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Daily Archive : Tuesday July 29, 2014

News

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    Audience members wait for the start of Tuesday night's committee-of-the-whole meeting in Batavia. Most were there to tell the council they oppose development of an industrial park on land originally designated for housing off Kirk Road.

    Batavia industrial park plan upsets neighbors

    Residents of neighborhoods in Batavia and Aurora showed up en masse to a Batavia committee meeting Tuesday to let aldermen know they don't want an industrial park built on the east side of Kirk Road. “When the residents of Kirkland Chase moved in, if this industrial complex had already been built at the entrance of the subdivision, I'm sure that most of us, including myself, would not have...

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    ESPN suspended sportscaster Stephen A. Smith on Tuesday for a week because of comments about domestic abuse, suggesting women should make sure they don't provoke attacks.

    ESPN suspends Smith for comments on abuse

    ESPN has suspended outspoken sportscaster Stephen A. Smith for a week because of his comments about domestic abuse suggesting women should make sure that they don't do anything to provoke an attack. “Let's make sure we don't do anything to provoke wrong action," he said.

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    Tommy Alter, 9, of Highland Park is hugged by his mother, Leslie, during a reunion with his Coast Guard rescuers Tuesday. Nearby is Lt. Dan Schrader, the pilot of the mission.

    Boy meets Coast Guard crew who saved him on Lake Michigan

    Nine-year-old Tommy Alter of Highland Park showed off his toy helicopter on Tuesday to the Coast Guard crew that saved him from a kayaking mishap earlier this month. "Thank you so much," his mom, Leslie Alter, told the crew, who landed for a reunion at a Wheeling airport. “We don't want them to happen, but it's also what we train for," rescue swimmer Derek Johnson said. "We're glad to do...

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    Ryan Flannigan

    Palatine man faces murder charge in punching death

    A Palatine man accused of throwing an unprovoked punch that fatally injured a 26-year-old man outside a bar is in custody on a newly filed charge of first-degree murder, police said Tuesday. “This is a tragedy from a senseless act of violence,” police Cmdr. Michael Seebacher said. The victim, Ryan Flannigan, was described by his sister as "kind, considerate and selfless."

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    Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn speaks at an elementary school in Berwyn, Ill., Tuesday, July 29, 2014, before signing legislation that would add a nonbinding resolution to the November ballot asking voters whether millionaires should pay an additional income tax to help fund schools. (AP Photo/Sun-Times Media, Brian Jackson) MANDATORY CREDIT, MAGS OUT, NO SALES

    Illinois to ask voters about taxing millionaires

    Illinois voters will get a chance in November to weigh in on whether millionaires should pay an additional income tax to help fund schools after Gov. Pat Quinn signed legislation Tuesday adding a nonbinding resolution to the ballot. The resolution asks voters whether incomes over $1 million should be taxed with a 3 percent surcharge. It comes as Quinn is locked in a hotly contested gubernatorial...

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    Michelle Lee

    Woman gets jail for selling fatal heroin dose to Vernon Hills teen

    An Evanston woman convicted of selling a fatal dose of heroin to a 15-year-old Vernon Hills girl was sentenced to 18 months in jail and 30 months of probation Tuesday. Michelle Lee, now 21, was sentenced after she was convicted in May of selling a gram of heroin to three teens in 2011.

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    Courtesy of Jeopardy Productions Inc.Selena Groh, a 16-year-old junior at Buffalo Grove High School, with "Jeopardy!" host Alex Trebek.

    Arlington Heights teen ends Jeopardy! run

    Selena Groh's run on the Jeopardy! Teen Tournament came to an end Tuesday after she bet it all on the final answer and came up with the wrong question. But the Arlington Heights resident isn't letting defeat get her down. "I'm just really happy about the whole experience,” the 17-year-old Buffalo Grove High School student said.

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    Man arrested in Round Lake Beach shooting

    A Round Lake Beach man was arrested Tuesday in a shooting that injured a 16-year-old, according to police. Anthony M. Weber, 21, of Round Lake Beach, who had a separate arrest warrant from Wisconsin on domestic battery charges, was arrested at about 11:45 a.m. at a residence in Janesville, Wisconsin.

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    Kenny Loggins performs during the Elk Grove Village Mid-Summer Classic concert series on the Village Green Tuesday.

    Kenny Loggins gets ‘Footloose’ in Elk Grove

    Suburban music fans got “Footloose” and traveled to the “Danger Zone” Tuesday night as 80s pop-rock stalwart Kenny Loggins closed out Elk Grove Village’s Mid-Summer Classics Concert Series with those and other top 40 hits. Loggins, who scored chart-toppers with songs off the “Caddyshack.” “Footloose,” and “Top Gun”...

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    The Mike Flack Octet play some cool jazz music Tuesday night at Centennial Park in Grayslake.

    Grayslake residents treated to jazz at Centennial Park

    Grayslake residents were treated to a Ravinia-style concert Tuesday night in Centennial Park. The Mike Flack Octet performed some cool jazz as people sat in their lawn chairs and opened up their picnic baskets.

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    This is a section of the I-75 Phase II modernization project under way in Dayton, Ohio. The Senate passed legislation on Tuesday to keep federal highway money flowing to states, with just three days left before the government plans to start slowing down payments. The House passed a $10.8 billion bill last week.

    Senate passes highway bill, sends it back to House

    The Senate on Tuesday voted to change the funding and timing of a House bill to keep federal highway funds flowing to states in an effort to force Congress to come to grips with chronic funding problems that have plagued transportation programs in recent years. The House could accept the Senate’s changes or reject them and send the bill back to the Senate. Whichever outcome, a highway...

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    Detainees sleep in a holding cell at a U.S. Customs and Border Protection processing facility in Brownsville,Texas. For nearly two months, images of immigrant children who have crossed the border without a parent, only to wind up in concrete holding cells once in United States, have tugged at heartstrings. Yet most Americans now say U.S. law should be changed so they can be sent home quickly, without a deportation hearing.

    Poll: Immigration concerns rise with tide of kids

    For nearly two months, images of immigrant children who have crossed the border without a parent, only to wind up in concrete holding cells once in the United States, have tugged at heartstrings. Yet most Americans now say U.S. law should be changed so they can be sent home quickly, without a deportation hearing. A new Associated Press-GfK poll finds two-thirds of Americans now say illegal...

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    The United States and European Union on Tuesday curbed Russia’s access to bank financing and advanced technology in its widest-ranging sanctions yet over President Vladimir Putin’s backing of the rebels in eastern Ukraine. Putin is seen here.

    U.S., Europe impose tough new sanctions on Russia
    Spurred to action by the downing of the Malaysian airliner, the European Union approved dramatically tougher economic sanctions Tuesday against Russia, including an arms embargo and restrictions on state-owned banks. President Barack Obama swiftly followed with an expansion of U.S. penalties targeting key sectors of the Russian economy.

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    Peggy Kinnane to visit namesake Arlington Hts. restaurant Wednesday

    Peggy Kinnane, namesake of the Arlington Heights restaurant and pub, will be visiting from Ireland for a special event on Wednesday night. Kinnane is owner Derek Hadley’s mother and at 75, she’s making a visit to the restaurant that bears her name.

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    Lawmakers struggle to seal $225 million Iron Dome package

    Democrats and Republicans in Congress vowed urgent support Tuesday for a $225 million missile defense package for Israel, boosting the likelihood that legislation will clear Congress before lawmakers begin a monthlong vacation at week’s end.

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    Smoke and fire from the explosion of an Israeli strike rise over Gaza City, Tuesday, when Israel escalated its military campaign against Hamas, striking symbols of the group’s control in Gaza and firing tank shells that shut down the strip’s only power plant in the heaviest bombardment in the fighting so far.

    Israel hits symbols of Hamas rule; 128 killed

    Israel unleashed its heaviest air and artillery assault of the Gaza war on Tuesday, destroying key symbols of Hamas control, shutting down the territory’s only power plant and leaving at least 128 Palestinians dead on the bloodiest day of the 22-day conflict.

