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Daily Archive : Saturday August 6, 2011

News

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    The Farmers Insurance Zeppelin airship flies over DuPage County.

    Zeppelin airship lumbers across suburban skies

    Ever wanted to take a ride in an airship? You can this weekend for a mere $375 on the Zeppelin airship at DuPage Airport this weekend. Just don't call it a blimp (you'll learn why on the flight).

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    Haley Reinhart performs during the American Idol concert.

    Images: Haley Reinhart and the American Idol tour
    The American Idol summer tour rolled into the Allstate Arena in Rosemont on Saturday. Wheeling native Haley Reinhart, along with 10 other Idol finalists including season 10 winner Scotty McCreery, performed for thousands of Idol fans.

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    59-year-old Randy Suchy of Naperville helped save 12-year-old Evan Schwarz of Bolingbrook from a Fox River undertow near the Geneva dam.

    Naperville man ‘didn't hesitate' to save Bolingbrook boy on Fox River

    The man who saved a 12-year-old who slipped into the Fox River in Geneva should be remembered as a hero, those who know Randy Suchy say. “Everyone I've talked to said it would be just like Randy to give his life for someone else's," said Bill Suchy.

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    Haley Reinhart performs during the "Idols Live" concert Saturday at Allstate Arena in Rosemont.

    Wheeling sweetheart Reinhart plays to sold-out crowd

    Haley Reinhart's hometown crowd couldn't get enough of her Saturday night. More than once during the sold-out “Idols Live” show, the audience at Allstate Arena chanted the Wheeling native's name, urging Haley to sing for just a little longer.

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    Zion Mayor Lane Harrison, left, had touted the Lake County Fielders as an economic boost for his city. He joined actor Kevin Costner, a Fielders investor, on an off day at Zion's temporary baseball stadium last year.

    Expert: Fielders a ‘terrible investment' for Zion

    Zion's lust to provide a city-owned stadium to an independent baseball team that owes $185,000 in back rent since its inaugural season in 2010 was perfectly understandable, says a prominent sports economist. But that doesn't mean it was a good idea.

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    Mary O’Connor of St. Charles greets members of the Mount Prospect Cheerleading Club who sponsored her on the Susan G. Komen 3-Day Walk for the Cure. The club chose O’Connor after she met a former employee of her event-planning firm who is on the club board at the event last year.

    Komen walkers draw cheers, support in Mt. Prospect

    About 19,000 walkers passed through Mount Prospect on Saturday in the Susan G. Komen 3-Day Walk for the Cure to raise money for cancer research. And a group of cheerleaders singled out a St. Charles resident as their person to support in this year's march.

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    Woodridge man charged with killing Aurora man

    A Woodridge man has been charged in the fatal shooting of an Aurora man Thursday night on Chicago’s West Side. Miguel Vazquez, 26, of the 7900 block of Everglade Avenue, was charged with one count of first-degree murder in the death of Robert Solomon, 33,

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    Study: More casinos, more gambling addicts

    One university study shows that living near a casino can as much as double your likelihood of becoming addicted to gambling. It’s a temptation that may become stronger with the recent opening of the new Rivers Casino in Des Plaines, plans for tens of thousands of video poker machines, and the possibility of five more casinos and slot machines at racetracks.

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    2 dead, 2 in critical after I-88 crash

    Two people are dead and two are in critical condition after a four-vehicle accident Saturday evening in a westbound lane of I-88 near Lisle, according to Illinois State Police.

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    Police reports
    Aurelio Contreras, 55, of Lessenden Place, was arrested at 7:30 p.m. Aug. 5 on the bike path by the 0-100 block of Times Square in Elgin and charged with attempted robbery and two counts of aggravated battery, police said. Contreras beat the victim with a belt to try to take $5 from him.

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    Leah Kirchmann of Winnipeg, Manitobam is the winner of the Pro Women’s Stage 2 Road Race on the second day of the Tour of Elk Grove.

    Pro women cyclists grab attention at Tour

    This year, for the first time, the Alexian Brothers Tour of Elk Grove features a three-day, three-stage professional women’s race that has drawn the largest number of elite women cyclists the race has ever seen, officials said.

