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Daily Archive : Sunday August 14, 2011

News

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    Students Devin Stompanato, Matthew Du, Nick Nelson and Nathan Campbell helped refurbish more than 700 laptop computers this summer.

    District 203 refurbishes computers for students

    Some students in Naperville Unit District 203 spent a portion of their summer refurbishing computers that the district will give to students who otherwise could not afford them. The recipients can keep the computers, and get tech support, as long as they remain in the district.

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    Indiana State Police and authorities survey the collapsed rigging and Sugarland stage on the infield at the Indiana State Fair in Indianapolis Sunday Aug. 14 2011. Five people died in the stage collapse.

    Deerfield doctor helped Indiana stage collapse victims

    A doctor from Deerfield was in the grandstand Saturday night and rushed to the aid of more than 40 people who were crushed beneath the collapsed stage at the Indiana State Fair in Indianapolis. A 29-year-old Chicago woman was among five concertgoers killed in the tragedy.

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    Republican presidential candidates Rep. Michele Bachmann, speaks Sunday to local Republicans during the Black Hawk County Republican Lincoln Day Dinner in Waterloo, Iowa.

    Bachmann, Perry court Iowa voters

    The two fastest-rising stars in the race for the 2012 Republican presidential nomination worked to broaden their appeal Sunday in Iowa.

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    Afghan soldiers inspect the damaged building inside the governor’s compound Sunday in Parwan provincial capital of Charikar, about 30 miles north of Kabul, Afghanistan.

    6 suicide bombers strike in Afghanistan

    Six suicide bombers attacked a governor’s security meeting in one of Afghanistan’s most secure provinces, killing 22 people and driving home the point that the Taliban is able to strike at will virtually anywhere in the country.

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    Hotel bomb kills 12 people in Pakistan

    A bomb attached to a timer ripped through a two-story hotel in Pakistan’s southwestern Baluchistan province Sunday, reducing the building to rubble and killing 12 people, police said.

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    Jim Jarvis, executive director of the Metropolis Performing Arts Centre in Arlington Heights, will step down after three years with the Arlington Heights theater.

    Metropolis exec. director to step down

    Jim Jarvis, the executive director of the Metropolis Performing Arts Centre in downtown Arlington Heights, is stepping down after three years on the job. Credited for doing a great job during a tough economy, Jarvis' last day on the job is Oct. 28. A search is now under way for his replacement.

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    Brianna Dufault, 11, takes a picture of the tile she created in the mural during a back-to-school open house Sunday at Mechanics Grove School in Mundelein. This year, the school will combine Lincoln and Mechanics Grove schools and become a third- through fifth-grade building.

    Unity stressed as Mundelein reconfigures schools

    Students and parents attended a back-to-school open house Sunday at Mechanics Grove School, which will now take in students from Lincoln School. The open house, which stressed unity between the two schools, featured two large murals created by the students from both schools last year.

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    Members of the Cavaliers Drum & Bugle Corps performed in front of 20,000 spectators this weekend at the Drum Corps International world championships in Indianapolis. The group finished third overall.

    Cavaliers Drum & Bugle Corps finish 3rd

    Despite a first-place finish in the percussion division, the Rosemont Cavaliers Drum & Bugle Corps finished 3rd in this weekend's national championship in Indianapolis.

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    Raku Gold Pottery was a popular booth to visit Sunday during the 7th annual Art in Your Eye fine art show in Batavia. The artists of Raku Gold, Shawn and Jim Barbagallo of Rockford, displayed several ceramic pieces, created using the Japanese technique called Raku.

    Batavia art fest draws crowds for 7th year

    As the clay grew taller and then wider, then developed a lip along the upper edge, 5-year-old Nicholas Maskell of Batavia glanced up, eyes glowing, and said, “Mom, look!” The boy was learning how to use a pottery wheel in the kids activities section of Batavia’s 7th annual Art in Your Eye festival Sunday.

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    A mime makes a balloon gun for Ronan Mendoza, 2, during the Cantigny Park’s French Connection Day Sunday in Wheaton.

    Cantigny celebrates founder’s love for France

    Visitors to Wheaton's Cantigny Park on Sunday were treated to an open-air market, wine-tasting events and live music as part of French Connection Day, the park's annual celebration of founder Robert McCormick's ties to France.

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    Metra lobbying, fare plans deliver all the shock riders need

    How thoughtful that Metra plans to install defibrillators on all of its trains. But Metra won’t have to install the heart-zapping machines in ticket offices. For riders, just seeing the commuter rail's proposed new prices will be shocking enough.

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    Court denies North Aurora man’s weapons appeal

    A North Aurora man recently lost his bid to have an armed violence conviction and a 12-year prison sentence overturned by an appellate court.

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    Buster

    Kiriluk: How to spot an ill pet
    If your pet's behavior is off, he may be telling you that he's not feeling good. Here are some ideas of what to look for when your pet is ill.

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    Tony Musur has a photo taken as he tries to round up contestants for the first Lakemoor hot dog eating contest held at Lakemoor Fest at Morrison Park.

    Images: Weekend Festival Review
    There were no shortages of festivals in the suburbs over the weekend. The festivals we photographed this weekend were the Mane Event in Arlington Heights, Family Fest-Summer Bash in Des Plaines, Lindenfest, Lakemoor Fest, Prairie Fest in Wood Dale, Indian Independence Day parade in Schaumburg, Taste of Arlington Heights, Veggie Fest in Naperville, Gurnee Days and the Winfield Criterium.