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    The Senate confirmed former Arlington Heights resident Robert McDonald as the next Veterans Affairs secretary Tuesday.

    Senate confirms McDonald as VA secretary

    The Senate on Tuesday unanimously confirmed former Procter & Gamble CEO Robert McDonald as the new Veterans Affairs secretary, with a mission to overhaul an agency beleaguered by long veterans’ waits for health care and VA workers falsifying records to cover up delays. McDonald, 61, who grew up in Arlington Heights,has pledged to transform the VA and promised that “systematic...

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    Three injured in Aurora home invasion

    Three people were injured early Tuesday when at least four people forced their way into an Aurora home. Authorities responded about 4:35 a.m. to the home invasion on the 700 block of Fifth Street.

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    Ted Bukowski

    Bond set at $250,000 for Hoffman Estates man in Bensenville shooting

    Bond was set at $250,000 Tuesday afternoon for a Hoffman Estates man accused of firing his rifle at his ex-girlfriend’s new boyfriend near Bensenville. Ted Bukowski, 20, of the 900 block of Evanston Street, is charged with aggravated discharge of a firearm in the direction of a person, reckless discharge of a firearm and aggravated unlawful use of a weapon.

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    Former Chicago Mayor Jane Byrne in 1979.

    Chicago committee OKs naming plaza for Byrne

    A Chicago City Council committee has advanced a plan to name a plaza next to a downtown landmark in honor of former Mayor Jane Byrne. Byrne held office from 1979 to 1983. She was the city’s first and only female mayor.

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    Meadows Christian Fellowship plans to make it snow before showing film

    Snow is not much fun in February, but more welcome in August. Meadows Christian Fellowship will have a real "blizzard" Friday evening, Aug. 1, before the showing of its annual community movie, "Frozen." Viewers can wear shorts and sandals, but bring your gloves!

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    $1.2 million may go to family of athlete shot by cop

    Chicago could pay $1.2 million to the family of a high school athlete who was fatally shot by an off-duty police officer. The city council’s finance committee on Tuesday approved the settlement in the 2009 shooting of 17-year-old Corey Harris. The entire city council will vote Wednesday.

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    Kevin Summers

    Wheeling man pleads guilty to 2012 home invasion

    One of two defendants charged in a 2012 Wheeling home invasion pleaded guilty to the class X felony. Kevin Summers, 30, was sentenced to 15 years in prison in exchange for his guilty plea.

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    Wheeling considers requiring landlords to join crime fight

    The Wheeling Village Board is excited about requiring all landlords in the village to join a cirme-free housing program, but trustees are nervous about finding funds for the program.

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    State police cracking down on trucks on I-90/94

    The Illinois State Police will join 15 states along the I-90 and I-94 corridor in a massive public safety initiative called the I-90/94 Challenge aimed to reduce traffic fatalities and prevent criminal activity, according to a news release issued Tuesday.

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    Man on motorized bike dies after hitting parked car

    A 52-year-old man died Sunday night after his motorized bicycle struck a parked car in Waukegan. Jeffrey McLaren, 52, of Waukegan, had been driving a motorized pedal bicycle north around 9:15 p.m. Sunday when he hit a parked car in the 600 block of Hickory Street, according to Waukegan police.

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    Following his sermon, Imam Shamshad Nasir greets fellow worshippers as the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community celebrates the end of Ramadan at its Glen Ellyn mosque.

    Muslims celebrate Eid al-Fitr at Glen Ellyn mosque

    Muslim families celebrated Eid al-Fitr — a holiday marking the end of Ramadan — Tuesday with food and activities at a Glen Ellyn mosque.

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    Illinois warns insurers of discrimination ban

    Illinois regulators issued a reminder to health insurers that it is illegal to deny coverage to someone because they are transgender, drawing praise from the gay rights community. The bulletin, which was dated Monday and announced Tuesday, notes that both new and amended policy filings should comply with provisions in the Affordable Care Act, the Illinois Human Rights Act and the Illinois Mental...

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    In this July 22, 2014, photo in Chicago, Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn, surrounded by workers, speaks during a bill signing ceremony. The candidates for Illinois governor have ridiculed each other’s plans for the state budget in recent weeks, with Republican Bruce Rauner accusing Gov. Quinn of leading a “tax-happy, fee-happy state,” and the Chicago Democrat countering that Rauner’s plan to cut taxes is a dishonest, “flim flam approach” that will leave an $8.5 billion budget hole. But a closer look at the state’s books and the two candidates’ plans shows both sides are playing a little fast and loose with the numbers. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)

    Lawsuit against Quinn back in court in October

    A legal battle between an anti-patronage lawyer and Gov. Pat Quinn’s administration will return to federal court less than two weeks before voters will decide if they want to re-elect the Chicago Democrat.

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    Chicago Transit Authority reports drop in crime

    Chicago officials are releasing figures that show violent crime and thefts on Chicago Transit Authority trains, buses and platforms has dropped significantly.

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    Prison watchdog praises Aurora halfway house

    Two years after Gov. Pat Quinn targeted for closure an Aurora center that helps female prisoners prepare to rejoin society, a top prison watchdog Tuesday gave it high marks.

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    ASSOCIATED PRESS Polly Akhurst, right, and David Blackwell, co-founders of Talk To Me London, a new campaign that wants to change London’s image as one of the loneliest places in Britain.

    Lonely Londoners looking to open up to strangers

    It’s a typical urban routine: Sit on the subway, headphones in, fiddling with the smartphone to avoid eye contact with fellow passengers. Now a new campaign called “Talk to me” wants to break that habit and change London’s image as one of the loneliest places in Britain.

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    Streamwood man pleads guilty to molesting teen

    A 32-year-old Streamwood man pleaded guilty to molesting a 14-year-old girl and was sentenced to one year in prison. Angelo Cannata, who pleaded guilty to criminal sexual abuse, was also ordered to register as a sex offender and pay $689 in fines, court records show.

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    Patricia A. Hewitt, 76, of Geneva, was charged with disorderly conduct at 6:37 p.m. Monday in the 100 block of South College Street, according to a Batavia police report.

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    Fox Valley police reports
    Arturo Gonzalez, 43, of Elgin, was charged Monday with vehicular invasion, aggravated battery, domestic battery and possession of cannabis after he reached inside a vehicle with two occupants and punched both of them, court records show.

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    Prospect Hts. plans classic car event

    Classic Car Night at the French Market in Prospect Heights will take place from 4 to 7 p.m. Wednesday, July 30. Anyone is welcome to display his or her classic car. The city plans food and entertainment, along with the regular weekly market, during the event.

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    Warren High registration:

    Warren Township High School walk-in registration continues July 30 and 31, from 1 to 6 p.m. at both campuses.

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    Youth baseball fundraiser:

    Lake Villa Township Baseball hosts its inaugural golf outing and silent auction Friday, Sept. 12, at the Antioch Golf Club, 40150 Route 59, Antioch.

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    Gurnee village government has combined with three school districts to create the Keeping Posted+ newsletter. It’ll land in mailboxes this week with updates from the village, Gurnee Elementary District 56, Warren Township High School District 121 and Woodland Elementary District 50.

    Gurnee village government, 3 school districts join forces on newsletter

    Gurnee village government and three school districts are launching a joint newsletter in what officials say is an effort to improve communication with taxpayers. About 30,000 copies of Keeping Posted+ will land in mailboxes by week’s end with updates from the village, Gurnee Elementary District 56, Warren Township High School District 121 and Woodland Elementary District 50. The three...

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    Buffalo Grove leaders face economic development questions

    Buffalo Grove has been courting economic development for years,but has remained basically a bedroom community with pockets of strip malls. Whether that should stay the case was a topic of discussion this week as elected village leaders met as a committee of the whole to work on a comprehensive economic development strategy.

