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Daily Archive : Monday October 7, 2013

News

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    Ron Burgundy (Will Ferrell) anchors the 2014 Dodge Durango advertising campaign in a unique partnership with Dodge and Paramount Pictures' upcoming film, “Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues.”

    Chrysler stays classy with Will Ferrell ads

    When you've got the smallest marketing budget of the Detroit Three automakers, you have to take risks to get your TV spots noticed. That's why Olivier Francois, Chrysler's marketing chief, gambles a lot. He's following successful ads featuring Eminem and Clint Eastwood with a pitch from a fictitious character — egotistical airhead television anchorman Ron Burgundy.

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    People wait in line for the beginning of the Supreme Court 2013-2014 opening term in Washington, Monday, Oct. 7, 2013. The justices take the bench Monday for the start of their new term with important cases about campaign contributions, housing discrimination and government-sanctioned prayer already on tap. Abortion, contraceptive coverage under the president's new health care law and mobile phone privacy also may find their way onto the court's calendar. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

    Supreme Court term begins amid government shutdown

    The Supreme Court's new term may be short on the sort of high-profile battles over health care and gay marriage that marked the past two years, but the court already has agreed to hear important cases about campaign contributions, housing discrimination, government-sanctioned prayer and the president's recess appointments. Abortion, contraceptive coverage under the new health care law and...

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    In this Dec. 8, 2008 photo, armed al-Shabab fighters just outside Mogadishu prepare to travel into the city in pickup trucks after vowing there would be new waves of attacks against Ethiopian troops.

    Target of US raid in Somalia planned Kenya attacks

    A U.S. official says the target of raid by Navy SEALs in Somalia over the weekend was a Kenyan man named Abdulkadir Mohamed Abdulkadir. A Kenyan government intelligence document names him as the coordinator of other planned attacks.

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    Sergio Maldonado, a Northern Arapaho member and diversity coordinator at Central Wyoming College, listens during a break of an intertribal meeting in Riverton, Wyo.

    Tribes mishandle funds, go unpunished

    American Indian tribes have been caught misappropriating tens of millions of taxpayer dollars, according to internal tribal audits and other documents. But federal authorities do little about it — due to a lack of oversight, resources or political will. The result? Poor tribes like the Northern Arapaho of Wyoming suffer.

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    Egyptian security forces and civilians detain a supporter of ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi near Ramsis Square, Cairo, Egypt.

    Wave of deadly attacks in Egypt kills 8

    A drive-by shooting killed six Egyptian soldiers east of Cairo on Monday, shortly after a massive explosion, possibly from a car bomb, hit the security headquarters in a town near the area's tourist resorts in southern Sinai, killing at least two and wounding dozens.

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    Anas al-Libi

    Libya wants 'clarification' in al-Qaida leader nab

    Libya said Sunday it has asked the United States for “clarifications” regarding the abduction in Tripoli of an al-Qaida leader linked to the 1998 U.S. Embassy bombings in East Africa, adding that Libyan nationals should be tried in their own country.

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    John Kerry, U.S. secretary of state, speaks at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) CEO Summit in Nusa Dua, Bali, Indonesia, Monday.

    Kerry pleased with Syria chemical disarmament

    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said Monday that the United States and Russia are “very pleased” with the progress made so far in destroying Syria's chemical weapons stocks. And, he offered some rare, if qualified, U.S. praise for Syrian President Bashar Assad.

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    This combination of undated images released by the the New York City Police Department shows a man wanted for questioning in regards to an assault on Sept. 29, 2013 where dozens of bikers stopped a Range Rover SUV on a highway, attacked the vehicle, then chased the driver and pulled him from the car after he plowed over a motorcyclist while trying to escape.

    DA: Motorcyclist had key role in NYC SUV brawl

    A motorcyclist accused of smashing a window and catalyzing a bloody encounter between a group of bikers and an SUV driver was arraigned Sunday on gang assault and other major charges, which his lawyer said were overblown.

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    The Capitol in Washington is seen under an overcast sky at dawn, Monday, Oct. 7, 2013. The government shutdown entered its second week with no end in sight and ominous signs that the United States was closer to the first default in the nation's history as Speaker John Boehner ruled out any measure to boost borrowing authority without concessions from President Barack Obama.

    Congress stands pat as default looms

    The government shutdown entered its second week with no end in sight and ominous signs that the United States was closer to the first default in the nation's history as Speaker John Boehner ruled out any measure to boost borrowing authority without concessions from President Barack Obama.

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    Boy boards plane at Minn. airport without ticket

    A 9-year-old runaway went through security, boarded a plane at the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport without a ticket and flew to Las Vegas, an airport spokesman said Sunday.

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    James Rothman

    Americans, German-American win medicine Nobel

    Two Americans and a German-American won the Nobel Prize in medicine on Monday for discovering how key substances are transported within cells, a process involved in such important activities as brain cell communication and the release of insulin.James Rothman, 62, of Yale University, Randy Schekman, 64, of the University of California, Berkeley, and Thomas Sudhof, 57, of Stanford University...

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    Quinn says more layoffs possible with shutdown

    Gov. Pat Quinn says if the federal government shutdown continues, the state will have to lay off more workers whose paychecks come from federal funding. Illinois has already issued nearly 100 such temporary layoffs.

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    Illinois. eyes Joliet youth center for inmates

    State officials are considering whether to use the now-closed Illinois Youth Center-Joliet as a facility to house mentally ill prisoners. Tom Shaer is a spokesman for the Illinois Department of Corrections.

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    Central Ill. farmers help with harvest after death

    Dozens of central Illinois farmers worked together to harvest more than 300 acres of corn that belonged to a man who died this summer from a heart attack.The (Bloomington) Pantagraph reports Dave Thomas died in July and his family decided to sell the farm and its equipment.

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    Father, daughter charged in Chicago dismembering

    A Chicago woman and her father were charged Sunday in the grisly death of a man who was dismembered and buried on the southwest side earlier this year.

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    8 hurt, including 6 kids, in Chicago highway crash

    Eight people were hurt, including six children, when a minivan struck a guardrail on Interstate 57 in Chicago. WMAQ-TV reports a woman who was behind the wheel is charged with driving under the influence and child endangerment for Sunday night's crash.

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    O'Hare opens new taxiway

    O'Hare International Airport has a new taxiway. The Chicago Department of Aviation said Monday that it has opened Taxiway Zulu, also known as Taxiway Z. It's part of the ongoing O'Hare Modernization Program.

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    IDOT defends Illiana Expressway project

    The Illinois Department of Transportation is defending a proposed expressway linking Interstate 65 in northwestern Indiana with Interstate 55 in the South suburbs. The move comes after a report raised questions about feasibility. IDOT Secretary Ann Schneider said Monday she doesn't agree with analysis by the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning.

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    Daily Herald File Photo Gov. Pat Quinn and former Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels kicked off the Illiana Expressway with a memorandum of understanding in 2010.

    Why you should care about the battle of the Illiana Expressway

    It's Gov. Pat Quinn against the CMAP wonks in this smackdown over the future of the Illiana Expressway. Some think the proposed highway linking I-55 with I-65 in Indiana is a boondoggle, others say it's a job panacea.

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    Grant Gambaiani

    Naperville man convicted of sexually assaulting, photographing boy

    Grant Gambaiani’s retrial on charges he sexually assaulted and took nude photos of a 10-year-old boy ended with the same verdict his first trial did: guilty. A DuPage County jury deliberated about 3 1/2 hours Monday before convicting the former Naperville man of predatory criminal sexual assault of a child, aggravated criminal sexual abuse, and 18 counts of various child pornography...

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    Hoffman Estates officials tonight will consider new taxes and fees to help pay for road and capital improvement projects due to a lingering shortfall in the general fund revenues once relied upon.

    Hoffman Estates favors new taxes for roads, projects

    Meeting as the finance committee, the Hoffman Estates village board approved a recommendation Monday to establish new taxes and fees to fund the village’s road and capital improvement projects. The board is scheduled to make a final vote on the proposed new sources of revenue — which include a utility tax on electricity, a utility tax on natural gas, a municipal motor fuel tax, a liquor tax and a...

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    Driver seriously hurt in Gurnee

    A 41-year-old man driving a Scion rear-ended a stopped truck on Route 41 in Gurnee on Monday afternoon and was seriously injured, Gurnee firefighters said. The crash happened just after noon on Route 41 north of Stearns School Road.

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    W. Dundee OKs new police security cameras

    A complete upgrade to the West Dundee Police Department’s obsolete security camera system can now take place, thanks to a unanimous vote from village board. West Dundee Police Chief Andy Wieteska has had the system upgrade at the top of his list of priorities for years. “That’s an absolute need,”Wieteska said before the vote. “We’re kind of rolling the dice by not getting this done.”

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    Chicago jail guard gets 2 years for smuggling

    A former federal jail guard who worked in downtown Chicago has been sentenced to two years in prison for smuggling food and cigarettes. Tony Henderson of Portage, Ind., was a jail guard at the Metropolitan Correctional Center for 16 years.

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    Are glitches in the Affordable Care Act system fatal or fleeting?

    The glitch-ridden rollout of President Barack Obama’s health care law has opponents crowing: “Told you so!” and insisting it should be paused, if not scrapped. But others, including insurance companies, say there’s still enough time to fix the online enrollment system before uninsured Americans start getting coverage on Jan. 1.

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    Army Reserve Staff Sgt. Catherine Threat watches students as they arrive Monday at Courtenay Elementary Language Arts Center in Chicago.

