Breaking News Bar
updated: 12/29/2010 8:21 PM

Reptiles invade Indian Trails Public Library

hello
Success - Article sent! close
  • Shreya Sriram, 10, of Buffalo Grove enjoys holding Lucky the American alligator Wednesday at Indian Trails Public Library in Wheeling.

       Shreya Sriram, 10, of Buffalo Grove enjoys holding Lucky the American alligator Wednesday at Indian Trails Public Library in Wheeling.
    Bill Zars | Staff Photographer

  • Jim Nesci with Cold Blooded Creatures gave visitors an up close and personal look at this monitor lizard and other reptiles he brought Wednesday to the Indian Trails Public Library in Wheeling.

       Jim Nesci with Cold Blooded Creatures gave visitors an up close and personal look at this monitor lizard and other reptiles he brought Wednesday to the Indian Trails Public Library in Wheeling.
    Bill Zars | Staff Photographer

  • Amanda Logan sits atop an African spurred tortoise during a reptile presentation Wednesday at Indian Trails Public Library in Wheeling.

       Amanda Logan sits atop an African spurred tortoise during a reptile presentation Wednesday at Indian Trails Public Library in Wheeling.
    Bill Zars | Staff Photographer

  • Nathan York, 6, has a black-throated monitor lizard placed on his head during a reptile presentation Wednesday at Indian Trails Public Library in Wheeling.

       Nathan York, 6, has a black-throated monitor lizard placed on his head during a reptile presentation Wednesday at Indian Trails Public Library in Wheeling.
    Bill Zars | Staff Photographer

  • Kids hold a albino Burmese python Wednesday during a presentation by reptile expert Jim Nesci at Indian Trails Public Library in Wheeling.

       Kids hold a albino Burmese python Wednesday during a presentation by reptile expert Jim Nesci at Indian Trails Public Library in Wheeling.
    Bill Zars | Staff Photographer

  • Rose Johnson, of children's services at Indian Trails Public Library, reacts as Lucky, a 5-foot-long American alligator, gives her a kick Wednesday at the library in Wheeling.

       Rose Johnson, of children's services at Indian Trails Public Library, reacts as Lucky, a 5-foot-long American alligator, gives her a kick Wednesday at the library in Wheeling.
    Bill Zars | Staff Photographer

  • Jen Jacobs reacts to a python being placed on her neck Wednesday at Indian Trails Public Library in Wheeling.

       Jen Jacobs reacts to a python being placed on her neck Wednesday at Indian Trails Public Library in Wheeling.
    Bill Zars | Staff Photographer

  • Caleb Samuel, 3, of Arlington Heights takes a ride Wednesday on Bubba, an 8-foot-long, 200-pound American alligator, at Indian Trails Public Library. Bubba has been trained by Jim Nesci with Cold Blooded Creatures.

       Caleb Samuel, 3, of Arlington Heights takes a ride Wednesday on Bubba, an 8-foot-long, 200-pound American alligator, at Indian Trails Public Library. Bubba has been trained by Jim Nesci with Cold Blooded Creatures.
    Bill Zars | Staff Photographer

 
 

Snakes, lizards and alligators made their way Wednesday into the Indian Trails Public Library -- some around the necks of lucky patrons.

The reptiles arrived at the Wheeling library as part of a presentation by Jim Nesci of Cold Blooded Creatures in Homer Glen.

Order Reprint Print Article
 
Interested in reusing this article?
Custom reprints are a powerful and strategic way to share your article with customers, employees and prospects.
The YGS Group provides digital and printed reprint services for Daily Herald. Complete the form to the right and a reprint consultant will contact you to discuss how you can reuse this article.
Need more information about reprints? Visit our Reprints Section for more details.

Contact information ( * required )

Success - request sent close

Shreya Sriram, 10, of Buffalo Grove beamed and said, " I love reptiles," as she held an alligator in her arms.

Other children rode on Bubba, an 8-foot-long, 200-pound American alligator that has been trained by Nesci to be docile.

"You couldn't get him to open his mouth if you tried," Nesci said.

The alligator is the second "Bubba" that Nesci has owned and taken on television programs such as "The Oprah Winfrey Show," "Live with Regis and Kathie Lee" and "The Today Show."

His presentation is designed to dispel myths about reptiles, such as snakes being evil and slimy, and educate people about conservation.

Twelve children lined up to hold an albino Burmese python as Nesci pointed out its value to humans because of its diet of grain-devouring rodents.

Not everybody, though, was eager to take a hands-on approach to learning about reptiles.

"I quit," Rose Johnson, of the library's children's services department, said jokingly when a 5-foot-long alligator was placed in her arms.

Share this page
    help here