Daily Archive : Sunday August 28, 2011

News

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    Kenneth Green

    Chicago cops wounded, accused shooter walks

    Who's to blame when a man accused of trying to kill two Chicago police officers walks free, despite what some believed was overwhelming evidence against him?

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    Electricity suspected as cause of Geneva business fire

    Geneva fire officials suspect an electrical problem caused a fire Saturday afternoon at Ray Construction, 527 Edison St., but are still investigating. No one was injured. A neighboring business sustained smoke damage.

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    Beyonce dropped a bombshell when she arrived at the MTV Video Music Awards on Sunday in Los Angeles. The singer, who is married to hip-hop superstar Jay-Z, is expecting her first child.

    Despite Perry win, Beyoncé baby news tops VMAs

    Even Lady Gaga spending the night in drag or Britney Spears being anointed a legend of our time couldn't upstage Sunday's MTV Video Music Awards' most surprising moment: one simple rub of Beyoncé's belly.

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    Bennington Police Chief Paul Doucette looks at a collapsed bridge on Route 9 in Woodford, Vt. on Sunday. The remnants of Hurricane Irene dumped torrential rains on Vermont on Sunday, flooding rivers and closing roads from Massachusetts to the Canadian border.

    Irene spares big cities, but Vt. sees huge floods

    The storm that had been Hurricane Irene crossed into Canada overnight but wasn't yet through with the U.S., where flood waters threatened Vermont towns and commuters had to make do with reawakening transit systems.

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    Selena Gomez arrives at the MTV Video Music Awards on Sunday in Los Angeles.

    Images: Video Music Awards
    Lady Gaga spent the entire night in drag; Chris Brown flew above the audience like Mary Poppins; Britney Spears was officially anointed as a legend of our time. Yet as jaw-dropping as those moments were at Sunday's MTV Video Music Awards, the show's most surprising moment came with one simple rub of a belly.

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    It was just the first game of the season, but with an enthusiastic crowd and ESPN cameras catching the action, it felt like there was a state title on the line Sunday when Wheaton Warrenville South and Glenbard West high schools renewed their gridiron rivalry. Glenbard West won the contest, 21-7. For more, see Sports.

    WWS-Glenbard game whips fans' emotions to fever pitch

    Emotions ran high on both sides of Sunday's nationally televised football game between Wheaton Warrenville South and Glenbard West. South fans relished a chance to march toward a third straight title, while Glenbard was out to avenge two playoff losses.

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    Appeals court dismisses Barrington ‘bad mothering’ suit

    Not sending your son a birthday gift and refusing to buy your daughter a homecoming dress might not be ideal parenting behavior, but it's not nearly enough to sue over, a state appeals court has ruled in dismissing a "bad mothering" lawsuit a pair of Barrington Hills siblings filed against their mom.

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    Lake Villa dad killed, 9-year-old injured in motorcycle crash

    A 29-year-old Lake Villa man was killed in a motorcycle accident Saturday night in Ingleside and his 9-year-old daughter, who was on the back of the bike, remains in intensive care, according to police.

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    Packages containing crystal methamphetamine seized during an anti-drug operation are displayed to the media in Tijuana, Mexico. Mexico’s most powerful drug cartel appears to be expanding methamphetamine production on a massive scale.

    Mexican cartel move to meth

    Mexico’s most powerful drug cartel appears to be expanding methamphetamine production on a massive scale, filling a gap left by the breakdown of a rival gang that was once the top trafficker of the synthetic drug

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    Noah Egler, 13, and his father, Mark, work together on a science experiment in the basement of their home in Bourbonnais. Because of his love for science and electronics, Noah was invited to participate in a workshop on electronic prosthetics at the Indiana University Northwest medical school.

    Invite gives gifted boy chance to belong

    Eighth-grader Noah Egler is here because he was invited, because the director of the summer program at the Indiana University Northwest medical school saw something in this young man perhaps a bit of the boy he himself once was, a kid who also liked reading and studying more than sports.

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    In this undated photo provided by the Warwick Township Police Department, Leonard John Egland is seen. Egland, a soldier who recently returned from war service, fired at officers in suburban Philadelphia as he was sought in the Virginia deaths of his ex-wife, her boyfriend and the boyfriend’s young son, authorities said. The soldier’s former mother-in-law was also killed, and he remains at large. Residents of Warwick Township were asked to stay in their homes and lock doors and cars as police hunted for Egland, 37, of Fort Lee, Va., who evaded authorities as Hurricane Irene lashed the area.

    Soldier sought in 4 deaths found dead in Pa.
    A soldier suspected of killing four people in Pennsylvania and Virginia was found dead of an apparently self-inflicted gunshot wound in suburban Philadelphia after a daylong manhunt during which he fired at and injured officers, authorities said.