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    People talk to a British armed policeman attending the scene after six people were killed in a knife attack, Sunday Aug. 14, 2011, in St Helier, Jersey, England. A man is reported to have been arrested Sunday on suspicion of fatally stabbing six people, including two young children, two men and two women, on the British island of Jersey, police said, and unidentified neighbors declared that the incident may have involved members of the same family.

    6 dead in British knife attacks

    A man was arrested Sunday on suspicion of stabbing six people to death, including three children, on the British island of Jersey in what was the deadliest crime in the community’s living memory, police said.

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    Christina Santiago, 29, of Chicago died Aug. 13 after a stage collapsed at the Indiana State Fair.

    Chicago woman among dead at Indiana State Fair concert

    Authorities in Indiana say a Chicago woman is one of the five people who were killed when a blast of wind toppled a stage and its rigging before a Sugarland concert at the Indiana State Fair.

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    Indiana State Police and authorities survey the collapsed rigging and Sugarland stage on the infield at the Indiana State Fair in Indianapolis, Sunday, Aug. 14, 2011. Five people died in the stage collapse.

    Updated: Indiana stage collapse images
    Five people were killed and more than 40 injured when high winds blew over a stage at the Indiana State Fair Saturday. The fans waiting to see Sugarland perform.

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    Republican Presidential Candidate Former Minnesota Governor Tim Pawlenty says he's dropping out of the race for the GOP presidential nomination.

    Pawlenty drops out of GOP race after Iowa straw poll

    Former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty dropped out of the race for the GOP presidential nomination on Sunday, hours after finishing a disappointing third in the Iowa straw poll.

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    Making their way to the Family and Friends Day celebration, these teen mothers learn to take care of themselves and their babies at Casa Imani, Maryville Academy's group home in Bartlett for girls who have mental illnesses and are pregnant or have babies.

    Where can a mentally ill 12-year-old mom find a home?

    Mothers, some as young as 12, find coping skills and a home at Maryville Academy's Casa Imani in Bartlett. “We are here to teach them how to cope. They have to be able to live outside of here,” says Donita Fuller, an evening supervisor at Casa Imani.

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    Indiana State Fair cancels events

    The Indiana State Fair has canceled its Sunday activities after a deadly stage collapse.

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    Sugarland heartbroken by collapse

    The lead singer for the country band Sugarland says members are heartbroken after last night's stage collapse at the Indiana State Fair.

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    Republican presidential candidate Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-Minn., blows kisses as she speaks to her supporters after winning the Iowa Republican Party’s Straw Poll in Ames, Iowa, Saturday, Aug. 13, 2011.

    Bachmann, Perry flocking to same event in Iowa

    AMES, Iowa — It might be a preview of the months ahead in the GOP presidential race.Texas Gov. Rick Perry, who just got into the race, and U.S. Rep. Michele Bachmann of Minnesota, fresh off an Iowa straw poll victory, are competing for attention Sunday as their campaign schedules put them at the same event.

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    Norway killer back on island for reconstruction

    OSLO, Norway — Held tightly on a police leash, the Norwegian man who confessed to killing 69 people at an island youth camp has reconstructed his actions for police back at the crime scene.

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    Elaine Riddick is comforted by her son, Tony, as she testifies before the Justice for Sterilization Victims Foundation task force compensation hearing in Raleigh, N.C. Victims of a state-sponsored sterilization program and their family members are urging a governor-appointed task force to recommend financial compensation for the suffering they endured under North Carolina's discontinued eugenics program.

    Eugenics victim, son fighting for justice

    Elaine Riddick has become an inspiration to other survivors of North Carolina's eugenics program. She has become the face of the movement to compensate victims of what most now acknowledge as a dark, misguided era. Her son is confident they will prevail.

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    Illinois Congressman Joe Walsh, left, has a hallway chat with 14th District Congressman Randy Hultgren in Washington D.C. The two Republicans could find themselves in a primary matchup in the newly drawn 14th District.

    Walsh faces tough fight ahead in re-election bid to Congress

    As he makes a bid for re-election, how will 8thDistrict Congressman Joe Walsh face constituents after deadbeat dad allegations and party leaders he has bucked on key votes? “What makes him attractive could also make him unattractive,” one expert said.

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    Several Sun City women have started a 9/11 memorial flag project and plan to place more than 3,000 flags out for the 10th anniversary. From left are Linda Bahwell, Barb Soracco, Peg Mulhall, Catherine Portera, Michele Neigebauer and Mary Neigebauer.

    Huntley women planning 9/11 memorial in Sun City

    When two airplanes crashed into the World Trade Center almost 10 years ago, Peg Mulhall of Huntley felt the need to do something. Almost 10 years later she, along with four of her friends from the Sun City subdivision, are arranging a flag memorial project in which volunteers will plant a flag for each of the nearly 3,000 people who died in the terrorist attacks.

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    Tony Petrillo, general manager of Arlington Park, on the phone in the winners tent Saturday after the Arlington Million at Arlington Park.

    Arlington Park boss expands track’s reach, stature

    Tony Petrillo celebrating his first Million as general manager of Arlington Park, enjoys bringing the world to Arlington Heights. “To get a horse population with international connections increases the competitiveness of horses here in the United States,” Petrillo said.

