Breaking News Bar
updated: 3/1/2014 5:14 PM

Kline Creek Farm makes room for baby -- lambs that is

hello
Success - Article sent! close
  • Several ewes of the Southdown sheep flock at Kline Creek Farm in West Chicago have given birth to lambs in recent days.

       Several ewes of the Southdown sheep flock at Kline Creek Farm in West Chicago have given birth to lambs in recent days.
    Daniel White | Staff Photographer

  • Beth Wyse, left, of Warrenville and Debbie Dolecki, right, of Villa Park observe an ewe and her newly born lambs at Kline Creek Farm in West Chicago.

       Beth Wyse, left, of Warrenville and Debbie Dolecki, right, of Villa Park observe an ewe and her newly born lambs at Kline Creek Farm in West Chicago.
    Daniel White | Staff Photographer

  • Several ewes of the Southdown sheep flock at Kline Creek Farm in West Chicago have given birth to lambs in recent days.

       Several ewes of the Southdown sheep flock at Kline Creek Farm in West Chicago have given birth to lambs in recent days.
    Daniel White | Staff Photographer

  • Debbie Dolecki of Villa Park observes an ewe of the Southdown sheep flock at Kline Creek Farm in West Chicago, which has given birth to lambs in recent days.

       Debbie Dolecki of Villa Park observes an ewe of the Southdown sheep flock at Kline Creek Farm in West Chicago, which has given birth to lambs in recent days.
    Daniel White | Staff Photographer

 
 

Ewes and rams make lambs.

"It's a mom-nature thing," said Dave Barr, agricultural specialist at the 1890s living-history Kline Creek Farm in West Chicago, who along with other volunteers has patiently waited to oversee the arrival of this season's newborn lambs.

Order Reprint Print Article
 
Interested in reusing this article?
Custom reprints are a powerful and strategic way to share your article with customers, employees and prospects.
The YGS Group provides digital and printed reprint services for Daily Herald. Complete the form to the right and a reprint consultant will contact you to discuss how you can reuse this article.
Need more information about reprints? Visit our Reprints Section for more details.

Contact information ( * required )

Success - request sent close

With six births down and 10 to go for the Southdown sheep flock, the approximate 145 day gestation period is nearing completion of its birthing process.

"Five months and five days," Barr said.

The ewes are in lambing pens, or jugs.

"An ewe identifies her lambs by smell, so they are in there to get acquainted for a few days. It gives the ewe's mom's milk a chance to go through that lamb because the mom will identify her lambs by smell," said Barr. " ... That's how she knows that it's her lamb. She wants to raise only her lambs."

Visitors Like Debbie Dolecki of Villa Park made the trek to Kline Creek Farm to observe the lambing pens.

"I like to come here. I'm an animal and nature lover. What else are you going to do, watch TV or come out here to see nature at work?" Dolecki said.

"Sometimes mom can do everything on her own, but our staff and volunteers are at the ready this time of year to intervene if needed for a successful birth," said Keith McClow, manager of Kline Creek Farm.

"We're always ready to share the historical perspective with visitors, too, so they learn how lambs provide income for farmers and what it takes to raise them."

Visitors may observe the lambs and speak with staff and volunteers during the farm's normal hours of 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursdays through Mondays.

Share this page
Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.