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    Kenny Loggins

    Loggins rocks Elk Grove Village tonight

    Kenny Loggins comes to Elk Grove Village tonight as part of the sixth annual Mid-Summer Classics Concert Series. The free concert begins at 7 p.m. on the Village Green, 901 Wellington Ave. between the municipal complex and library.

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    “Miss Carole” Stephens, a nationally renowned music specialist, and her accompanist Clarence Goodman, engage children in a music program called Macaroni Soup! at Cook Memorial Public Library in Libertyville on Wednesday. The program involves singing, dancing and rhythmic movement.

    ‘Miss Carole’ has kids dancing and jumping at Cook Memorial library in Libertyville

    More than 80 children and adults danced, wiggled and jumped with Miss Carole and Macaroni Soup! Wednesday at the Cook Memorial Public Library in Libertyville.

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    Foreclosure prevention program:

    A workshop to help homeowners struggling with their mortgage will be held from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 2 at W.J. Murphy Elementary School, 220 N. Greenwood Drive, Round Lake Park.

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    Dance for a cause:

    Forever Fit women’s fitness and nutrition club, 1163 W. Park Ave., Libertyville, is holding a zumbathon fundraiser for the Center for Women and Children in Need Growing Stronger also known as WINGS from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. and from 7 to 9 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 9.

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    Damar Elerby

    3 charged in Roselle vandalism cases

    Three men are awaiting trial after being charged in connection with a series of vandalism incidents last month in Roselle. Christopher Geldmeyer, 20, of the 1300 block of Carriage Way, in Roselle; David Henry, 19, of the 1300 block of Greenbrook Court in Hanover Park; and Damar Elerby, 19, of the 12 block of West Pinehurst, in Glendale Heights, each were charged Thursday with felony criminal...

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    Mystery business proposal heading to Naperville council

    Naperville decision-makers say they don’t know exactly which business is looking to develop a new research and office building on roughly 13 acres at Warrenville Road and Lucent Lane, but so far, they’re OK with that. “I thought they gave us enough information at this point to approve or provide a positive recommendation,” planning and zoning commission member Sean...

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    Connor Harvey reclines while spinning on the Tilt-a-Whirl ride with Lily Engelhardt, both of Hampshire, at last year’s Coon Creek Country Days.

    Annual festival runs Thursday to Sunday

    Hampshire Coon Creek Country Days opens its four-day run at 6 p.m. Thursday. General admission to the festival is free, but funds raised throughout the weekend will go toward local charities and organizations, including the Burlington-Hampshire Food Pantry.

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    Streamwood nurse charged with Medicare fraud

    A Streamwood woman who managed an in-home health care business is facing several federal Medicare fraud charges. Diana Jocelyn Gumila, 45, is accused of "double-billing" Medicare or billing for services that were unnecessary. Gumila, a registered nurse since 1991, operated Doctor At Home and Xpress Mobile Imaging, both based in Schaumburg. She faces 10 years in prison if convicted.

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    New uses for 2 former restaurant sites in Bloomingdale

    Two former restaurant sites along Army Trail Road in Bloomingdale are expected to get new uses — one as a Starbucks and the other as a Chick-fil-A.

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    Roughly 175 people participated in Sunday’s Scott’s Walk in south Naperville to raise awareness about testicular cancer.

    Scott’s Walk raises awareness of testicular cancer

    A walk at Whalon Lake in south Naperville helps celebrate the life of Scott Zager and raise awareness of tewsticular cancer.

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    The spring 1969 signing of the Hoffman Estates Park District’s purchase of the Vogelei property. At the last minute, owner Ida Vogelei decided she didn’t want to sell the driveway, but ultimately gave in.

    Looking back on 50 years of the Hoffman Estates Park District

    The Hoffman Estates Park District will mark its 50th anniversary with its Party in the Park on Saturday, Aug. 2 at Highpoint Park, and some of those who remember the entire long journey to this weekend’s celebration are sharing stories of how the district came to be. Among them are the wife and son of Joe Fabbrini — the visionary leader who did much of the legwork to establish the...

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    First Fridays returns to downtown Aurora on Aug. 1

    After taking a month off for Aurora’s July 4 fireworks celebration, First Fridays in downtown Aurora is back to “wow” with art, music, dancing, and more. On Aug. 1, First Fridays returns with nine venues throughout downtown Aurora. The events are free and art is for sale.

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    Woman dies retrieving cell phone from fire

    Authorities say a central Illinois woman is dead after running back into her burning home to get her cell phone. A police officer who tried to save her was hospitalized. Police in Bartonville said the home caught fire around 4 a.m. Tuesday. The woman and her teenage daughter were out of the house but the woman ran back inside. Bartonville is just southwest of Peoria.

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    Maureen Riedy, president of Visit Lake County, discusses tourism numbers during an event Monday at Six Flags Great America in Gurnee.

    Lake County sees steady boost in tourism spending

    Tourism spending in Lake County showed a steady increase in 2013, topping $1.2 billion, an increase of 1.6 percent from last year. Travel spending generated about $25.8 million in local tax revenue and helped support 10,190 jobs, offiicals said.

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    Illinois River’s man-made island now complete

    A man-made island in the Illinois River built to provide habitat for fish and a place for birds to call home will officially be complete this week.The Army Corps of Engineers plans to mark the end of the five-year project with a ceremony Friday in Peoria.

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    Peter A. Mazzara

    St. Charles man faces more theft-by-fraud charges

    A St. Charles man has been charged with stealing from a former co-worker. Charges of forgery and theft were filed in June against Peter Mazzara, who is already facing charges of theft in an unrelated case, according to court records.

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    Asana co-founders Justin Rosenstein, center, and Dustin Moskovitz, right, at the company’s headquarters in San Francisco.

    Escaping email: Inspired vision or hallucination?

    Dustin Moskovitz is plotting an escape from email. The 30-year-old entrepreneur has learned a lot about communication since he teamed up with his college roommate Mark Zuckerberg to create Facebook a decade ago, and that knowledge is fueling an audacious attempt to change the way people connect at work, where the incessant drumbeat of email has become an excruciating annoyance. Moskovitz is...

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    A tow truck works Tuesday to remove an overturned vehicle at the I-90 entrance ramp.

    Truck overturns at I-90 entrance ramp

    A truck overturned on the entrance ramp to eastbound I-90 from Route 53 Tuesday morning. The accident briefly closed the left side of the ramp.

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    Conlan Fay films before an outdoor movie event at Towne Center Park in Shorewood.

    Shorewood man’s love of TV began at village hall

    In 2006, seventh-grader Conlan Fay went to the old Shorewood Village Hall to see how local government works as part of a Troy Middle School youth and government group.But he wasn’t as interested in the politics as he was with what he saw through a window to a closed-circuit cable TV setup: lights, camera and action.Fay’s interest in TV started at the village and blossomed into a...

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    Historian documents the men of 44th regiment

    Civil War Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman once said, “War is hell.”Spencerville author and historical researcher Margaret Hobson says that was perhaps never more true than during that war, now marking its sesquicentennial.For the past two decades, the 71-year-old retired Fort Wayne Community Schools math teacher has been compiling exhaustive information on one small part of the Civil...

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    Act 10, voter ID, domestic registry decisions near in Wisconsin
    Associated PressMADISON, Wis. — The Wisconsin Supreme Court plans to rule Thursday in three major cases.The court is planning to issue its ruling on the collective bargaining changes Gov. Scott Walker and the Republican Legislature approved in 2011, despite massive protests that led to a series of recall elections.

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    Wisconsin mother of kids shot in van charged with neglect
    he mother of six of the seven children who were shot at last week in a Milwaukee gunfight has been charged with child neglect.Twenty-five-year-old Octavia Burton of Milwaukee faces seven misdemeanor counts of child neglect. Police say Burton was in a van with her children on July 17 when the man driving the van got into a gunfight. Police say after Burton dropped the driver off, she took two of...

