 4-0 start following a 35-13 victory over Bartlett on Friday night when the Bulldogs intercepted Air Force-bound quarterback A.J Bilyeu five times.Senior Johnny Gray picked off three of those passes, giving him five through four games. That his team was prepared for Bartlett’s high-powered attack came as no surprise to first-year Batavia coach Dennis Piron who said the Bulldogs can’t get enough of studying the finer points of the game.

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    Antioch defense downright stingy this season

    Bah humbug! No other defense in Lake County has been less generous in the points department this season than Antioch. The Sequoits have allowed a total of just 26 points, and they had a shutout in Week 3 against a Libertyville team that is averaging 25 points per game in its other three contests.

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    The Bears had only 11 runs as they tried to pass the ball 52 times against the New Orleans Saints on Sunday. Bears coach Lovie Smith promised a more balanced attack next Sunday against the Green Bay Packers.

    Smith vows to fix Bears’ lopsided run-pass ratio

    Bears coach Lovie Smith admits that the Bears' run-pass ratio in Sunday's loss to the Saints was out of whack. They ran the ball only 11 times, but they tried to pass it 52 times. Now, it's a question of doing something about it.

Business

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    Markets fall over Greek debt woes

    Pessimism about Greece’s financial problems returned to the financial markets Monday. Stocks fell sharply as investors once again doubted that the country will be able to avoid a default on its debt.

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    Saturday mail could end under Obama plan

    The U.S. Postal Service, which says it won't be able to make required payments at the end of this month, should be allowed to end Saturday mail delivery and get back $6.9 billion paid into a federal retirement program, according to President Barack Obama's deficit-reduction plan.

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    Euro sinks on debt crisis plan concern as dollar, yen rally

    The euro weakened to almost a seven-month low against the dollar after European officials failed last week to offer a plan to halt the region’s debt crisis as Greece struggles to avoid default.The dollar rose against all its major counterparts except the yen as Treasury two-year yields fell to a record before the Federal Reserve begins its two-day meeting tomorrow. The yen rallied to within 0.5 percent of its record against the greenback on refuge demand before European Union and International Monetary Fund officials judge whether the Greek government is eligible for its next aid payment. Norway’s krone fell as oil prices declined.“There is insufficient talk and insufficient results to ease the markets, so everybody thinks the situation can only get worse,” said Mamoru Arai, foreign-exchange manager in New York at Mizuho Financial Group Inc. “We are recommending people sell the euro against the dollar and the Japanese yen.”The euro depreciated 1.1 percent to $1.3639 at 12:51 p.m. in New York, erasing last week’s 1 percent gain. It touched $1.3495 on Sept. 12, the least since February.The shared currency weakened 1.6 percent to 104.28 yen, after sliding to 103.90 on Sept. 12, the lowest level since June 2001. The yen rose 0.4 percent to 76.47 per dollar. It reached record strength of 75.95 on Aug. 19, spurring the Bank of Japan to sell 4.51 trillion yen ($59 billion) in the currency market during August, the nation’s biggest currency intervention in seven years.‘Risk Aversion’“The yen is catching up on the risk-aversion flows that we’re seeing today with the Dow Jones Industrial Average down 200 points,” said Boris Schlossberg, director of research at online currency trader GFT Forex in New York. “People are trying to probe and see how serious the BOJ is about defending the levels. If dollar-yen comes near the 75 level that’s where we think the BOJ will intervene.”Japan may outline measures to counter the strong yen as early as tomorrow, Economic Policy Minister Motohisa Furukawa signaled in remarks yesterday, Kyodo News reported. The package will be aimed at reducing the impact of the currency’s gains on local businesses, according to the report.The yen has risen 8 percent in the past three months, the best performer among the 10 developed-nation currencies tracked by Bloomberg Correlation-Weighted Indexes. The dollar, the third best, has advanced 2.6 percent.Greek ReviewAfter a two-day meeting of EU finance ministers and central bankers German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble and Bundesbank President Jens Weidmann rejected using the European Central Bank to boost the euro-area rescue fund’s firepower. “We don’t think that real economic and social problems can be solved by means of monetary policy,” Schaeuble told reporters Sept. 17. “That has never been the European model and it won’t be.”“The comments are worrisome in the sense that it has really been the ECB that has provided some stability to the euro-zone bond markets through the bond buying program,” said Vassili Serebriakov, a currency strategist at Wells Fargo & Co. in New York. “There are limits, but that has done more to support the bond markets and the euro than the politicians have done and the other EU initiatives.”Greek Finance Minister Evangelos Venizelos will hold a conference call with the heads of the EU and IMF mission to Athens at about 7 p.m. local time, the state-run NET TV reported, without saying how it got the information. The country is struggling to convince critics that it will be able to win a sixth tranche of loans to prevent default.Rapid MoveThe euro’s seven-day relative strength index versus the dollar fell below 30 for the first time in four days. A reading below that level indicates an asset may have fallen too quickly and may be due to rebound.

