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Daily Archive : Monday September 2, 2013

News

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    The Rotary Rubber Duck Race is one of the highlights of the fifth and final day of Buffalo Grove Days.

    Duck race wins money for Buffalo Grove Rotary

    For Rick Drazner, it was a “three-peat.” For the third year in a row, Drazner outsold all others in the Rotary Rubber Duck Race in Buffalo Grove. He sold $1,050 worth of ducks for Monday's fundraiser, held during the final day of Buffalo Grove Days. “It's for a good cause,” said Stephen Legge, past president of the Rotary Club. “We really do contribute to a lot of...

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    South Barrington teen seriously hurt in crash

    A 17-year-old Barrington High School senior from South Barrington is in stable condition after a one-vehicle accident in Barrington Hills Monday afternoon. The student suffered two broken legs, two broken femurs and a facial fracture, but his injuries are not being considered life-threatening.

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    Natural gas leak fixed on Quentin Road in Kildeer

    Kildeer police spent much of Labor Day monitoring a natural gas leak along Quentin Road as Nicor was repairing it. The leak was reported to be resolved late Monday, but an exact time could not be given for completion of the repair.

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    Former World War II airplane mechanic Tony Thomas, 91, looks at the engine of a 1942 Boeing Stearman before flying in it Monday at Chicago Executive Airport in Wheeling.

    Flights bring back fond memories for vets

    Eight military veterans living in Covenant Village of Northbrook flew Monday in a 1942 Boeing Stearman — the type of airplane used to train aviators in World War II. They soared at 1,000 feet for views of Lake Michigan and the Chicago skyline. “This is a World War II trainer, very familiar to this generation,” said pilot Darryl Fisher. “It’s very nostalgic and,...

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    Yomara Ibarra, right, of BalloonsbyTommy.com, marches the parade route Monday at Schaumburg's Septemberfest.

    Septemberfest parade sends summer out on high note

    Schaumburg's Septemberfest parade signaled the unofficial end to summer Monday, and it seemed as if the entire community came out to bask in the fun one last time. Thousands lined the two-mile route down Summit Drive, cheering the high school bands and veterans who marched, as well as the many community organizations, Scouts and teams that formed parade entries.

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    Oakbrook Center is in the midst of the largest renovation project in the outdoor mall's 51-year history. The project, expected to be completed in time for the Black Friday start to the holiday shopping season, will include a vortex fountain that will operate 365 days a year.

    Oakbrook Center undergoing largest renovation since 1962 opening

    More than 50 years after it opened, Oakbrook Center is undergoing its biggest facelift, a $30 million renovation expected to be complete in time for Black Friday. Here's a look at what's happening and what you can expect to see by the time the work is done.

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    Cherish Kramer, 3, of Glen Ellyn scoops up candy during Naperville's Labor Day parade.

    Naperville's Labor Day parade thrills viewers ages 3 to 97

    Ninety-seven-year-old Clara Stonecipher never tires of parades. This year, she especially liked the electric cars at the Labor Day parade in Naperville, which kicked off the last day of the annual Last Fling festival organized by the Naperville Jaycees. “We have a parade in Elburn every year, but this one down here has so many more people,” said Stonecipher.

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    Southwest jet safely returns after bird strike

    A Southwest Airlines spokeswoman says a jet carrying 124 people struck a bird shortly after departing for Chicago from a North Carolina airport but safely returned without injuries. The jetliner, which was destined for Midway International, has since been taken out of service for inspection and any necessary repairs.

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    Chicago officials announce 50 speed camera zones

    Chicago transportation officials are announcing the 50 areas citywide that’ll be equipped with automated speed enforcement cameras.

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    In this Sunday, Sept. 1, 2013, citizen journalism image provided by Edlib News Network, ENN, which has been authenticated based on its contents and other AP reporting, Syrian children hold signs during a demonstration in Maaret al-Numan, Idlib province, northern Syria. More than 100,000 Syrians have been killed since an uprising against Syrian President Bashar Assad erupted in 2011.

    French report concurs: Syria used chemical weapons

    International aid to Syrians uprooted by civil war is a “drop in the sea” of what is needed, a top U.N. official said Monday, estimating that five million Syrians have been displaced inside the country. In addition, 2 million Syrians have fled to neighboring countries, according to U.N. figures. The total, of about 7 million, amounts to nearly one-third of Syria's population.

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    President Obama worked on Monday to persuade skeptical lawmakers to endorse a U.S. military intervention in civil war-wracked Syria, winning conditional support from two leading Senate foreign policy hawks even as he encountered resistance from members of his own party after two days of a determined push to sell the plan.

    Obama tries persuading the skeptical on Syria

    President Barack Obama worked on Monday to persuade skeptical lawmakers to endorse a U.S. military intervention in civil war-wracked Syria, winning conditional support from two leading Senate foreign policy hawks even as he encountered resistance from members of his own party after two days of a determined push to sell the plan.

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    Dan Rutherford

    Rutherford, Dillard name lieutenant governor picks

    State Treasurer Dan Rutherford has chosen Chicago attorney Steve Kim as his running mate in the Illinois gubernatorial race, while state Sen. Kirk Dillard picked state Rep. Jil Tracy.

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    Siert Bruins, a 92-year-old former member of the Nazi Waffen SS, sits Monday in a courtroom in Hagen, Germany. Dutch-born Siert Bruins, who is now a German, is on trial on allegations he executed a Dutch resistance fighter in 1944.

    Germany tries 92-year-old for Nazi war crime

    Germany put a 92-year-old former member of the Nazi Waffen SS on trial Monday on charges that he killed a Dutch resistance fighter in 1944. Dutch-born Siert Bruins, who is now German, entered the Hagen state courtroom using a walker, but appeared alert and attentive as the proceedings opened. No pleas are made in the German system, and Bruins offered no statement. His attorney, Klaus-Peter...

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    Cary man flown for treatment after fall from ladder

    A Cary man, estimated to be in his mid-50s, was flown to Condell Medical Center in Libertyville Monday afternoon after falling off a ladder while trimming a tree on his property. Paramedics reported that the man fell approximately 12 to 15 feet to the ground and appeared to be slightly confused when they arrived.

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    Sparky Rucker of Maryville, Tenn., weaves a tale for a delighted crowd Monday during the 37th annual Fox Valley Folk Music and Storytelling Festival Monday at Island Park in Geneva.