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    Woodstock woman killed, Round Lake Beach man injured in head-on crash

    Sonia Hume, 38, of Woodstock, was killed in a head-on collision with a car that was trying to pass other vehicles on Friday morning in unincorporated McHenry, officials said. The other driver, a Round Lake Beach man, was injured.

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    Leah Kirchmann of Winnipeg, Manitoba is the winner of the Pro Women’s Stage 2 Road Race on the second day of the Tour of Elk Grove.

    Images: Tour of Elk Grove, Day Two
    Racing continued Sunday during the second day of the Tour of Elk Grove. Some of the featured races included the stage two of the Women's Pro Circuit Stage and stage two of the Men's Pro Road Race.

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    Sklyer Grey performs during the Lollapalooza music festival at Grant Park in Chicago, Saturday, Aug. 6, 2011.

    Images: Lollapalooza Day Two
    Day two of Lollapalooza at Grant Park in Chicago included performances by bands Skylar Grey, Cee Lo Green and My Morning Jacket.

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    Bernardo Ramirez-Barron

    McHenry man charged with sex abuse

    A McHenry man was arrested on charges of providing alcohol to two juveniles before engaging in sex with one of them, authorities said Friday. Hospital staff reported that two juveniles were being treated for alcohol intoxication and allegations of sexual abuse. The man admitted to being involved in sexual relationship with one of the victims for several months.

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    South Barrington recycle event on Aug. 20

    The South Barrington Park District is encouraging the community to recycle responsibly by offering the fourth annual Electronics Recycling Event, 1-3 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 20. Drive up, volunteers will help you unload, and you can drive off with an empty trunk and the positive feeling that you kept your electronics items out of the landfill.

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    Cary 26 board says no to union

    The Cary Elementary District 26 school board has declined a request from the teachers union to enter into interest arbitration. In a letter to the teachers union on Friday, the school board vice president wrote that the district could not put the future in the hands of a third party.

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    Laura Dwyer of Batavia in her vendor booth for her company, “Rainbow Gardens” at the World of Faeries Festival at Vasa Park in South Elgin on Saturday. Dwyer and her mother, Kathy Clary of St. Charles sell whimsical wigs (like the one she is wearing), fairy clothing and accessories.

    Whimsy for adults and children alike at South Elgin festival

    If you think the world of magic, fairies and elves is the stuff of kids, think again.The World of Faeries Festival at Vasa Park in South Elgin drew plenty of grown-up fans on Saturday, including Susan Willrett, who donned a colorful green-and-pink “Rosie the Flower Fairy” costume of her own making.

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    Joe Tenerelli of Buffalo Grove served as the chairman of the Buffalo Grove parade for 25 years.

    Buffalo Grove parade organizer ‘loved people’
    Not one for small gestures, Joe Tenerelli surprised his family and friends by showing up at his 90th birthday party in style. “He was never a jeans kind of guy,” daughter Carol Ann Kunz said. “He came in his tuxedo.” Mr. Tenerelli, 90, died July 31.

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    Elgin man shot at home

    An Elgin resident hosting a gathering was shot early Saturday morning by one of two armed offenders who entered the resident’s home and demanded money, a city spokeswoman said Saturday.

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    Elk Grove Village Mayor Craig Johnson rests after setting a time of 12:09 minutes in the Mayor's Charity Time-Trial Friday during the Tour of Elk Grove.

    Pro cyclists take to streets for Tour of Elk Grove

    The 2011 Alexian Brothers Tour of Elk Grove kicked off Friday with a record number of professional men and women cyclists participating in separate three-day, three-stage criterium races.

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    Dalia Satas serves up a Magners Irish Cider Saturday during the first Wheaton Ale Fest, an event featuring more than 100 craft beers in downtown Wheaton.

    First Wheaton Ale Fest a success

    The first Wheaton Ale Fest, an outdoor microbrew festival in the city's downtown, sold out by 2:30 p.m. Saturday, with 1,650 tickets sold.

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    Scott Webb

    DuPage authorities searching for indicted ex-cop

    A former Woodridge cop accused of pilfering more than $30,000 from a police charity continues to elude authorities more than two months after his indictment, officials said. Scott Webb, 39, has been wanted since May 23.

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    Afghan President Hamid Karzai says 31 U.S. special forces and seven Afghan soldiers were killed when a helicopter, similar to the one shown here crashed in eastern Wardak province Saturday.