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    New Illinois logo to promote farmers who served in military

    A new logo on agricultural products will help identify Illinois farmers, fishermen and ranchers who served in the military.The state Department of Agriculture and Illinois Farm Bureau say veterans can take part in a national branding campaign called Homegrown by Heroes. It allows agricultural producers who served or are serving in the military to advertise that fact by putting a special logo on...

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    Quinn says state EPA will block PCBs from landfill

    Toxic PCBs will not be stored in a central Illinois landfill sitting atop an aquifer that provides water to 750,000 people, Gov. Pat Quinn’s office announced Monday. The Illinois Environmental Protection Agency agreed to bar PCBs from being dumped in the Clinton Landfill near Clinton after learning that local approval of the landfill in 2002 didn’t include PCBs. The agency initially...

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    U of I club hockey team looks for temporary home

    he Ice Arena at the University of Illinois won’t be able to open until at least mid-September because of mechanical problems. That will leave the school’s popular club hockey team looking for a new temporary home.Coach Nick Fabbrini tells The News-Gazette that he is looking at rinks in Bloomington, Danville, Kankakee and Chicago for sites for practices and possibly games. The team...

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    Chicago Police union wants file release delayed

    The union that represents Chicago police wants a judge to delay the release of officer misconduct files.The Chicago Sun-Times reports that the Fraternal Order of Police filed an injunction Monday in Cook County Circuit Court. The union’s request comes after the Chicago Police Department announced a new policy that would make public all completed investigations of Chicago police misconduct.

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    Excavation finds courthouse where Lincoln worked

    rchaeologists excavating near the McLean County Museum of History in Bloomington have unearthed part of the footprint of the 1836 courthouse where experts said Abraham Lincoln worked as an attorney. The discovery happened Monday on the first day of two to three weeks of archaeological work before construction starts on a new entrance into a planned tourism center on the lower level of the history...

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    Starved Rock trails still closed from storm damage

    A majority of the 13-mile trail system at Starved Rock State Park in northern Illinois remains closed because of significant storm damage that happened four weeks ago.The park is waiting for an emergency contract to be awarded for tree removal, The Pantagraph reported. The damage includes limbs hanging dangerously overhead, branches littering the trails and falling trees.

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    Hometown police officer fired after shooting dog
    A Hometown police officer was fired after shooting to death a family dog.Nicole Echlina says her 6-year-old daughter saw the shooting of their dog, Apollo, by the Hometown police officer The owners of the 14-month-old, German shepherd mix called police for help after he ran off.

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    Illinois boy to meet Coast Guard rescuers

    A 9-year-old boy is scheduled to reunite with the members of the Coast Guard helicopter crew who rescued him earlier this month.Tommy Alter of Highland Park plans to meet with crew members Tuesday afternoon at Chicago Executive Airport in Wheeling. Coast Guard officials say Alter, his aunt and cousin had gone out on Lake Michigan in rented kayaks July 11 near Peninsula State Park in Door County,...

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    Congressman wants to end CHA “supervouchers”

    Illinois Congressman Aaron Schock is seeking an end to a Chicago Housing Authority program that puts some of the city’s poorest residents into its highest priced apartments.Schock says CHA “supervouchers” allows a select few families to receive $3,000 to $4,000 a month in rent assistance that puts them in “some of the nicest luxury units.”

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    Chicago cop wins discrimination suit
    A federal jury has awarded a Chicago police officer more than $500,000 in a discrimination lawsuit against a former supervising officer.The Chicago Sun-Times reports Officer Detlef Sommerfield sued the city and his former boss, Sgt. Lawrence Knasiak, in 2008 for taunting him with anti-Semitic and racist remarks. He was awarded $540,000 in the suit Monday.

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    No bond for 2 Chicago men accused of shooting boy

    A judge has ordered two Chicago men held without bond Monday on charges connected to the shooting of a 3-year-old boy hit in the abdomen and hip. The two men — 19-year-old Alger Sanchez and 22-year-old Anton Aseves — face two counts each of attempted first-degree murder. They also have been charged with one count each of aggravated battery and discharge of a firearm.

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    Kaneland school board meeting gets heated over budget

    The Kaneland school board Monday night tentatively approved a $66.5 million budget with a $3 million deficit in the education fund portion, over the objection of board member Tony Valente. Valente said administrators should have trimmed expenses. And he again criticized collecting more in property taxes for transportation than needed, calling the plan “immoral and unethical.”

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    Maine Gov. Paul LePage, the governor of the state with the largest percentage of white people, placed thousands of miles from the southern border, has thrust the issue of immigration to the forefront with his criticism over the federal government’s placement of eight immigrants in the state.

    Immigration debate roils politics in ... Maine?

    In the whitest U.S. state, thousands of miles from the Mexican border, the debate over immigration became a central issue in one of the nation’s most closely watched governor’s races when Maine's Republican Gov. Paul LePage roiled the cultural waters by criticizing the federal government’s placement of eight immigrant children in Maine without advising him.

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    House to vote on slimmed-down bill for border

    House Republicans are heading toward a vote Thursday on a slimmed-down bill to address the immigration crisis on the border by sending in National Guard troops and speeding unaccompanied migrant youths back to Central America.

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    A woman rushes into her house past the body of a community service worker who was killed during the shelling at a residential apartment house in Donetsk, eastern Ukraine Tuesday, July 29, 2014. Local residents said it was a shelling from direction of Ukrainian army’s positions.

    Shelling adds to mounting civilian toll in Ukraine

    Shelling in at least three cities in eastern Ukraine has hit a home for the elderly, a school and multiple homes, adding to a rapidly growing civilian death toll Tuesday.

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    Ross Martin, 28, of Burlington, Wis., tips his bike in the deep dirt during the motocross race at last year's McHenry County Fair.

    McHenry County Fair opens Wednesday

    For Susan Simons of Marengo, the McHenry County Fair has been a staple summer event since her daughter started participating in a 4-H club 13 years ago. Since then, Simons' involvement in the fair has grown. Simons said she is amazed at how much work is put into the fair each year. “When you come to the fair, you don't realize what all goes on behind the scenes,” she said.

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    The Lake County Division of Transportation wants to install smarter traffic signals on Gilmer Road from Fremont Center Road to Midlothian Road.

    Lake County trying new technology for traffic light system

    The Lake County Division of Transportation is using a new technology that allows for real-time collection of traffic data and signal timing. The first corridor is being installed along Aptakisic Road in Buffalo Grove, and a second is being considered for Gilmer Road near Hawthorn Woods. “If it were a holiday or if it were a snowstorm and people went home early, it reacts to actual...

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    The Yogurtland store at 432 S. Randall Road is scheduled to open later this year in Algonquin.

    Yogurtland coming to Randall Road in Algonquin

    Yogurtland is expected to begin serving its frozen yogurt later this year on Randall Road in Algonquin.

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    Gurnee has been awarded a $229,000 federal grant to mostly cover the cost of replacing 14-year-old air packs for firefighters. Rolling Meadows firefighter/paramedic John Loesch Jr. donned a pack for a drill last year.

    Federal grant to mostly pay for Gurnee firefighters’ upgraded air packs

    Gurnee has scored a nearly $229,500 federal grant toward the purchase of upgraded safety equipment for firefighters. Deputy Fire Chief John Kavanagh said Monday the promised federal money will allow the village to replace 14-year-old air packs. "We would not be able to make the purchase without this grant being awarded,” he said.

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    Dawn Patrol: Man injured outside bar dies; police ID man in fatal crash

    Palatine man injured outside bar dies. Police ID Hoffman Estates man in fatal Schaumburg crash. Charity covers funeral for Barrington infant who starved to death. Rolling Meadows trees cut down despite neighbors’ protests. Elgin escapee to get fitness test. Wheaton grad directs films. Williams could be next Hester.

  •  
    Wheaton Municipal Band Director Bruce Moss is celebrating his 35th season with the ensemble this year.

    Conductor celebrates 35 years with Wheaton Municipal Band

    When Bruce Moss first took the baton as director of the Wheaton Municipal Band, there were more than a few skeptics. This week, Moss will celebrate his 35th anniversary with the band and those skeptics are long, long gone.

