Daily Archive : Monday August 28, 2017

News

Sports

Business

  •  
    A home is surrounded by floodwaters from Tropical Storm Harvey on Monday, Aug. 28, 2017, in Spring, Texas. Homeowners suffering from Harvey flood damage are more likely to be on the hook for losses than victims of prior storms, a potentially crushing blow to personal finances and neighborhoods along the Gulf Coast. Experts say far too few homeowners have flood insurance, just two of ten living in Harvey’s path of destruction. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

    Most Harvey flood victims uninsured, face big bills alone

    Homeowners suffering from Harvey flood damage are more likely to be on the hook for losses than victims of prior storms. Only two of 10 homeowners hit by the storm have flood insurance so most will have pay for repairs themselves.

  •  

    Grain lower, Livestock mixed

    CHICAGO (AP) - Grain futures were lower Tuesday in early trading on the Chicago Board of Trade. Wheat for Sept delivery was lower 2 cents at $3.98 a bushel; Sept corn was down 1.60 cents at $3.3420 a bushel; Sept oats lost 3.40 cents at $2.35 a bushel while Sept soybeans was down 3.20 cents to $9.32 a bushel. Beef higher and pork lower on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. August live cattle lost .10 cent at $1.0610 a pound; August feeder cattle gained .68 cent at $1.4310 a pound; October lean hogs was .08 cent lower at $.6155 a pound.

  •  
    Munchies Rolled Ice Cream is an Asian-style dessert and snack shop that opened this month in downtown Naperville.

    Rolled ice cream shop brings new treat trend to Naperville

    Rolled ice cream is a thing, and a photo-worthy thing, at a new downtown Naperville shop that sells Asian-inspired desserts and snacks.

  •  
    A man walks past an electronic stock indicator of a securities firm in Tokyo, Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2017. Asian shares were mostly lower Tuesday, as the region was rattled by a ballistic missile launch in which the projectile flew over Japan and fell into the Pacific Ocean. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)

    Asian stocks fall, rattled by North Korean missile launch

    Asian shares are falling as the region gets rattled by what was believed to be a launch of a missile by North Korea, which flew over Japan and fell into the Pacific Ocean

  •  

    Trump Organization gives up US Open suite, but wants it back

    The U.S. Tennis Association says that the Trump Organization has suspended its suite agreement for the U.S. Open while President Donald Trump is in the White House

  •  
    FILE- In this July 13, 2012, file photo, Dara Khosrowshahi the CEO of Expedia, Inc., attends the Allen & Company Sun Valley Conference in Sun Valley, Idaho. Two people briefed on the matter said Sunday, Aug. 27, 2017, that Khosrowshahi has been named CEO of ride-hailing giant Uber Technologies Inc. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, File)

    Uber's pick for new CEO brings skills, experience

    For a surprise choice, Expedia CEO Dara Khosrowshahi appears to check the boxes needed to tackle the massive job of leading Uber from a rapidly growing but dysfunctional money-loser to a company that can turn a consistent profit

  •  

    Energy trade groups get say on potential pipeline shutdown

    A federal judge deciding whether to shut down the Dakota Access pipeline while more environmental review is done is allowing national energy trade groups to have a say

  •  

    The Latest: Pipeline developer seeks to resolve state probes

    The builder of the Dakota Access pipeline is negotiating with North Dakota regulators to resolve all investigations into potential wrongdoing during construction

  •  
    Palatine village council members have given permission for a high-end consignment shop to operate in space at 345 N. Eric Drive, in a manufacturing area just north of downtown.

    Palatine approves high-end consignment store near downtown

    Crystal and other high-end goods will be available at a proposed consignment shop planned in a manufacturing area on the edge of downtown Palatine.

  •  
    Customers shop at a Whole Foods Market, Monday, Aug. 28, 2017, in Tampa, Fla. Parent company Amazon has announced they will drop the prices on certain food items at the stores. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)

    Amazon cuts prices at Whole Foods by up to 43 percent on first day

    Amazon spent its first day as the owner of a brick-and-mortar grocery chain cutting prices at Whole Foods Market.At the Whole Foods on 57th Street in Manhattan, organic fuji apples were marked down to $1.99 a pound from $3.49 a pound; organic avocados went to $1.99 each from $2.79; organic rotisserie chicken fell to $9.99 each from $13.99; and banana prices were slashed to 49 cents per pound from 79 cents.Amazon acquired the upscale supermarket chain for $13.7 billion, sending competitors such as Kroger, Costco and Wal-Mart reeling. Whole Foods earned a reputation for high prices, getting the nickname Whole Paycheck.Shares of Kroger fell as much as 2 percent in early trading on Monday.wholefoods-bg

  •  

    Littelfuse acquires IXYS Corp. for $750 million

    Littelfuse announced it will acquire IXYS Corp. a cash and stock transaction valued at approximately $750 million.