    Folk music a hit at Fox Valley festival in Geneva

    Lissette Rivera of Carpentersville said attending the 37th annual Fox Valley Folk Music and Storytelling Festival at Island Park in Geneva was a great way to spend Labor Day. “It’s so peaceful and nice to hear the music and lay out by the river.” The festival featured about 200 performers of folk music, dance and storytelling on eight stages.

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    This Feb. 22, 2013, file photo shows Two heavily damaged homes on the beach in Mantoloking, N.J., from Superstorm Sandy. Man-made global warming may decrease the likelihood of the already unusual steering currents that pushed Superstorm Sandy due west into New Jersey in a freak 1-in-700 year path, researchers report.

    Sandy’s ‘freaky’ path may be less likely in future

    WASHINGTON — Man-made global warming may further lessen the likelihood of the freak atmospheric steering currents that last year shoved Superstorm Sandy due west into New Jersey, a new study says.

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    More than $50 million in unclaimed prizes in Wisconsin

    Wisconsin has more than $50 million in unclaimed lottery winnings going back to 1997. Many lotto game players trash their tickets if they don’t win major jackpots. But some of those tickets were worth money, and the pot of unclaimed money keeps growing.

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    Police: Father was target in 1-year-old’s death

    A 1-year-old boy in a stroller was fatally shot in the face as his parents pushed him across a city street, and police continued looking for the gunman Monday.

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    Canine rescue fund benefit:

    Our House of Hope K-9 Rescue will sponsor a sidewalk sale, rain or shine, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Sept, 7, at Animal Care Medical Center in the Country Court Shopping Center, 438 Peterson Road, Libertyville.

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    Six hurt in two-vehicle crash near Elmhurst

    A two-vehicle crash on southbound Interstate 294 near Elmhurst just after midnight Monday sent six people to area hospitals, according to Illinois State Police. The six injured occupants of the vehicles were transported to hospitals by the Berkeley Fire Department, Hillside Fire Department and Northlake Fire Protection District.

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    Hawthorn Woods fall fest:

    Hawthorn Woods hosts its fifth annual fall fest from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, Sept. 7 at the Hawthorn Woods Aquatic Center, 94 Midlothian Road.

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    Lake Zurich’s Rock the Block:

    Lake Zurich plans to throw a party in the village's downtown Saturday, Sept. 14.

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    Cherish Kramer, 3 of Glen Ellyn scoops up candy during the Naperville Labor Day parade Monday that is part of the Jaycees' Last Fling.

    Images: Labor Day in the Suburbs
    Area residents enjoyed Labor Day attending festivals throughtout the suburbs including Buffalo Grove Days, Last Fling in Naperville, Maple Park's Fun Fest, Lake Forest's Art Fair on the Square, Schaumburg Septemberfest and the Fox Valley Folk Music Festival.

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    Advocate for medical marijuana not eligible

    A seriously ill woman who’d lobbied to legalize medical marijuana in Illinois won’t be eligible to get it herself because of a drug charge.

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    Glenn Poshard

    SIU president: Lobbyists in Capitol a needed expense

    Southern Illinois University has spent more than $2 million in the past dozen years on Springfield lobbyists, according to a published report. But SIU president Glenn Poshard says it’s a necessary expense for a billion-dollar operation to keep up with legislative developments.

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    Dick Durbin

    Durbin headed to Washington for Syria debate

    U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin has canceled a Tuesday luncheon appearance before Chicago’s business and political elite to head to Washington and begin preparing for congressional debate on possible action in Syria.

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    U of I considers future of online courses

    Administrators at the University of Illinois say they’re pondering the future of their free online courses, offered through an ambitious startup program the school joined last year.

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    Mexico’s President Enrique Pena Nieto gives a thumbs up as he gives his first state-of-the-nation address at Los Pinos presidential residence in Mexico City, Monday, Sept. 2, 2013. Pena Nieto opened his address by praising the passage of a key education reform just hours earlier.

    Mexico leader celebrates education reform victory

    MEXICO CITY — President Enrique Pena Nieto used his first state-of-the-nation address Monday to push an aggressive reform agenda that seemed to be on the ropes last week, as protesting teachers attempted to block his plan for mandatory evaluations.

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    Iraq promises probe into Iranian exile killings

    BAGHDAD — Iraq’s prime minister ordered an investigation Monday into the slaying of half of the roughly 100 remaining residents at an Iranian dissident camp north of Baghdad, where a U.N. team got its first look at the aftermath of the large-scale bloodshed.

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    “Sons of Anarchy” star Charlie Hunnam will play Christian Grey in the movie adaptation of E L James’ “Fifty Shades of Grey.”

    Leads cast in ‘Fifty Shades of Grey’ movie

    The big-screen adaptation of E L James’ “Fifty Shades of Grey” has cast its lead roles. Charlie Hunnam will play the 27-year-old billionaire Christian Grey, and Dakota Johnson will play the college student he captivates, Anastasia Steele. Focus Features and Universal Pictures announced the castings Monday.

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    In this photo provided by the Florida Keys News Bureau, Diana Nyad, positioned about two miles off Key West, Fla., Monday, Sept. 2, 2013, swims towards the completion of her approximately 110-mile trek from Cuba to the Florida Keys.

    Nyad, 64, swims from Cuba to Florida without cage

    Looking dazed and sunburned, U.S. endurance swimmer Diana Nyad, 64, walked onto the Key West shore Monday, becoming the first person to swim from Cuba to Florida without the help of a shark cage. Nyad arrived at the beach just before 2 p.m. EDT, about 53 hours after she began her swim in Havana on Saturday.

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    In this Monday, Aug. 19, 2013, lava lamps are photographed in a shop in London. The lava lamp, an iconic piece of British design and social trends, is celebrating its fiftieth birthday. Since its launch in 1963, Mathmos lava lamps have been in continuous production at their factory in Poole, Dorset. The company founder and eccentric inventor Edward Craven-Walker originally developed the lava lamp from an egg timer design he saw in a Dorset pub.

    Lava lamps: 50 years old and still groovy

    Call them `60s relics or hippy home accessories, lava lamps have been casting their dim but groovy light on interiors for half a century, having hit British shelves 50 years ago on Tuesday. A British company began marketing their original creation as an “exotic conversation piece” in 1963.