    Elite SEAL team among casualties in chopper crash

    A military helicopter was shot down in eastern Afghanistan, killing 31 U.S. special operation troops, most of them from the elite Navy SEALs unit that killed al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden, along with seven Afghan commandos.

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    Participants sing and pray Saturday at The Response, a call to prayer for a nation in crisis, in Houston. Texas Gov. Rick Perry addressed the religious rally.

    Texas governor: Turn to God for answers to nation’s woes

    Texas Gov. Rick Perry asked Christians to turn to God for answers to the nation’s troubles as he held court Saturday over a national prayer rally attended by thousands of evangelical conservatives, an important constituency should the Republican seek the GOP presidential nomination.

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    Both parties stung by S&P action

    The downgrade of the U.S.’s AAA credit rating by Standard & Poor’s darkens President Barack Obama’s re-election chances while also damaging members of Congress from both parties , political analysts said.

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    Rangers find body of Yosemite waterfall victim

    The body of a California man who died after being swept into a raging waterfall at Yosemite National Park nearly three weeks ago has been found, rangers said Saturday.

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    Bobby Bailey stretches to tighten a screw that holds a corner of a solar panel at the O2 Energies solar power farm in Newland, N.C. Of the 11 states that do not set voluntary or mandatory requirements on how much green energy utilities must buy, eight of those states are clustered in the Southeast.

    Southeast resists renewable energy mandates

    States across the country are gradually forcing or cajoling their electric companies into buying renewable energy, but the trend has fallen flat in the Southeast.

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    Will Singing Hills be silenced? Barn’s future uncertain

    A distinct yellow barn on Fish Lake Road just north of Gilmer Road near Volo will remain for the foreseeable future as Lake County Forest Preserve commissioners consider the costs of preserving Singing Hills barn. “It’s a landmark. People in the community know what it is," said Commissioner Bonnie Thomson Carter of Ingleside. “They see it. It means something to them.”

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    Elgin police Detective Mark Whaley saved a 2-year-old's life by using CPR at a Fourth of July party in Campton Hills. He says it was really a group effort with family and partygoers helping at the scene.

    Elgin cop saves toddler using CPR

    It was the 17th anniversary of the day Mark Whaley became a cop: July 3. He was enjoying an early 4th of July party with family and friends in Campton Hills relaxing on his day off. Then the mood changed. His 14-year-old daughter noticed a toddler in the pool. She jumped in the water and pulled the boy out, noticing immediately he was in trouble. Whaley's wife started chest compressions and...

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    The Illinois Gaming Board has released its July riverboat casino revenue report showing Rivers Casino in Des Plaines raked in more than $17 million in its first two weeks of operation since opening July 18 to massive crowds.

    Des Plaines casino takes in $17 million in first two weeks

    The Illinois Gaming Board has released its July riverboat casino revenue report, showing Rivers Casino in Des Plaines raked in more than $17 million in receipts and drew more than 270,000 visitors during its first two weeks of operation since opening July 18.

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    Kane County wants hunters to help with deer culling

    Kane County Forest Preserve District officials are working with the state to become a drop station for deer parts from animals killed by hunters if they want to voluntarily test them for chronic wasting disease. The state hasn’t set numbers for deer they’ll cull in Kane County next year, but forest preserve officials believe local hunters can keep that number low if they’ll voluntarily test their...

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    Blackburn College has planted walnut trees on a farm south of Carlineville.

    Blackburn alumnus gives back with walnut trees

    Marvin Mahan, 90, gave Blackburn College $1 million in seed money to build a new science building that opened in 2008 and now bears his name. And he’s given the school something else he hopes will grow in value: walnut trees.

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    Kayla Obert, 20, of Quincy brought 53 rabbits to the Adams County fair.

    Raising rabbits is labor of love

    One summer when she was around 11 years old, Kayla Obert of rural Quincy walked into the rabbit barn at the Adams County Fair and immediately fell in love with the furry critters.

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    Bartlett RR crossing to close for repairs

    The Canadian National railroad crossing on Stearns Road near Powis Road in Bartlett will be closed for repairs starting at 8 a.m. Monday, Aug. 8.