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    Five new team members have joined the Downers Grove Fire Department’s Emergency Medical Services Bike Medic program. They received their training earlier this month.

    Downers Grove adds five medics on two wheels

    Seventeen years after it first started using bicycles to reach areas where ambulances can’t go, the Downers Grove Fire Department is bolstering its Emergency Medical Services Bike Medic program. The department recently added five new members to the program, bringing the total number of team members to about a dozen. “These new guys are going to be the ones who end up carrying the...

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    Milk a cow for $2 as part of 4-H fundraiser

    The McHenry County Fair opens Wednesday, and a 4-H fundraiser will allow people to milk a cow.

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    Lombard office complex damaged in early morning fire

    Lombard Fire officials are investigating the cause of a fire that caused about $5,000 in damages to an office building on the 2200 block of South Main Street early Monday morning.

Sports

  •  
    For Bears defensive tackle Nate Collins, here celebrating after a sack last season, his future with the team could hinge on his play in preseason games.

    Bears' Collins faces tough competition for roster spot

    Bears defensive tackle Nate Collins has made a rapid recovery from last year's torn ACL in his left knee, and he has displayed some dominant pass-rush moves in training camp practices, but he faces tough competition for a roster spot on a defensive line that has been upgraded. “It's nothing new to me, this situation that I'm in,” Collins said.

  •  
    Cubs starting pitcher Edwin Jackson made it through just 4 innings Tuesday night against the Rockies.

    ‘Moving day’ could be here at Wrigley Field

    Edwin Jackson turned in yet another poor start for the Cubs Tuesday night as he lasted just 4 innings against the Colorado Rockies. Before the game, Cubs GM Jed Hoyer said it's possible the Cubs will make a deal before Thursday's nonwaiver deadline. Just after 1:30 a.m., the Cubs won 4-3 on a 16th-inning sacrifice fly by Starlin Castro.

  •  
    Chicago White Sox's Jose Abreu is congratulated by Alexei Ramirez after hitting a two run home run off of Detroit Tigers pitcher Joakim Soria during the seventh inning of a baseball game Tuesday, July 29, 2014, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Duane Burleson)

    Abreu hits 31st homer, White Sox pound Tigers 11-4

    Jose Abreu homered, drove in four runs — and accomplished something nobody on the White Sox had managed in 94 years. Abreu's three-hit night extended his hitting streak to 18 games, and the White Sox routed the Detroit Tigers 11-4 on Tuesday. Abreu has hit safely in 36 of his last 37 games, and this is his second 18-game streak of the year. The only other player with two 18-game hitting streaks in a season for the White Sox was Hall of Famer Eddie Collins, who had runs of 21 and 22 games in 1920. Collins was already a seasoned veteran by that point. Abreu is in his first year in the majors.

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    Cougars open trip with 3-2 loss

    The Kane County Cougars (22-15, 67-40) came in to Appleton looking for an end to their losing streak but instead were handed another 1-run loss as they fell to the Timber Rattlers 3-2 at Fox Cities Stadium on Tuesday night.

  •  
    Arlington Heights’ Doug Ghim, hugging his father and caddie, Jeff, at the U.S. Amateur Public Links Championship earlier this month, is in the field of this week’s marathon Western Amateur at Chicago’s Beverly Country Club.

    Western Amateur one tough test

    No tournament in golf, amateur or professional, requires as much to win as the Western Amateur. The Western Golf Association is conducting its annual golf marathon for the 112th time this week at Chicago’s Beverly Country Club, and Wednesday is an especially big day because it includes the largest cut of the event — from the starting field of 156 to the low 44 and ties.

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    Boomers sweep six-game homestand

    The Schaumburg Boomers swept the homestand with an 8-2 victory Tuesday over the Lake Erie Crushers. For the Boomers, who own a league-best 26-7 home record, it was the first 6-0 homestand in franchise history.

  •  
    Coach Tim Beckman is confident that the tide might be turning for his Illini this fall.

    Beckman, Illinois hope for better days ahead

    As Illinois coach Tim Beckman stood in front of the Big Ten media Monday at the Chicago Hilton, he wanted to discuss the numbers of the present and future. The team returns 40 of the 50 players on last year’s two-deep roster. Of those 40, 34 will be back for the next season.

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    And now Cubs’ Ramirez is on disabled list

    The Cubs changed course Tuesday on relief pitcher Neil Ramirez. Although Ramirez has been one of the team's most effective relievers, the Cubs sent him to the minor leagues Saturday in a curious move. On Tuesday, they moved him to the DL with triceps soreness.

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    Bloomington High School running back Adrian Arrington tries to clear a pile of Providence Catholic defenders during the Class 6A championship football game in Champaign. Arrington, who later went on to play at Eastern Illinois, is the lead plaintiff in a class-action head injury lawsuit against the NCAA.

    NCAA settles head-injury suit, will change rules

    The NCAA agreed Tuesday to settle a class-action head-injury lawsuit by creating a $70 million fund to diagnose thousands of current and former college athletes to determine if they suffered brain trauma playing football, hockey, soccer and other contact sports. However, a federal judge in Chicago stopped short of granting preliminary approval for the settlement, saying he needs more time to decide if it’s a good deal.

  •  
    FILE - In this Nov. 12, 2010, file photo, Shelly Sterling sits with her husband, Donald Sterling, during the Los Angeles Clippers’ NBA basketball game against the Detroit Pistons in Los Angeles. Only final arguments and a ruling remain in the trial to determine whether Sterling’s estranged wife can sell the Clippers to former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer for $2 billion. Lawyers for Sterling plan to argue Monday, July 28, 2014, that Shelly Sterling had no right to make the deal with Ballmer, even though Donald Sterling had given her written authority to pursue a sale. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill, File)

    NBA, Clippers eager for Sterling out, Ballmer in

    The NBA and the Los Angeles Clippers are ready to move on, even if Donald Sterling wants to keep fighting.Move on to Steve Ballmer, who paid a record price for the team and is now a step closer to finally owning it.The Clippers are a potential powerhouse team next season, with two All-Star players and one of the league’s best coaches. The only thing that could’ve messed it up was ownership.

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    Rec Park plays host to Legion state tourney

    The American Legion baseball state tournament is returning to the Northwest suburbs. Beginning Wednesday at Lloyd Meyer Field at Recreation Park in Arlington Heights, six teams from across the state will battle for the Illinois Legion state championship. And keeping with tradition, there will be no admission and the pass-the hat custom will take place at each game. Three teams from the Northwest suburbs will be battling in the double-elimination tournament that begins at 11 a.m. Wednesday. Arlington Post 208, Barrington Post 158 and Northwest Legion Post 690 will compete, with play continuing each day through Saturday. The title game will be at either 11 a.m. or 3 p.m. Saturday.

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    North Dakota State picked to win Missouri Valley football crown

    Three-time defending national champion North Dakota State is picked to win the Missouri Valley Football Conference title. The poll of league coaches, media and sports information directors released Tuesday shows the Bison with 24 out of 39 first-place votes and 370 points.

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    Ohio State head coach Urban Meyer talks to the media Monday during the Big Ten Football Media Day in Chicago.

    Playoffs could create chances for Big Ten teams

    The old BCS system is out. A four-team playoff to determine a national champion is being implemented this season, and that could open some more opportunities for the Big Ten and the other four power conferences. “Hopefully, this will give everyone an equal opportunity to play for a national championship, which everyone wants,” Michigan State quarterback Connor Cook said Tuesday as the Big Ten wrapped up its two-day media event.

  •  
    Derrick Rose, the Bulls star who is coming off two knee injuries that kept him out for much of the last two seasons, said he played roughly nine minutes of the team’s scrimmage during a two-hour practice. He added he was excited about how he felt physically.