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    Emily Gregorich of Mundelein paddles to the finish during the Floating Zucchini Kayak Relay Races Sunday at Twin Lakes Recreation Area in Palatine. The event raised money for Smart Farms of Barrington that advocates sustainable gardening.

    Kayaking for ... vegetables?

    The Floating Zucchini Kayak Races being held at Twin Lakes in Palatine. Two- and four-member teams will race around a course set up in Twin Lakes, picking up zucchinis and other veggies along the way. Event is a fundraiser for Smart Farm of Barrington, an advocacy group for sustainable gardening.

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    Debrina Moore holds the hand of her 5-year-old son Christian while watching a performance during a service Sunday at Lutheran Church of the Master in Carol Stream. The church held a benefit concert for the family and Christian, who has cerebral palsy.

    Carol Stream church raises money to help family with special-needs son

    To help the family of 5-year-old Christian Moore, of Glendale Heights, the Lutheran Church of the Master in Carol Stream held a benefit concert Sunday. The family was chosen for the benefit after a story on their struggles appeared in the Daily Herald.

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    Sixth Avenue near Radio City Music Hall is empty as Tropical Storm Irene hits in New York, on Sunday, Aug. 28, 2011. Seawater surged into the streets of Manhattan on Sunday as Irene slammed into New York, downgraded from a hurricane but still unleashing furious wind and rain. The flooding threatened Wall Street and the heart of the global financial network.

    Images: Hurricane Irene — Sunday
    New York seemed to escape the worst of Hurricane Irene, which left nine dead and 4 million without power as it ripped up the East Coast.

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    Three people were killed in Virginia from falling trees caused by Hurricane Irene.

    Hurricane Irene leads to 21 deaths

    Hurricane Irene had led to the deaths of at least 21 people in eight states as of Sunday evening.

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    A flooded road is seen in Hatteras Island, N.C., Sunday, Aug. 28, 2011, after Hurricane Irene swept through the area Saturday cutting the roadway in five locations.

    As Irene weakens, flood worries grow

    Stripped of hurricane rank, Tropical Storm Irene spent the last of its fury Sunday, leaving treacherous flooding and millions without power — but an unfazed New York and relief that it was nothing like the nightmare authorities feared.

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    3 killed in car stopped on Bishop Ford Expressway

    Three people are dead after their car was struck by an SUV while stopped on the middle of the Bishop Ford Expressway.

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    Fire damages Geneva woodworking shop

    Geneva fire officials continue to investigate a Saturday afternoon blaze that severely damaged a woodworking shop on the 500 block of Edison Street.

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    Jeffrey Ferrigan, 50, of Hanover Park, is pictured in an archive booking photo from a prior arrest in DuPage County.

    Hanover Park murder probe continues

    Hanover Park police continue to investigate the slaying of a 40-year-old mother of two found dead in her home Thursday. Her husband, hospitalized after being shot by police in Lockport, remains a "person of interest."

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    Activists meet in Chicago over G8, NATO summits

    More than 100 activists gathered Sunday in Chicago to plan demonstrations during next spring’s G8 and NATO summits in the city.

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    Associated Press Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel finished the Chicago Triathlon on Sunday in 1:36.

    Emanuel finishes Chicago Triathlon

    Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel is among the successful finishers of the Chicago Triathlon on Sunday.

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    Sharing is caring- Jasmine Lucero, 2, of South Elgin gives her onion ring but none of her ribs to her dad, Joel, at the Palatine Streetfest on Friday.

    Images: The Weekend Festival Review
    There were no shortages of festivals in the suburbs over the weekend. The festivals we photographed this weekend were the Palatine Street Festival, Little Bear Ribfest in Vernon Hills, Hainesville Fest, Glen Ellyn Festival of the Arts, and the Taste of the Towns in Lake Zurich.

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    Former Secretary of State Colin Powell, speaking on CBS’s “Face the Nation” on Sunday, said former Vice President Dick Cheney’s book took “cheap shots” at him and others.

    Powell: Cheney takes ‘cheap shots’ in book

    Former Secretary of State Colin Powell on Sunday dismissed as “cheap shots” the criticism leveled at him and others in Vice President Dick Cheney’s memoir.

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    A departures board indicates that many flights, mostly to the New York area, are canceled at Raleigh-Durham International Airport Sunday due to Hurricane Irene.

    Travelers wait for flights to resume after Irene

    Airlines planned to resume flights in and out of New York and Boston airports Monday after they were shut down over the weekend by Tropical Storm Irene. Nearly 12,000 flights were canceled nationwide by Sunday afternoon, according to a flight-tracking service.