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    Iliana Williams, 8, is comforted Friday by her mother, Paula, during a fundraiser for the family of her friend and classmate Sydney Chidester, 9, of Batavia. Sydney was seriously injured in a house explosion in Wisconsin Sunday that killed her grandparents. She remains hospitalized in Madison. The kids have been friends since kindergarten at Louise White Elementary School in Batavia.

    Batavia embraces explosion victims’ kin

    Friends of a 9-year-old girl injured in a house explosion while vacationing with her grandparents last Sunday in Wisconsin hold a lemonade sale to raise funds for the family. The grandparents died in the explosion in Juneau County, according to police.

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    Sophie Loiacano, right, 9, of Lake in the Hills and Aspen Davis, left, 8, of Lake in the Hills, show the one-year-old cow, Honey Suckle, some love at the McHenry County Fair on Friday.

    Images: Day three of the 2011 McHenry County Fair
    Day three of the 2011 McHenry County Fair in Woodstock.

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    Shaunese Teamer

    Lake County Chamber names new executive director

    The board of directors of the Lake County Chamber of Commerce has appinted Shaunese Teamer as its new executive director. Teamer, who joined the chamber Aug. 1, has more than 20 years of marketing and public relations experience.

Sports

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    Richard Dent poses with a bust of himself during the induction ceremony at the Pro Football Hall of Fame on Saturday, Aug. 6, 2011, in Canton, Ohio.

    Richard Dent gives thanks for what he became

    During his Pro Football Hall of Fame induction speech Saturday, Richard Dent said he “wanted to be someone special my mother and father and brothers could look up to.”

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    Chicago Rush falls to Arizona Rattlers in conference championship

    — A fourth-quarter comeback fell short, and the Chicago Rush (14-6) lost 54-48 to the Arizona Rattlers in the Arena Football League National Conference championship at the US Airways Center on Saturday night before 6,886.The Rattlers (18-2) will host ArenaBowl XXIV on Friday.

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    Zach Stewart throws to the Minnesota Twins in the first inning Saturday in Minneapolis.

    Sox beat Twins behind call-up’s stellar outing

    Right-hander Zach Stewart was called up from the minor leagues to start Saturday’s game at Minnesota. Acquired by the White Sox from Toronto on July 27, Stewart’s promise had been better than his reality. But he succeeded against the Twins, allowing just 1 run in 6 innings as the White Sox made it 2 straight wins at Target Field with a 6-1 victory.

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    Illini alumni show how it should be done

    Illinois held a star-studded alumni basketball game Saturday night at Assembly Hall. Did the presence of Deron Williams and Dee Brown encourage future stars to help re-establish the Illini program?

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    Carlos Zambrano celebrates after hitting a solo home run against the Reds on Saturday. Zambrano's 23rd career homer moved him into a tie for ninth all-time among pitchers.

    Big Z does it all against Reds

    When Carlos Zambrano is in the spotlight, things always get interesting. And that was certainly the case Saturday at Wrigley Field in the Cubs' 11-4 blowout victory over the Cincinnati Reds.

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    Bears adamant: Install FieldTurf, scrap sod

    Bears players are overwhelmingly in favor of replacing the grass at Soldier Field with artificial FieldTurf.

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    Tiger Woods reacts on the 16th fairway as his shot goes into a bunker Saturday in the Bridgestone Invitational golf tournament at Firestone Country Club in Akron, Ohio.

    Woods struggles again at Bridgestone

    Tiger Woods has discovered something about his game that he never imagined could be a problem: He’s hitting it too straight.

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    Chicago Sky scouting report
    The Sky is in the midst of one of the toughest stretches of its schedule, and so far, not so good.

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    Richard Dent, left, looks on as his presenter, Joe Gilliam, unveils a bust of Dent during Dent's induction ceremony at the Pro Football Hall of Fame on Saturday in Canton, Ohio. Gilliam is a former Tennessee State coach.

    Tom Thayer lauds Richard Dent on his all-around greatness

    Hall of Fame defensive end Richard Dent was much more than just a great pass rusher, according to former teammate Tom Thayer.

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    Tony Campana follows through on a two-run inside-the-park home run during the first inning of a game against the Cincinnati Reds Friday.