    Rose returns as U.S. basketball team opens camp

    Derrick Rose, the Bulls star who is coming off two knee injuries that kept him out for much of the last two seasons, said he played roughly nine minutes of the team’s scrimmage during a two-hour practice. He added he was excited about how he felt physically. “I think Derrick was a great excitement for us, because you hear about how he’s worked out, but to see him today, I mean, he put it all out,” coach Mike Krzyzewski said.

  •  
    Kyle Solomon (12) suffered multiple concussions as a forward for Maine’s ice hockey team from 2008 to 2010. One happened during a nationally televised game in 2009, when he was slammed into the boards and blacked out, according to filings. After receiving seven stitches in the locker room, he returned to the game in the final period.

    Stories of athletes named in NCAA lawsuit

    Ten head-injury lawsuits filed against the NCAA were consolidated into one federal class-action suit in Chicago, where a settlement was announced Tuesday. In all of the lawsuits combined, dozens of plaintiffs who said they suffered concussions playing contact sports in college are named. Here are some of their stories.

  •  
    Mike North would gladly take new Hall of Famers Tony La Russa, from left, Joe Torre or Bobby Cox to manage his team.

    The Hall of Fame hit a home run this year

    Mike North knows the 2014 Cooperstown inductees wouldn’t be left off too many baseball rosters.

Business

  •  
    Employees stand on a platform beneath the wing of a Airbus A380 aircraft on the assembly line at the Airbus Group NV factory in Toulouse, France. Chicago-based Boeing competitor Airbus Group NV said it’s closely monitoring the financial health of customers for the flagship A380 and acknowledged that not all superjumbos on order will get built after it pulled a purchase accord with a Japanese carrier. “Without referring to any specific airline, I can assure you that we have cases where airlines are in the order backlog but not in the production plan,” Chief Executive Officer Tom Enders said today on a conference call to discuss earnings. “We are watching the situation carefully, and know about the strengths and weaknesses of customers.”

    Airbus says not all a380s in backlog will get delivered

    Chicago-based Boeing competitor Airbus Group NV said it’s closely monitoring the financial health of customers for the flagship A380 and acknowledged that not all superjumbos on order will get built after it pulled a purchase accord with a Japanese carrier. “Without referring to any specific airline, I can assure you that we have cases where airlines are in the order backlog but not in the production plan,” Chief Executive Officer Tom Enders said today on a conference call to discuss earnings.

  •  
    More than 35 percent of Americans have debts and unpaid bills that have been reported to collection agencies, according to a study released Tuesday by the Urban Institute.

    Study: 35 percent in U.S. facing debt collectors

    More than 35 percent of Americans have debts and unpaid bills that have been reported to collection agencies, according to a study released Tuesday by the Urban Institute. “Roughly, every third person you pass on the street is going to have debt in collections,” Caroline Ratcliffe, a senior fellow at the Washington-based think tank, said. “It can tip employers’ hiring decisions, or whether or not you get that apartment.”

  •  
    Stocks fell on Tuesday as the European Union and the U.S. announced sanctions against Russia, snuffing out earlier gains led by a rally in telephone stocks.

    Stocks decline as Russian sanctions overshadow phone rally
    U.S. stocks fell as the European Union and the U.S. announced sanctions against Russia, snuffing out earlier gains led by a rally in telephone stocks.

  •  
    A Jimmy Dean Pulled Pork sandwich. Jimmy Dean, the breakfast sausage brand started by the late country singer of the same name, is hoping its new bowls and sandwiches can lure eaters at other meals.

    Jimmy Dean moves beyond breakfast for first time

    Jimmy Dean is coming to dinner — and lunch, too.The sausage brand started by the late country singer of the same name has become a breakfast staple, with products even including a pancake-and-sausage on a stick. Now the brand is hoping its new bowls and sandwiches can lure eaters at other meals. Jimmy Dean, owned by Chicago-based Hillshire Brands, is rolling out 16 microwavable products that cost around $3 each and are designed to be eaten later in the day, including a pulled pork sandwich and grilled steak bowl.

  •  
    Mark Zuckerberg, chief executive officer of Facebook Inc.,The U.S. should investigate whether Facebook Inc.'s tracking of users' Web browsing activities violates an agreement with the government to ensure people's privacy, an advocacy group said.

    Facebook plan on Web browsing alarms privacy groups

    The U.S. should investigate whether Facebook Inc.'s tracking of users' Web browsing activities violates an agreement with the government to ensure people's privacy, an advocacy group said. Facebook, the biggest social networking site, began monitoring the Web habits of its users following a June 12 announcement. That's contrary to the company's prior representations, according to a letter sent to the Federal Trade Commission.

  •  
    Carry Johnson, left, shows dresses to her daughters Zoey, 3, center, and Payton while they shop at a Costco in Plano, Texas. Confidence among U.S. consumers soared in July to the highest level in almost seven years as Americans grew more upbeat about the labor market and the outlook for the economy.

    Consumer confidence in U.S. jumps to highest since 2007

    Confidence among U.S. consumers soared in July to the highest level in almost seven years as Americans grew more upbeat about the labor market and the outlook for the economy. The Conference Board’s index rose to 90.9, the highest since October 2007, from a revised 86.4 in June, according to the New York-based private research group said today. The gauge exceeded the most optimistic forecast in a Bloomberg survey in which the median called for an 85.4 reading.

  •  

    Burger king follows Yum in cutting ties with vendor OSI in China

    Burger King Worldwide Inc., reacting to a health scare in China, cut ties with OSI Group LLC in the country after the supplier’s Shanghai operation was accused of changing the expiration dates on meat.Burger King’s Chinese division investigated the matter and decided it was safer to stop sourcing any products from OSI’s facilities throughout the country, Alix Salyers, a spokeswoman for the Miami-based company, said in an e-mail.

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    U.S. homeownership falls to 19-year low amid credit crunch

    The homeownership rate in the U.S. fell to a 19-year low as rising prices and tight credit kept many first-time buyers out of the property market.The share of Americans who own their homes was 64.7 percent in the second quarter, down from 64.8 percent in the previous three months, the Census Bureau said in a report today. The rate matched the level in the second quarter of 1995.Housing has become less affordable and more difficult to finance for entry-level buyers, even as mortgage rates have held close to record lows.

  •  

    Dutch want Ukraine to do more to gain MH17 access amid fighting

    The Netherlands wants Ukraine to do more to help gain access to the MH17 crash site as forensic workers failed to reach the area today due to fighting between government forces and pro-Russia separatists.“I want to judge them on the facts and it has been insufficient, so we keep up the pressure,” Dutch Foreign Minister Frans Timmermans told lawmakers in The Hague today. “This is an incredibly complex situation and there is no way we can turn this into a stable situation on our own.”

  •  

    DuPage County manufacturing incubator nearing launch

    An innovation center that aims to provide entrepreneurs with space and manufacturing technology to launch their ideas is soon to have a home in DuPage County. Rev3 Innovation Center expects to choose a site in the next few weeks, said Nic Zito, business services director for Choose DuPage. “We’re 99 percent done with securing our space."

  •  

    BP warns more russia sanctions may hurt business as profit rises

    BP Plc, the U.K. oil company with the single-biggest foreign investment in Russia, warned that more sanctions against the country could hurt its business. BP, with a 20 percent stake in OAO Rosneft, stands to lose the most from further sanctions in response to the country’s annexation of Crimea. The European Union and the U.S. may act as soon as today to intensify punitive measures aimed at key sectors of the economy -- finance, defense and energy.

  •  
    Malaysian Airline System Bhd. is facing an influx of passenger cancellations after the carrier’s second disaster this year, adding to the strains of a company that’s bracing for a fourth consecutive annual loss.

    Malaysian air faces passenger cancellations after disasters

    Malaysian Airline System Bhd. is facing an influx of passenger cancellations after the carrier’s second disaster this year, adding to the strains of a company that’s bracing for a fourth consecutive annual loss. Travel agents from Melbourne to Singapore, New Delhi and Malaysian Air’s home country said they’ve seen a spike in withdrawn reservations since MH17’s downing this month -- with cancellations climbing above 20 percent in some places. The Samoan women’s rugby team switched to Thai Airways International Pcl from Malaysian Air on July 27 for a flight to a world cup event in France.