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    Roger Jenisch, right, is among hundreds of teens who found summer jobs in early July when about 70 park districts across the state received $2.3 million in grants to hire young workers. Jenisch recently worked with Tomaso Tenuta and Eric Thomason to remove brush from wetlands in Bloomingdale’s Springfield Park.

    Grants allow Illinois parks to hire 760 teen workers

    More than 760 teens looking for summer jobs got a stroke of luck in early July, when about 70 park districts across the state received $2.3 million in grants to hire teen workers. But partly because of the late timing, teens couldn't take full advantage of the program.

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    Lake County to open special court for veterans

    The doors are scheduled to open Aug. 19 on a special Lake County court program designed to divert military veterans in trouble with the law away from the traditional justice system and toward the help they need. “It is essential that we do everything we can to assist the people who were willing to put their lives on the line for the rest of us,” Chief Judge Victoria Rossetti said.

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    Youths stand in front of Moscow’s City Center skyscrapers in Moscow, Russia. In the 20 years since the collapse of the Soviet Union, the once shabby and dour Russian explosion has exploded with wealth and glitzy developments.

    20 years later, ex-USSR is a cracked mosaic

    In the 20 years since the collapse of the Soviet Union, the once shabby and dour Russian explosion has exploded with wealth and glitzy developments.

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    Wind sets sail blimp moored at Ohio State airport

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — A 128-foot-long blimp docked at the Ohio State University airport broke free of its moorings in high winds early Sunday and drifted away, and it hasn’t yet been located.The Ohio State Highway Patrol says no one was aboard when strong winds lifted the blimp just after midnight Sunday at the Don Scott airfield in Columbus. The blimp then began drifting eastward.

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    Hundreds rally in Nepal for sexual rights

    NARAYANGHAT, Nepal — Hundreds of gay, lesbian, transgender people marched with supporters in a southern Nepal town Sunday to demand equal rights under a new constitution the country is in the process of writing.

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    Spanish designer Jesus del Pozo dies aged 65

    MADRID — Fashion designer Jesus del Pozo, one of Spain’s most influential style modernizers, has died aged 65.A statement released late Saturday by Spain’s Fashion Creators Association said Del Pozo had succumbed to a lung problem. Association president Modesto Lomba said although Del Pozo had looked weak in recent months he had worked with commitment and energy to the end.

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    Versatile Indian actor Shammi Kapoor has died after a long career in Bollywood. He was 79.

    Popular Indian actor Shammi Kapoor dies at 79

    Versatile Indian actor Shammi Kapoor has died after a long career in Bollywood. He was 79.

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    Part of the 17th Street bridge that spans Atlanta’s downtown connector collapsed onto the northbound lanes of Interstate 85 before midnight on on Saturday, Aug. 13, 2011, causing large traffic delays in the midtown area of Atlanta. The crumbled metalwork can be seen in the lower right of this photo,

    Police: Falling bridge debris snarls Atlanta route

    ATLANTA — Metal railings rained down onto a heavily traveled interstate in downtown Atlanta from a landmark bridge late Saturday night, narrowly missing vehicles on the key corridor and shutting off traffic both ways for hours, authorities and motorists said.

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    ’Doomsday’ defense cuts loom large for select 12

    WASHINGTON — For the dozen lawmakers given the task of producing a deficit-cutting plan, the threatened “doomsday” defense cuts hit close to home.

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    Oak Forest Metra station to get $1.3 million grant

    The Illinois Department of Transportation and Metra have received a $1.3 million federal grant to modernize the Oak Forest rail station.U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin says the money has been awarded by the U.S. Department of Transportation.Durbin says the Oak Forest station southwest of Chicago is the second-busiest on the Rock Island rail line and is used by nearly 1,500 commuters.

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    Quinn signs bill to research black community

    Illinois Governor Pat Quinn has signed a bill creating a commission aimed at researching disparities in the African-American community.The commission will study social and economic issues including health services, employment and education.

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    Abandoned toddler rescued from garbage in Spain

    MADRID — An official says a 2-year-old girl has been rescued from a dumpster after her parents abandoned her.He says residents of the southeastern town of Cabezo de Torres were alarmed by sobbing sounds coming from the garbage container late Saturday and after removing several plastic bags of refuse found the girl “crying, sweating and with panic showing in her face.”

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    19 dead in attack on Afghan governor’s compound

    KABUL, Afghanistan — A team of six suicide bombers launched a coordinated assault on a provincial governor’s compound in eastern Afghanistan on Sunday, killing 19 people in the latest high-profile attack to target prominent Afghan government officials, authorities said.

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    Gadhafi forces, Libyan rebels fight in Zawiya

    ZAWIYA, Libya — Residents say Libyan rebels and forces loyal to Moammar Gadhafi are battling inside Zawiya a day after opposition fighters entered the strategic western city.

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    Youths run from an electronics store in Birmingham, England as disturbances saw looting and vehicles set alight. As Britain comes to grips with the causes of the past week’s descent into anarchy, Prime Minister David Cameron has identified the growth of gangs as a key factor and is recruiting high-profile American anti-gang experts to help bring them to heel.

    UK gangs thrive in August riots

    BIRMINGHAM, England — The Burger Bar Boys. The Cash or Slash Money Crew. The Bang Bang Gang. These names might sound straight out of a dime-store novel, but they’re real-life Birmingham gangs — underground armies that spearheaded England’s worst riots in a generation.