    Campana gets ‘outrageous’ number of texts about his HR

    It’s been quite the whirlwind for Tony Campana since becoming the first Cub to collect his first career home run with an inside-the-parker since Carmen Mauro accomplished the feat on Oct. 3, 1948.

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    Devin Hester, here catching a TD pass behind the Eagles’ Asante Samuel, says he’s not having to think as much when running pass routes.

    Bears excited about what Hester can do this year

    Devin Hester seems more comfortable as a receiver in his second season in Mike Martz's offense, but the Bears hope to give him enough down time to keep him fresh for the return game.

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    Monmouth quarterback Alex Tanney, left, talks with host Daniel Browning Smith, right, and a cameraman from “Stan Lee's Superhumans,” which airs on the History Channel. Tanney, a former Lexington High School star who garnered international attention for a trick shot video posted on YouTube, will be featured in the upcoming season on the show.

    Monmouth's quarterback may be superhuman

    A five-minute YouTube video shows Monmouth quarterback Alex Tanney throwing a football with remarkable accuracy. It is impressive, entertaining. But is it superhuman? We'll find out, courtesy of the History cable channel.

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    Nancy Lieberman, right, played in a WNBA game on July 24, 2008, at 50 years old. Lieberman signed a seven-day contract with the Detroit Shock and broke her own record as the oldest player in league history. She played one game and had 2 assists and turnovers against the Houston Comets, who beat the Shock 79–61.

    Basketball legend Nancy Lieberman’s new book features leadership strategies

    Now it’s Nancy Lieberman’s turn to share her playbook.The legendary basketball star, broadcaster and coach was in Chicago at a Sky game recently to promote her new book, “Playbook for Success,” a guide that offers strategies and techniques about how to be a strong leader, particularly in the business world.“It’s the first business book I’ve done,” said Lieberman, an NCAA champion, a Hall of Famer and a former player in the United States Basketball League, a men’s professional league. “It’s a navigational system for being successful. I’m trying to teach people how to work together.”

Business

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    Australia’s economic outlook ‘favorable’

    Australia’s economic outlook is favorable, with activity “expected to bounce back in the second quarter” of the year, the International Monetary Fund said.

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    Gap, the nation's largest clothing chain, rolled out a marketing campaign that features 30- to 90-second online documentary-style videos centered around the goings on at its denim design studio in Los Angeles called the Pico Creative Loft.

    Gap touts jeans with tacos and Twitter

    The “1969: L.A. and Beyond” series of short videos has all the elements of a reality TV show. It has action. It has fashion. And the star of the show -- Gap -- is always in demand.

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    College students Saloni Shah, 18, from left, Roshani Munat, 18 and Shruti Jain, 19, check Facebook accounts on their smartphones in Mumbai, India, on Wednesday. India has 32 million Facebook users, according to socialbakers.com.

    Poor in India add Facebook before tap water

    Cheaper Internet-ready phones may make India Facebook Inc.’s biggest market after the U.S. next year with more than 50 million users

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    Ed Ho, right, uses Skype to talk with a friend in Palo Alto, Calif., in 2009. An new Skype app lets users make free voice and video calls from their iPads to other Skype users over Wi-Fi or 3G wireless connections.

    Skype releases online calling app for iPad

    The new app, which can be downloaded at Apple’s iTunes store, lets users make free voice and video calls from their iPads to other Skype users over Wi-Fi or 3G wireless connections.

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    Reviewer Peter Svensson says the Revo is a good value at $470 with a DVD drive or $570 with Blu-ray.

    Review: Acer media-center PC has built-in touchpad

    The new Revo RL100 personal computer is designed from the ground up to fit into an entertainment center. It’s smaller than most DVD players and very quiet, according to reviewer Peter Svensson.

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    The entrance to the Sears Holdings Corp. Prairie Stone campus area in Hoffman Estates. Sears is narrowing its search to Washington, D.C. and Boston, but the company is using the discussions as leverage to sweeten the incentives to stay in Illinois.

    Sears explores move, but experts have their doubts

    While Sears Holding Corp. is considering leaving its Hoffman Estates headquarters and taking more than 6,000 jobs out of Illinois, the costs — in money, lost employees and disruption — make moving an expensive proposition, one that some experts say they doubt the struggling retailer will undertake.