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    Silvercorp falls after new allegations on alfredlittle.Com

    Silvercorp Metals Inc., the Canadian miner accused of fraud in two anonymous reports, fell as much as 7.9 percent after a website published new allegations about the company.Silvercorp, which mines silver in China, fell 19 cents, or 2.8 percent, to C$6.62 at 12:35 p.m. in Toronto Stock Exchange trading. The shares dropped 20 percent this month through Sept. 16.Alfredlittle.com, a website that publishes research about companies doing business in China, posted a report that said Vancouver-based Silvercorp and Henan Found Mining Co., an operating subsidiary, may both have overstated their net income in 2010 by at least fivefold.Silvercorp, which describes itself as China’s largest silver miner, has denied previous allegations posted on Alfredlittle.com that questioned the quality of Silvercorp’s ore and transactions with a related party. On Sept. 2, Silvercorp denied allegations contained in an anonymous report that alleged Silvercorp reported a profit in calendar 2010 to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission while posting a loss to regulators in China.“All of the allegations made against Silvercorp have been anonymous,” Silvercorp Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Rui Feng said today in a statement. “All of the allegations are baseless and designed to be manipulative.”The new material on the Alfredlittle.com site is based in part on Silvercorp’s response to the first posting, Simon Moore, who said he’s a managing editor at Alfredlittle.com, said today in a telephone interview.“This is more of a detailed report, a more complete report,” Moore said, declining to say where he was speaking from.

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    Solyndra flop doesn’t slow $9.2 billion push to aid wind, solar

    The Obama administration, defying congressional Republicans after the failure of solar-panel maker Solyndra LLC, is working to award as much as $9.2 billion in government financing to renewable energy companies before a Sept. 30 deadline.Loan guarantees for 14 companies will close by month’s end if the projects meet government lending rules, Damien LaVera, a Department of Energy spokesman, said in an interview. “We want to get as many of these done in a way that responsibly protects the taxpayers’ interest,” he said. “If they meet conditions set out in the agreement, then they’ll close.”Solyndra filed for bankruptcy protection on Sept. 6, after receiving $535 million in loan guarantees from the administration, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation raided its Fremont, California, headquarters two days later. Republicans have called Solyndra a “poster child” for the failure of clean-energy subsidies awarded by the Department of Energy under President Barack Obama.“I am very concerned about where the $10 billion DOE has left to spend before the September 30 deadline is going,” Representative Cliff Stearns, a Florida Republican, said at the Sept. 14 hearing of a House oversight panel he heads. “Taxpayers would be better served by not risking even more of their money, instead using it to reduce our mounting national deficit.”Obama’s stimulus program, passed by Congress in 2009, set the Sept. 30 deadline for loan guarantees for most alternative energy projects. Programs to invest in advanced-technology vehicles and nuclear power plants will continue.Third to FailSolyndra was the third U.S. solar manufacturer to fail in a month as lower-cost Chinese panels and weak global demand drive a wave of industry consolidation. Solyndra, the only one of the three with a federal guarantee, produced cylindrical devices that convert sunlight into electricity using copper-indium- gallium-diselenide thin-film technology. Standard solar panels are flat.Nine of the pending loan guarantees are for construction of solar-power stations and one is for a wind farm, projects that carry less risk than manufacturing because the power they will produce is already sold, according to Shyam Mehta, senior analyst for GTM Research, a Boston-based analysis firm.“Those I think are relatively low-risks investments,” Mehta said in an interview. “These farms are going to generate energy and are going to be paid a price for the electricity generated based on power-purchase agreements.”Wind, Corn CobsNordic Windpower of Kansas City, Missouri, a closely held maker of wind turbines, is seeking a $16 million loan guarantee. Abengoa Bioenergy Biomass of Kansas LLC, a unit of Seville, Spain-based Abengoa SA, and Poet LLC of Sioux Falls, South Dakota are seeking aid to build the first U.S. plants to produce ethanol using non-food feedstocks, such as corn cobs and switch grass.Ormat Technologies Inc. of Reno, Nevada, is awaiting a $350 million loan guarantee to build geothermal power stations that can convert heat into electricity in Nevada. Chief Executive Officer Dita Bronicki said she doesn’t expect the uproar over Solyndra to derail Ormat’s application.“It’s hard to predict political fallout,” Bronicki said in an interview. “We are quite confident that we will close before Sept. 30.”Ormat Technologies is a unit of Yavne, Israel-based Ormat Industries Ltd. Foreign-owned companies are eligible for loans if their projects are located in the U.S., according to the Energy Department’s website.‘Moving Along Well’“We’re fairly confident that our process is moving along very well,” Jeff Broin, CEO of Poet, said in an interview. “It’s expected that some project will fail. That’s why a loan guarantee program does exist in the first place.”The Energy Department has provided about $9.6 billion in loan guarantees to 18 developers and manufacturers since 2009.