    Veteran helps patrol Chicago streets during shutdown

    Staff Sgt. Catherine Threat returned from active duty in Afghanistan in July. Since then, she’s been in the Army Reserve and working as a civilian at Fort McCoy in central Wisconsin — until last week when she was furloughed. Rather than sitting around, Threat decided to volunteer for a veteran patrol for the Chicago Public Schools “safe passage” program.

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    Grandmother charged with killing baby with sledgehammer, knife

    A South suburban woman is charged with murder in the death of her 6-month-old granddaughter. Authorities said Monday that 61-year-old Alfreda Giedrojc of Oak Lawn used a sledgehammer and knife to kill baby Vivian Summers on Sunday morning.

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    Farmer Ron Moore surrounded by his soybean plants outside Roseville, Ill. Legislation proposed in Springfield would require farmers and manufacturers to label any food that’s available for retail sale in Illinois and that contains more than 1 percent of genetically engineered ingredients.

    Labeling bill raises modified food debate in Illinois

    Over the past 16 years, biotechnology has helped Illinois farmer Ron Moore grow crops that could survive drought, produce higher-quality grain to feed his livestock and yield sweet corn so plentiful his family has donated extras to the church and local food pantry. But the same scientific advances that have so greatly altered the agriculture industry also have made some consumers nervous about...

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    Newport Beach firefighters put out a burning mulch pile at a nursery near Santiago Canyon in Orange County, Calif. Sunday, Oct. 6, 2013. The blaze, reported late Sunday morning, quickly spread to surrounding wild vegetation, said Orange County Fire Authority Capt. Steve Concialdi. No homes were threatened.

    Southern California fires fade as weather turns

    CAMP PENDLETON, Calif. — A nearly 4-square-mile wildfire on the Marine Corps’ Camp Pendleton was reduced to smoldering Monday as hot, dry Santa Ana winds faded and a cooling trend began as a storm approached.About 230 residents return to housing near Lake O’Neil on Sunday evening, base officials said in a statement. Some 30 patients removed from a base hospital were returned.

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    Toni Preckwinkle

    Preckwinkle wants Cook County judges to pay all their health premiums

    Cook County circuit court and associate judges, who now pay about $1 a month for their health insurance, would have to pay the full cost of their health benefits — anywhere from $440 to $1,700 a month — or else shop for health insurance in the new exchanges, according to a proposal announced Monday by Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle.

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    Fox Valley police reports
    An estimated $3,100 was caused by ATV riders in a soybean field near Jackson Drive and Linda Lane near Elgin sometimes Sept. 30, according to a sheriff’s report. The damage was reported Friday

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    More than $300 damage was done to a door at a vacant home in the 33W500 block of Route 64 near St. Charles after someone broke in and littered the home with fast food wrappers and bottles of alcohol, according to a sheriff’s report. The damage was reported at 10:57 a.m. Thursday.

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    Two charged after Bartlett crash

    Two women face charges after they were involved in a car crash Saturday in Bartlett, according to police. Kathryn L. Barnes, 46, of the 400 block of Lela Lane in Bartlett, was driving west on Morse Avenue near Oak Avenue about 7 p.m. Saturday when she disobeyed a stop sign and her car was struck by a vehicle driven by Maira Alonzo, 22, of the 900 block of St. John Street in Elgin, police said.

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    Missing Lake Villa man positively identified

    Lake County officials say the body found in field in Vernon Hills has been positively identified as Nicholas Steward of Lake Villa. Steward, who was married and the father of a 1-year-old son, was reported missing after he was last seen Sept. 20.

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    Steven Andersson

    Geneva man wants state House 65th District seat

    Geneva attorney and library trustee Steven Andersson is running for the Republican nomination for the state 65th House seat. The current representative, Republican Tim Schmitz, is not seeking re-election.

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    Chicago Blackhawks left wing Patrick Sharp visited every classroom at Lisle Junior High School Monday to reward students for their generosity during Goodwill’s Pass It On Donation Challenge.

    Blackhawks’ Patrick Sharp visits Lisle Junior High

    When students at Lisle Junior High donated nearly 75,000 items to Goodwill, they knew they were helping others and doing a good thing. On Monday, the Chicago Blackhawks' Patrick Sharp came to the school to say thanks. miliar with compares to the NHL’s penalty box. “Being in the penalty box is just like getting detention," Sharp told the students.

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    32-year-old woman killed in crash near Maple Park

    A 32-year-old woman from Cortland was killed Monday after a crash near Route 38 and Watson Road near Maple Park, authorities said. Sheriff's pollice said Shanay Martin was killed after she crossed over into oncoming traffic and struck a pickup truck, whose driver, a 35-year-old Maple Park man, was treated for injuries that were not life-threatening.

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    The suspect in the robbery of the American Midwest Bank near Gurnee hops on the counter Monday.

    Gurnee-area bank robber didn’t appear armed, police say

    A Gurnee-area bank was robbed Monday by a bandana-wearing bandit, authorities said. The stickup occurred about 10:55 a.m. at America Midwest Bank, 36044 N. Brookside Drive. No one was injured.

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    Lake Zurich students hoofing it:

    Some Lake Zurich children plan to celebrate International Walk to School Day on Wednesday.

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    Chimney fire damages Streamwood townhouse

    Streamwood firefighters Monday were continuing to investigate the cause of a fire that damaged the area around a townhouse’s fireplace and chimney Sunday night. Damages were estimated at $15,000 and no injuries were reported.

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    Flu shots in Hawthorn Woods

    The village of Hawthorn Woods will offer a flu shot clinic on Wednesday, Oct. 9, from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in conjunction with the senior luncheon at the Village Barn.

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    Historic cemetery walk:

    Learn about Round Lake-area history while meeting “characters” who settled the area during the early 1800s to 1900s at the Round Lake Civic Center Foundation’s annual cemetery walk at 1 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 13.

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    Business insight sought on long range plan:

    Hawthorn Woods is hosting a workshop from 8 to 9:30 a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 9, for business owners and managers to obtain their unique input for the Comprehensive Plan.

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    Most of Great Lakes Naval Station’s 2,500 civilian employees were back at work Monday after being furloughed without pay in the government shutdown that started Oct. 1.

    Most Great Lakes Naval Station civilians back at work

    Most of Great Lakes Naval Station's civilians were back to work Monday after being furloughed in the federal government shutdown that started last week. “When you’re gone for four days, the work doesn’t stop,” said Great Lakes spokesman John Sheppard, who was among those sent home after the shutdown started Oct. 1. “It’s a catch-up day for a lot of...

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    West Chicago officials tonight may approve a deal allowing a local group to repair the 144-year-old Wiant House, built by Joel Wiant, one of DuPage County's first white settlers and a prominent businessman.

    West Chicago might approve deal tonight to save historic house

    West Chicago leaders tonight may approve a deal that would prevent a 144-year-old landmark from being demolished. The city council would OK an agreement with the West Chicago Community Center, which will work to restore the exterior of the Joel Wiant House at 151 W. Washington St.

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    Swiped iPad in Batavia returned after video posted on Facebook

    The power of social media: An iPad thief was shamed into returning the device to its owner, after video of the theft was posted on the Batavia Crime Stoppers' Facebook page last week. The video was shared 1,081 times.

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    Willard Helander

    Lake County Clerk Helander won’t run in 2014, cites changes to election laws

    Longtime Lake County Clerk Willard Helander won’t seek re-election in 2014. Helander, a Libertyville Republican, announced her decision Monday on social media and in an email to reporters. She’s held the post since 1994.

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    Bruce Lammers, president and CEO of Ridgestone Bank

    Schaumburg bank’s small-business loans slowed by shutdown

    There will be no new federally guaranteed loans for small businesses during the government shutdown. That’s bad news for Ridgestone Bank in Schaumburg, the state's largest Smalll Business Administration lender. “You keep reading about stress testing of banks," CEO Bruce Lammers said. "... Right now we’re looking at the stresses and asking whether or not we can keep our shareholders and customers...

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    A poster advertising the Don Skelton concert of Nov. 10, 1973. Ticket prices were only $3.

    Vintage Elgin folk singer returns to the stage

    Singer Don Skelton was a staple in the Fox Valley folk music scene in the 1970s. He played at the Hemmens and even opened for Anne Murray in 1976. But gradually, he stopped performing. Skelton has decided to make a comeback, and will return to the stage Friday, Oct. 11 at the Highland Avenue Coffeehouse in Elgin.

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    Argentina’s President Cristina Fernandez arrives to a local hospital, in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Monday, Oct. 7, 2013. Argentine president is back in the hospital, presumably for more treatment of the head injury that prompted doctors to order a month’s rest. Her car entered the Fundacion Favaloro hospital on Monday, as Cabinet members gathered without her in the government palace for a speech by Vice President Amado Boudou, who wished her strength and said they would carry on, “giving her the rest she deserves.”

    Argentine president to undergo head surgery

    BUENOS AIRES, Argentina — Argentina’s president will undergo surgery on Tuesday to surgically remove blood between her brain and skull that has been causing new and worrying symptoms, her physicians said.The doctors who discovered the subural hematoma had ordered Cristina Fernandez on Saturday to rest for a month. In some patients, such blood clots reabsorb by themselves over time.

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    Deondre J. Nance

    Elgin man gets 2 years probation in ATV theft

    A 18-year-old man who Elgin police said was caught riding an ATV in the same neighborhood where it was reported stolen earlier that day received two years of probation after pleading guilty to burglary. Deondre Nance, of Elgin, also spent 43 days in jail while the case was pending and must pay a $1,380 fine.

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    A portrait of Rabbi Ovadia Yosef hangs on a door in a yeshiva during his funeral in Jerusalem, Monday, Oct. 7, 2013. Rabbi Yosef, 93, a religious scholar and spiritual leader of Israel’s Sephardic Jews, transformed his downtrodden community of immigrants from North Africa and Arab nations and their descendants into a powerful force in Israeli politics.