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    Flu vaccination is no longer merely a choice between a jab in the arm or a squirt in the nose. This fall, some brands promise a little extra protection. For the first time, certain vaccines will guard against four strains of flu rather than the usual three.

    Some flu vaccines promise a little more protection

    Flu vaccination is no longer merely a choice between a jab in the arm or a squirt in the nose. This fall, some brands promise a little extra protection. For the first time, certain vaccines will guard against four strains of flu rather than the usual three.

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    In this Friday, Aug. 30, 2013 photo provided by the U.S. Forest Service, a member of the Bureau of Land Management Silver State Hotshot crew from Elko, Nevada, walks through a burn operation on the southern flank of the Rim Fire near Yosemite National Park in Calif. The wildfire burning in and around Yosemite National Park has become the fourth-largest conflagration in California history.

    Crews make overnight gains on Yosemite wildfire

    Crews working to corral the massive wildfire searing the edge of Yosemite National Park made major gains on the blaze overnight. The fire was 60 percent contained as of Monday morning, up from 45 percent Sunday night. The blaze also grew about 9 square miles and now covers more than 357 square miles.

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    People watch the coffin of Irish poet Seamus Heaney leave the Church of the Sacred Heart in Donnybrook, Dublin, Ireland, Monday, Sept. 2, 2013. Heaney who died aged 74, won the 1995 Nobel Prize for Literature ‘for works of lyrical beauty and ethical depth, which exalt everyday miracles and the living past’. He was widely considered Ireland’s greatest poet since William Butler Yeats.

    ‘Don’t be afraid’: Final words from Seamus Heaney

    Ireland mourned the loss of its Nobel laureate poet, Seamus Heaney, with equal measures of poetry and pain Monday in a funeral full of grace notes and a final message from the great man himself: Don’t be afraid. Among those packing the pews of Dublin’s Catholic Church of the Sacred Heart were government leaders from both parts of Ireland, poets and novelists, Bono and The Edge from rock band U2,...

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    Ind. psychiatric hospital patient dies after fight

    Police have arrested an Indiana psychiatric hospital patient in the death of another patient. State police say staffers at the Richmond State Hospital found 59-year-old Charles Boyer dead inside his room on Sunday after he was involved in a fight with 30-year-old Daniel Davis.

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    Pedestrian killed crossing Indianapolis street

    Police say an SUV struck and killed a man who was walking across a main street on the south side of Indianapolis.

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    Indy civic leaders defend $6 million cricket park

    Indianapolis civic leaders are supporting plans for a $6 million park that will host national cricket championships despite protests from residents.

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    Martin, former CPD superintendent, dies at 84

    Chicago police say a former superintendent who led the department under two mayors died this weekend at age 84.

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    Police: 2 arrested for trespassing at Wrigley

    Chicago authorities say two men have been arrested for allegedly trespassing at Wrigley Field.

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    New proof of insurance law puzzling some police

    A new Illinois law that allows motorists to provide proof of insurance using their smartphones is puzzling some police departments.

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    Madigan sues phone company she says scammed customers

    Attorney General Lisa Madigan says a phone company billed Illinois residents for long-distance service they never authorized.

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    IDOC adds officers to search for missing inmate

    Illinois corrections officials say additional officers are being brought in to search for a missing eastern Illinois inmate who walked away from a work crew.

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    IDOC: Illness at Danville prison is virus

    State officials say testing shows an illness outbreak at Danville Correctional Center that caused a partial lockdown was caused by a respiratory virus and not influenza.

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    Dean Emeritus Gary Morgan explains mechatronics. The new program is part of a College of Lake County effort to help bring skilled workers to local manufacturing businesses looking for employees.

    CLC links students, manufacturers

    College of Lake County is making a push to link students and graduates from its high-tech programs related to manufactuing to companies having problems finding skilled workers. “We continue to see and hear folks say, ‘I can’t find workers,’" said Richard Haney, CLC’s vice president for educational affairs. “And so we want to at least let them know, here’s...

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    Gail Borden Public Library’s main location in Elgin has a 3M Cloud Library that allows patrons to download e-books wirelessly. Librarians say getting e-books from publishers, however, remains a challenge.

    Lending of e-books not always easy for suburban libraries

    Anyone interested in reading author Dan Brown’s latest best-seller, “Inferno,” on a Kindle can download a copy for roughly $13. But for many suburban libraries, downloading that same book so that it can be lent out to patrons costs $85. That’s a hefty difference in price, and it’s one reason why public libraries have had difficulty keeping up with the demand for e-books in the suburbs.

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    Navy: Training, testing may kill whales, dolphins

    HONOLULU — Navy training and testing could inadvertently kill hundreds of whales and dolphins and injure thousands over the next five years, mostly as a result of detonating explosives underwater, according to two environmental impact statements released by the military Friday.

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    Three Russian Federation Air Force SU-27s intercept a passenger plane that was hijacked during a simulation to test the response of NORAD and Russian Federation forces. The exercise among Canadian and U.S. forces from NORAD, along with the Russian Federation, saw the Canadians successfully hand off the hijacked plane to Russian fighters over the Bering Strait.

    Russian, NORAD forces unite for exercise

    Flying at 34,000 feet over the Bering Strait, the Russian pilots had a singular focus: making sure they smoothly received the hand-off of a “hijacked” jetliner from their U.S.-Canadian counterparts. Up here, there were no thoughts about strained Russia-U.S. relations. Those were for another day, and for high-level officials. This training exercise was to make sure Russia and NORAD forces could...

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    Financial stress may hit your brain and wallet

    WASHINGTON — Being short on cash may make you a bit slower in the brain, a new study suggests.People worrying about having enough money to pay their bills tend to lose temporarily the equivalent of 13 IQ points, scientists found when they gave intelligence tests to shoppers at a New Jersey mall and farmers in India.

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    Adrienne Esposito, director of Citizens Campaign for the Environment, walks to the top of an old battery, previously used for defense, on Plum Island in New York. Environmental groups on both sides of Long Island Sound have for several years called for the property to be kept as a nature preserve, but the government hopes to sell the island.

    Gov’t reaffirms it will sell ex-lab island off NY

    The federal government has reaffirmed it plans to sell Plum Island, finalizing the environmental review of the animal disease research site off Long Island. A GSA environmental study in June suggested homes might be built on the island. Environmental groups want it to become a nature preserve.