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    Des Plaines 4th Ward Alderman Dick Sayad poses with Alpana Singh, the host of “Check, Please!”

    Des Plaines alderman to appear on ‘Check, Please!’

    A familiar face from Des Plaines will guest appear next month on WTTW Channel 11’s popular restaurant review program, “Check, Please!” Fourth Ward Alderman Dick Sayad recently taped an episode, which will air at 8 p.m. Sept. 9.

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    Lambs Farm throws party to celebrate 50th anniversary

    Bring your blankets and chairs for a full day of music, activities, food and fun from 2 to 9:30 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 20 at Lambs Farm is at 14245 W. Rockland Road, Libertyville.

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    Historic photo of where the current pet shop is located at Lambs Farm near Libertyville.

    Lambs Farm celebrates 50 years serving the developmentally disabled

    In 2011, Lamb’s Farm celebrates 50 years of providing jobs, a place to live and companionship for the developmentally disabled, and peace of mind for their families.

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    Susan Miura, right, and Patt Nicholls will bring the sights and flavors of the Florida Keys to the Elk Grove Public Library on Monday Aug. 15, when they present “A Taste of the Florida Keys.”

    ‘Taste of Florida Keys’ at Elk Grove library

    The sights and flavors of the Florida Keys will be highlighted in “A Taste of the Florida Keys” from 7-8:30 p.m., Monday, Aug. 15, at the Elk Grove Public Library, 1001 Wellington Ave., Elk Grove Village.

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    Terri Ryburn hopes to open the ice cream and coffee shop seen here at Sprague’s Super Service station along Old Route 66 in Normal, Ill. She has contributed about $90,000 out of her own pocket and is depending on grants to complete the project. She hopes to have it all done in three years.

    Route 66 site seeks restoration aid

    Terri Ryburn’s love affair with Route 66 started on a family vacation when she was 5. In 2006, she got a tangible piece of that memory when she purchased the former Sprague service station on Old Route 66. Her goal from the beginning has been to restore the building.

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    Julio Cesar, 18, left, and friend Vitor, 14, stand on the debris of Cesar’s house, destroyed by a January mudslide, in Teresopolis, Brazil.

    Corruption charges mar recovery after Rio floods

    Suffering has turned into rage over allegations that money to help victims recover from Brazil’s worst disaster in a century has been stolen. Even in a country used to scandals, the news has been shocking.

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    State panel on race and drivers stuck in park

    A state panel created to study racial profiling in traffic stops has fallen behind in its work. Five years after state officials approved it, the group hasn’t held a single meeting. That’s largely because the governor — first Rod Blagojevich and Pat Quinn — failed to appoint anyone to serve on the panel.

Sports

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    Keegan Bradley reacts with the Wanamaker Trophy on the 18th green Sunday after winning a three-hole playoff against Jason Dufner.

    Bradley’s stunning turnaround wins PGA Championship

    There was even a guy in a red shirt Sunday, pumping his fists with each clutch putt in the final, frenzied hour of the PGA Championship. In a major filled with unfamiliar names, Keegan Bradley delivered an unforgettable finish. Bradley was 5 shots behind with only three holes to play after his chip shot raced across the 15th green and into the water, leading to a triple bogey.

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    Bell makes the most of it, but can Bears back make the team?

    Running back Kahlil Bell didn't get a single carry for the Bears last season, but he looked impressive in Saturday night's preseason opener.

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    Wide receiver Johnny Knox, center, could be the Bears’ go-to guy for kick returns this season.

    Happy returns in Knox’s future?

    Johnny Knox could be back on kickoff returns this season. He led the NFL in that department as a rookie in 2009.

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    While it might not seem fair to Matt Forte, the best move for the Bears would be to wait before rewarding their running back with any long-term deal.

    Bears need not rush to pay Forte

    As sports go, there is no bigger business than football, and as football goes, there is no crueler business than the NFL. Welcome to the world of Matt Forte.

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    Perez strong again in Cougars’ win

    Leondy Perez became the first Kane County pitcher to win 4 consecutive starts this season as he led the visiting Cougars past the Cedar Rapids Kernels 3-2 on Sunday at Veterans Memorial Stadium.

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    The Sky’s Sylvia Fowles, front, and San Antonio’s Jayne Appel chase after a loose ball Sunday.

    Fowles comes up big in Sky victory

    When Sylvia Fowles is on her game, there are few players in the WNBA who can stop her. Fowles proved that by scoring 28 points and grabbing 17 rebounds to help the Chicago Sky defeat the San Antonio Silver Stars 85-73 on Sunday.

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    Brent Lillibridge, right, celebrates with Paul Konerko, middle, and Carlos Quentin after hitting a 3-run homer in the first inning Sunday.

    White Sox poised for another shot at getting above .500

    The White Sox are back at the .500 mark again, but can they keep on winning and make a real run at winning the AL Central. They have 42 games to show what they can do.

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    Atlanta’s Dan Uggla gets a hug from teammate Jose Costanza in the dugout Sunday after Uggla’s 33-game hitting streak came to an end. He went 0-for-3 in the Braves’ loss to the Cubs.

    Fourth straight series win for Cubs

    Without any Carlos Zambrano meltdowns, retirements, suspensions or disqualification lists, the Cubs got back to their recent winning ways Sunday in Atlanta. They overcame 4 errors and a 4-0 deficit to defeat the Braves 6-5, winning the series over the National League wild-card leaders

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    White Sox starter John Danks tosses his glove as he walks back to the dugout during the sixth inning Sunday at U.S. Cellular Field.