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    Some emerging nations seek ‘escape hatch’ on climate, Stern says

    Some emerging nations are seeking an “escape hatch” on climate-protection measures because they want their commitments to be dependent on finance and technology support, said a U.S. climate envoy.The U.S. was not prepared to enter into a climate- protection agreement where some nations could make commitments to curb emissions of greenhouse gases only if they receive the support from developed nations, Todd Stern, who leads the U.S. climate delegation, said today on a call with reporters. “That’s what I mean when I say no escape hatches.”The U.S. wants to change the basis of negotiations, which have put developed nations against developing countries, he said. China’s emissions are projected to be double those of the U.S. by 2020, he said. The United Nations is planning its annual conference in Durban, South Africa, in November.

  •  

    RBS hires Majewski for asset-backed finance coverage, advisory

    Royal Bank of Scotland Group Plc’s global banking and markets division in the Americas hired Tom Majewski as a managing director for its asset-backed finance coverage and advisory team.Majewski will be responsible for originating structured transactions including collateralized loan obligations and for providing distribution services to corporate clients and financial institutions, the Edinburgh-based bank said today in a statement.He previously worked at AMP Capital Investors, where he was head of the subordinate debt and infrastructure group for the Americas, according to the statement from RBS, Britain’s biggest government-controlled bank.

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    Argentines expect consumer prices to rise 25% over next year

    Argentines expect consumer prices to climb 25 percent over the next year, according to a monthly survey by Buenos Aires-based Torcuato Di Tella University.Argentine inflation expectations have remain unchanged at 25 percent for seven months, Di Tella said in an e-mailed report.The survey of 1,205 people was conducted Sept. 1-9 and has a margin of error of 3.5 percentage points.To contact the reporter on this story: Bill Faries in Buenos Aires at wfariesbloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Richard Jarvie at rjarviebloomberg.net

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    The outlook of U.S. homebuilders worsened in September, as foreclosures and anxious buyers hurt construction and sales activity.

    U.S. home builder outlook worsens in September

    The outlook of U.S. homebuilders worsened in September, as foreclosures and anxious buyers hurt construction and sales activity. The National Association of Home Builders says its index of builder sentiment in September fell to 14 from 15.

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    This screen shot shows Qwikster.com, a new website service available soon from Netflix.

    Netflix boss explains services division

    Netflix CEO Reed Hastings said on Sunday in a blog posting that the DVD service will be called Qwikster while the streaming business will be housed under the Netflix name.

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    OfficeMax to donate $1 million in supplies to teacher

    OfficeMax Incorporated said it will donate $1 million in classroom supplies to teachers nationwide through its annual A Day Made Better teacher surprise events on October 4.

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    Nalco marks 1,000th boiler system installation

    Nalco recently marked the installation of the 1000th 3D TRASAR boiler automation system and the expansion of its Nalco 360T Service, to provide 24/7 monitoring for boiler systems.

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    AT&T offering 4G LTE in Chicago
    AT&T said that customers in Chicago will now have access to the latest generation of wireless network technology.