    Death of Israeli kingmaker leaves huge void

    JERUSALEM — To his supporters, Rabbi Ovadia Yosef was a revered spiritual sage who empowered masses of disenfranchised Sephardic Jews. Among secular Israelis, he was widely perceived as a medieval figure, bedecked in flowing robes and occasionally given to bizarre rants.

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    Gun battle at Fresno biker club kills 1, wounds 13

    FRESNO, Calif. — Investigators were trying to determine on Monday what triggered a running gun battle at a weekend dance staged by a Central California motorcycle club that left one man dead and 13 people wounded as hundreds of partygoers scrambled for cover.

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    Social Security judge accused of disability scheme

    WASHINGTON — A retired Social Security judge in West Virginia collaborated with a lawyer to improperly award disability benefits to hundreds of applicants, according to a report released Monday by congressional investigators.The report accuses retired administrative law Judge David B. Daugherty of scheming with lawyer Eric C. Conn to approve more than 1,800 cases from 2006 to 2010.

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    Mike and Kristin Kiss at the Margreth Reimer Reservoir near their Palatine home, right before they flew to Maine for their final half-marathon.

    Palatine couple completes 50 half-marathons in 50 states

    Mike and Kristin Kiss of Palatine celebrated a milestone on Sunday: They completed their 50th half-marathon — one in every state — and all in under 100 hours, or less than two hours apiece. They crossed the finish line of the Maine Half Marathon hand in hand, to the cheers of 30 friends and family members. “We started to think that this would be an awesome way to see the...

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    Anthony Cechini

    Plea deal talks continue in fatal Fox Lake crash

    A defense attorney for a Fox Lake man accused of killing his friend in a 2012 alcohol-fueled crash said he is hopeful a plea deal is still possible, even though his client is held in jail on new criminal charges. Anthony Cechini is held in Lake County jail on $1 million bail after violating a previous bond he received after being charged with five counts of aggravated driving under the influence...

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    Juany Garza

    Aurora alderman helping with Mexican hurricane relief

    Aurora is responding to a global call for assistance to Mexico in the wake of the devastating destruction caused by twin storms, hurricanes Manuel and Ingrid. The hurricanes unleashed torrential rain that led to floods and mudslides. More than 1 million people have been affected across the country, more than 50,000 have been evacuated from their homes, and roughly 100 deaths have been confirmed.

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    Jeanne Ives

    Ives to speak during Fixing Illinois series

    State Rep. Jeanne Ives will discuss “Holding Illinois to a Higher Standard” as the next speaker in Elmhurst College’s Fixing Illinois lecture series.

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    On Sunday, Oct. 27, Algonquin Commons will hold a safe trick-or-treat event.

    Algonquin mall to hold scavenger hunt for adults

    Adults can get in on the Halloween fun this year at Algonquin Commons. The Randall Road mall is hosting its first Pirates of the Commons event on Tuesday, Oct. 29, which will send adults on a scavenger hunt throughout the shopping center.

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    Ryan Putz of Wheeling can’t wait to pick out a pumpkin to paint at the 2012 Mount Prospect Fall Fest.

    Mt. Prospect Fall Fest & Oktoberfest take over downtown this Saturday

    The Mount Prospect Downtown Merchants Association invites everyone to join them for the annual Fall Festival and Oktoberfest Celebration on Saturday, Oct. 12. The Fall Festival will be held 1-4 p.m. all kinds of activitiesfor families. The Oktoberfest is 4-11 p.m. with food, music and more.

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    Author Maggie Anton to speak at Beth Judea

    The Sisterhood of Congregation Beth Judea will welcome author Maggie Anton on Oct. 23 for a discussion of her books “Rav Hisda’s Daughter: Book 1-Apprentice, Love, Talmud and Sorcery in Third Century Babylonia” and “Rashi’s Daughter.”

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    Eugene Bordelon of Warrenville took first place in our September Photo Finish contest with this image of a praying mantis.

    Warrenville photographer’s praying mantis image captures monthly prize

    A Warrenville photographer captures first place in our monthly Photo Finish contest with his image of a praying mantis seemingly enjoying its own reflection.

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    Illinois military workers back on job; some 2,500 at Great Lakes

    Thousands of civilian employees furloughed last week at Illinois military installations as part of the federal government shutdown are headed back to work. At the Great Lakes Naval Training Station at North Chicago, many of the 2,500 furloughed civilian returned.

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    Salvation Army collecting gifts now for Angel Tree

    Christmas can be a magical time, but many children in the Chicago area won’t even have a Christmas tree, much less presents to open. This is why The Salvation Army depends on the generosity of others to help provide a happy Christmas for thousands of families throughout Chicago. Here's how you can help.

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    Gov’t seeks delay in NSA case over US shutdown

    The Justice Department says that because of the shutdown, it wants a federal court to delay a court case in which the government has said it will reveal more secret documents about the National Security Agency’s surveillance program.

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    Darwin Walton holds a picture of her husband, Claude, during ceremonies in Lombard where Claude was named Senior of the Year for 2013. Claude, 100, was not feeling up to attending the ceremony.

    Lombard honors 2013 Senior of the Year

    Lombard has named 100-year-old Claude Walton as Senior of the Year for 2013. The village’s community relations committee chooses recipients of the Senior of the Year award each year based on nominations from the community. Claude and his wife, Darwin, have lived in Lombard since 1955 where they raised their two children, Claudette and John.

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    On exhibit at the San Diego Museum of Man is this rare limestone cartouche, a specialized oval drawing that indicates the writing of a royal name. This one refers to Nefertiti, the Great Royal Wife of Pharaoh Akhenaten, believed by some to have led the country after his death. These royal names were almost completely lost to history as their cartouches were often destroyed by unhappy subjects.

    Ancient Egyptians were born into strict class structures

    Students in Nancy Sullivan’s sixth-grade class at Frederick Nerge Elementary School in Roselle asked, “In ancient Egypt, how were the Pharaoh and other important social classes chosen?”

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    Another sunken freighter found in Lake Superior

    The group that found a sunken freighter off the shore of Marquette, Mich., this spring has found a second one in Lake Superior that sank more than 60 years ago. Searchers confirmed the location of the Scotiadoc in more than 850 feet of water last month near Thunder Bay, Ontario, possibly making it the deepest shipwreck ever found in the Great Lakes, the Duluth News Tribune reported .

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    Teresa Marano gave birth to her son Samuel at just 26 weeks gestation. He fought for nearly three months before he died of complications.

    Son’s short life forever changed Aurora parents

    Teresa Marano's son Samuel was born just 26 weeks into her pregnancy. A warrior, he fought for 11 weeks to survive outside his mother's womb. Though he needed life support throughout his time in the NICU, Marano was overcome by the connection with her son. She'll honor him Saturday in A Walk to Remember.

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    Dee Mack carried her eighth child nearly to term despite knowing he wouldn’t survive. She hoped to donate the baby’s organs, but he was stillborn.

    Mom hoped her loss would save someone else

    Dee Mack hadn't expected to hear she was pregnant with her eighth child but quickly warmed to the idea. Then, mid-pregnancy, doctors said her son wouldn't survive after birth. Still, she decided to carry the baby in hopes of helping others. Mack will join A Walk to Remember on Saturday to honor baby Donavan.

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    Kristin Salazar has been pregnant six times, but has experienced loss more often than joy with three miscarriages and a stillbirth.

    Yorkville mom feels like someone is missing

    With a textbook first pregnancy, Kristin Salazar never anticipated she'd have trouble having a second child. After three miscarriages and accepting she would have only one child, she had a successful pregnancy that brought her a second son and hope for a third child. Salazar will take part on Saturday in A Walk to Remember.

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    Rachel Tobin had a miscarriage and a stillbirth before having Owen, her “first baby at home.”

    Bolingbrook family’s photos don’t tell the entire story

    Rachel Tobin's family looks picture-perfect from the outside, with doting parents and a son.Yet she has experienced both a miscarriage and the death of a baby born too soon. She's formulated an answer to "Is he your first?" that honors the babies who came into her life before her son, Owen, arrived safely. Tobin will honor her first two babies on Saturday when she takes part in A Walk to Remember.

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    Rare Lake County Indiana GOP officeholder dies at 77

    SCHERERVILLE, Ind. — The first Republican in 50 years to win a countywide office in northwestern Indiana’s Lake County has died just days after resigning for health reasons.

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    William Glass of Lombard did a great deal of research at the Helen Plum Library before embarking on a 750-mile journey to walk, alone, to Atlanta to raise money and awareness for the fight against Alzheimer’s disease. His mother was diagnosed with the disease in 2010.

    Chicago-Atlanta walk is Lombard man’s first step toward ending Alzheimer’s

    William Glass of Lombard recently completed a journey of more than 750 miles, walking the entire distance from Chicago to Atlanta in two months on a mission to get back to his mother, who has Alzheimer’s disease. He chronicled his walk on social media for longtime friends and new followers alike. This is an edited version of his final entry.

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    Dawn Patrol: Fox River Grove fire displaces residents; Bears lose

    Fire leaves Fox River Grove-area home uninhabitable; girls giving rugby a chance, helping sport’s growth in U.S.; Morton Arboretum celebrates fall

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    William Glass of Lombard completed a 58-day, more than 750-mile walk to Atlanta to be with his mother, who has Alzheimer's disease, and to console families of other Alzheimer's patients along the way. His walk also raised funds for the Alzheimer's Association and promoted the federal HOPE for Alzheimer's Act.