    White Sox’ Danks thinking no hitter into sixth

    White Sox left-hander John Danks wound up making a quick exit after flirting with a no-hitter in Sunday's start against the Royals.

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    Jon Woods beats best friend Taylor Kanute for St. Charles crown

    Jon Woods saved his best for last Sunday afternoon at Pottawatomie Golf Course in what was not his normal casual golf round with best friend Taylor Kanute. Woods, a St. Charles East graduate who will be heading to Penn State in a couple of weeks, won the final two holes of the St. Charles Men’s City Golf Championship title match against Marmion High School graduate Kanute for a 2-up victory.

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    Cubs second baseman Darwin Barney makes a diving catch of Atlanta Braves batter Dan Uggla’s short fly to right field in front of Chicago teammate Marlon Byrd in Sunday’s fifth inning in Atlanta.

    Cubs stop Uggla’s hitting streak

    The Chicago Cubs stopped Dan Uggla’s 33-game hitting streak and rallied from a four-run deficit to beat the Atlanta Braves 6-5 on Sunday.

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    White Sox hitter Brent Lillibridge smacks a three-run home run during Sunday’s first inning at U.S. Cellular Field.

    Sox victory begins with Lillibridge homer

    Brent Lillibridge hit a three-run homer, John Danks pitched six strong innings and the White Sox beat the Kansas City Royals 6-2 on Sunday.

Business

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    EBay says that the number of gold buyers on its site rose 11 percent compared with the weekly average throughout this year. The number of gold sellers rose 14 percent above the year’s weekly average as well.

    Sales of gold up on eBay amid stock market turmoil

    SAN FRANCISCO — For gold sellers on eBay, the recent stock market turmoil has been a boon for business.Gold and silver sales on eBay had already been rising steadily over the past several years — so much so that eBay Inc. created a special area in May to make it easier for buyers to find sellers.Now, activity on that part of the site, the Bullion Center, is intensifying as consumers unnerved by the economic uncertainty flock to gold in hopes it will be a stable investment.“When people are coming down to the question, `Do they want to have cash in the bank or gold in their hands?’ the answer is they’d rather have gold or silver,” said Jacob Chandler, CEO of Great Southern Coins, the largest seller of precious metals on eBay.The stock market just ended one of its most volatile weeks in years, prompted in part by a downgrade in the nation’s credit rating and fears of another recession. The Dow Jones industrial average fell nearly 6 percent on Monday, its worst one-day drop since December 2008. Then the index rose Tuesday, fell Wednesday and rose Thursday and Friday to end the week 2 percent lower than a week ago.Through most of last week, the average selling price increased for gold bullion — bars or coins stamped with their weight and level of purity.According to the most recent data available from eBay, sales of 1-ounce gold American Eagle coins and 1-ounce gold Pamp Suisse bars rose steadily from Aug. 5 to Wednesday, before dipping slightly on Thursday.On Aug. 5, when Standard & Poor’s lowered the nation’s credit rating, American Eagle coins were selling for an average of $1,800 among eBay’s featured sellers. The average price of the coins, produced by the U.S. Mint, rose more than 8 percent to $1,952 on Wednesday, before dropping to $1,915 on Thursday.The Pamp Suisse brand of gold bars sold for an average of $1,787 on Aug. 5 and climbed nearly 8 percent to $1,927 by Wednesday. On Thursday, the bars dropped slightly to $1,890.Even before last week’s market turbulence, investors were cautious because economic signals in the U.S. and overseas pointed toward trouble.The Dow index fell 6 percent in the week ending Aug. 6. That week, the number of gold buyers on eBay rose 11 percent compared with the year’s weekly average. The number of gold sellers rose 14 percent. EBay would not provide the total number of buyers and sellers.“With all the turmoil in the markets, this is seen as a way to diversify,” said Anthony Delvecchio, eBay’s vice president of business management and strategy for eBay’s North America business.EBay, which is based in San Jose, Calif., does not impose minimum purchase amounts for bullion. Sellers offer gold both through auctions and “Buy It Now” fixed-price sales.The increased popularity of gold on eBay echoes what’s happening in the broader gold market, where prices have spiked during the past two years. Gold traded at about $900 per ounce in the summer of 2008, before the financial crisis unfolded that year. It passed $1,600 in late May and briefly rose above $1,800 for the first time on Wednesday before pulling back to $1,784. On Friday, gold fell to $1,740.60 per ounce, still nearly twice the summer 2008 prices.Great Southern Coins has benefited from this uptick. Chandler said the company is selling more gold lately, and its silver sales remain strong, too. Chandler estimated his business has nearly quadrupled in the past 45 days, and he said it appeared to be up about five or six times during the past week, with most of this growth coming from sales on eBay.Daniel Hirsch, a New York-based statistician who recently purchased more than a dozen gold coins on eBay from Great Southern Coins, said he started buying gold less than a year ago in an effort to expand his investment portfolio.“It’s kind of a safe haven and a hedge against low interest rates,” he said.

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    Kate Brown as “Page” and David Elliott as “Cooper” star in a new series of humorous promotional videos for business travel to the Northwest suburbs for the Woodfield Chicago Northwest Convention Bureau.