  •  

    Berkley Program Specialists hires business development executive

    Berkley Program Specialists, a Berkley company, has appointed Michael Greville as vice president and business development officer.

  •  

    CellTrak names Royal to lead software development

    CellTrak Technologies has named Ryan Royal Chief Technology Officer.

  •  

    Partnership brings Glory, Symitar programs together
    Cash technology solutions company Glory said it has joined the Symitar Vendor Integration Program.

  •  

    CDK partnership enhances messaging to new websites
    CDK Global has partnered with ActivEngage Inc. to create Concierge Chat, a one-of-a-kind messaging tool built directly into CDK next generation websites.

  •  
    Clockwise from upper left, mechanic Cristian Carbone, body shop workers Todd Hanna and Dave Liszkowski, mechanic Chuck Rhode and body shop worker John Willems picket Friday outside Bill Stasek Chevrolet in Wheeling.

    No joy in strike, auto mechanics say

    From bottles of water and kindly honks to one-fingered salutes and sunburn - striking auto mechanics describe four weeks on the picket line.

  •  

    US Nuclear Weapons Center unveils new nuke weapons contacts

    The U.S. Air Force Nuclear Weapons Center in Albuquerque has announced billions of dollars in nuclear weapons contracts aimed at modernizing the ground- and air-based legs of the country's nuclear triad

  •  

    China merging state-owned energy giants

    China's government plans to combine the world's biggest coal producer and a major power company as part of a marathon effort to make state industry more efficient and competitive

  •  
    In this 2005 photo provided by the USA Dry Pea & Lentil Council, farmer Roy Kopf harvests chickpeas, east of Pullman, Wash. Changing consumer tastes for healthy high protein food are driving a boom in the demand for crops like chickpeas and lentils and some farmers, faced with the lowest wheat prices in nearly a century, have chosen to plant less wheat and more of these higher profit crops driving them to record production levels this year. (USA Dry Pea & Lentil Council via AP)

    An odd trend in wheat country: not much wheat

    In vast stretches of the Plains and Northwest known for wheat production, fewer farmers are growing wheat

  •  
    Nearly $50 million in improvements are planned for Bloomingdale’s Stratford Square Mall. The mall’s owners are asking village leaders to modify a tax-sharing agreement to help them recoup some of their costs.

    Stratford Square owner asks to extend extra 1% sales tax to help fund work

    The company that owns Stratford Square Mall is looking to spend nearly $50 million over the next four years as part of its ongoing effort to improve the mall in Bloomingdale. And they’re asking village leaders to sign off on a measure to help them recoup some of those costs.

Life & Entertainment

Discuss

  •  
    The pink handcuffs used by Lake County Sheriff’s Deputy Rebecca Loeb were a hit on A&E Network’s “LivePD” reality TV show. The office’s participation in the show is a creative way to connect with citizens.

    Editorial: Police need to get creative to connect with residents

    A Daily Herald editorial urges suburban police departments to embrace creative approaches to connecting with the communities they serve.

  •  

    Results of early-childhood programs last into adulthood

    Guest columnist Kallie Skiles: I vividly remember the day I received my application to my college’s education program.

  •  

    Walls don’t have a good record of success
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: Our president recommends extending the wall between Mexico and the U.S. to prevent undocumented foreign nationals, looking for a better life, from entering the country.

  •  

    Funding needed for Alzheimer’s research
    A Schaumburg letter to the editor: There are more than 5 million Americans living with Alzheimer’s disease and more than 15 million unpaid caregivers.

  •  

    ‘Free’ health care would have a very high price
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: Twenty-five years ago, I was the general manager of a small industrial machinery company.

  •  

    Keep controls on free-speech rights
    A Schaumburg letter to the editor: The First Amendment to the Constitution guarantees the right of free speech and the right to peaceably assemble.

  •  

    Big Pharma thread seen among killers
    A Naperville letter to the editor: On Monday, Merck CEO Ken Frazier, announced he was leaving The American Manufacturing Council.

  •  

    Tearing down history, along with statues
    An Elgin letter to the editor: Slavery was bad. Yes, but to deny or rewrite our history is also bad. When I saw the video of them bringing down the statue of Lee, my first thought was, we have come full circle.

  •  

    No more gazing heavenward, ballplayers
    A Wheaton letter to the editor: In the Aug. 11 Daily Herald Sports Section, we see a picture of White Sox second baseman Yoan Moncada crossing home plate after hitting a home run, and the caption simply reads, “White Sox second baseman Yoan Moncada tied Thursday’s game at Guaranteed Rate Field with a ninth-inning homer.”

  •  

    Trump’s wall a symbol of bigotry and hate
    A Hampshire letter to the editor: Congress seems to be moving forward on Trump’s plan to build a wall on our southern border.

«Jul

Aug 2017

Sep»
S M T W T F S
30 31 1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31 1 2