  •  

    Where the rich people are and where they will be

    Tucked into today’s second-quarter earnings presentation from UBS AG is a table that acts as kind of a map of where in the world’s new wealth is being created. The figures suggest that any company trying to cater to the needs of the rich should be focusing on the Asia-Pacific region. Switzerland’s biggest bank manages about 1.8 trillion Swiss francs ($2 trillion) of rich people’s money, split almost equally between two divisions called Wealth Management and Wealth Management Americas.

  •  
    A man wipes his mouth near logos for McDonald’s and KFC restaurants in Beijing Tuesday. McDonald’s in Japan is increasing its checks on chicken from suppliers in China and Thailand after allegations a Chinese supplier sold expired chicken. It says the scare will hurt its earnings.

    McDonald’s Japan to strengthen checks on chicken
    McDonald’s in Japan is increasing its checks on chicken from suppliers in China and Thailand after allegations a Chinese supplier sold expired chicken. It says the scare will hurt its earnings. The U.S. fast-food chain’s Japan unit on Tuesday withdrew this year’s earnings and sales forecasts, citing uncertainties from the food scandal. It promised to disclose information online about where its food comes from.

  •  
    More travelers are flying than ever before, creating a daunting challenge for airlines: keep passengers safe in an ever more crowded airspace.

    Avoiding plane crashes as air traffic doubles

    More travelers are flying than ever before, creating a daunting challenge for airlines: keep passengers safe in an ever more crowded airspace. Each day, 8.3 million people around the globe — roughly the population of New York City — step aboard an airplane. They almost always land safely. Some flights, however, are safer than others.

  •  
    Mitsuhisa Kato, executive vice president at Toyota Motor Corp., speaks as he introduces the company’s fuel-cell vehicle (FCV) during a news conference in Tokyo Wednesday.

    Toyota said to plan Mirai as name for $69,000 fuel-cell vehicle

    Toyota Motor Corp. is planning to name its $69,000 fuel-cell car Mirai, the Japanese word for future, a person familiar with the decision said.The person asked not to be identified because the decision hasn’t been made public. The name of the car will be unveiled closer to when it goes on sale, said Danny Chen, a company spokesman, declining to comment on Mirai, which has been trademarked by Toyota in the U.S.

  •  

    Google sued by ex-racing chief Max Mosley over sex-party images

    Google Inc. was sued by Max Mosley at a London court for showing images of the former Formula One president at a sex party. Mosley is asking the court to compel Google to stop gathering and publishing the images, saying the world’s largest search provider has breached rules on the use of private information and data protection, according to a statement from his law firm Payne Hicks Beach.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Comedian Finesse Mitchell appears at the Improv Comedy Showcase in Schaumburg from Friday through Sunday, Aug. 1-3.

    Weekend picks: Schaumburg's Improv hosts Finesse Mitchell

    Comedian Finesse Mitchell, a veteran of the 2013 Shaq All-Star Comedy Jam tour, continues his run of standup shows this weekend at the Improv Comedy Showcase in Schaumburg. Tots get a chance to sit in the driver's seat of some heavy machinery at the Big Trucks Event in Barrington Saturday. And Downtown Libertyville's MainSweet Dessert Walk coincides with the David Adler Festival of the Arts Saturday. All this and more in Chicago and the suburbs.

  •  
    Jack (John Crosthwaite) shares his plans to marry Gwendolyn with the self-indulgent Algernon (Jude Willis) in Oak Park Festival Theatre's outdoor production of Oscar Wilde's “The Importance of Being Earnest.”

    Oak Park theater marks 40 years with fun, flawed 'Earnest'

    To celebrate Oak Park Festival Theatre's 40th anniversary, the company is staging “The Importance of Being Earnest” for the first time. Oscar Wilde's classic 1895 comedy promises theatergoers a fabulously fizzy and fun time. And since the second act of “The Importance of Being Earnest” takes place in a garden of an English grand estate in Hertfordshire, the show certainly feels at home outdoors in Oak Park's Austin Gardens. While the casting might not always be ideal, it still makes for a fun night under the stars.

  •  
    BrightSide Theatre performs out of Meiley-Swallow Hall at North Central College in Naperville.

    ‘Sound of Music’ part of Naperville theater’s next season

    BrightSide Theatre, in residence at North Central College in Naperville, announced its 2014-15 season Tuesday will feature a radio play, a comedy and a beloved musical.

  •  
    Vin Diesel, left, Dave Bautista, Zoe Saldana, director James Gunn, and Chris Pratt are ready for “Guardians of the Galaxy” to hit the big screens Friday.

    ‘Guardians’ blasts Marvel in a different direction

    Despite its flawless superhero pedigree, there’s always been apprehension about “Guardians of the Galaxy.” Since the president of Marvel Studios first teased the possibility of making a movie based on the comic book about a team of intergalactic do-gooders, the proposition has been called risky — by critics, by fans and by Marvel Studios President Kevin Feige himself. That never mattered to writer-director James Gunn, the horror maven best known for 2006’s “Slither.”

  •  
    The Bryanism sandwich and gingered coleslaw grace a table at Zenwich in Elmhurst.

    Elmhurst's Zenwich achieves culinary yin and yang

    Can a sandwich change your life? If it's from Zenwich in Elmhurst, then critic Deborah Pankey thinks it can. She says the Asian-leaning hoagies she enjoyed during a recent lunchtime visit altered her sandwich reality. And the owners' commitment to bold flavor and high quality shines through with every bite.

  •  

    Name change because of speech impediment causes friction

    Due to a speech impediment, she could not say her first name without embarrassment. So in college she decided to use her middle name instead, which has caused friction with her parents.

  •  
    A sweet and savory cookbook by Brian Emmett, winner of “The American Baking Competition,” is due out in April 2015.

    From the food editor: Catching up with suburban chef-testants

    Want to know what some of our local reality TV stars have been up to lately? Brian Emmett, winner of "The American Baking Competition" tells Food Editor Deborah Pankey his book is due out next spring. And chef Paul Caravelli, a former Libertyville chef who appeared on Season 1 of "The Taste," has re-settled in Sacramento where he's making "the best pizza in the country."

  •  
    Lady Gaga and Tony Bennett spent two years recording an album of jazz standards called “Cheek to Cheek.”

    Gaga on Bennett duet CD: Jazz comes easier vs. pop

    Lady Gaga is a bonafide pop star, but the singer says recording jazz music was easier than pop. Gaga has spent two years recording an album of jazz standards with Tony Bennett called “Cheek to Cheek,” to be released this fall. “You know, it’s funny, but jazz comes a little more comfortable for me than pop music, than R&B music,” Gaga said in an interview Monday.

  •  
    Luicidal plays Brauerhouse in Lombard on Thursday, Aug. 7.

    Music Notes: Luicidal brings old-school punk to Lombard

    Luicidal, a new band anchored by two members of the classic 1980s punk band Suicidal Tendencies, will play songs from ST's first three albums during a show next week at Brauerhouse in Lombard. And pop star/drum whiz Sheila E. returns to Buddy Guy's Legends in Chicago on Tuesday.

  •  
    Lightly breaded tilapia boosts the flavor of a BLT without much added fat.

    Bulking up the classic BLT without adding fat

    Sara Moulton always thought of the BLT as an air sandwich; it packs plenty of calories but demonstrates very little staying power. So here she's rejiggered the traditional recipe in ways that simultaneously slim it down and bulk it up.

  •  
    Carrie La Seur chronicles a woman’s complicated relationship with her hometown of Billings, Montana, and her relatives who stayed behind in “The Home Place.”