    Lombard man completes 'emotional' Alzheimer's walk to Atlanta

    William Glass spent almost all of August and September walking. Now he's decompressing. The Lombard man traveled by foot to Atlanta from Chicago, completing a 750-mile journey in more like 850 miles because of wrong turns and detours, but spending every step advocating for more research, treatment and understanding of Alzheimer's disease. “I'm still dealing with a lot of emotions,”...

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    Participants pose for a photo during one of the monthly ladies' nights at Maxon, an indoor gun range and shooter's supply store in Des Plaines.

    Des Plaines gun shop caters to women

    Bullets and guns are part of the ladies night parties at Maxon, a Des Plaines gun range and retail store that's seen a steady growth in the number of women showing up to shoot. “We had such a flux of women coming in, we had to change our business dynamics,” said Maxon co-owner Claudia Levin, who started the ladies night events two years ago based on demand. “It was a...

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    Chicago Bears quarterback Jay Cutler is sacked by New Orleans Saints strong safety Kenny Vaccaro during the Bears 26-18 loss Sunday at Soldier Field in Chicago.

    Weekend in Review: Man hurt in crash; rift widens between airport owners
    What you may have missed over the weekend: War hero doctor goes from battlefield to Discovery Channel; Des Plaines woman charged in grandmother's slaying; 3 schools withdrawl from SEDOL; tensions still high between owners of Chicago Exeuctive Airport; Lake in the Hills man critically injured in South Barrington crash; Halle Berry has her baby; and Bears lose another one - this time to the Saints

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    Michael Lynch of Wheaton auditions on NBC’s “The Voice” on Monday, Oct. 7.

    St. Francis grad to appear on ‘The Voice’ tonight

    Singer Michael Lynch of Wheaton will audition on Monday night's episode of "The Voice" on NBC. He’s one of three singers from the Chicago area — including Sam Cerniglia of Chicago and Lupe Carroll of Bourbonnais — to do “blind” auditions this season in front of celebrity judges Blake Shelton, Adam Levine, Christina Aguilera and CeeLo Green.

Sports

  •  
    Bears quarterback Jay Cutler, right, and wide receiver Brandon Marshall sit on the sideline during the second half Sunday against the Saints at Soldier Field.

    Trestman insists Marshall not 'any kind of distraction'

    Coach Marc Trestman and quarterback Jay Cutler say that wide receiver Brandon Marshall's frustration is not a distraction to the team.

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    The Bulls' Derrick Rose shoots a free throw during the second half of a preseason game against the Memphis Grizzlies on Monday in St. Louis.

    Rose continues to look strong

    Derrick Rose stayed aggressive in his second preseason game since recovering from knee surgery. When his free throws go in, he can be dangerous, as demonstrated in the Bulls' 106-87 victory over Memphis in St. Louis.

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    The Blues like to play a physical game, led by captain David Backes. The Blackhawks play their first road game Wednesday night at St. Louis.

    Blackhawks brace for showdown with Blues

    Division games have always been important, but thanks to NHL realignment they're even bigger now. The Blackhawks will invade Scottrade Center on Wednesday night for an early-season showdown with the 2-0 St. Louis Blues, a team that some have picked to win the Stanley Cup. Joel Quenneville and Patrick Kane talk about what they expect to see from the Blues.

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    Bears defensive tackle Nate Collins leaves Sunday's game after a knee injury ended his season.

    Bears lose another defensive lineman

    The Bears' injury-decimated defensive line is in dire straits with a short work week before Chicago hosts the Giants Thursday night. Two weeks after Pro Bowl tackle Henry Melton was lost for the season with a torn ACL in his left knee, Nate Collins suffered the same injury in Sunday's loss to the Saints.

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    The Bulls' Carlos Boozer shoots over Memphis' Ed Davis during the second half of an NBA preseason basketball game Monday in St. Louis.

    Balanced Bulls rout Grizzlies 106-87

    Carlos Boozer scored 16 points and Kirk Hinrich and Taj Gibson added 15 each to lead the Chicago Bulls to a 106-87 preseason victory over the Memphis Grizzlies on Monday night. Derrick Rose added 13 points for Chicago (2-0).

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    The Dodgers’ Juan Uribe (5) celebrates with Hanley Ramirez (13) after Uribe hit a two-run home run in the eighth inning Monday in Game 4 in the National League Division Series against the Braves. The Dodgers won 4-3 at home.

    Dodgers win series against Braves

    Juan Uribe hit a go-ahead, two-run homer in the eighth inning after Clayton Kershaw started on short rest for the Dodgers in a 4-3 victory over the Atlanta Braves on Monday night, sending Los Angeles into the National League championship series for the first time since 2009.

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    Monday’s girls volleyball scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Monday's girls volleyball matches, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s girls tennis scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Monday's girls tennis meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s girls swimming scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Monday's girls swimming meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s girls golf scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Monday's girls golf meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s girls cross country scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Monday's girls cross country meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s boys soccer scoreboard
    High school varsity results of Monday's boys soccer matches, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s boys cross country scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Monday's boys cross country meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Athletics relief pitcher Grant Balfour clenches his fist after the final out in Game 3 of an American League Division Series against the Tigers in Detroit.

    A’s take 2-1 series lead over Tigers

    The Oakland Athletics have beaten Detroit with both pitching and power. And that’s left the Tigers on the brink of elimination — and simmering with frustration. Brandon Moss, Josh Reddick and Seth Smith homered for the Athletics, who chased Anibal Sanchez in the fifth inning Monday and defeated the Tigers 6-3 for a 2-1 AL division series lead.

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    St. Louis Cardinals pitcher Michael Wacha, right, celebrates with teammates after a 2-1 win over the Pittsburgh Pirates in Game 4 of a National League Division Series on Monday in Pittsburgh.

    Cardinals edge Pirates 2-1 to knot NLDS

    Rookie Michael Wacha took a no-hit bid into the eighth inning and the St. Louis Cardinals showed off their October poise, edging the Pittsburgh Pirates 2-1 Monday and setting up a winner-take-all Game 5 in the NL division series. The Cardinals tied this playoff matchup and improved to 7-1 over the last three years when facing elimination in the postseason.Pedro Alvarez hit his third home run of the series, connecting with one out in the eighth for Pittsburgh’s only hit in Game 4.

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    The Rays’ Jose Lobaton celebrates a ninth-inning home run against the Boston Red Sox to win Game 3 of an American League Division Series in St. Petersburg, Fla. Tampa Bay Rays won the game 5-4.

    HR in 9th lifts Rays over Red Sox

    Jose Lobaton hit a solo home run with two outs in the bottom of the ninth inning and the Tampa Bay Rays staved off elimination once again, beating the Boston Red Sox 5-4 Monday night. The Rays cut Boston’s lead in the best-of-five AL division series to 2-1. Game 4 is Tuesday night, with Jake Peavy starting for the Red Sox against Jeremy Hellickson. Tampa Bay took a win-or-go-home game for the fourth time in nine days.

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    New York Jets kicker Nick Folk celebrates his field goal as time expired against the Atlanta Falcons on Monday night in Atlanta. The Jets won 30-28.

    Smith, Folk lead Jets past Falcons 30-28

    After plenty of mistakes in his first four games, Geno Smith suddenly looked like a wily ol’ veteran for the New York Jets. The rookie quarterback threw three touchdown passes, didn’t turn the ball over at all and guided the Jets on a clutch drive that set up Nick Folk’s winning field goal on the final play, giving New York a 30-28 victory over the struggling Atlanta Falcons on Monday night.

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    Will Blues keep Blackhawks fans out?

    On Wednesday, the Blackhawks pay their first visit to St. Louis, where over the summer the Blues instituted a ticket policy designed to keep Hawks fans out of the Scottrade Center. Fans with a Chicago-area ZIP code weren’t allowed to buy single-game tickets for Hawks games. If you wanted a ticket to see the Hawks, you needed to buy either a full or partial season-ticket package.

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    Montini at its best against Wheaton Academy

    With the depth on the Montini roster this season, players have to have their individual games always at their best. And senior setter Bridget Lucas wouldn’t have it any other way. “It’s definitely competitive. You always want to play to the best of your ability,” she said. “But there’s always somebody there to pick you up when you are down.” The Broncos’ depth was on display Monday night in Lombard as No. 13 Montini dispatched Wheaton Academy 25-14 and 25-13 with a strong display of hitting led by Natalie Lopez’s 11 kills and eight kills each from Monica Loftus and Joyce Balash.

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    Vernon Hills runs to victory

    Boys cross countryVernon Hills d. Round Lake: Five Vernon Hills runners tied for first place with a 17:27 en route to the Cougars’ 15-50 win.Keith Carlson, Kyle Whitney, Ben Mohrdieck, Nick Webber and Eric Doerhoefer all converged on the finish line at the same time for Vernon Hills, which accounted for the first 14 runners to finish.Round Lake’s top finisher was Emmanuel Sanchez with an 18:50.Antioch wins: Antioch got wins over Grant (16-45) and Lakes (20-37). Dan Ressler (16:40) and Zach Bessor (16:56) of Antioch finished in second and third place respectively. Jimmy Burchard of Lakes took first place with a 16:23. Grant’s top finisher was Rigo Jejia. He placed sixth with a 17:09.

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    Grant clinches Prairie title

    Girls cross countryGrant wins Prairie: Grant clinched the North Suburban Conference Prairie Division title with a perfect 5-0 record. The Bulldogs got wins over Lakes (27-32) and Antioch (15-46). Senior Lindsey Lewis led Grant with a 19:11. She placed second. Kortney Schardt of Lakes took first place with an 18:46 while Antioch’s top finisher was Ashley Lapointe. She placed ninth with a 19:55.Vernon Hills d. Round Lake: Cassie Lira (19:36) edged teammate Vivian Overbeck (19:37) to take first place and lead Vernon Hills to a 15-50 win over Round Lake. The Cougars swept the top 17 places.