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    Relatives of six who died in fire sue Aurora landlords

    Relatives and guardians of six people killed in a May fire in Aurora have filed a lawsuit against their landlords, charging them with negligence, wrongful death and failing to provide adequate smoke alarms.

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    Albert

    Owners should plan for pet care after their death

    A lot of people worry about what will happen to their animals when they die. The Humane Society of the United States has prepared the fact sheet “Providing for Your Pet’s Future without You.” This fact sheet provides information to help you plan ahead to make sure your animals continue to receive food, water, shelter, veterinary care and love.

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    About 200 car owners will display their gleaming chrome, polished paint and crisp whitewalls in the Glendale Heights Show and Shine Car Show, rescheduled to Sunday after being rained out earlier this month.

    Car owners hope for sun at Glendale Heights show

    Even a few drops of rain can make some car owners peel out of a car show, but a storm forced cancelation of the whole Glendale Heights Show and Shine Car Show earlier this month. Organizers rescheduled for Sunday and are hoping the sun will shine on the 200 cars expected in Camera Park.

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    Pa. police seek soldier in 4 deaths; officers hurt

    DOYLESTOWN, Pa. — Authorities in suburban Philadelphia say a soldier sought in four slayings in two states fired at officers during a pursuit and remains at large.

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    Irene cancels flights at Chicago airports

    Tropical Storm Irene is causing problems for travelers in Chicago. Officials at both of the city’s airports said about 250 flights were canceled on Sunday mostly due to weather conditions on the East Coast. That’s about 200 flights at O’Hare International Airport and about 50 at Midway International Airport. Chicago’s Department of Aviation says there aren’t any delays.

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    Fresno County School Superintendent Larry Powell is forgoing $800,000 in compensation over the next three years of his term. Until his term expires in 2015, Powell will run 325 schools and 35 school districts with 195,000 students, all for less than a starting California teacher earns. As he prepares for retirement, he wants to ensure that his pet projects survive California budget cuts.

    School superintendent gives up $800k in pay

    FRESNO, Calif. — Some people give back to their community. Then there’s Fresno County School Superintendent Larry Powell, who’s really giving back. As in $800,000 — what would have been his compensation for the next three years.

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    Implosion topples 2 towers that were Indy eyesore

    INDIANAPOLIS — Hundreds of people watched from nearby as explosives brought down a long-shuttered Indianapolis apartment tower near the Indiana State Fairgrounds that had become a neighborhood eyesore and a haven for crime.

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    The Arr-Mac water rescue team from Wayne County maneuvers around a beached boat in the middle of Hwy. 304 Saturday, Aug. 27, 2011 in Mesic, N.C. Hurricane Irene knocked out power and piers in North Carolina, clobbered Virginia with wind and churned up the coast Saturday to confront cities more accustomed to snowstorms than tropical storms.

    States survey damage after Irene

    Hurricane Irene fell short of the doomsday predictions of record-breaking storm surges in North Carolina and Virginia. But a slow-crawling storm that spread out hundreds of miles was still hurling heavy rain and high winds at a wide swath of the East Coast a day after its first U.S. landfall, vexing official attempts to gauge the full damage toll on the region.

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    Billionaire Warren Buffett plans to hold a Sept. 30 fundraiser in New York City to benefit President Barack Obama’s re-election bid,

    Warren Buffett hosts Obama fundraiser

    Billionaire Warren Buffett plans to hold a Sept. 30 fundraiser in New York City to benefit President Barack Obama’s re-election bid, according to two Democratic officials not authorized to speak publicly about the event.

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    Jack Thompson portrays Billy Beal, a lifelong resident of Minier, Ill., during the Minier Historical Society Cemetery Walk on Aug. 14.

    Cemetery walk tells of small town’s past

    In 1867, George Minier established a town that bears his name, and residents with a wide variety of personalities settled there. Some of those residents who have passed on came back to life through portrayals done by current residents during the recent Minier Historical Society Cemetery Walk.

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    Molly McHargue, 9, of Herrin has been perfecting her archery skills and winning competitions like her dad, Paul. Molly was awarded second place July 17 in the cub division for 8- to 10-year-olds at the International Bow Hunters Organization Traditional World Championship in Clarksville, Tenn.

    9-year-old archer is right on target

    While some 9-year-olds may have read or seen movies about Robin Hood, Molly McHargue of downstate Herrin has been perfecting her archery skills and winning competitions.

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    Barn artist Scott Hagan paints a tractor on a garage door at Jo Morrison’s barn east of Towanda, Ill. Hagan has painted between 300 and 400 barn signs since beginning his carrer in 1997. (

    Artist paints murals on Illinois barns

    Advertising signs painted on rural barns were once a common sight across the country in 1920s and 1930s. Now, murals on barns are making a comeback farms in the Bloomington area.