  •  

    Greece promises primary surplus in 2012

    VOULIAGMENI, Greece — Greece’s finance minister promised Monday to stick with his plan for the country to post a primary surplus in 2012, hours before he was to hold an emergency teleconference with top officials from debt inspectors.Evangelos Venizelos’ target of generating more revenues next year than the country spends, before paying off interest on debts, comes despite the ongoing recession in the crisis-hit country. Greece’s economy is expected to contract by about 5.5 percent this year.Speaking at a conference south of Athens, Venizelos said the 2012 target was vital for Greece to avoid international “blackmail and humiliation.”The government still must live up to its commitment to achieve its 2011 budget deficit goal of 7.6 percent of gross domestic product. When it became obvious earlier this month that there was a more than (euro) 2 billion ($2.75 billion) shortfall in the budget, Greece’s creditors — the eurozone member countries, the European Central Bank and the International Monetary Fund — threatened to withhold the sixth installment of a (euro) 110 billion rescue package agreed upon in May 2010.Without the installment, worth (euro) 8 billion, Greece faces defaulting on its debts by mid-October.A review by officials from the IMF, ECB and European Commission, collectively known as the ‘troika,’ was suspended earlier this month amid talk of missed targets. The troika heads had been due to return to the country this week, but have stayed away and will hold a crucial teleconference with Venizelos on Monday afternoon instead.Prime Minister George Papandreou, who canceled a scheduled trip to Washington and New York on Saturday to remain in Athens for a “critical week,” has called a government meeting for after the call.

  •  
    Boeing's 737 Max

    Boeing 737 max will be 4% more fuel efficient than Airbus rival

    Boeing Co.'s 737 Max, a single- aisle plane that will offer new engines will be 4 percent more fuel efficient than Airbus's A320neo rival offering, even with smaller fan diameters on its engines, commercial plane market head Randy Tinseth said today.

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    Airbus says A320s with winglets will enter service in 2012

    Airbus SAS said its first single- aisle A320 planes outfitted with winglets, also known as sharklets, will enter service in 2012 as scheduled.

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    John Leahy, chief operating officer of Airbus SAS, gestures during the company's 2011-2030 global market forecast news conference at the Dorchester Hotel in London, U.K.

    Airbus sees demand rising to 27,800 jetliners over next 20 years

    Airbus SAS, the largest maker of commercial aircraft, predicted airlines will buy 27,800 planes valued at $3.5 trillion over the next 20 years, buoyed by Asian economic growth and increased demand for single-aisle models.

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    Garuda’s Citilink Airbus A320 Flights Started Sept. 16

    PT Garuda Indonesia’s low-cost carrier, PT Citilink Indonesia, deployed Airbus SAS A320 planes on commercial flights beginning Sept. 16, Doni Rizal, acting senior manager of marketing at Citilink, said today via phone in Jakarta.

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    Batavia company serves as IT department

    A business in Batavia, TEQWORKS, works with small- and medium-sized businesses, serving as an in-house IT department.

  •  

    Lennar 3Q profit drops 31 pct, meets Street view

    MIAMI — Lennar Corp.’s fiscal third-quarter profit dropped 31 percent as the company delivered fewer homes.The Miami-based homebuilder said Monday that demand is picking up somewhat, driven by low home prices and all-time low interest rates. Still, the company conceded that the uptick in demand is being squeezed by tightening lending standards, high unemployment and weak consumer confidence.Homebuilders are a bellwether for the housing market and the economy. While new homes represent less than one-fifth of the total housing market, construction of houses has a major impact on the economy. Each new home creates an average of three jobs and generates $90,000 in taxes, according to the National Association of Home Builders.Lennar shares rose 40 cents, or 2.9 percent, to $14.20 in premarket trading.Lennar reported net income of $20.7 million, or 11 cents a share, for the three months ended Aug. 31, down from $30 million, or 16 cents a share, a year ago.The reduced earnings figure matched the expectations of analysts polled by FactSet.Revenue dipped 1 percent to $820.2 million from $825 million, but beat Wall Street’s estimate of $794.4 million.Home deliveries fell 3 percent to 2,865 homes, while new orders rose 11 percent to 2,914 homes. CEO Stuart Miller said in a statement that it was the first quarterly increase in new orders in more than five years, excluding the first half of 2010 when consumers were buying homes largely because of a federal homebuyer tax credit.The average sales prices of homes delivered increased 3 percent to $247,000 from $240,000. Sales incentives rose to $33,600 per home delivered from $30,600 per home delivered in the prior-year period.Lennar said its cancellation rate was 20 percent for the quarter, while backlog climbed 16 percent to 2,519 homes.The company’s Rialto division, which buys troubled loans and properties from banks, reported that its operating earnings fell to $11.7 million from $18.5 million while revenue climbed to $42.1 million from $38 million.Stuart predicted that the company would be profitable in the fourth quarter and for the full year, assuming market conditions remain stable.Lennar has operations in 17 states and is the third-largest homebuilder in the U.S., based on homes delivered last year.