    ‘The Home Place’ a strong debut for Carrie La Seur

    Carrie La Seur’s finely crafted debut chronicles a woman’s complicated relationship with her hometown of Billings, Montana, her relatives who stayed behind and her ancestral history. La Seur’s graceful prose in “The Home Place” complements her incisive character studies of a family that has managed to keep most of its problems behind closed doors. Alma Terrebonne left Billings and the family’s “home place” more than 15 years ago to attend college on a full scholarship, shortly after her parents were killed in a car accident that maimed her younger sister, Vicky. Alma returns home when Vicky is found frozen to death.

  •  
    Jillian Owens shows some of her thrift-store dresses at her home in Columbia, S.C. Since 2010, the 32-year-old Columbia resident has been delving into thrift store racks around the area, taking what some may see as “ugly” pieces and whipping them into hip, trendy fashions.

    South Carolina woman makes clothes from castoffs

    For Jillian Owens, some of her passion for fashion was motivated by a desire for new garments without the creation of more waste. And, she says openly on her blog, “I was also quite broke and couldn’t afford new clothes.” Since 2010, Owens has been delving into thrift store racks around her Columbia, South Carolina, home, taking what some may see as outdated castoffs and whipping them into hip, trendy fashions. She says she’s made hundreds of creations, donating many to charity and at times opening up her closet to friends for their perusal.

  •  
    Contemporary design encompasses many styles — the common denominator is that it is a clean design that includes current trends.

    What style of contemporary design are you dreaming of?

    I am always asked what exactly is contemporary design. Is it interiors that incorporate shiny chrome accents, black leather couches and spinning disco balls? Perhaps ... Is it an interior filled with abstract art? Maybe ...

  •  
    Lightly breaded tilapia boosts the flavor of a BLT without much added fat.

    ‘Fried’ Fish BLT Pitas
    Tilapia bulks up BLT without adding fat.

  •  
    The self-titled debut album from Drenge is pretty much perfect.

    Muscle, menace from Drenge on debut album

    British rock duo Drenge’s self-titled debut is pretty much perfect. That’s not a word critics of any kind should throw around lightly, and it’s not done so here. Young twentysomething brothers Eoin and Rory Loveless distill almost everything that’s been great about rock ’n’ roll over the last 25 years into 12 diamond-cut songs on their U.S. debut.

  •  
    Jaclyn and Adam eat mandarins in the Discovery Channel series “Naked and Afraid.” Nudity is reality TV’s latest hot trend.

    Nudity is hot right now in reality TV

    The “Dating Naked” series is the latest example of reality television’s newest trend. Nudity is hot, no longer confined to late-night premium cable. Leading the way is Discovery’s “Naked and Afraid,” where a man and woman who don’t know each other fend for themselves in the wilderness for three weeks without a stitch between them. That program’s success since its June 2013 premiere begat VH1’s “Dating Naked” and TLC’s real estate show, “Buying Naked,” with more in the planning stages.

  •  
    Making guests happy keeps Penny Kadlec of Wood Dale cooking. When Banana Caramel Pie is on her table they can’t help but smile.

    Cook of the week: Cook’s fundraiser dinner hot auction item at school

    Once a year Wood Dale teacher's aide Penny Kadlec cooks a full meal for 10 people who outbid the competition at a school fundraiser. Cooking daily for her family of six keeps her in practice for that special meal. “There is a ton of people who look at you and respect you as a teacher, and then you’re serving them food,” she said. “But it’s really fun to be able to do that and get to know them as people versus just parents of kids at school. It’s a nice experience.”

  •  
    Wood Dale Cook of the Week Penny Kadlec tops her Champagne Risotto with crispy prosciutto.

    Champagne Risotto
    Crispy proscuitto adds flavor and crunch to Penny Kadlec's Champagne Risotto.

  •  
    Banana Caramel Pie is an easy-to-make summer dessert.

    Banana Caramel Pie
    Caramel and bananas come together in a yummy and easy pie.

  •  
    Penny Kadlec of Wood Dale tucks prosciutto and ruyere into thin chicken breasts and coats them in panko for her version of chicken cordon bleu.

    Chicken Cordon Bleu
    Penny Kadlec of Wood Dale tucks proscuitto and Gruyere into thin chicken breasts and coats them in panko for her version of chicken cordon bleu.

  •  
    Uzo Aduba, who stars in the Netflix series “Orange is the New Black,” is nominated for an Emmy Award for outstanding guest actress in a comedy series along with her “Orange” co-stars Laverne Cox and Natasha Lyonne.

    ‘Crazy Eyes’ actress Uzo Aduba is crazy about fans

    “Orange is the New Black” actress Uzo Aduba is flooded with marriage proposals these days. “People on the street, people on Twitter ask, ‘Can I be your prison wife?’ I’m like you know, ‘Name the day and the time,’” Aduba joked. Aduba plays Suzanne “Crazy Eyes” Warren on the Netflix Inc. original series about a women’s prison. She’s nominated for an Emmy Award for outstanding guest actress in a comedy series along with her “Orange” co-stars Laverne Cox and Natasha Lyonne.

Discuss

  •  
    Rick West/rwest@dailyherald.com Alex Fulton graduated from Hampshire High School and was accepted at DePaul University after being essentially homeless for the last year and a half. He’s lived with a friend after difficulties with both of his divorced parents and has worked full-time while finishing school.

    Editorial: Homeless education funding scarce but needed

    Daily Herald editorial: For the fifth year, money for helping schools identify and help homeless students got left out of the state budget, but it doesn't take a lot of money to have a big impact.

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    Exonerating the criminals

    Columnist Richard Cohen: Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s anti-Semitism is getting the better of him. Once again, the Turkish prime minister has trotted out the Hitler analogy in relation to Israel and what it has done in Gaza. “They curse Hitler morning and night,” he said of the Israelis. “However, now their barbarism has surpassed even Hitler’s.” Erdogan’s Hitler fetish is both revolting and inaccurate.

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    Skip the comparisons with Mexico

    Columnist Ruben Navarrette: Almost any discussion of how the United States treats uninvited visitors — whether they be child refugees looking for shelter or adult immigrants looking for jobs — will eventually get to the point where someone asks: “What about Mexico?”

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    Why incumbents keep getting re-elected

    Columnist Lee Hamilton: Nearly three-quarters of Americans want to throw out most members of Congress, including their own representative, yet the vast majority of incumbents will be returning to Capitol Hill in January. In other words, Americans scorn Congress but keep re-electing its members. How could this be?

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    Palestinians’ needs must be recognized
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: John Kerry can negotiate until he’s blue in the face, but Israel’s people will never have peace (and neither will America) until Netanyahou resolves the core problem and marches out of the West Bank.

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    Train engineers not ‘whistle happy’
    A letter to the editor: As a locomotive engineer, I take exception to the July 21 column “Quiet zone might be answer to horn problem” by Marni Pyke, specifically her comment: “But at least Bensenville residents living or working near the Milwaukee District West Line will get a little relief from whistle happy engineers.”

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    ‘Overseas’ corporations costing U.S. taxpayers
    A Rolling Meadows letter to the editor: How many big businesses are already increasing their profit by lowering taxes paid to the U.S.? Among the biggest corporations, of course, is Apple, and I don’t mean the fruit. I would like to see a list of the top 20 U.S. corporations that have their so-called corporate offices overseas, along with the amount of tax money they are saving each year. And who has to make up the revenue? You and me.

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    State pensions inherently against constitution
    A Rolling Meadows letter to the editor: State constitution: the fundamental principles by which a state is governed. I question the legality of the part of the Illinois Constitution regarding the pension system. It is my belief that the constitution is for everyone equally.

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    Leftist writers can’t see the error of their ways
    A Bartlett letter to the editor: The Herald is becoming too left-leaning for my taste. Your writers, Richard Cohen (and others), are living in never-never land. We should take his advice and avoid a book that criticizes people whom he secretly loves? I haven’t read the book (“Blood Feud: The Clintons vs. the Obamas”), but the buying math tells me there are a lot of people wanting to know what it has to say.

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