    Northwest suburbs star in new promo video

    Though aimed at business travelers, a new promotional video from the Woodfield Chicago Northwest Convention Bureau makes the Northwest suburbs look like a fun recreational destination where even residents might want to plan a vacation. “Videos are becoming very, very important as a way of driving content,” bureau President Dave Parulo said.

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    Thousands protest against Chinese chemical plant

    BEIJING — Authorities in a northeastern Chinese port city ordered a petrochemical plant be shut down after more than 12,000 people demonstrated Sunday over pollution concerns, state media said.Officials also pledged to relocate the Fujia chemical plant from Dalian city, the Xinhua News Agency said.Earlier Sunday, scuffles broke out between riot police and more than 12,000 protesters who were demanding that the plant, which produces the chemical paraxylene, be moved after a tropical storm raised fears of a toxic spill, Xinhua said. No injuries were reported in the confrontations.Calls to relocate the plant grew after waves from Tropical Storm Muifa broke a dike guarding it last week and raised fears that flood waters could release toxic chemicals. Xinhua said no chemical leaks had been reported.Paraxylene is widely used in the production of polyester. Short-term exposure can cause eye, nose or throat irritation in humans, and chronic exposure can affect the central nervous system and cause death.Despite the apparent success of the protest, censors quickly began deleting references to it on social networking sites — a usual practice to prevent demonstrations from spreading.A video posted on the microblogging site Weibo showed the city’s top official, Tang Jun, standing on a police van trying to appease the crowd. Xinhua said Tang and Mayor Li Wancai promised to move the plant out of the city, but some protesters refused to budge until a timetable was given.Xinhua reported that the municipal committee of the Communist Party and the government ordered an immediate shutdown.In 2007, plans for another paraxylene plant in the city of Xiamen in southeastern China provoked protests from residents worried about health hazards. In 2009, the Environment Ministry said it would be built instead in a less populated area of another southeastern city, Zhangzhou.On Friday, the Zhangzhou government said that a paraxylene plant is expected to be completed there by the end of this year and will start operating early next year.

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    Dee and Tom Dannenberg spent the last seven years building a cheesecake business and developing other pastry recipes in preparation for the June 30 opening their own bakery and retirement business.

    Homemade cheesecake business grows

    While most people prepare for their retirement years by thinking about where they’ll travel or how they’ll spend their time relaxing, Dee and Tom Dannenberg have been preparing in a different way. They have spent the last seven years building a cheesecake business and developing recipes for their own bakery.

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    Low rates are squeezing retirees who typically keep most of their savings in safe but low-yielding certificates of deposit money market accounts. The Fed might have made it impossible for many retirees to rely just on interest-bearing accounts.

    Fed’s low rates are no fix for economy or retirees

    The Federal Reserve’s plan to keep interest rates super-low for at least two more years is great news for mortgage refinancers and other borrowers. For retirees and others who need interest income, it’s a threat.

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    With their current low cash stakes, fund managers could miss some of the rally if the market rebounds, and they’ve got little in reserve to buy stocks. Those reserves may dwindle further if stock fund investors respond to the recent market turmoil by pulling out more cash.

    Stock fund cash levels hit record low

    Cash is comforting. That’s the belief many investors embrace when the stock market starts to head south or swing wildly. But the desire of average investors to hold onto their cash, and pull money out of stock mutual funds, has left portfolio managers with fewer dollars to hold onto themselves.

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    About 17 percent of all emergency department visits could take place at less expensive alternatives such as retail clinics and urgent care centers, according to a study published last fall in the journal Health Affairs.

    Health plan rules: What counts as an emergency?

    ER visits are not cheap. Insurers may see a bill of $580, depending on the location, for a case of strep throat treated in an emergency room. In contrast, an urgent care clinic may charge $90 and a retail health clinic (think Walgreens or CVS) might ask for only $40.

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    Kite Hill Winery in Carbondale, owned by Barbara Bush, won four awards, including a Governor’s Cup for its White Chambourcin, in this year’s Illinois State Fair Wine Competition.

    Downstate winery enters product competition

    Kite Hill Vineyards may have been the new kid on the block at this year’s Illinois State Fair Wine Competition, but the small southern Illinois winery left a lasting impression.

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    Wagyu cattle graze in a pasture at Meadows Farm in Cazenovia, N.Y. Kobe beef from the United States can’t be called Kobe. Because of an import ban, Kobe-style or Wagyu beef is the closest most Americans can come to tasting the legendary meat.

    American version of Japan’s Kobe beef growing in popularity

    Domestic production of Kobe-style beef has grown from practically nothing a dozen years ago to a flourishing boutique niche, with recent growth fueled in part by a ban on Japanese beef because of reports of foot-and-mouth disease.

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    Reem Qaraqe, a teller at the Bank of Palestine Plc, counts U.S. dollars at her desk in a branch of the bank in Bethlehem, West Bank. By winning the confidence of her customers, Qaraq is helping to fulfill the vision of the Bank of Palestine’s 35-year-old CEO, Hashim Shawa.

    ‘There’s a girl here’ proves recipe for Mideast bank growth

    Bank of Palestine CEO Hashim Shawa says “hiring women is directly correlated with growth, better business, better reputation, better customer satisfaction, more trust and less staff turnover.”

  •  
    One investment option with rising significance in this political climate is the Roth individual retirement account. Unlike 401(k) plans, investors pay taxes on contributions rather than on their withdrawals. It’s a difference worth noting as lawmakers look for ways to dramatically reduce the deficit.