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    Mike DeMeritt of West Chicago competes each year in a 100-mile race in Wisconsin to raise money for DuPage PADS. He’s part of the planning committee for the organization’s Run 4 Home.

    DuPage PADS’ run funds shelters, transitional programs

    For most of us, it’s nearly impossible to imagine ourselves without our basic needs covered, to think of sleeping in a shelter or asking for and accepting help from others. Mike DeMeritt can picture it, though. A volunteer with DuPage PADS, DeMeritt can’t shake the memory of helping at a shelter and identifying with a homeless man who had come to sleep on the church.

Sports

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    Hersey wins MSL title rematch

    Led by junior Gabri Olhava (6 kills), junior Kelly Hill (5) and sophomore Liz Fuerst (3), defending Mid-Suburban League girls volleyball champion Hersey topped visiting Palatine 25-19, 26-24 in a rematch of last’s MSL title match at the Carter Gymnasium.

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    Appearances, not innings, up for Cubs’ Russell

    Although left-handed reliever James Russell has shouldered a big workload again this season, manager Dale Sveum said the big difference between this year and last is that Russell's innings count has not been as taxing.

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    Cubs starter Travis Wood settled down after giving up 4 runs in the first two innings Monday at Wrigley Field. Still, he took the loss to fall to 8-11.

    Wood’s bid for quality start ends early in Cubs’ loss

    Cubs lefty Travis Wood has been a model of consistency all year and death on left-handed batters. But he allowed a homer to a left-hander and to Marlins pitcher Henderson Alvarez Monday as the Cubs fell 4-3 to Miami at Wrigley Field. “He’s been giving us a lot of innings, and he’s been giving us a lot of opportunities. Today, we just fell short,” said catcher Dioner Navarro.

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    Steve Stricker tees off on the first hole during Monday’s final round of the Deutsche Bank Championship golf tournament in Norton, Mass.

    Stricker sews up spot in Presidents Cup

    Steve Stricker wasn’t sure he deserved a captain’s pick for the U.S. Presidents Cup team because of his limited playing schedule, so he came to the Deutsche Bank Championship wanting to make the team on his own. He nearly wound up winning, closing with a 67 to finish two shots behind Henrik Stenson. The runner-up finish moved him from No. 11 to No. 7 in the final standings.

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    Roger Federer walks off the court after losing to Tommy Robredo on Monday during the fourth round of the U.S. Open in New York.

    Federer ousted in 4th round of U.S. Open

    No longer the dominant presence he once was, Roger Federer lost in the round of 16 at Flushing Meadows for the first time in a decade, surprisingly beaten 7-6 (3), 6-3, 6-4 by 19th-seeded Tommy Robredo of Spain on Monday night. “I kind of self-destructed, which is very disappointing,” said Federer, who made 43 unforced errors and managed to convert only 2 of 16 break points. “It was a frustrating performance.”

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    White Sox catcher Tyler Flowers, who lost his starting job two months ago, is scheduled to have shoulder surgery Thursday.

    Flowers could be finished with White Sox

    White Sox catcher Tyler Flowers is done for the season, and he's scheduled to have exploratory shoulder surgery on Thursday. Top prospect Erik Johnson is expected to join the Sox Tuesday, and the right-hander could make his first major-league start Wednesday at Yankee Stadium.

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    Cougars close season with walk-off win

    Giuseppe Papaccio coaxed a bases-loaded walk to drive in the winning run as the Kane County Cougars closed their season with a 5-4 win over the Peoria Chiefs at Fifth Third Bank Ballpark in Geneva on Monday.

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    Bears wide receiver Earl Bennett, who has been sidelined with a concussion, said he is aware of the dangers but is confident he has fully recovered.

    Bennett, Melton hope to play opener vs. Bengals

    Wide receiver Earl Bennett and Pro Bowl defensive tackle Henry Melton missed almost a month of football with concussions, but both are back at practice and hope to play in the season opener Sunday at Soldier Field against the Bengals.

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    The Bears believe wide receiver Brandon Marshall will be ready to step up his game when the season opens Sunday against the Bengals.

    Bears’ Brandon Marshall on target for opener

    After a few days of mixed messages, all the principals seem to be in agreement that four-time Pro Bowl wide receiver Brandon Marshall is ready for action. Marshall was back at practice Monday for the first time in nearly a week, but he returned from an extended but excused absence with good news about the surgical hip that had him frustrated a week earlier.

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    Indiana quarterback Tre Roberson (5) carries the ball against Indiana State on Thursday night at Memorial Stadium in Bloomington, Ind.

    Indiana might use 3 quarterbacks again

    Indiana coach Kevin Wilson says he expects to play three quarterbacks again when the Hooisers play Navy on Saturday. Indiana opened with a 73-35 victory against Indiana State on Thursday. Tre Roberson started and threw two touchdown passes. Nate Sudfeld relieved and passed for 219 yards and four scores. Cameron Coffman also played in the opener.

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    Michigan quarterback Devin Gardner throws a pass in the first quarter of Saturday’s game with Central Michigan in Ann Arbor.

    Michigan’s line to face real test vs. ND

    Michigan’s new-look offensive line passed its first test. The next one is going to be much tougher. After steamrolling Central Michigan 59-9 in the season opener, the 17th-ranked Wolverines face No. 14 Notre Dame in just the second night game in Michigan Stadium history. ESPN’s College Gameday show will be at the game, and Michigan hopes to break the attendance record of 114,804, set during the first primetime game between the two teams.

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    Michigan RB will miss rest of season

    Michigan says a knee injury in his first college game will force redshirt freshman running back Drake Johnson to miss the rest of the season. The 17th-ranked Wolverines said Monday that Johnson tore an anterior cruciate ligament in Saturday’s 59-9 home victory over Central Michigan.

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    Nebraska quarterback Taylor Martinez carries the ball past Wyoming linebacker Lucas Wacha, right, and cornerback Blair Burns in the first half of Saturday’s game in Lincoln.

    Nebraska QB says his left shoulder is fine

    Nebraska quarterback Taylor Martinez says his left shoulder is fine and that he’ll be full strength for this week’s game against Southern Mississippi. Martinez fell on his non-throwing shoulder in the third quarter against Wyoming on Saturday and left Memorial Stadium with an ice pack on it.