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    Superheated steam laden with carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide billow from a test well in the volcanic field at Reykjavik Energy’s Hellisheidi geothermal power plant in Iceland. In the CarbFix experiment, scientists will separate out the CO2 and pump it underground to react with porous basalt rock, forming limestone, to see how well the gas most responsible for global warming can be locked away in harmless form.

    Seltzer water could keep CO2 locked in rock

    Sometime next month, on the steaming fringes of an Icelandic volcano, an international team of scientists will begin pumping “seltzer water” into a deep hole, producing a brew that will lock away carbon dioxide forever. Chemically disposing of CO2, the chief greenhouse gas blamed for global warming, is a kind of 21st-century alchemy that researchers and governments have hoped for to slow or halt...

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    President Barack Obama’s presidential campaign launched a new voter registration and grassroots organizing program Thursday aimed at boosting turnout and participation among its core supporters.

    Obama campaign launching voter drive program

    President Barack Obama’s presidential campaign launched a new voter registration and grassroots organizing program Thursday aimed at boosting turnout and participation among its core supporters.

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    Gov. Pat Quinn, left, and then Chicago Mayor-elect Rahm Emanuel shake hands at a March 18 news conference in Chicago. Emanuel, who badly wants a casino in Chicago, has repeatedly expressed impatience with Quinn’s long deliberation over the measure. The governor has snapped back, telling the mayor to back off.

    Quinn-Emanuel spat not new for governors, mayors

    Governors and Chicago mayors have bickered for years, like two powerful titans with muscles to flex, different agendas to push and different constituencies to please. At times it has involved personality clashes more than partisan politics, as Democratic mayors sometimes get along better with Republican governors.

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    O'Hare, Midway report cancellations due to Irene

    Officials at Chicago's two major airports report that more than 230 flights to and from the East Coast have been canceled as a result of Hurricane Irene.The city's Department of Aviation says more than 200 of those flights are in and out of O'Hare International Airport, with the rest of the cancellations being reported at Midway International Airport.

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    Sign up now to compete in the fourth annual Smokin’ Hot Chili Cook-Off, an annual fundraiser for the Rotary Club of Dundee Township.

    Get spicy by competing in W. Dundee chili cookoff

    The village of West Dundee and the Rotary Club of Dundee Township are seeking contestants for the fourth annual Smokin’ Hot Chili Cook-Off, an annual fundraiser for the Rotary Club.

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    Self-esteem must be grounded in self-worth

    Can we really solve all of society’s ills with just more self-esteem? Our Ken Potts agrees that low self-esteem is a problem. Simply building up people’s esteem, he says, is not necessarily going to solve anything. Our self-esteem first must be grounded in our self-worth.

Sports

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    Max Bruere, left, and Avery Balogh of Glen Ellyn celebrate after a TD at Red Grange Field.

    A keepsake football victory for Glenbard West

    Glenbard West's defense held two-time defending state champion Wheaton Warrenville South in check with a 21-7 victory on national TV. “It was unbelievable. I'll probably never experience anything like that in my life again," said Glenbard West senior Avery Balogh.

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    Glenbard West, WW South look forward to what's ahead

    For the past nine months, Glenbard West and Wheaton Warrenville South have built toward the latest Game of the Millenium. They have only a handful of days to come down from it.

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    Associated Press Chicago White Sox Dayan Viciedo rounds the bases on his three-run home run against Seattle Mariners in the fourth inning Sunday in Seattle.

    Viciedo arrives in big way for White Sox
    In his first game with the White Sox, Dayan Viciedo showed why there was so much clamoring for his callup. The 22-year-old right fielder hit a 3-run homer and helped the Sox complete a three-game sweep over the Mariners.

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    Cougars’ losing streak hits 4

    The Kane County Cougars fell 2-0 to the Peoria Chiefs in Game 2 of a four-game series at Elfstrom Stadium. With eight games remaining in the regular season, the Cougars own a 5-game lead over Wisconsin and own the tiebreaker for the wild-card playoff spot in the Western Division.

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    Chicago Sky's Erin Thorn celebrates after scoring a three- points shot during the fourth quarter of an WNBA basketball game against the New York Liberty on Sunday, Aug. 28, 2011, in Rosemont, Ill. The Sky won 74-73. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

    Prince lifts Chicago Sky to victory with late 3-pointer
    The Chicago Sky is still alive in the hunt for a spot in the Eastern Conference playoffs, thanks to a wild 74-73 victory over the New York Liberty Sunday in front of 5,707 fans at Allstate Arena.

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    Associated Press Chicago White Sox Dayan Viciedo rounds the bases on his three-run home run against Seattle Mariners in the fourth inning Sunday in Seattle.