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    Smith rallies Jets past Falcons as time expires

    ATLANTA — Nick Folk kicked a 43-yard field goal on the final play of the game and the New York Jets handed struggling Atlanta its third straight loss, beating the Falcons 30-28 on Monday night.The Falcons rallied from a 27-14 deficit in the fourth quarter, going ahead on Matt Ryan’s 3-yard touchdown pass to Levine Toilolo with 1:54 remaining.But rookie Geno Smith, who threw 3 touchdown passes, guided the Jets (3-2) on the winning drive. He completed 4 straight passes and ran for an 8-yard gain before the Jets ran the clock down and sent Folk on for the last play.Jacquizz Rodgers scored on a pair of touchdown runs, and Ryan also threw a scoring pass to Jason Snelling. But the Falcons (1-4) are now mired in their longest losing streak since 2007.

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    Carmel, Benet battle to draw

    Carmel ties Benet: Carmel and Benet worked to a 4-4 tie in East Suburban Catholic Conference action.The No. 1 doubles team of Michelle Kannenberg and Kathleen Felicelli led the way for Carmel with a 6-1, 6-0 sweep of Benet’s Sarah Callahan and Katie Telford.New Trier d. Stevenson: New Trier got a 4-3 win over Stevenson despite two Stevenson wins in singles action.No. 1 singles player Zoe Manion won her match in three sets, 7-6 (6), 2-6, 6-4.

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    Wins for Wauconda, Libertyville

    Boys soccerWauconda 4, Woodstock 2: Brandon Morales scored 2 goals and Jake Sullivan had a goal and an assist to lead Wauconda to the win. The Bulldogs are 5-9-2 on the season.Libertyville 4, Lake Zurich 3: Trey Toohey had a goal and 2 assists to lead Libertyville to the win. The Wildcats, who move to 9-7, got 7 saves from goalie Alex Prillman.Lake Forest 3, Warren 2: RJ Hill had 3 saves for Warren, which drops to 9-3-6 on the season.

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    Warren edges Grant in 3

    Warren d. Grant: The Blue Devils outlasted Grant 25-17, 21-25, 25-16 on Monday to improve to 10-8 overall.Jenna Walczak had 9 kills and 12 digs while Lindsey Biedron and Rachel Ziegler added 3 kills apiece. Biedron also had 10 digs while Ziegler had 7 digs to go along with 15 assists. Lauren Frericks also had 15 assists as well as 11 digs. For Grant, Beka Couch had 7 kills while Tori Gallichio and Deanna Rodriguez each had 6 digs.Stevenson d. Palatine: Stevenson swept Palatine 25-18, 25-8 to move to 16-5.Khaila Donaldson rolled up 8 kills to go along with 6 digs. Alexa Bykowski had 18 assists and 8 digs.At Lake Forest: Carmel won the Scouts’ tournament Saturday, going 5-0 to improve to 22-3.The Corsairs defeated Hoffman Estates (25-10, 25-15), Joliet West (25-16, 25-17) and Regina (25-12, 25-13) in pool play before beating Grayslake North (25-10, 25-16) in the semifinals and Joliet West (25-14, 25-12) in the final.Carmel’s star setter Alyssa Armada played outside hitter and had 20 kills, while Morgan Meade dished out 86 assists, while also totaling 10 kills, 5 aces, 7 blocks and 12 digs. Armada earned a spot on the all-tournament team.Carmel coach David Pazely said his girls “grew as a team” during the tournament.“Different players were called to play different positions and everyone contributed to the 5 wins,” Pazely said.Corsairs freshman Grace Butler filled in at middle blocker and did a “great job up front,” Pazely said, with 12 kills and 6 blocks. She also served 10 aces. Grace Schofield “crushed the ball,” Pazely said, in the finals, racking up 12 kills.“Our defense was everywhere,” Pazely said. “Hopefully this growth can continue.”Carmel hosts St. Viator tonight on senior night. The Corsairs are 4-1 in East Suburban Catholic Conference play.

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    Lakes’ Richard Galat, left, and Brian Werchek hug after Werchek’s second goal of the first half against host Grant on Monday.

    Werchek, Lakes net NSC title berth

    Brian Werchek scored a pair of goals and Joey Savino added another in leading Lakes to a 3-1 victory over host Grant in a North Suburban Prairie Division boys soccer matchup Monday night in Fox Lake. The outcome netted Eagles the Prairie title and earned them a berth in Thursday night’s conference championship game. Lakes (9-6-2, 5-0-1) will host Lake Division champion Lake Forest (11-5-1, 5-1) at 6:15 p.m. Thursday in Lake Villa.

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    Burlington Central wins 15th straight

    Burlington Central 10, North Boone 0: Austin Van Acker had 2 goals and seven other Rockets found the back of the net as BC won for a program record 15th straight time in this Big Northern East rout. Michael Passi, Anthony Passi, Steven Saletta, James Raney, Nathan Moxness and Ryan DeTamble added goals and BC had an own goal. Ryan Fitzgerald made 5 saves in goal for the Rockets (17-1, 11-0).

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    Jovanovic, Manso stepping up in soccer

    Two natives of Lake County are playing key roles on their collegiate women’s soccer team this fall. University of Chicago senior Natalia Jovanovic of Gurnee scored an unassisted goal and assisted teammate Naomi Pacalin during a 2-0 victory against Kalamazoo College.The Maroons improved to 7-2-0 and pushed their winning streak to four games. Jovanovic is tied for the team lead with 6 assists to go along with 3 goals. Ohio University redshirt freshman Carly Manso of Vernon Hills scored her second goal of the year and assisted on Ohio’s two other goals en route to a 3-1 victory against Bowling Green in both teams’ MAC opener. Through nine games, Manso is the Bobcats’ points leader with eight, notching 2 goals and 4 assists this season.

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    St. Edward handles Walther Christian

    St. Edward d. Walther Christian: Cory Kelly had 8 kills and Katie Swanson added 6 kills and 8 digs to lead the Green Wave (12-8) to a 25-10, 25-20 Suburban Christian win. Allison Kruk had 13 digs and Clara McDowel added 10 for St. Edward, Mallory Gross contributed 10 assists.

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    Stevenson’s Kara Maleski, left, and Julia Osmond set up the block against host Palatine on Monday night.

    Stevenson picks up win at Palatine

    Stevenson’s girls volleyball team stopped host Palatine 25-19, 25-8 in a nonconference match on Monday. The Pirates (4-14) were led on attack by Kim Butler (3 kills), Nora Walsh (2) and Hannah Bridier (2).

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    Kristin Acciavatti and Sarah Muisenga of St. Francis attempt to block a shot by Rory Manion of IC Catholic Prep during girls volleyball, Monday.

    St. Francis dynasty too hard to duck

    St. Francis might not have been at its best Monday night, but the Spartans volleyball players did manage to have plenty of fun.

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    Streamwood’s Donnie Sosa and Larkin’s Diego Ramirez, right, compete for a corner kick Monday in Streamwood.

    Streamwood blanks Larkin behind Blanco

    Streamwood boys soccer coach Matt Polovin feels Sergio Blanco is quickly becoming one of the best goalkeepers in the area. Blanco showed why again Monday, making a key diving save late in the first half to keep the Sabres in the lead. Streamwood increased its lead to 2-0 just 3 minutes later and went on to beat Larkin, 3-0, in Upstate Eight River action at Millennium Field.

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    Palatine regional presents Fox Valley teams tough competition

    How competitive is today’s Class 3A Palatine boys golf regional at Palatine Hills? “If this was World Cup soccer, we would be in the pool of death,” said Huntley coach Jim Rolando. “There are six really good teams and only three qualify for the sectional. We are ready to do our best and see what happens. It’s probably going to take a great score to be in the Top 3. Good scores most likely won’t make it through.” Rolando’s Red Raiders finished second in the Fox Valley Conference to Jacobs with Jake Grabner, Riley Wicks, Brad Spoeth, Tyler Ross and Trent Craig earning all-conference honors and Glenn Miller narrowly missing a medal.

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    Bears wide receiver Brandon Marshall makes a touchdown reception during the second half of Sunday’s loss to the Saints.

    NYG on short rest just what Bears docs ordered

    Are the Bears who we thought they were, an 8-8 team suffering the growing pains of new coaches, systems and personnel, with an aging defense and an invisible Devin Hester? Are they the 12-4 team that started 3-1? Or are they something in between?

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    Not tough to buy this heartwarming message

    Let's take a break from the action customarily chronicled on these sports pages to celebrate, of all things, a heartwarming beer commercial that celebrates the true meaning of "Friendship."

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    Marmion’s defense held Aurora Christian to 8 first downs, 1 offensive touchdown and under 200 yards of offense Friday.

    Marmion’s peanuts playing big role

    For all the muscle that paved the way for Marmion’s 35-14 win at Aurora Christian Friday night, Cadets coach Dan Thorpe made sure to thank his peanuts, too. Those peanuts would be the Cadets’ defensive linemen like Nick Ferraro, Malcolm Confer, Joe Talbot and Paul Khoury who made life miserable for a normally high-scoring Eagles offense.

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    Former Chicago Cardinal dies at 82

    Gordon Polofsky, who played three seasons in the NFL and was a linebacker and fullback on Tennessee’s 1951 national championship team, has died. He was 82. Polofsky played for the NFL’s Chicago Cardinals from 1952-54.

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    A frustrated Eli Manning reacts to throwing an interception during the Giants’ loss to the Eagles on Sunday at home.