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    Wisconsin’s Chris Borland (44), Conor O’Neill (13), Vince Biegel (47) and Bryce Gilbert (77) tackle Massachusetts quarterback A.J. Doyle during the second half of Saturday’s game in Madison, Wis.

    Wisconsin’s new defense opens well

    No. 23 Wisconsin’s adjustment to new coach Gary Andersen’s 3-4 defensive scheme went fine against overmatched Massachusetts. It will likely hold up fine this week against Tennessee Tech, too. The hope is that it will be ready to roll for Arizona State in Week 3.

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    Storms linger in the background as Lake Zurich’s players walk off the field during the season opener at Fremd High School on Friday.

    How they fared: AP Top 10

    Here’s how the Top 10 ranked teams in each class in The Associated Press statewide poll fared in their season openers over the weekend.

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    Ohio State head coach Urban Meyer shouts to his team during the third quarter Saturday’s game against Buffalo.

    Meyer wary of San Diego St. despite stunning upset

    Even though San Diego State was beaten by a lower-division team in its opener, Urban Meyer believes it is dangerous to take the Aztecs lightly. The Ohio State coach made the case that the Aztecs were on the wrong end of a 40-19 score at home on Saturday night because they lost Adam Muema to an ankle injury — “arguably the best tailback we’ll face all year” — and that FCS member Eastern Illinois played a great game.

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    Northwestern cornerback out for rest of season

    Northwestern cornerback Daniel Jones will have season-ending knee surgery. Coach Pat Fitzgerald said Monday that Jones will miss the rest of the year after he was injured in the first half of the Wildcats’ season-opening win at California on Saturday.

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    Bears get TE Rosario from Cowboys

    The Chicago Bears have acquired tight end Dante Rosario from the Dallas Cowboys for a seventh-round pick in next year’s draft. Dallas picked up Rosario during the offseason, and he was among five tight ends on the team’s original 53-man roster.

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    Blackhawks goalie Corey Crawford has been busy since he hoisted the Stanley Cup after helping beat the Boston Bruins in Game 6 for the title. On Monday, he celebrated his day with the Cup and agreed to a six-year deal with the Blackhawks.

    $36 million extension caps Crawford’s big summer

    With training camp returning next week, the Chicago Blackhawks took care of some business on Monday, agreeing to a six-year contract extension with goalie Corey Crawford.

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    White Sox pitcher Dylan Axelrod reacts after the Yankees’ Vernon Wells reached on an infield single during the fourth inning Monday in New York.

    Yankees rough up error-prone Sox 9-1

    Derek Jeter ended a slump with two hits and two RBIs, Alex Rodriguez reached base twice in an eight-run fourth inning and the New York Yankees battered the Chicago White Sox 9-1 on Monday in a game interrupted nearly two hours by rain. The Yankees rocked reliever Dylan Axelrod and took advantage of the sloppy White Sox for their most productive inning since Oct. 1 to help end a six-game skid against Chicago.

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    Cubs starter Travis Wood delivers a pitch during the first inning of a baseball game against the Miami Marlins in Chicago, Monday, Sept. 2, 2013, at Wrigley Field.

    Cubs lose 4-3 to Marlins

    Henderson Alvarez hit his first career home run and pitched six innings before exiting with a hamstring injury, and the Miami Marlins beat the Chicago Cubs 4-3 on Monday at Wrigley Field. Alvarez smacked a three-run shot off Travis Wood in the second inning and also had a single and a sacrifice bunt. Alvarez (3-3) allowed three runs and seven hits in six innings before he left with a tight right hamstring in his first career appearance against the Cubs.

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    In this June 7, 1993 file photo, newly crowned WBO heavyweight champion Tommy Morrison receives his championship belt after defeating George Foreman in Las Vegas, Nev. Morrison, a former heavyweight champion who gained fame for his role in the movie “Rocky V,” has died. He was 44. Morrison’s former manager, Tony Holden says his longtime friend died Sunday night, Sept. 1, 2013, at a Nebraska hospital.

    Ex-heavyweight champ Tommy Morrison dies at 44

    Tommy Morrison’s career reached its pinnacle on a hot June night in Las Vegas, when he stepped into the ring and beat George Foreman to become heavyweight champion. It reached its nadir when he tested positive for HIV three years later. Morrison died Sunday night at a Nebraska hospital. He was 44.

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    Former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Scott Tolzien has been signed by the Green Bay Packers and assigned to their practice squad. The Packers open the NFL season against the 49ers.

    Packers sign QBs Wallace, Tolzien

    The Packers signed quarterback Seneca Wallace just days after he was released by San Francisco, Green Bay’s opening-game opponent. And they added more 49ers experience to their practice squad by signing former Wisconsin QB Scott Tolzien to that unit.

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    Despite being cut by New England, Mike North contends Tim Tebow shouldn't give up on his NFL dream, and those who say Tebow should quit should recall Kurt Warner's path to the NFL.

    Tebow has more to offer than some NFL backups

    Since Tim Tebow as cut by the New England Patriots, some people think he should just give it up, but Mike North says Tebow shouldn’t give up on his just dream yet. There is still time to make it happen.

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    The White Sox have already gotten younger this season with the additions of infielder Leury Garcia, left, and outfielder Avisail Garcia.

    Rongey: White Sox already have head start on 2014

    While we don’t know precisely how long it will take for the White Sox to get better, it is apparent based on recent comments by general manager Rick Hahn that there doesn’t seem to be much intent to concede next season for the sake of doing that. But do they really even have to make that point? Chris Rongey is not so sure they do.

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    The Cubs’ Darwin Barney heads to the dugout after scoring against the Phillies in the first inning Sunday.

    Kasper: Barney is my kind of baseball player

    Len Kasper sits down and talks with one of his favorite baseball players, Cubs Gold Glove second baseman Darwin Barney.

Business

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    CBS, Time Warner reach content agreement

    CBS and Time Warner Cable have ended their payment dispute and expect programming to resume in millions of homes by 5 p.m. CST on Monday.

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    Verizon Wireless signage is displayed with products inside the company’s store in San Francisco, California, U.S. on Thursday Aug. 29, 2013. Verizon Communications Inc.’s buyout of the rest of its wireless venture may yield more than $240 million in fees for the bankers lucky enough to win a role on the biggest transaction in more than a decade.