    5 smart moves to get by in battered economy

    The stock market is swinging wildly and the economy is barely registering a pulse. And that presents some opportunities for consumers. For anyone who still has some financial flexibility, here are five moves worth considering:

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    Rebecca Van Dyck’s hiring at Levi Strauss & Co. is part of an overhaul that includes new leadership, a shift in management structure to eliminate regional control over design and a reduction in how many products are released each year.

    Levi’s hiring means shift to global focus

    Rebecca Van Dyck, who led Nike’s “Just Do It” campaign and helped Apple make the iPhone a best-seller, just took on a taller advertising task: reviving sluggish sales at Levi Strauss & Co.’s namesake brand.

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    Tuition and fees for in-state students at public four-year institutions averaged $7,605 for the 2010-11 school year, according to the College Board, a New York-based nonprofit. At private nonprofit four-year colleges and universities, costs averaged $27,293.

    Affluent parents aren’t giving college kids a free ride

    About half of Americans with assets of more than $250,000 say they won’t pay the entire tab for their children’s college education, according to Bank of America. Having kids foot at least part of the bill for college is an example of how a “sandwich generation” is coping with caring for parents and dependent children at the same time.

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    Jim Capannari makes ice cream at his shop in Mount Prospect. Prices of the milk, butter fat and sugar that are key to Capannari’s ice cream have spiked this year, but he hasn’t passed much of those increases along to customers.

    Ice cream makers try to eat high ingredient costs

    The costs of the milk, butter fat and sugar that are key to Jim Capannari’s ice cream have spiked this year, but he hasn’t passed much of the cost along to customers. The Mount Prospect ice cream maker and a lot of his colleagues don’t feel like they can, saying customers will pay only so much in a down economy.

Life & Entertainment

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    Law talk: Family trust simplifies inherited rental property

    Q. My six siblings and I own some property we inherited from our parents. The property brings in a fair amount of income that we split every month. For now, everyone is happy with the situation and it looks like we will keep the property for the foreseeable future. Attorney Tom Resnick answers readers' questions about real estate law.

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    Francesca, 7, joins sister Marissa, 3½, in the construction of a tubular roller coaster in DuPage Children's Museum's newest exhibit, “Tubes and Tunnels,” during the museum's recent Golden Birthday Celebration.

    Kids get connected with ‘Tubes' exhibit

    They might not realize it, but kids at DuPage Children's Museum's newest permanent exhibit, "Tubes and Tunnels," are learning principals of science that will help them in school. “It's all about physics — force, velocity and motion,” said Alison Segebarth, director of marketing and membership.

  •  
    Singer-songwriter Rufus Wainwright is set to perform with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra at the Ravinia Festival in Highland Park on Sunday, Aug. 14.

    Sunday picks: Rufus meets Ravinia

    Rufus Wainwright comes to town for an outdoor croon at Ravinia tonight, but there's plenty to do earlier on. Celebrate French culture in Wheaton, get a taste of some local theater or say goodbye to the Tall Ships ... just to name a few.

  •  
    An online petition calling for the nuptials of Muppet flat-mates Bert and Ernie has sparked controversy. Chicago resident Lair Scott, who posted the petition, is seeking matrimony for the “Sesame Street” chums as a way to make gay and lesbian kids who watch the show feel better about themselves.

    Bert and Ernie wed? An idea divorced from reality

    An online petition calling for the nuptials of Muppet flat-mates Bert and Ernie has sparked comment, controversy and lots of tweets. But don’t bet on wedding bells to ring.

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    Researchers embedded electronic sensors in a film thinner than the diameter of a human hair, which was placed on a polyester backing like those used for the temporary tattoos popular with kids. The result was a sensor that was flexible enough to move with the skin and would adhere without adhesives.

    Stick-on patch proposed for patient monitoring

    One day, monitoring a patient’s vital signs like temperature and heart rate could be a simple as sticking on a tiny, wireless patch, sort of like a temporary tattoo.

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    Treasures in your attic: Crown Tuscan shades vary widely

    Q. I would like to know about the pink glass piece with a nude woman holding up a bowl. There are no markings, and the piece is in perfect condition with no chips or cracks. The piece is 8 by 7 inches, and when the light hits it, there is a lot of fire in the glass.

  •  
    Madam Vincent created one of the prettiest pictures in an exhibit of rare books featuring roses at the Lenhardt Library of the Chicago Botanic Garden in Glencoe.

    Ancient beauty of the rose unfolds in display

    If you ask the first 10 people you see what their favorite flower is, we’re betting the trend of centuries will hold, and roses will come out on top. And so is the Lenhardt Library at the Chicago Botanic Garden, which will extend the season for these beloved flowers with “Genus Rosa,” a display of rare books about roses through Nov. 13.

  •  
    With vertical gardening, the possibilities are limited only by imagination and available containers and structures.

    Art in the garden: Vertical gardening

    Hanging baskets and vines on trellises are still the most traditional choices for gardening vertically but some recently spotted alternate structures definitely shake up tradition.

  •  
    Tour participants enter Mammoth Cave in Mammoth Cave National Park, Ky. The celebrated cave that has lured the curious for thousands of years remains a temperate 54 degrees year-round.