    Coughlin says stop blaming Eli for 0-5 record

    If somebody is going to take the blame for the New York Giants miserable start, it’s Tom Coughlin. The 67-year-old coach pointed the finger at himself for the Giants’ worst start since the 1987 strike season. New York will try to right the ship Thursday against the Bears.

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    The Packers’ Clay Matthews sacks Detroit quarterback Matthew Stafford during the second half of Sunday’s game in Green Bay. Matthews injured his thumb on the play.

    Packers brace for life without Matthews

    The Green Bay Packers know what life is like without Clay Matthews, and they’re bracing themselves again for being without their four-time Pro Bowl outside linebacker for an extended time after Matthews broke his right thumb during Sunday’s 22-9 victory over the Detroit Lions at Lambeau Field.

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    Wisconsin wide receiver Jared Abbrederis scores a touchdown past Ohio State defensive back C.J. Barnett during the first quarter of the Badgers’ 31-24 loss on Sept. 28 in Columbus, Ohio.

    Refreshed Wisconsin eager to get back after bye

    Brendan Kelly looked around the room during the Wisconsin football team’s morning meeting and felt a different vibe. Less yawning. Guys paying extra attention. Lots of note-taking. Refreshed from a bye week, the Badgers are eager get back to winning again. Good thing, because No. 19 Northwestern is next up for Wisconsin (3-2, 1-1 Big Ten) in a homecoming weekend game at Camp Randall Stadium.

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    Bobby Richardson helps the officials make the call after Indiana’s defense scored a safety against Penn State during the second half of the Hoosiers’ 44-24 win Saturday at home, the team’s sixth straight game inside the state borders.

    Hoosiers hoping to change course on the road

    Indiana is taking a different tack through the rugged Big Ten. Instead of getting detoured by perennial powerhouses, the Hoosiers are ready to take on those challenges. Instead of being distracted by outside expectations, they have focused on meeting their own goals. And before making a postseason bowl trip, the Hoosiers know they must start winning some games outside Indiana.

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    Michigan defensive tackle out of rest of year

    Michigan defensive tackle Ondre Pipkins will miss the rest of the season after tearing an anterior cruciate ligament in one of his knees during Saturday’s win over Minnesota.

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    Dodgers starting pitcher Clayton Kershaw works against Braves in the first inning of Game 1 of the National League Divisional Series Thursday in Atlanta.

    Kershaw replaces Nolasco as L.A.’s Game 4 starter

    The Dodgers turned to their ace in a bid to win the National League division series. Clayton Kershaw replaced Ricky Nolasco as the Dodgers’ starting pitcher when they tried to clinch the division title against the Atlanta Braves tonight. Los Angeles had a 2-1 lead in the best of five series.

  •  
    Illinois tight end Matt LaCosse narrowly misses a touchdown catch as he steps out of bounds while in the grasp of Nebraska safety Corey Cooper in the first half Saturday in Lincoln. Nebraska won 39-19.

    Huskers finally going on road after 5 at home

    It’s the second week of October, and Nebraska is finally preparing for its first road game. The Cornhuskers (4-1, 1-0) visit Purdue (1-4, 0-1) on Saturday after playing their first five in Lincoln. The schedule has been a blessing for a young defense that has had lots of kinks to work out, coach Bo Pelini said Monday.

  •  
    Nebraska’s Taylor Martinez (3) guides Jack Hoffman of Atkinson, Neb., down the field for his touchdown play during a special segment dedicated to Jack at the Red-White spring game at Memorial Stadium in Lincoln, Neb.

    Cancer in remission for Nebraska boy who made TD run

    The young boy with cancer whose touchdown run at the Nebraska spring football game was viewed by millions on the Internet is in remission, his father said Monday. Jack Hoffman, now 8, captured the hearts of Nebraska football fans when, with the players’ help, he ran 69 yards to score during April’s intrasquad game.

  •  
    According to sources, the Cubs interviewed former Cleveland Indians manager Manny Acta on Monday, and they will interview San Diego bench coach Rick Renteria later this week or early next week.

    Cubs interview Acta; Renteria next on list

    Cubs president Theo Epstein wants to cast a "wide net" in his search for a new field manager. On Monday, Epstein and GM Jed Hoyer interviewed former big-league skipper Manny Acta. They'll also speak with Padres bench coach Rick Renteria in the coming days.

  •  
    Former gymnast Svetlana Khorkina holds a torch during a relay of the Olympic flame on Monday in Moscow.

    Olympic flame relay highlights Putin's Russia

    The relay for the Sochi Winter Games, which began Monday in Moscow, will pass through many cities that showcase the historical, cultural and ethnic richness of Russia. But other cities on the route will do more to remind the world of the evils of Stalinism, the harsh treatment of dissent under Putin or the Islamic insurgency simmering in the Caucasus Mountains not far from Sochi's ski slopes.

  •  
    Former Boston Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling, sitting with his wife, Shonda, was introduced as a new member of the Red Sox Hall of Fame last fall. The Schilling home, which he bought from former Patriots quarterback Drew Bledsoe for $4.5 million, is for sale for $3 million. It has a heated eight-car garage, a batting/pitching cage, putting green and wine room.

    Schilling selling items from home

    Former Boston Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling — whose video game company collapsed into bankruptcy last year, prompting a high-profile lawsuit in Rhode Island — is selling off furniture, sports collectibles and even artificial plants from his Massachusetts home.

  •  
    Oakland released quarterback Matt Flynn on Monday. Flynn was beaten out for the starting job in the preseason by Terrelle Pryor and then fell to third string behind undrafted free agent Matt McGloin last week.

    Raiders release QB Matt Flynn

    The Oakland Raiders released quarterback Matt Flynn on Monday, just six months after bringing him in to be the starter. Oakland acquired Flynn in April from Seattle for a 2014 fifth-round draft pick and a conditional pick in 2015. The Raiders also reworked Flynn’s contract to give him $6.5 million in guaranteed money this season.

  •  
    A pink penalty flag lies on the turf in the fourth quarter of Sunday’s game between the Tennessee Titans and the Kansas City Chiefs in Nashville, Tenn. Pink penalty flags were used for breast cancer awareness.

    NFL won’t use pink penalty flags for Week 6

    The pink flags were part of the NFL’s “A Crucial Catch” campaign in support of breast cancer awareness. Coupled with the players’ pink equipment, especially their gloves and towels, the pink flags caused confusion among broadcasters, fans, players and coaches Sunday.

  •  

    DePaul’s the right fit for Petrillo

    Because of her soccer talent, St. Viator senior Maria Petrillo had opportunities to go to some top universities in Illinois, Indiana, Florida, Kansas, North Carolina, Missouri and Michigan. With the help of Sockers FC Chicago college counselor, Albert Martin, Petrillo was able to narrow down her choices. “He got me to focus on the most important factors in selecting a school based on education and what I wanted in a soccer program,” she said. Petrillo got her list down to three schools, and the winner happened to be right in her own backyard. The Lions’ defender plans to play her collegiate years for DePaul University.

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    Boys soccer/Top 20
    Hinsdale Central, St. Charles East and Lake Park are the top 3 teams in this week's Top 20 rankings of boys soccer teams in the Daily Herald coverage area.

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    Girls volleyball / Top 20
    St. Francis, Benet and Glenbard West remained the top 3 teams in this week's Daily Herald Top 20 girls volleyball rankings.

Business

  •  

    U of I faculty without tenure want more security

    URBANA — The growing number of professors at the University of Illinois who don’t have tenure want somebody besides their students to listen to them.The (Champaign) News-Gazette reports adjunct faculty, instructors, lecturers and others who don’t have tenure are hoping the school will take steps that would give them more job stability. Some are even assessing the need for a faculty union in Urbana. Tenured faculty say their non-tenured colleagues deserve a stronger voice in what happens on campus.Administrators in the school’s provost office have been reviewing issues that are specific to non-tenured instructors. A spokeswoman says the goal is to have some policies in place sometime during this academic year.

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    Vicki Hynes, left, and her daughter, Jessica, of Roselle pick out just the right pumpkins Monday afternoon at Goebbert's Pumpkin Patch in Hampshire.

    Area pumpkin farmers say this year's crop is good

    This year's pumpkin year's harvest is shaping up to produce a bumper crop, according to Illinois farmers. The weather can be thanked: Plenty of rain at the right time early in the season, and the lack of it in August and September, say farmers in Maple Park and South Barrington. “The harvest has been wonderful,” Terry Goebbert said. “It's been one of our better years.”

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    In Chicago, Deborah Mitchell, 57, attempts to login to an insurance marketplace site searching a better rate on health insurance on the first day President Barack Obama's health care reforms. People looking for the best deals on the new Illinois health insurance marketplace should consider moving to the cities along the northwestern state boarder, if they don't live there already.

    Go west for best deal on Illinois insurance market

    People looking for the best deals on the new Illinois health insurance marketplace should consider moving to cities along the northwestern state border, if they don't live there already. In general, the highest prices are inLake, McHenry, Kane and DuPage counties. “We're trying to offer plans that meet consumer need and expand access to cost-effective health care,” said Kurt Kossen, vice president of retail markets for Health Care Service Corporation, the operator of Blue Cross plans in Illinois and four other states.

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    Plane strikes bird, returns to Chicago's O'Hare

    An American Airlines flight heading to China had to return to O'Hare International Airport when the pilot declared an emergency because the plane hit a bird. American spokesman Matt Miller says 237 passengers and 15 crew members were on board Flight 289 when it departed O'Hare around 10:50 a.m. Sunday.

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    The benchmark Japan Airlines purchase agreement with Airbus is for 13 A350-1000s, along with 18 shorter-fuselage A350-900 jetliners.