    Verizon to buy out Vodaphone’s stake in company

    Verizon Communications Inc. is poised to announce an agreement as soon as today to acquire Vodafone Group Plc’s 45 percent stake in their wireless venture for $130 billion, capping its decade-long pursuit of full control of the biggest U.S. mobile-phone company. The $130 billion price will be paid in a combination of cash and Verizon’s stock.

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    Naked Wines offering ‘Fine Wine Bonds’ to raise 3 million pounds

    Naked Wines UK, which has invested more than 25 million pounds ($39 million) in independent winemakers since 2008, is planning to raise 3 million pounds by issuing what it calls the Naked Fine Wine Bond.

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    ‘One Direction’ caps record summer box office

    “One Direction: This Is Us,” the concert documentary on the British boy band, led the box office at U.S. and Canadian theaters over the Labor Day weekend, capping a record summer for Hollywood.

  •  
    In this Aug. 29, 2013, photo, Dan Dimon, left, herds cows with his father-in-law, Kevin Carley, at The Carley Farms in Pompey, N.Y. Dimon is in the process of buying the dairy and agricultural farm that has been in the Carley family since 1938, in phases.

    Selling farms sometimes calls for creative deals

    The need to be innovative in selling farms to the next generation is becoming more urgent as farmland prices rise and farmers get older. Some farmers have come up with different strategies to make sure the younger generation can continue to work the land. The number of farmers who are 65 or older grew by 22 percent nationwide in the five years ending in 2007.

  •  
    In this July 26, 2013 photo, Nidhi Gaur, far left and her fiance Rahul Rai, far right, participate in “So It’s Final,” a talk show on Shagun TV that features engaged couples in Noida, India. Indians are obsessed with weddings and obsessed with reality television.

    Indian TV channel seeks success with weddings

    Weddings and reality television: Indians are obsessed with both. Now, Shagun TV, a new television channel headquartered in a sprawling suburb of India’s capital, is hoping it has found a can’t-miss idea — merging the two into a 24-hour matrimonial TV station.

  •  
    In this Tuesday, July 30, 2013 photo, Jacquelin Finley, right, shows her grandmother Ida Filey, 101, a family photo she recovered during a visit to the house she grew up in with her grandmother in Dirgin, Texas. The Finleys are descendants of slaves holding out against companyís attempt to mine East Texas land for coal. (AP Photo/LM Otero)

    Descendants of slaves hold out against coal mining

    For three years, Luminant Mining Co. has tried to purchase a 9.1-acre plot of land in Texas owned by descendants of slaves. The company owns more than 75 percent of the parcel but can’t mine it because of a complex inheritance arrangement and the refusal of some family members to let go or accept Luminant’s offer. Luminant has sued some of the heirs, asking a court to equitably divide the land or force a settlement.

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    Bottles of mead are lined up at the tasting bar at Artesano in Groton, Vt. Beekeepers and vintners are rediscovering mead, an alcoholic drink made of fermented honey and water. These days, fruits, spices and even carbonation are being added for distinct flavors that arenít a far cry from the beverage favored during the Middle Ages.

    Beekeepers, vintners rediscover nectar of the gods

    Once called the nectar of the gods, the oldest fermented beverage is seeing a renaissance. Beekeepers and vintners are rediscovering mead, an alcoholic drink made of fermented honey and water. These days, fruits, spices and even carbonation are being added for distinct flavors that aren’t a far cry from the beverage favored during the Middle Ages.

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    Fate of GM factories hangs on Australian election

    The fate of Australian car plants run by General Motors Co. and Toyota Motor Corp. hangs on the Sept. 7 election that pits a government committed to subsidies against an opposition vowing to scale back support. GM’s manufacturing unit in Australia, Holden, is waiting on the result before deciding on investments in the country beyond 2016, as Prime Minister Kevin Rudd styles the contest as a vote on the industry’s future.

  •  
    A Verizon Wireless billboard stands in San Francisco, California, U.S. on Thursday Aug. 29, 2013. Verizon Communications Inc.’s buyout of the rest of its wireless venture may yield more than $240 million in fees for the bankers lucky enough to win a role on the biggest transaction in more than a decade.

    Verizon doubles down on U.S. as AT&T seeks a hedge in Europe

    Verizon Communications Inc.’s plan to buy out its wireless partner for $130 billion is a bet that the U.S. mobile-phone market still has room for expansion even as competition intensifies and smartphone demand slows.

  •  
    In this Sept. 3, 2012 file photo, Vorayuth Yoovidhya, a grandson of late Red Bull founder Chaleo Yoovidhaya, is taken by a plain-clothes police officer for investigation, in Bangkok, Thailand. Thai authorities are seeking an arrest warrant for the heir to the Red Bull energy drink fortune.

    Prosecutors seek arrest warrant for Red Bull heir

    Thai authorities are seeking an arrest warrant for an heir to the Red Bull energy drink fortune after he failed to appear for his indictment in the hit-and-run death of a policeman, a prosecutor said Monday. A lawyer for Vorayuth Yoovidhya said the 30-year-old heir was on a business trip in Singapore and was unable to return to Thailand for the indictment because he fell ill.

  •  
    Colleen C. Berg

    Mother, daughter team run business selling sweaters & sweets
    Colleen C. Berg and her mother, Lyn Hallberg, operate a pet bakery offering a variety of treats for dogs, cats and horses as well as an outlet to purchase hand knit, machine washable sweters for dogs and cats.

  •  
    David and Kristen Berryhill

    Christian singer finds calling with Rolling Meadows firm

    Kukec's People column features Kristen Berryhill of Palatine, a singer of Christian music, who also co-owns Archadeck of Chicagoland in Rolling Meadows. The firm builds patios, decks and other outdoor settings.

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    Face-to-face networking remains key to new business

    LinkedIn. Facebook. Twitter. All the social media sites. Who needs old-fashioned face-to-face networking? Maybe a lot of us, according to two highly successful entrepreneurs. Small Business Columnist Jim Kendall looks at the topic.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    This Aug. 8, 2013 publicity photo provided by courtesy of Maria Pinto shows fashion designer Maria Pinto, in Chicago. Pinto, famous for dressing first lady Michelle Obama and Oprah Winfrey, is back with a new, more affordable collection that she plans to launch with the help of an online funding campaign three years after a poor economy forced her to close her namesake Chicago boutique. Pinto is trying to raise $250,000 within 45 days for her M2057 line when it goes live on the Kickstarter crowd-funding website this weekend.