    Viciedo hits 3-run HR in Sox win

    Dayan Viciedo made a sudden impact in his return to the majors, hitting a three-run homer in his season debut as the Chicago White Sox beat the Seattle Mariners 9-3 Sunday for a sweep.

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    White Sox scouting report
    White Sox vs. Minnesota Twins at U.S. Cellular FieldTV: Comcast SportsNet Monday and Tuesday; WGN WednesdayRadio: WSCR 670-AMPitching matchups: The White Sox’ Mark Buehrle (10-6) vs. Kevin Slowey (0-2) Monday at 7:10 p.m.; Zach Stewart (1-2) vs. Anthony Swarzak (3-4) Tuesday at 7:10 p.m.; Jake Peavy (6-6) vs. Scott Diamond (0-2) Wednesday at 1:10 p.m.At a glance: After sweeping the Mariners and going 3-2 on the West Coast, the White Sox return to the Cell for a quick homestand. The Sox are beginning a stretch of 29 straight games against teams in the AL Central. The Twins are having a rare down season, and their run of dominance against the Sox is over for now. The White Sox swept a three-game series at Minnesota in early August and have won four of the last five vs. the Twins. Buehrle has pitched 23 innings against Minnesota this season and allowed just 1 earned run.Next: Detroit Tigers, Friday-Sunday at Comerica Park— Scot Gregor

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    Cubs scouting report
    Cubs scouting report

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    Bears quarterback Caleb Hanie threw an interception Saturday that was returned 90 yards for a touchdown. “(You) can’t throw the ball directly to him,” said coach Lovie Smith. “We’d like to have that one back of course.”

    Hanie’s pick-6 bothers Smith

    Bears coach Lovie Smith is willing to overlook a missed tackle by safety Major Wright, but not a costly interception by Caleb Hanie.

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    Bears wide receiver Earl Bennett makes a catch as he is hit by Tennessee Titans defensive back Anthony Smith in the third quarter Saturday.

    Bears’ offensive line getting better

    The Bears' offensive line has shown definite signs of improvement in the past two preseason games.

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    Kids playing kids’ games inevitable for TV

    I'm officially part of the problem after spending the weekend watching the ESPN family of networks cover a slew of high school football games and the Little League World Series.

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    Tony Campana will have a future in the majors, Cubs manager Mike Quade believes, if he can get stronger and drive the ball so the outfielders have to respect his swing.

    Cubs find speed is fine, but getting on base is better

    The Cubs have more team speeed on their team this season. But it won't do them much good unless that speed can get on base regularly. With their speedsters being young, this process may take awhile.

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    Cubs third baseman Aramis Ramirez reacts after striking out during Sunday's sixth inning in Milwaukee.

    Cubs swept away by Brewers

    Zack Greinke pitched effectively into the eighth to remain perfect at home, Corey Hart homered for the second time in as many days and the Milwaukee Brewers swept the Cubs with a 3-2 win on Sunday.

Business

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    To save energy, it's wise to plug your computer equipment into a surge protector because they can be easily switched off when not in use. Appliances draw electricity when plugged into an outlet.

    ComEd offers energy saving tips
    Twelve no-cost ways to save energy in your home.

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    Laura Reedy Stukel

    Make energy efficiency a priority when upgrading your home

    A growing legion of homeowners is opting for energy-efficient appliances or other measures to keep their home comfortable and, they hope, to save money down the road.

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    Waya Richardson, of the Tuscarora tribe, dances outside the New York Stock Exchange Thursday during the ceremonies celebrating NativeOne becoming the exchange's first Native American-owned member. Stocks seem to have stabilized last week.

    After 4 weeks of losses, stocks rise. Can it last?

    The reality is, investors are down 13 percent in a month, and few expect market turmoil to disappear soon. But the good news for stock investors is that most security exchanges said by Sunday afternoon that they planned to operate normally Monday, and stocks appear relatively cheap.

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    Fifth Third Bank, which operates 1,300 branches in the Midwest and South, is offering a new card that’s linked to both a checking and credit card account. The Cincinnati-based bank says the Duo MasterCard is the first to offer the split functionality.

    Fifth Third Bank offers single card for both debit and credit

    It’s plastic that does double duty as a credit and debit card. Fifth Third Bank, which operates 1,300 branches in the Midwest and South, is offering a new card that’s linked to both a checking and credit card account. The Cincinnati-based bank says the Duo MasterCard is the first to offer the split functionality.

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    Christine Lagarde, of France, managing director of the International Monetary Fund, arrives at the morning session of the Economic Policy Symposium at Jackson Hole in Moran, Wyo.