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    The Editions app includes a variety of default sections such as top news and sports. Users can tweak what they see by adding keywords and topics they want to read more about.

    AOL launches personalized magazine app for iPad

    AOL is trying to snatch a larger portion of the tablet computer audience by launching free iPad software that presents a customized, daily e-magazine that draws in content from all over the Web.

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    Google and other companies have ramped up spending on patent portfolios in recent months to gain exclusive rights to a broadening array of technology, much of it used in the emerging area of smartphones.

    Google says Apple, Microsoft and Oracle waging ‘hostile campaign’

    Google alleges its rivals are banding together to purchase patents to keep them out of Google’s hands and taking other steps to make it more expensive for handset makers to use the Android operating system.

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    Jeans are so yesterday. Students today are looking for something a little dressier like the actors on “Gossip Girl.”

    ‘Gossip Girl’ back-to-school couture is boon for retailers

    Teens are following the example of television shows such as “Gossip Girl” — in which actress Blake Lively prances to class in couture — as they head to stores to stock up for the new school year. Retailers, stung by slowing sales growth and record cotton costs, are obliging with blouses and dresses that sell for higher prices.

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    Hacker attacks over the past five years have targeted a broad range of organizations, including the United Nations, the International Olympic Committee and companies mostly in the United States.

    Report: Global cyberattack under way for 5 years

    A computer security firm says cybercriminals have spent at least the past five years targeting more than 70 government entities, nonprofit groups and corporations around the world to steal troves of data.

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    Broadband providers generally advertise Internet services that offer connections up to a certain speed, but they don’t guarantee those speeds.

    Broadband services approach advertised speeds

    The major providers of residential broadband services in the U.S. deliver Internet connections that are generally 80 percent to 90 percent of maximum advertised speeds, according to a government study.

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    Vijay Singh, 25, bottom right, registers at an Internet cafe in Mumbai, India, on Wednesday. New regulations in India prohibit websites and service providers from hosting information that could be regarded as “harmful,” “blasphemous” or “insulting” to any other nation, among other things.

    India criticized for new web rules

    New Internet rules that seek to enhance national security and limit offensive content have sparked an angry debate about free speech in the world’s largest democracy.

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    Serve is similar to eBay Inc.’s PayPal service in that it’s based on pre-funded accounts,

    Verizon Wireless to install AmEx app on phones

    Verizon Wireless, the country’s largest cellphone company, will install apps for credit card issuer American Express Co.’s new online payment service, Serve, on its phones and tablets.

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    Artist’s rendering an innovative wraparound curtain encircling the Olympic Stadium for the 2012 Games.

    Olympic stadium gets cloth curtains
    London organizers have sealed a deal with U.S.-based Dow Chemical Co. to restore an innovative curtain to encircle the Olympic Stadium for the 2012 Games.

Life & Entertainment

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    Yube Cubes start at $29.50 each and all kinds of personalization is available. This wall unit is $354.

    What will come in handy in the dorm room

    Every store comes up with cool dorm finds this time of year. But if you're going to be a freshman and it's your first time living away from home — and maybe your first time sharing a room — how do you know what you really need?

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    Marilyn Dopler of RE/MAX Suburban says the kitchen in this Tudor was recently updated.

    Suburban Tudor is a private retreat

    This elegant Tudor in Prospect Heights feels like home, according to listing agent Marilyn Dopler of RE/MAX Suburban.

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    Skip Wilson, left, scuba dives with the Bottom Breathers Dive Club in Aurora.

    Active adults having a blast while staying healthy

    Today’s over 50 crowd has learned an important lesson from their doctors, media reports and health gurus, as well as from watching their parents’ decline: Stay active if you want to stave off heart disease, diabetes and other killer conditions.

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    Fashion designers in Denmark are banking on bright colors for next spring and summer to help shake the retail industry out of a slump.

    Images: Fashion Week in Copenhagen
    Designers at Copenhagen Fashion Week pinned high hopes on the bright colors of spring and summer, which might help shake off the industry’s retail blues. “For many seasons we have been talking about financial crisis. But I sense a great spirit of optimism in our industry at the moment,” said Eva Kruse, CEO of Copenhagen Fashion Week. Danish fashion brands suffered a sharp decline in sales in the aftermath of the global financial crisis of 2008-2009, but have rebounded since late 2010, owing to export-led growth.