    Exploring underground wonders of Mammoth Cave

    Blasts of cool air offered a welcome reprieve from the scorching summer as a tour group descended into the depths of the world’s longest-known cave. Some visitors donned light jackets for the long hike past panoramic scenes of subterranean wonders. Heading underground at Mammoth Cave National Park is a sure way to escape the dog days of August.

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    Indian summer fest celebrates 25 years

    The Milwaukee Indian Festival is celebrating their 25 year on Sept. 9-11. This is North America's largest Native American gathering.

  •  

    Ask yourself if wedding woes are about you, or the bride

    Q. My sister is getting married. The problem? Nobody in my family is being asked to participate. The thing is, the groom’s family IS participating in the ceremony. But what is really irking me is this will cost me approximately $5,000 in travel, hotel expenses and food all to be left out in front of everyone. What do I do?

  •  

    Home and garden calendar
    Weekly Home & Garden events calendar

  •  

    Doug McAllister/Under the Hood: Heat, cold spark battery debate

    Q. Can you settle an argument about battery longevity? I say that heat is the true killer of batteries. Summers of 200-degree under-hood temperatures eventually weaken the battery and it fails on the coldest day of the winter. My co-worker claims it’s not heat but cold that kills your battery.

  •  
    Before replacing your sink, consult with a licensed contractor certified to work with solid-surface countertops.

    Ask the plumber: Couple unites on a divided issue

    Q. My wife and I agree that we need to make a change in our kitchen. We've been in this home for a year and the kitchen has a solid-surface "manmade" countertop. There's a built-in flush-mounted kitchen sink that is part of the countertop. But it's a divided double sink and we want a single-bowl sink. Any ideas on how we can change to a "new style" of sink without removing the countertop?

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    This Riverwoods home was designed by architect Arthur Dennis Stevens, who in 1948 became the youngest and last of Frank Lloyd Wright’s students.

    Wright apprentice designed Riverwoods home

    Nestled deep in the woods, just outside the boundaries of the Ryerson Woods Forest Preserve in North suburban Riverwoods, is a home like no other. Blending with its environs to an extent most would not consider possible, the cedar, stone, glass and concrete home appears to grow from the earth like all of the trees and vegetation surrounding it.

  •  

    Home repair: Second layer of shingles carries risk

    Q. My husband and I have read your excellent column ever since moving to Vermont in the early ’80s. In 1986, we moved into a house in Burlington that was built around 1908. The house has a stone foundation, and the house sits at the top of a hill.

  •  
    John Katz-Mariani of Vernon Hills tends the Mitzvah garden behind the Congregation Or Shalom community temple in Vernon Hills.

    Men’s club tends Mitzvah Day garden

    If you think that backyard gardening is a woman’s pursuit, think again.At the Congregation Or Shalom in Vernon Hills, it is members of the Men’s Club who have organized a garden, and already they are seeing the fruits of their labor.

Discuss

  •  

    Public deserves answers on Walsh child support

    A Daily Herald editorial says Congressman Joe Walsh's child support dispute is a not just a private issue in a divorce case but a serious matter of public consequence.

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    The mark of a tired nation

    The ultimate cause of the economic malaise is not a political failure but a political choice. Since the New Deal — and especially since the Great Society — America has chosen an accelerating transfer of wealth from young to old.

  •  

    Wisconsin’s message to big labor

    Why must teachers effectively be forced to join a union to teach in public schools? Nineteen states require it and, according to the Public Service Research Foundation, another 31 states offer varying degrees of opt-outs for teachers who don’t want to be part of the union, but they have to either still pay the member dues or adhere to the district’s collective bargaining agreements.

  •  

    Obama mission is disaster
    A Wauconda letter to the editor: If the stock market collapses and this country ends up on crutches, that’s when you will see Obama and his gang out celebrating.

  •  

    Fiscal solution must put people first
    A Kenilworth letter to the editor: While the debt ceiling deal put in place isn’t perfect, I am pleased that Washington came together to take the first step toward finding a real solution for the problems we face.

  •  

    Vote for candidates, not campaigners
    Letter to the Editor: One-term limits and limits and caps on political funding seem to be the logical answers to the lack of good candidates . We’ve got to get back to electing people who are truly knowledgeable and dedicated to the best interests of this country and not their own interests.

  •  

    So, who’s guilty of breaking law?
    Letter to the Editor: In a recent announcement, the state expropriated money supposedly donated to charities via Illinois tax returns for operational costs. And that raises an interesting question. Can or should the state be prosecuted by the feds for this action?

  •  

    Don’t disparage tea party patriots
    Letter to the Editor: Tea party patriots have been doing their best and working hard to wake people up to the fact that, in order for us to get our country back, we must return to following the Constitution of the United States of America. Instead of term limits, I would like to see the congressman and person in the Oval Office, who have subverted the Constitution by supporting unconstitutional laws, put on trial for treason.

  •  

    Make decisions fair to seniors
    Prior to the national debt agreements, there was talk of lost Social Security payments. That would mean that if the government doesn’t pay out, then our workforce would not be obligated to pay in.

  •  

    More spending will get us nowhere
    Congress did not present a budget for 2011. This is like a charge card that has reached its limit. When most people reach their limit, they cut back, but Congress feels we should spend more.

  •  

    Jobs created when middle class spends
    The corporations are sitting on trillions of dollars. These “job creators” have not been creating jobs. We need to make sure that the “spenders” have money in their pockets.

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