    IMF chief urges US policymakers to help economy

    The new head of the International Monetary Fund urged U.S. policymakers to take more aggressive steps to stimulate the economy and ease the housing crisis.

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    China blog site shuts accounts over 'rumors'

    China's most popular microblogging site is cracking down on what it says is the spread of false rumors after the ruling Communist Party told Internet companies to tighten control over information online.

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    American Airlines expands preferred seats

    American Airlines has expanded and renamed its Express Seats offering, now called Preferred Seats.

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    Low rates squeeze savers and may hold back economy

    Super-low interest rates haven’t done what they usually do after a recession. They haven’t ignited economic growth or revived the home market or persuaded consumers to spend freely again.

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    Business world donating expertise to aid groups

    Bar codes. Electronic way bills. Vertically integrated partnerships. They help businesses turn big profits. Now companies like UPS and Wal-Mart are teaching these trade crafts to aid workers so they can deliver food and shelter to famine victims more quickly and cheaply, saving money and ultimately more lives.

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    While stocks have tumbled, mutual funds that specialize in long-term government bonds have returned an average 10.6 percent, according to Morningstar.

    8 revealing stats for fund investors

    Here are eight revealing statistics about the market correction that may help investors brace for their next quarterly 401(k) statements and mutual fund reports. Each illustrates which investments have been holding up relatively well over the last four weeks, and which haven’t.

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    Weary of the stock market’s volatility, some investors are now looking to the art market instead.

    Stock fears fuel spike in art market

    As the stock market gyrated sharply in recent weeks, New York art dealer Asher Edelman began receiving calls from clients asking to sell works they owned by major 20th-century artists. And the sellers were willing to take about 20 percent less than they would have only a couple of weeks earlier. “People are afraid of what’s going on in the world and they want to take some cash out of their art,” Edelman says.

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    Libyan rebels tear up a portrait of Moammar Gadhafi on Wednesday inside his compound Bab al-Aziziya in Tripoli.

    Gadhafi’s exit to spur Libya’s Shariah banking

    Islamic banking in Libya, where rebels stormed the capital Tripoli this week, may benefit from the departure of Moammar Gadhafi, who stifled the industry’s growth, a former central bank chief said.

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    A few banks have already started teaming up with retailers to offer revamped programs that reward customers for spending at specific stores.

    Debit rewards are still available — in new form

    The migration away from traditional rewards programs — where customers typically earn a set cash back rate on all purchases — is a response to the changing business environment. Starting in October, a regulation will cap the fees banks can collect from merchants whenever customers swipe their debit cards.

Life & Entertainment

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    A pint of Cigar City beer is shown on the bar at the brewery's tasting room in Tampa, Fla. Cigar City uses ingredients such as Spanish cedar, guava, Cuban espresso and citrus woods to craft beers that also taste of Tampa's heritage.

    Cigar City brewing beer that tastes like Tampa

    Plenty of brewers name their beers for the regions where they are made. But Cigar City takes it further, using ingredients such as Spanish cedar, guava, Cuban espresso and citrus woods to craft beers that also taste of Tampa's heritage.

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    The countertop on the island was replaced in this Lake Bluff home, but the perimeter ones were “painted.”

    Sometimes, you can't gut the kitchen for a remodeling project

    Some kitchens are just too good for a sledgehammer. They need updating, but the layout works well, and the materials are high quality. There's just something about them that drives their owners crazy. Say all those well-organized cabinets are oak, which doesn't fit the recently redecorated house. Or perhaps she hates the chipped stone countertops.

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    A bumblebee stripe around the trunk lid and twin hood scoops are telling signs that this is no ordinary Dodge Dart.

    Classic Recollections: 1970 Dodge Dart Swinger 340

    There's always been a market for economy cars. Even during the 1960s and '70s, at a time when gas-chugging performance models ruled the streets, manufacturers saw plenty of need to produce inexpensive, fuel-efficient vehicles to satisfy thriftier buyers.

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    Ryan Van Cleave sits behind a computer at his home in Sarasota, Fla. Gaming and thinking about video games was all-consuming for Van Cleave. Yet living inside the game World of Warcraft, which became his obsession, seemed preferable to the drudgery of everyday life.

    Suburban man describes video-game addiction

    A suburban Chicago man is like millions who end up addicted to virtual reality games. The pretend life inside your computer becomes more important than your real life.

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    In this music video image released by Interscope Records, a sceen from Lady Gaga’s “Born This Way” video is shown. The video is nominated in the new category Best Video with a Message at the 2011 MTV Video Music Awards on Sunday Aug. 28, 2011.

    Winehouse tribute to highlight VMA awards

    Amy Winehouse never appeared on the MTV Video Music Awards during her short but celebrated career. Still, Sunday’s show will take a break from its planned circus atmosphere to pay tribute to the British singer, who died a month ago after years of substance abuse.