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    Author J.K. Rowling has recorded a television program with the BBC that shows her coming to terms with the revelation that her family had confused Louis Volant, a war hero awarded with the Legion d’honneur for his bravery during the Battle of Verdun, with her real great-grandfather, who had the same name and also fought for France.

    J.K. Rowling uncovers French roots in TV show

    For years, Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling and her family had honored a French ancestor who they believed was a World War I war hero. But the best-selling author has now discovered that her family had been mistaken about the true identity of her great-grandfather.

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    Two paintings attributed to Rembrandt van Rijn are on display at the Rembrandt and the Face of Jesus exhibit at the Philadelphia Museum of Art in Philadelphia. The exhibit is scheduled to run from Aug. 3 through Oct. 30.

    ‘Rembrandt and the Face of Jesus’ in Philadelphia

    “Rembrandt and the Face of Jesus” is open in Philadelphia, after its three-month premiere run at the Louvre Museum in Paris. It’s the only East Coast stop for the exhibit, which continues through Oct. 30 and contains works from public and private collections in the U.S. and Europe.

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    Should parents let kids have cellphones?

    One of the more vexing questions during back-to-school-shopping season is whether to buy a cellphone. It’s a hard question to answer personally and a hard one for parents to agree on collectively.

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    Alice Di Giovanni, second from right, poses with her father, Antonello Di Giovanni, right, her mother, Anna Manikowska, second from left, and her nanny, Marisol Espinoza Lazo, in Miami Beach, Fla. Alice, 1, is one of an increasing number of Americans living in homes where languages other than English are spoken. Her Polish-Canadian mother speaks to her in French, her father in Italian and her Honduran nanny in Spanish.

    Parents look for best ways to raise bilingual kids

    While past generations of Americans sometimes encouraged children to abandon mother tongues to assimilate faster, today’s parents see the benefits of being fluent in more than one language, and they look for ways to encourage it.

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    As a young teenager, before the fame, kids, paparazzi and front-row seats at fashion shows, Moore regularly passed an Ann Taylor store at a local mall, taking note of the clothes. In the years since, she’s been a red-carpet rebel, jeans-wearing mom, bikini globetrotter and Versace model. Now things have come full circle, and Moore is the star of the Ann Taylor fall ad campaign.

    Demi Moore adds her style stamp to Ann Taylor

    Demi Moore regularly passed an Ann Taylor store at a local mall, taking note of the clothes. In the years since, she’s been a red-carpet rebel, jeans-wearing mom, bikini globetrotter and Versace model. Now things have come full circle, and Moore is the star of the Ann Taylor fall ad campaign.

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    Dollywood officials respond to lesbian couple

    Dollywood officials have offered a refund to a lesbian couple after an employee asked one of the women to turn her T-shirt reading “marriage is so gay” inside-out to avoid offending others during a recent visit to the Tennessee theme park complex.

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    Seven-year-old Ellie Clark holds her insulin pump, which also works with an implant to display blood sugar levels. A security researcher who is diabetic has identified flaws that could allow an attacker to remotely control insulin pumps and alter the readouts of blood-sugar monitors.

    Insulin pumps, monitors vulnerable to hacking

    A security researcher who is diabetic has identified flaws that could allow an attacker to remotely control insulin pumps and alter the readouts of blood-sugar monitors. As a result, diabetics could get too much or too little insulin, a hormone they need for proper metabolism.

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    “Mad Men” has gone beyond a fashion fad. The AMC show about a 1960s ad agency that counts its clothes as an additional character continues to influence runways and retailers, including its own branded collection debuting next week at Banana Republic.

    ‘Mad Men,’ Banana Republic polish office clothes

    “Mad Men” has gone beyond a fashion fad. The AMC show about a 1960s ad agency that counts its clothes as an additional character continues to influence runways and retailers, including its own branded collection debuting next week at Banana Republic.

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    Since your kitchen island is such an important place in your home, make it beautiful.

    Give your kitchen island a makeover

    For most of us, the kitchen is the heart of the home, and some of our best memories are made when it’s filled with family and friends. If you have an island in your kitchen, chances are this is the hub around which all the love and laughter is shared.