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    Bookshelves sit empty at the Borders bookstore at Penn Plaza in Midtown Manhattan in New York.

    Last Borders shoppers wistful, looking for deals

    The scene this weekend at the last of the remaining Borders bookstores to close was more like a memorial service than a funeral. Shoppers reminisced fondly about their beloved bookseller rather than grieve its loss.

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    Small businesses are spending on technology

    Small and medium-sized businesses are changing their ways when it comes to spending money on technology. Columnist Jim Kendall explores the trend.

Life & Entertainment

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    A new Dave’s Hot ‘N Juicy Cheeseburger is displayed in the Wendy’s research and development laboratory at the company’s international headquarters in Dublin, Ohio.

    Wendy’s serves up its newest burger

    When Wendy’s decided to remake its 42-year-old hamburger, the chain agonized over every detail. A pickle chemist was consulted. Customers were quizzed on their lettuce knowledge. And executives went on a cross-country burger-eating tour.

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    Local theater: Atomic action

    Fermilab physicist Michael Albrow directs Vex Theatre Company’s Elgin production of “Copenhagen,” Michael Frayn’s play inspired by the September 1941 meeting between Danish scientist Niels Bohr and German scientist Werner Hiessenberg, seminal figures in the development of atomic theory.

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    What’s new: Sept. 16-23

    Here's a look at what's happening on the Chicago area theater scene.

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    ABC's “Charlie's Angels” stars Ramon Rodriguez as John Bosley, Minka Kelly as Eve French, Annie Ilonzeh as Kate Prince and Rachael Taylor as Abby Sampson.

    New cast clicks for ‘Charlie's Angels'

    “Once upon a time, there were three little girls ...” The “little girls” part may not sit as well now, but the new “Charlie's Angels” quickly prove themselves quite capable in fighting crime. The expectedly glamorous, Miami-set ABC update of the female-detective series premieres Thursday, Sept. 22, with Minka Kelly (“Friday Night Lights”), Rachael Taylor and Annie Ilonzeh (“General Hospital”) as the trio working for heard-but-not-seen Charlie.

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    Chaz Bono, right, and Lacey Schwimmer practice dance steps while rehearsing for the upcoming season of “Dancing of the Stars,” which premieres at 7 p.m. Monday, Sept. 19, on ABC.

    Chaz Bono overcomes shyness, controversy to dance

    Chaz Bono is dancing right past the controversy surrounding his casting on “Dancing With the Stars,” which premieres at 7 p.m. Monday, and he's not even the dancing type. “I like it, but I'm kind of an introvert,” he said from the nondescript dance studio where he has been rehearsing for the hit ABC show for up to five hours a day. “My natural tendency is to go in, not show off.”

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    Too many questions surround hair analysis

    Hair analysis is a procedure that is relatively common in some areas of nontraditional medicine. The hair is analyzed for content of specific minerals and vitamins. Unfortunately, except for detecting acute arsenic and cadmium poisoning as well as illegal drug use, there is no reliable data to indicate that this particular procedure is beneficial in diagnosing or treating any specific medical condition.

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    NBC's Lester Holt will replace Ann Curry as host of the newsmagazine “Dateline NBC” when it begins its 20th season on Sept. 23.

    Lester Holt new host of ‘Dateline NBC'

    Lester Holt will replace Ann Curry as host of the newsmagazine “Dateline NBC” when it begins its 20th season on Friday, Sept. 23, NBC announced Monday. The NBC News veteran will keep his job as co-anchor of the “Weekend Today” show. He said he'll report stories for “Dateline” as well as anchor.

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    “The Good Wife” cast member Julianna Margulies enjoys her Emmy win for best lead actress in a drama series.

    Celebrities hold court at Emmy after-party

    Perched atop 5-inch heels, Julianna Margulies stood sipping a glass of blush wine while accepting a wave of congratulations and hugs from well-wishers while partygoers at the 63rd annual Primetime Emmy Awards Governors Ball craned their heads to watch a woman perform an aerial act in the upper reaches of the West Hall of the Los Angeles Convention Center on Sunday night.