    Designer launches new collection First lady, Oprah favorite looks to Kickstarter for funds

    Fashion designer Maria Pinto — famous for dressing first lady Michelle Obama and Oprah Winfrey — is back with a new, more affordable collection that she plans to launch with the help of an online funding campaign three years after a poor economy forced her close her Chicago boutique. Pinto is trying to raise $250,000 within 45 days for her M2057 line when it goes live on the Kickstarter crowd-funding website this weekend.

  •  
    Making sure you go to the grocery store every few days to restock fruits, veggies and meats is one way stay healthy.

    Master diet to make sure you are eating healthy

    What is the secret to healthy eating? It seems everyone has their own idea of the perfect diet. But, regardless of what style of eating you consider healthy — food guide pyramid, low-carb, paleo — those who have mastered their dietary health share the following common practices.

  •  
    Paula Patton is busy promoting her second film this year, the upcoming romantic comedy "Baggage Claim."

    Paula Patton, Robin Thicke have clear lines on jealousy, work

    Paula Patton is having the best summer ever. The 37-year-old actress is busy promoting the romantic comedy “Baggage Claim,” while “2 Guns” opened earlier this month. Personally, Patton is relishing the success of her husband, Robin Thicke. “You couldn’t have planned this better. It’s a really odd, wonderful coincidence,” said Patton of their simultaneous career highs.

  •  
    Lady Gaga, fresh off this appearance at the MTV Video Music Awards, debuted her “ARTPOP” songs at the iTunes Festival on Sunday in London.

    Lady Gaga debuts ARTPOP at iTunes Festival

    With flying pigs and wigs, Lady Gaga debuted her “ARTPOP” songs at the iTunes Festival.

  •  
    Break the fast with a slice of date and honey zucchini bread.

    Rosh Hashana comes early with fresh possibilities
    1½ cups all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting the pan1½ cups white whole-wheat flour1 teaspoon baking powder1 teaspoon baking soda1 teaspoon kosher salt1½ teaspoons cinnamon¾ teaspoon ground nutmeg?3 eggs1 cup honey1 cup vegetable oil2 teaspoons vanilla extract2 cups packed shredded zucchini (not peeled)1 cup coarsely chopped medjool datesSet a rack in the center of the oven. Heat the oven to 350 degrees. Mist a bundt pan with baking spray.In medium bowl, whisk together both flours, the baking powder, baking soda, salt, cinnamon and nutmeg. Set aside.In a large bowl, whisk the eggs until well beaten. Stir in the honey, oil and vanilla, then fold in the zucchini.Add dry ingredients and chopped dates to the zucchini mixture. Stir just until the dry ingredients are just moistened. Do not over mix.Pour the batter into the prepared bundt pan. Bake until a toothpick inserted at the center of the loaf comes out clean and dry, 50-60 minutes. Let cool in the pan for 10 minutes, then turn out onto a wire rack to cool completely. Serve warm or at room temperature.Serves 10.Nutrition values per serving: 510 calories, 24 g fat (2 g saturated), 71 g carbohydrates, 5 g fiber, 40 g sugar, 7 g protein, 55 mg cholesterol, 400 mg sodium.Laura Frankel, executive chef for Wolfgang Puck Kosher Catering, Chicago

  •  
    Break the fast with a slice of date and honey zucchini bread.

    Rosh Hashana comes early with fresh possibilities

    Rosh Hashana typically is a solidly autumnal holiday, falling sometimes as late as October. But this year, the Jewish New Year comes early — the first week of September, a time when summer’s bounty is still fresh for much of the country.

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    Jewelweed may offset effects of poison ivy

    It seems that for the treatment of poison ivy, nature has provided us with a marvelous antidote, jewelweed. Jewelweed is more commonly known as impatiens, a group of flowering plants that are found throughout the Northern Hemisphere and even the tropics. Extracts from the stem and leaves of members of the impatiens group prevent and may relieve the rash caused by contact with poison ivy.

  •  
    If you can’t remember that important phone number or other crucial details, make sure you manage your stress, among other things, to improve your memory.

    Your health: How to stay mentally sharp
    Learn tips to keep your mind sharp and why it's completely natural to feel joy when others feel some amount of disappointment.

  •  
    The Russian Twist, (position 1)

    Getting past those exercise excuses

    You know the benefits of exercise and you have most likely heard them a zillion times: a healthier heart, reduced risk for some cancers, better sleep patterns, weight loss, lower stress levels, stronger bones and muscles, less fear of falling, mental acuity, more energy and confidence. Yet, according to the President’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports, only 3 out of 10 American adults get enough exercise. Here are some ways to get beyond the excuses.

  •  

    Inducing labor may be tied to autism, study says

    The biggest study of its kind suggests autism might be linked with inducing and speeding up labor, preliminary findings that need investigating since labor is induced in increasing numbers of U.S. women, the authors and other autism experts say. It’s possible that labor-inducing drugs might increase the risk — or that the problems that lead doctors to start labor explain the results. These include mothers’ diabetes and fetal complications, which have previously been linked with autism.

  •  
    The city of New Orleans will draw thousands of gay couples for Southern Decadence week.

    New Orleans promoted as a gay honeymoon haven

    Thousands of visitors roll into New Orleans this week for Southern Decadence: five days of celebration of gay culture in a city now being promoted by tourism officials as a honeymoon site for same-sex newlyweds — despite the state’s constitutional ban on gay marriage. “It just shows the dichotomy between what business knows in the state and what our political leaders think,” said gay rights activist John Hill. “Obviously, the business community in New Orleans knows that the gay travel market, the honeymoon destination, is a big market.”

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    Neil Patrick Harris will perform in an extremely unconventional Broadway show “Hedwig and the Angry Inch.”

    New Broadway season has something for everyone

    There’s Denzel Washington and Billy Crystal, plenty of Shakespeare and a nice dash of Harold Pinter. There’s even a musical of the boxing classic “Rocky” and the much anticipated return of Neil Patrick Harris and “Les Mis.” This upcoming season on Broadway seems to have something for everyone.