    JAL buys from Airbus, not Boeing

    Japan Airlines is buying its first-ever jets from Airbus in a deal with a list value of $9.5 billionwith a purchase of 31 A350 planes. JAL's fleet has been dominated by Chicago-based Boeing Co. offerings, partly because of the ties between Japan and the U.S. that span decades and include security arrangements.

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    The fare card changes are part of the new Ventra payment system that's being launched by the CTA and Pace, the suburban bus system.

    Changes to CTA, Pace fares continue with Ventra

    The latest changes to fare cards used by Northern Illinois public transit passengers is going into effect. Starting Monday, the Chicago Transit Authority will stop selling magnetic strip cards and passes. Meanwhile, travelers who use the Chicago Card won't be able to reload money onto the cards. The changes are part of the new Ventra payment system that's being launched by the CTA and Pace, a suburban bus system.

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    Schaumburg plans to use a tax-increment financing district to spur economic growth around its convention center, but other taxing bodies dislike the shift in the tax burden among property owners that TIF districts can cause.

    Schools aren’t fans of new Schaumburg TIF district

    Schaumburg is once again looking to tax increment financing to spur redevelopment and economic growth — this time along Algonquin Road near the convention center. And once again, other taxing bodies are hoping the life span of the TIF district — with its gradual shift of the tax burden to those outside it — will be as much below the 23-year maximum as possible.

  •  
    Chicago Bears defensive coordinator Buddy Ryan is hoisted on the shoulders of Otis Wilson, left, and Richard Dent, right, after the Bears’ lopsided 46-10 victory over the New England Patriots in Super Bowl XX in 1986.

    Images: Landmark Daily Herald photos through the years
    Here’s a look at some historic Daily Herald staff photos over the years. This article is part of a special series celebrating National Newspaper week Oct. 6-12. The Week was designated in 1940 as a way to recognize the importance of newspapers to their communities.

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    Specilaist Fabian Caceres works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange Monday, Oct. 7, 2013. The stock market is opening sharply lower as the U.S. government heads into a second week of a partial shutdown with no signs of a budget agreement in sight.

    Stocks fall as government shutdown drags on

    Investors kept their focus on Washington Monday, sending stocks lower with little hope for a deal to end the government shutdown. Speaker John Boehner on Sunday ruled out a vote in the House of Representatives on a straightforward bill to increase the borrowing authority of the U.S. government without concessions from President Barack Obama.

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    The longtime secretary of imprisoned financier Bernard Madoff and four other back-office subordinates of the Ponzi king go to trial Tuesday as the government for the first time shows a jury what it has collected in its five-year probe of one of history’s biggest frauds.

    NYC fraud trial to begin for 5 ex-Madoff employees

    The longtime secretary of imprisoned financier Bernard Madoff and four other back-office subordinates of the Ponzi king go to trial Tuesday as the government for the first time shows a jury what it has collected in its five-year probe of one of history’s biggest frauds.

  •  
    Lisle-based commercial truck and engine maker Navistar said Monday that it is planning a private offering of $200 million senior subordinated convertible notes due 2018.

    Navistar plans private offering of $200M notes

    Lisle-based commercial truck and engine maker Navistar said Monday that it is planning a private offering of $200 million senior subordinated convertible notes due 2018. The company is giving the initial buyers an option to buy up to an additional $30 million convertible notes.

  •  
    Jack Teboda

    Elgin financial planner reaches new heights for kids

    Kukec's People features Elgin financial planner Jack Teboda and his first climb up Mt. Rainer to help raise about $35,000 for a Guatemalan children's charity.

  •  
    Peak Design founder Peter Dering looks through a package of clothing he had received from Buck Mason at his office in San Francisco. The Silicon Valley has a fashion problem dating back to its founders, who launched high tech companies promising to be different: no more top down management, no more cubicles, no more business suits.

    Sloppy Silicon Valley techies find their style

    The Silicon Valley has had a men's fashion problem dating back to its founders. From their inception, tech companies went out of their way to be different — and that meant no more business suits. Thus brilliant innovations took place in the dumpiest of outfits as leather sandals, elastic-waist jeans and old T-shirts became ubiquitous.

  •  
    People don’t just watch TV anymore; they talk about it on Twitter. From the comfort of couches, they share reactions to touchdowns and nail-biting season finales —and advertisers and networks are taking note.

    Twitter tunes in to TV partnerships ahead of IPO

    People don’t just watch TV anymore; they talk about it on Twitter. From the comfort of couches, they share reactions to touchdowns and nail-biting season finales —and advertisers and networks are taking note. Examples of Twitter’s influence abound. The recent finale of “Breaking Bad” generated a record 1.24 million tweets.

  •  

    New York probes rights sold to ‘World Trade Center’ name

    New York is expanding its probe nationwide into the 1980s sale of the rights to the name “World Trade Center” to a nonprofit for $10, resulting in millions of dollars in fees for use of the name in 28 states, according to an official familiar with the investigation.

  •  
    Scott Stone

    How the Daily Herald adapts to help businesses

    Today’s world of “newspaper” advertising and marketing is as diverse and technologically driven as the business world we live in, says Daily Herald General Manager Scott Stone.

  •  
    Colin O’Donnell

    The future of news will still be news at the Daily Herald

    The future of newspapering may look different than it does today, but it still will be built around a commitment to news, says Daily Herald Sr. VP Colin O'Donnell.

  •  

    How much do clients actually know about your business?

    There’s business you’re likely not getting, probably because you don’t know your clients as well as you think you do. Conversely, and perhaps more importantly, you may be missing out on business because your clients don’t know as much about your firm and its capabilities as you think they do.

  •  
    Photo courtesy of Allison Thurman Allison Thurman is the owner of Art By Allison in Batavia, a business that provides interior decorating and decorative painting.

    Batavia’s Art by Allison offers an array of options

    An interview with Allison Thurman, owner of Art by Allison in Batavia. The business offers interior decorating and decorative painting options.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Vintage trailer rallies are becoming increasingly popular.

    Classic campers transport owners to a simpler time

    Some outdoor aficionados are opting for an even more whimsical approach to their recreational escapes. Increasingly, campers are participating in vintage trailer rallies. Much like classic car groups that gather to discuss and show off their favorite rides, these rallies are composed of enthusiasts who have diligently restored their vintage camping trailers.

  •  
    Jerry Clinnin, right, owner of Snowbird Peace of Mind, meets with his client, Loren Roberts, at Roberts’ Del Webb home in Elgin.

    How to find peace of mind for the time you are away

    Snowbirds prepare their cold-weather residences before heading south for the winter.

  •  
    In this Feb. 10, 2013 file photo shows producer Jermaine Dupri at the Warner Music Group 2013 Grammy Celebration at the Chateau Marmont in West Hollywood, Calif. Dupri is joining Mariah Carey’s management team. A representative for Carey confirmed the news Monday. Dupri and Carey have collaborated on hits like “Always Be My Baby,” “Don’t Forget About Us” and “We Belong Together.” The latter was named song of the decade and is one of the most popular songs of all-time.

    Jermaine Dupri joins Mariah Carey’s management team

    Music producer Jermaine Dupri is joining Mariah Carey’s management team. A representative for Carey confirmed the news Monday. They have collaborated on hits like “Always Be My Baby,” “Don’t Forget About Us” and “We Belong Together,” which was named song of the decade and is one of the most popular songs of all time.

  •  
    This Feb. 13, 2009 file photo shows actors Tori Spelling, left, and Jennie Garth at the Heart Truth’s Red Dress collection during Fashion Week in New York. The former “Beverly Hills, 90210” stars are reuniting. The actresses will co-star and executive produce the new ABC Family series “Mystery Girls.” In the series, Spelling and Garth play Holly and Charlie, who were on a crime-solving series in the 90’s that was the highest-rated show on TV. Spelling’s Holly is looking to reignite her fame and opens a detective agency. She persuades Charlie, now a suburban mom to help. “Mystery Girls” is set to shoot in November.

    Garth and Spelling to co-star in ABC Family pilot

    Former “Beverly Hills, 90210” stars Jennie Garth and Tori Spelling are reuniting. The actresses will co-star and executive produce the new ABC Family series “Mystery Girls.”

  •  

    Moosewood turns 40, offers fresh take on veg life

    Since it opened in 1973, the Ithaca, N.Y., restaurant has evolved from a group of 20-somethings cooking for friends into a mature business with a line of cookbooks and an international clientele. The group’s 40th anniversary cookbook, “Moosewood Restaurant Favorites” showcases a more sophisticated cuisine that is lighter, more diverse, and attuned to concerns about gluten, dairy and potential allergens.

  •  

    Thai Butternut Squash Soup
    THAI BUTTERNUT SQUASH SOUP

  •  
    “Bangerz” by Miley Cyrus

    Miley Cyrus' new album shows promise

    For all the antics that Miley Cyrus has demonstrated in the last few months, she could easily grab attention if she did one thing: let her music speak for itself. Cyrus' “Bangerz,” her fourth album, is a collection that marks the 20-year-old's musical breakthrough. When she explores the different emotions of her character and doesn't play the caricature that she's become, you're able to appreciate Cyrus as an artist.

  •  
    Herbs can help with a variety of ailments.

    Don't forget about herbs for your health

    Often overlooked, yet an important component of nutrition, herbs pack a big punch from a small package. Most people use culinary herbs or spices to flavor their food, but herbs have many benefits in addition to being taste enhancers. Herbs have been used for centuries as medicine to treat or alleviate symptoms of disease, so don't underestimate their potency.

  •  
    Megyn Kelly, host of Fox News Channel’s “The Kelly Files,” rehearses for the debut of her new show, which premieres Monday. Her program is the linchpin to the first overhaul of Fox’s prime-time lineup since 2002, or about a century in television time.