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    Sophia Coppola married Thomas Mars, lead singer of the French rock band Phoenix and the father of their two young daughters.

    Director Sofia Coppola weds in southern Italy

    Filmmaker Sofia Coppola went back to her roots for her wedding Saturday, marrying rocker Thomas Mars in the remote, southern Italian town where her great-grandfather was born.

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    Randy Weston opens the 33rd Chicago Jazz Festival.

    On the road: Chicago Jazz Fest turns 33

    The Chicago Jazz Festival kicks off Sept. 1 with intimate performances at the Chicago Cultural Center, shifts to Millennium Park for a Saxophone Summit, and fills Grant Park with a weekend full of music.

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    Eileen and Doug Flockhart laugh as she holds a picture of their seventh grandchild near a wall full of family photos in their home in Exeter, N.H.

    Grandparents play a bigger role in child-rearing

    Less frail and more engaged, today’s grandparents are shunning retirement homes and stepping in more than ever to raise grandchildren while young adults struggle in the poor economy. “Grandparents have become the family safety net, and I don’t see that changing any time soon,” said Amy Goyer, a family expert at AARP.

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    Despite the prominence of religious believers in politics and culture, America has shrinking congregations, growing dissatisfaction with religious leaders and more people who do not think about faith, according to a new study by a Duke University expert.

    Professor says American’s religious faith waning

    Despite the prominence of religious believers in politics and culture, America has shrinking congregations, growing dissatisfaction with religious leaders and more people who do not think about faith, according to a new study by a Duke University expert.

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    Christy Landrigan, 25, right, poses for photos with her parents, Mike and Rebecca, center, and her brother Kevin, in Fort Wayne. Christy has chosen to move back in with her parents and brother while she finishes college at Fort Wayne Indiana Purdue University.

    Adult children living with parents on rise

    CollegeGrad.com, an entry-level job search website, says its online surveys have shown an annual increase since the middle of the last decade of college graduates moving home after graduation. In recent years, online media have devoted themselves to the phenomenon, creating resources for parents and adult children alike.

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    Matt Tolosa, left, wearing an Anakin Skywalker costume, and his brother Dale Tolosa, dressed as a Stormtrooper, pose in front of a life-size replica of Yoda in San Francisco.

    Yoda statue becomes a Star Wars mecca

    Within sight of San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge lies another landmark cherished by a small but fervent group of travelers: a full-size replica of Yoda, George Lucas' master of the Force.

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    Noah Egler holds a prosthetic leg during a workshop on electronic prosthetics at the Indiana University Northwest medical school in Gary, Ind., earlier this month.

    Unusual invite gives boy with Asperger’s a chance to belong

    He is about half the age of other students in the room. Yet 13-year-old Noah Egler is completely in his element, wearing powder blue medical scrubs and answering questions with an enthusiasm that draws smiles from those around him.

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    Gretchen Cawthon, Kelli Kopetz and Katrina Fisher are the founding members of the Decatur Christian band Four Wall Flight.

    Dreams are the theme of Christian band’s songs

    For the past few years, Four Wall Flight has straddled the line between a hobby and full-time endeavor for the Christian group, but the one thing that has remained constant is its members’ passion for live performance. The love of making music is surpassed only by their desire to do good in their community.

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    A participant in the “Flippered Friends” Wild Encounter program at Brookfield Zoo watches as a zookeeper checks a harbor seal’s teeth.

    Brookfield Zoo offers up-close encounters with animals

    Whether its feeding penguins or caring for dolphins, the Wild Encounters program at Brookfield Zoo provides participants with a behind-the scenes tour and up-close views of the zoo's most popular animals.

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    The Annual Port Clinton Art Festival returns this weekend to downtown Highland Park.

    Sunday picks: Be wowed at Port Clinton Art Fest

    Highland Park is abuzz this weekend with the 28th Port Clinton Art Festival, which features more than 260 artists displaying their works, and the fifth annual Taste of Highland Park. Enrich your artistic side, listen to some music and fill your belly at Port Clinton Square.

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    Lights illuminate the 184 stone benches outside the Pentagon in Arlington, Va. The permanent outdoor Pentagon Memorial was created to honor the family members and friends killed both in the building and on American Airlines Flight 77.

    Pentagon Memorial a ‘sobering' site

    The Pentagon Memorial to the victims of the Sept. 11 attacks is a contemplative spot. But it's not quiet. Every time planes fly by, it reminds visitors of the force with which American Airlines Flight 77 crashed into the Pentagon killing 184 people.