  •  
    Caramelized Onion, Eggplant and Heirloom Tomato Tart is perfect for Rosh Hashana and other fall celebrations.

    Caramelized Onion, Eggplant And Heirloom Tomato Tart
    CARAMELIZED ONION, EGGPLANT AND HEIRLOOM TOMATO TART

  •  

    Major cancer study needs thousands of volunteers

    The American Cancer Society is seeking to sign up 300,000 people across the country to participate in the third iteration of its long-term Cancer Prevention Study. Two earlier such studies conducted decades ago led to remarkable findings that have had lasting impact on research and medical advances.

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    Traditional cuff no longer best option for blood pressure

    About 67 million Americans — a third of all adults — have hypertension, a symptom-less disease that is a major contributor to heart disease, stroke and kidney disease. But we're tracking this silent killer with random readings from a device that was invented in the 1890s. A better solution is out there: Will we use it? The original blood pressure cuff — the mercury sphygmomanometer — was invented in 1896, and it still works fine. But newer, user-friendly and portable devices make it clear that sporadic checks in a doctor's office are not nearly as good at detecting hypertension as frequent readings taken throughout the day.

  •  

    Hay fever sufferers have plenty of options

    This year I’m suffering from seasonal allergies for the first time. What medications will make allergy season more bearable?

  •  
    Inmates, from left, Eric McNeil, Kevin Fields and Julian Campbell, dance in their seats while watching rappers perform a hip hop adaptation of William Shakespeare’s Othello, titled “Othello: The Remix” at the Cook County Jail in Chicago.

    Hip-hop version of ‘Othello’ resonates behind bars

    Act I, Scene 1: Four actors in well-worn coveralls and baseball caps take the stage at the county jail. They’re here to tell a tale of love, friendship, jealousy and betrayal. It’s the stuff of Shakespearean tragedy. The names and themes haven’t changed over the centuries, but the language has a modern beat: “Othello never knew, He was getting schemed on by a member of his crew.” This is “Othello-The Remix,” the Chicago Shakespeare Theater’s hip-hop version of the tragedy about a valiant Moor deceived by the villainous Iago into mistakenly believing his wife has been unfaithful. After Othello smothers his beloved Desdemona, he discovers she has been true to him and he kills himself. That’s how Shakespeare told the story 400 years ago. This modern version — performed for about 450 Cook County jail inmates — is a rhyming, rapping, poetic homage to the Bard.

  •  
    Health officials say it’s not too early to get flu shots now instead of waiting until the end of the year.

    Flu shots already? Nothing like rushing the season

    If your kids hate going back to school while it’s still hot outside, imagine how they’ll feel about getting flu shots in September. Not that they really need the vaccine this early — and seniors for whom immunization is critical don’t either. But the shots are available now at major drugstore chains such as CVS and Walgreens — much earlier than used to be the case.

  •  

    'Car barn' a dream come true

    The “car barn,” as Mike and Ivy Guarise call it, has been a dream in the making for several decades. “For many years, I only had a two-bay car garage,” Mike said. “Any ‘fun’ car I had sat outside”

Discuss

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    Put end to construction ‘union tax’
    An Elk Grove Village letter to the editor: The vast majority of construction workers — 86.8 percent — choose not to belong to a labor organization. They have made the decision to put their professional craft skills to use in a merit shop, free enterprise environment. However, the livelihood of these merit shop workers is under assault by politicians who reward labor unions with political favors by supporting government-mandated project labor agreements (PLAs).

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    Overpass could be built more cheaply
    A Libertyville letter to the editor: I, like you, have noticed a large hump in the new Milwaukee Road north of the Peterson Road junction. The problem is the purpose versus the cost to the people who pay, i.e. the taxpayers.

  •  

    Support for beaning A-Rod is unprofessional
    A Vernon Hills letter to the editor: Once again, Mike Imrem and The Daily Herald have displayed a very unprofessional and immature attitude to us readers.

  •  

    Courts not the place to create lake safety
    A Fox Lake letter to the editor: I'm getting tired of parents, politicians, and media for capitalizing on tragedies of young victims.

  •  

    Cellphone accident rates have changed little
    A Bartlett letter to the editor: With so much being made of the dangers of using a cellphone while driving, one would expect that, over the years, accident rates would have increased in some proportion to the number of cellphones in use. However, according the government statistics, this has not been the case.

  •  

    Address root causes of youth crime
    A Mount Prospect letter to the editor: When will black organizations try to do something constructive and address root problems such as high percentage of illegitimate births to young girls not prepared to properly raise children, no family structure with a father present, high dropout rates, and youths forced to a life with drugs, crime and violence because there is no other option without job skills? And when will these black organizations and our president condemn events like the Australian baseball player, Christopher Lane, being killed at random by a black teen in Oklahoma because he was bored?

  •  

    Prosecute hate crimes equitably
    A Rolling Meadows letter to the editor: A jury found Zimmerman not guilty. So the federal government is struggling to find a way to charge him with a hate crime or a civil rights violation. Now comes James Francis Edwards Jr., a black 15-year-old and alleged trigger man who shot in the back and killed white Christopher Lane while he was jogging in Duncan, Okla. Edwards is a racist and no spin can wash away his vile tweets: “90% of white ppl are nasty. #HATE THEM.”

  •  

    New GED may shut out low-income applicants
    A letter to the editor: The Daily Herald’s James Fuller wrote an HYPERLINK "http://www.dailyherald.com/article/20130304/news/703049917/"article, “Some fear new, high-tech GED a problem for low-income test takers,” on March 4. I am a GED examiner in Belleville and East Saint Louis area, and I definitely believe that the low-income people struggling to get their GED will be left out of this process because of higher fees.

  •  

    Modesty in dress, actions honors women
    An Aurora letter to the editor: I am shocked and saddened by the vulgar and lewd actions recently displayed by Miley Cyrus, which is now known to many in this country. What is further depressing is that many people, including her manager and her own mother, have defended her actions as being reasonable and proper.

  •  

    Stop the killings in America first
    A Schaumburg letter to the editor: Why can and will our federal government get involved when there’s senseless murders of innocent people in other countries (for example, Syria) but it can’t or won’t when senseless murders continuously are happening in American cities (like Chicago) and the local police obviously cannot get it under control?

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