    Fox News’ Megyn Kelly heading to prime time

    Ask Fox News Channel’s Megyn Kelly how her new prime-time program will differ from the edgy news show she had been hosting in the afternoon and she says that “it’s going to be dark out.” The joke has a serious point. Don’t expect Kelly to turn into a fire-breathing partisan because she has more exclusive real estate. “The Kelly File,” which premieres at 8 p.m. Monday, is the linchpin to the first overhaul of Fox’s prime-time lineup since 2002, a century in television time.

  •  
    More than a decade after her kidnapping and rescue grabbed national headlines, Elizabeth Smart is publishing a memoir of her ordeal called “My Story,” which is being released Monday, Oct. 7.

    Elizabeth Smart details kidnapping in new memoir

    Minutes after 14-year-old Elizabeth Smart was snatched from her bedroom in the dead of night, a police cruiser idled by along a neighborhood street as she was forced to the ground at knife point. “Move and I will kill you!” her captor hissed. It was one of several fleeting times Smart watched a rescue slip away during her nine-month ordeal, she recounts in “My Story,” a 308-page book being released by St. Martin’s Press on Monday. She writes that she was so terrified of the street preacher who kidnapped her that when she was rescued by police in a Salt Lake City suburb in March 2003, she only reluctantly identified herself.

  •  
    Scarlett Johansson has earned the title of Esquire magazine’s sexiest woman alive, for a second time. She also won in 2006.

    Esquire names Scarlett Johansson ‘sexiest’ again

    Seven years after being named Esquire magazine’s sexiest woman alive, Scarlett Johansson has earned the title for a second time. Johansson, who also won in 2006, is the first woman to get the honor twice.

  •  
    Stephen (Robbie Amell) discovers he has special powers in The CW's new supernatural drama “The Tomorrow People.”

    Sci-fi show stays rooted in reality — except with superpowers

    As if high school weren't tough enough, Stephen Jameson is convinced, with good reason, that he is going crazy. He hears voices no one else does. Yet in Stephen's strange new life the voices are real. He's a superior creature, a “homo superior,” as he discovers on the compelling “The Tomorrow People,” premiering on The CW on Wednesday, Oct. 9.

  •  
    Dave Keeler and his Goldendoodle, Magnolia, spend time with a veteran.

    Man's best friend opens paths to veterans with PTSD

    What do you get when you put loving dogs, selfless trainers and veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder together? In many cases, a stepping stone to recovery. Dave Keeler is familiar with the trauma vets experience. He and his dog, a Goldendoodle named Magnolia, belong to “Divine Canines,” an organization that brings service dogs to soldiers diagnosed with PTSD. “This is important work,” Keeler said. “We bring the skills the dogs naturally have to these men who have so bravely served this country."

  •  
    What’s included in a furnace tuneup will vary greatly from company to company. Certified technicians can detect future problems in addition to cleaning up existing parts.

    Fall is the perfect time for a furnace tuneup

    As the temperature changes from summer warmth to fall coolness, it’s the perfect time to schedule a tuneup for your furnace. Doing so now, while your furnace is working, prevents the nightmare of a dead furnace in the middle of winter.

  •  
    Earl Sweatshirt performing in May at The Sasquatch! Music Festival in George, Wash. Hip-hop’s troubled prince says that having his much-anticipated major label debut “Doris” out is a relief and everything has been perfect in the time since it debuted at No. 5 on the Billboard 200 chart.

    Earl Sweatshirt finally finds his happy place

    Earl Sweatshirt thinks about it for a second and admits something surprising. “I’m pretty happy all the time now, to be honest,” he says. Hip-hop’s troubled prince says during a recent phone interview that having his much-anticipated major label debut, “Doris,” out is a relief and everything has been perfect in the time since it debuted at No. 5 on the Billboard 200 chart.

  •  
    Trudie Styler, wife of Sting and a former member of the Royal Shakespeare Company, has only lately returned to the stage after many years as a film producer, businesswoman, philanthropist, environmentalist and yoga instructor.

    Trudie Styler on her new play and being Mrs. Sting

    Trudie Styler would love it if you came to her new play. Just don’t tell her when. Forgive Styler, 59, a bout of nerves these days. The former member of the Royal Shakespeare Company has only lately returned to the stage after many years as a film producer, businesswoman, philanthropist, environmentalist and yoga instructor. She’s making her New York debut this month in the Culture Project’s production of Anton Chekhov’s “The Seagull.”

  •  
    Headaches in women and men can vary greatly.

    Your health: Sex matters with migraines

    When it comes to migraines, sex matters, says The Washington Post. So much so that migraines in men and migraines in women should be considered “different diseases altogether,” Harvard scientist Nasim Maleki tells Scientific American. Women are as much as three times as likely as men to experience the debilitating headaches and their associated symptoms, according to the article.

  •  
    Families can help their kids with autism practice traveling in airports, which can be scary for kids with the disorder.

    Children with autism practice travel at NYC’s JFK

    JetBlue Airways and the nonprofit Autism Speaks set up an air travel practice session recently for families who have children with the disorder. JetBlue officials said it was the first such event at JFK. “We had no idea what to expect, we didn’t know whether we’d have to turn around and go home,” said Zsuzsa Price, mom of Callum, 4, who has autism. “We’re grateful to have the chance to try it out.”

Discuss

  •  
    Robert M. Williams Jr.

    ‘Communities die when there is no newspaper’

    The president of the National Newspaper Association says "the Internet is no enemy of a good community newspaper. The enemy of a good newspaper is indifference -- a community that doesn’t care about honesty and clean government, effective schools, invigorating community service or the connections that bind us into a functioning society."

  •  

    Make your voice heard!

    Contacting your legislators isn't as difficult, or as time consuming, as some people think, says the president of the League of Women Voters in Wheaton.

  •  

    William Ayers deserves no honor
    A Rolling Meadows letter to the editor: This is pertaining to a Sept. 23 letter about William Ayers wanting to make money by speaking at Elgin Community College. I hope ECC’s president, Dr. David Sam, listens to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Haase’s reasons for not wanting Ayers to speak there.

  •  

    We still need answers from Metra
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: The Daily Herald publishes regular “Guest Views.” Some make us slightly better informed, but most are just ads for whatever political organization the writer has an affiliation with. Case in point, the Sept. 29 guest appearance by the interim executive director of Metra, Don Orseno. He talked about the dedicated people at Metra and all the fine work they are doing.

  •  

    Durbin should rethink his ‘pigs’ remark
    A Palatine letter to the editor: Let’s think about who are the real gluttons. Through an administrative sleight of hand by the federal Office of Personnel Management, senators, congressmen and their staff will receive a 75 percent subsidy on Obamacare premiums.

  •  

    Rich blessed enough to share their wealth
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: We need a new beatitude relevant to our current condition: Blessed are the rich because they have most of the material wealth and they can share with the poor so the poor can pay their fair share of the taxes.

  •  

    Story distorted facts on conferences
    A Grayslake letter to the editor: Re: The story from 2 October 2013 titled “School Conference already costing some taxpayers more.” The rehashing of past practices in order to taint current initiatives seems to be part and parcel of the Daily Herald approach to journalism.

  •  

    Spend more time with Congress, not Iran
    AMount Prospect letter to the editor:Is President Obama’s ego getting in the way of a solution with Congress? He’s not negotiating with Congress but is willing to negotiate with the Iranian president. America deserves better.

  •  

    Point fingers at Tea Party
    A letter to the editor: What Osama bin Laden could not accomplishm the Tea Party is doing: destroying this country.

  •  

    She’s grateful for the work on her home
    Letter to the editor: Ardath Jones of Hoffman Estates says a heartfelt thank you to the Fremd students and adults who worked to improve the outside of her home recently.

  •  

    Speed bumps could prevent a tragedy
    Letter to the editor: Lauren Sayre of Arlington Heights writes that the wonderful new park on Falcon Drive comes with a danger - cars speeding down the street.

  •  

    Let’s take missing seniors seriously
    Letter to the editor: Maxine Nugent of Arlington Heights writes there wasn't nearly enough attention paid to the disappearance of Eugene Jonsson, and to missing seniors in general.

  •  

    Bikes make Reimer path very dangerous
    Letter to the editor: Larry Lake of Palatine says the trail in the Margreth Reimer Reservoir is an accident waiting to happen, what with bike riders flying around paying no heed to walkers.

  •  

    Attack should have gotten more press
    Letter to the editor: Larry Powitz of Arlington Heights is concerned about the recent atack on a jogger at Lake Arlington.

  •  

    Turn off the lights when not in use
    Letter to the editor: Randall Richardson writes he wishes Buffalo Grove High School would turn off the stadium lights when the field is not in use.

  •  

    Anvil Club bailout a bad idea
    A West Dundee letter to the editor: Taxpayer dollars are used to fund the services that people deem government should be providing, such as a police force and a court system. While we may disagree on exactly what level of services it is appropriate for government to provide, I think we can all agree that it is not appropriate for government to use taxpayer dollars to bail out local businesses.

  •  

    GOP has no social conscience
    A Huntley letter to the editor: Prior to the period from Ronald Reagan until recently, the GOP stood for financial conservatism with a social conscience. It has slowly morphed into something much different.

  •  

    Health care act is back to haunt us
    A Wood Dale letter to the editor: Dear Congressman Boehner, thank you for not blinking. I know the politically correct wisdom is to blame the Republican House, especially the so-called Tea Party candidates, for what is being called “the government shutdown.”

  •  

    Thanks to all who helped health expo
    Letter to the editor: More than 800 people took advantage of the Hanover Township health expo last month, an event that wouldn't have been possible without the vendors, supporters and health experts who particiapted, writes township Trustee Mary Alice Benoit.

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