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    Religion in the news: Court rules on circumcision

    A California Senate committee unanimously approved a bill Tuesday to block local jurisdictions from banning male circumcision, a debate that evolved from a divisive ballot measure in San Francisco that would have barred the practice for most boys under age 18.

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    Treasures in your attic: These plates are great, but there are only eight

    Q. I have eight platters or large dinner plates by Wm. Guerin & Co., Limoges, France. They are red with encrusted gold decoration. Could you please advise me of their value and history?

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    Art in the garden: Preserving the summer’s tomatoes

    Here we go again. Tomato vines hanging full of beautiful tomatoes waiting to ripen. So what to do about all the tomatoes?

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    Owners need dog training as much as puppy does

    My fiance and I have a 9-month-old puppy. He is housebroken but is chewing everything in sight. Fiance has had it up to “here.” Any suggestions? No judgment please; we’ve really tried our best.

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    You have several options for hot water in a vacation property that is not in use much of the time.

    Ask the plumber: Vacation-cabin water heaters

    Q. I'm interested in purchasing a new water heater for a small vacation cabin that I recently invested in. We'll use the cabin once a week in warmer weather. It has electricity and propane gas. I plan to turn the water heater on only for quick showers, and shut it off when we leave.

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    Law talk: Closed pool irks condo buyer

    Q. I bought a condo in Palatine. The listing said “pool in the summer!” Well, I moved in and found out the pool hadn’t been open in years.

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    Under the hood: Checking a code is not diagnosis

    Q. I recently had a “check engine” light come on in my Toyota. I took it over to one of the parts stores and they diagnosed the car for free.

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    Home repair: Cabin may benefit from crawl-space insulation

    Q. I have a cabin that is built on a slope. The crawl space foundation is 8-inch concrete block, with a dirt floor. I have acquired some 3-1/2-by-3-1/2-foot rigid-foam-insulation panels about 2 inches thick. Will fastening this insulation to the bottom of the floor joists help keep the above floor space a little warmer?

Discuss

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    Transportation officials out of touch on cost control

    A Daily Herald editorial asks why area transportation agencies seem almost universally out of touch with serious cost control.

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    Sharia law and the future of Libya

    The legal system in Saudi Arabia is based on Sharia law. More than two dozen other countries operate according to at least some aspects of Sharia law. None of them is known for any of the principles stated in the pluralistic-sounding Libyan draft constitution.

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    MLK’s vision of justice

    In a sense, we’re not advancing toward the fulfillment of the Rev. Martin Luther King’s dream. We’re heading in the opposite direction.

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    ‘Buy American’ and watch jobs grow
    Far too often I hear the lament that “you can’t find anything in the stores made in the U.S.” Wrong! The answer is to try harder if you really care. The answer is to focus on buying only one of something vs. two of inferior quality. The answer is to do a little research to better understand online resources for American-made products.

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    Mistake to cut funds for Catholic Charities
    Catholic Charities was given state funds in the first place is because it does a good job of finding homes for children. A better job, in general, than state agencies for a cheaper price, which was a win-win for the state, children and taxpayers.

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    Don’t trust agencies that rate credit
    Aren’t these the same financial wizards who rated bundled, subprime mortgages a AAA? Aren’t these people cogs in the same wheel that brought the world to its knees in 2008 and part of the insider industry that is still almost completely unregulated?

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    Drop the labels; we’re all Americans
    I personally believe that Latinos, like any other race, are smart enough, strong enough and charismatic enough to get elected on ideas, philosophies and principles, and I do not believe Latinos need to rely on ethnic ties to see results.

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    Here’s a case for year-round school
    it would be best for the students’ education if schools implemented a full year schedule with a minimum of vacation breaks. As teachers often say, “Do it for the children.”

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    Here’s why S&P lowered credit rating
    Standard & Poor’s decided to lower the U.S. credit rating because 1. They felt that the inability of the United States government, to take decisive action on fiscal issues and their difficulties in trying to reach consensus, would continue to create uncertainty. 2. The agreement on the debt consolidation program fell short in both the size and the scope needed to stabilize the debt.

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    Judges should not legislate
    A Waukegan letter to the editor: If a federal judge says that any state law on Immigration cannot stand as it is unconstitutional or for any other reason, two things ought to happen.

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    Low taxes on rich, prosperity unrelated
    A Dundee letter to the editor: I’m tired of the right-wing distortions about taxes. “The bottom 50 percent pay no taxes,” is what we constantly hear. Well, sorry folks, but that’s a right-wing lie.

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    National attention foisted on Glen Ellyn

    What a week for Glen Ellyn. It has drawn the attention of a national magazine and ESPN, while its battle with College of DuPage temporarily subsides. But a controversy over installing lights at Glenbard West High School won't be subsiding soon.

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