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    Disney's “The Lion King” took the box office by storm, exceeding expectations and raking in nearly $30 million.

    3-D 'Lion King' roars to top of box office

    It's 1994 all over again, with a re-release of “The Lion King” opening at the top of the box office. A 3-D version of the wildly popular Disney animated musical earned a surprising $29.3 million in its first weekend in theaters, according to Sunday estimates. The original film made more than $40 million when it opened nationwide 17 years ago.

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    Matt Damon stars in “Contagion,” which has struck a nerve at the box office through its gripping tale of a fictional, global epidemic caused by a new kind of virus.

    ‘Contagion' epidemic ‘very plausible,' scientists say

    Yes, it could happen. But it's a stretch. “Contagion,” a Hollywood thriller that opened last weekend, rocketed to No. 1 at the box office through its gripping tale of a fictional global epidemic driven by a new kind of virus. “It's very plausible,” said Dr. Thomas Frieden, head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which would investigate such an outbreak.

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    Douglas Hamilton, of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Epidemic Intelligence Service, says the movie “Contagion” “had a significant scientific credibility.”

    Film shines light on real-life disease detectives

    Actress Kate Winslet plays a member of CDC’s Epidemic Intelligence Service who is deployed to probe the origins of the fast-moving disease in the movie "Contagion." In real life, Douglas Hamilton heads the 160-member EIS, a corps of public health and medical professionals who travel around the world to assist public-health agencies with their investigations.

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    Levi Johnston writes about his relationship with Bristol Palin and the Palin family in “Deer in the Headlights,” set for release Tuesday, Sept. 20.

    Levi Johnston writes of Bristol's pregnancy and more

    Levi Johnston writes in his upcoming book that his ex-girlfriend Bristol Palin was so angry about her mother's (former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin) pregnancy with son Trig that she wanted to get pregnant, too. Johnston says Bristol responded that she should be having a baby, not her mother. His book, “Deer in the Headlights: My Life in Sarah Palin's Crosshairs,” comes out Tuesday, Sept. 20.

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    Robin Reed, shown in the old general store she and her husband, Keith, moved and renovated in Lily Lake, will be putting on her first Country Folk Art Festival Sept. 23-25.

    Country Folk Art Festival stays true to its roots

    New owner Robin Reed stages her first Country Folk Art Festival Sept. 23-25 at the Kane County Fairgrounds in St. Charles. The show, which ran for 28 years under the former owners, specializes in folk art, reproductions of antiques and traditional American crafts.

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    Cholesterol levels may have link to Alzheimer’s risk

    People who accumulate plaque on their arteries may be more prone to another insidious type of buildup — one that clogs their brains. Scientists who tested the cholesterol levels of 147 patients found that those with the highest readings were more likely to also have the brain plaque that signals Alzheimer’s disease.

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    Shou-Mei Li, left, wraps a scarf around her husband, Hsien-Wen Li, as their daughter Shirley Rexrode looks on. Thousands of families are pleading for changes to improve early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

    Families urge action to fight Alzheimer's

    Dementia is poised to become a defining disease of the rapidly aging population — and a budget-busting one for Medicare, Medicaid and families. Now the Obama administration is developing the first National Alzheimer's Plan, to combine research aimed at fighting the mind-destroying disease with help that caregivers need to stay afloat.

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    Siblings create bonds that can last a lifetime.

    Your health: Sibling ties that bind

    Even though they sometimes get on your nerves, brothers and sisters are good to have around, according to The Washington Post. In “The Sibling Effect,” Time magazine science writer Jeffrey Kluger dissects sibling relationships, using biological and psychological studies. According to Kluger, sibling relationships are among the deepest that people ever have, and they are among the most enduring.

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    Despite its 71-year old age, Bernbaum says highway cruising “is surprisingly comfortable but requires a focused attention.”

    Classic recollections: 1940 Harley-Davidson UL flathead

    Some people need time to think decisions over. In Joel Bernbaum's case, 15 years were required to contemplate purchasing and restoring his 1940 Harley-Davidson UL motorcycle. After a Thanksgiving meal and another round of brotherly prodding, Bernbaum finally decided he'd take a casual look and kick the tires on the old asphalt cruiser. He ventured out to see the still torn-apart bike, buried in its back-lot crypt.

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    Restless Leg Syndrome responds to calcium

    Calcium has been found to be helpful in relieving nocturnal leg cramps, and some Restless Leg Syndrome sufferers have also found that it is beneficial in preventing symptoms when taken just prior to sleep. Other deficiencies, most notably iron, magnesium, folic acid and B vitamins, are known to cause RLS symptoms in some.

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    Barbell squat

    500 Workout can push you to new level

    This month's workout will challenge you both physically and mentally. Our workout consists of five exercises; with each exercise requiring the completion of 100 reps before moving on to the next one — for a total of 500 reps. Chances are you won't be able to complete all 100 reps of each exercise straight through, so rest when needed, but continue to push yourself to get through the entire workout as quickly as possible.

Discuss

  •  

    Remembering, honoring a spirit of moderation

    A Daily Herald editorial celebrates the bipartisan spirit of former Sen. Charles Percy, who died Saturday, but adds that rose-colored remembrances of the times in which he served dishonor the achievements of his moderation.

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    The great Ponzi debate

    A proposition: Social Security is one Ponzi scheme that can be saved by adapting to the new demographics. Three easy steps: Change the cost-of-living measure, means test for richer recipients and, most important, raise the retirement age.

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    Where are the compassionate conservatives?

    According to the Gospel of Matthew, Jesus told the pharisees that God commands us to “love thy neighbor as thyself.” There is no asterisk making this obligation null and void if circumstances require its fulfillment via government.

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    Arlington Hts. guilty of overbuilding malls
    Letter to the editor: Arlington Heights resident is disappointed by empty storefronts in the village's malls, saying the village was too eager to buy into plans when the builders didn't always have the tenants lined up.

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    Elk Grove memorial ‘just what we needed’
    Letter to the editor: Ron and Gloria Leaf appreciate the 9/11 commemorative service and picnic held in Elk Grove Village last Sunday, saying the events - and others like it -- are just what the country needed a decade after that tragic day.

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    Mt. Prospect grateful for help with school supply drive
    Letter to the editor: The Village of Mount Prospect is expressing gratitude to the local businesses that stepped up to contribute to the school supplies drive for children in need -- 173 children from 76 families received supplies on Aug. 22.

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    Coyotes get bolder in neighborhoods
    Letter to the editor: Bill Bierer of South Barrington says seeing a coyote slaughter its prey in his back yard -- near to a Hoffman Estates park -- has become a regular occurrence. He and his neighbors want to know where they can get some help before something more tragic happens.

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    Arlington Hts. parking rules meant to catch people unawares
    Letter to the editor: Rolling Meadows writer takes issue with Arlington Hts. for not allowing back-in parking in the downtown garage, and suspects it's a good fundraiser for the village.

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    End the lawsuit frenzy against Chicago
    The city of Chicago has been called the “City that Works,” but thanks to the frequent visits from lawsuit tourists looking to hit the lawsuit lottery, Chicago more appropriately should be called, “The City That Settles.” Illinois Lawsuit Abuse Watch, a grass-roots, legal watchdog group, recently released a study and found that Chicago’s notoriety as a target for lawsuits has cost the city a budget-busting $85 million for litigation in 2010 alone. The tens of millions spent fighting and settling lawsuits filed against the city is money that would be better spent on more worthwhile services. Had Chicago’s $85 million expenditure on litigation costs in 2010 been available for other, more worthwhile services and programs, the city would have been able to hire 1,239 police officers, pay 1,226 teachers, hire 1,119 new public health nurses or plant 155,801 trees. To put the lawsuit numbers in Chicago in perspective, consider that the city of Naperville, which has a population of 141,853, spent $15,375 on judgments and settlements and outside counsel in 2010, while the city of Chicago, which has 18 times the population of Naperville, spent about 5,528 times that amount. With 900 lawsuits filed against Chicago in the past three years, Chicago is literally sued every single day. But that should not be much of a surprise. A 2010 report from Harris Interactive ranked Cook County the worst local jurisdiction for legal fairness in the country. The time has come to finally shed Chicago’s reputation as “The City That Settles.” Travis Akin Executive director Illinois Lawsuit Abuse WatchMarion

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    Work together to lower electricity costs
    A smart electric system requires not only smart meters, but also smart rates and smart consumers. Smart meters allow consumers to see their energy use and make it possible for them to participate in real-time pricing programs through ComEd or Ameren that save them money.

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    Use care, courtesy when riding a bike
    I ride on the road because I can. My bike is a legal vehicle as is my car. As a driver of both, it is my responsibility to share the road and obey all laws.

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