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    On homes and real estate: Good credit won’t help her borrow more than house value

    Q. I have really good credit, but no equity. I am considering buying a home at a cheap price as an investment to sell in two to four years. Is it possible to get a mortgage that includes enough to pay off existing debt and home improvement costs?

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    Pickleball uses oversize table-tennis paddles to volley a whiffle ball. The game is finding a growing audience, particularly among seniors.

    Seniors embrace a new racket in pickleball

    Two mixed-doubles teams dashed around a badminton court at the Thomas Jefferson Community Center in Arlington, Va. - but they were not playing badminton. Instead, it looked as if the players were using oversize table-tennis paddles to volley a whiffle ball over a slightly undersized tennis net.

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    Mortgage Professor: Comparable loan data would aid borrowers

    One of the most vexing and perplexing problems faced by mortgage borrowers has long been the two irreconcilable disclosures they receive about their loan: the Truth in Lending (TIL) form administered by the Federal Reserve, and the Good Faith Estimate (GFE) form administered by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Past efforts by these agencies to consolidate the forms, or at least reconcile them, never succeeded.

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    Ask the broker: Any good sides to a short sale?

    Q. I have a Las Vegas property that I currently rent. The house is about $160K upside down, and I lose about $500 every month. I’d like to get it off my back with a short sale when the lease ends in a couple months. What are the good and bad points of a short sale?

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    Architect Sarah Deeds used a sail-shaped desk to work with the mere 120 square feet in her stand-alone office in Berkeley, Calif.

    Backyard hideaways: A home away from home, but not far away

    In a society largely removed from its agrarian roots, traditional agricultural buildings still touch something deep. Take Jeffery Broadhurst's Crib, a weekend cabin that doubles as iconic sculpture.

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    Wheeling native and “American Idol” finalist Haley Reinhart returns to the suburbs Saturday for the American Idol Live! Tour 2011 at the Allstate Arena.

    Weekend picks: Don't miss Haley's 'Idol' tour

    Cheer on Wheeling native Haley Reinhart when she comes back to town Saturday to perform with former "American Idol" contestants as part of the American Idol Live! Tour 2011 at the Allstate Arena in Rosemont.

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    Ray Franczak, president of R. Franczak and Associates, on the site of one of his condominium projects in Palatine.

    Industry Insider: Ray Franczak

    Ray Franczak and his partner and brother-in-law, Bob Lewandowski, believe in finding a niche and being faithful to it. For more than 40 years, R. Franczak and Associates has been constructing multifamily residential buildings, first in Chicago and more recently, in the North, Northwest and West suburbs

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    Home repair: Buried tree stumps give reader sinking feeling

    Q. The houses in this neighborhood were built among existing woods, so the builder had to cut down lots of trees. My guess is the builder buried the numerous tree stumps rather than carting them away. Half of the yard has always had lots of depressions. What can we do?

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    Home inspector: Buyer complains of false disclosure

    Q. We recently bought a foreclosed home from a bank and were not told the truth about what the heating and air conditioning system was. The home inspector did report that the system needed to be repaired or replaced. Can we sue the agents and the home inspector for replacement of this system?

Discuss

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    The Soapbox

    Joe Walsh's child support. Super legislature? Birds, backboards, Cubs, Sox and more. All topics of this week's Soapbox from the Daily Herald Editorial Board.

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    The unknown heroes hiding among us

    Columnist Susan Estrich: The world is a very, very dangerous place. There are many people out there who would like to hurt us; who value their own lives and those of their children so little that every day they are trying to figure out ways to sacrifice them in order to harm us. We Americans are the luckiest people on the face of the globe.

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    Roskam more interested in making Obama look bad
    I believe you, Congressman Roskam, and the rest of GOP in House and Senate are not as interested in deficit reduction as you are in defeating President Obama in 2012. Please prove me wrong.

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    Third Blago trial? Get serious
    After former Gov. Rod Blagojevich was convicted of 17 of 20 charges against him, there was a lot of oinking from him and his lawyers claiming judicial bias in his bid for a third trial. He has not stopped bending, folding and mutilating the truth

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    Quinn’s veto hinders DuPage educators
    We teach our students that one of the primary responsibilities of the executive branch of government in the United States is to enforce the law. Our students and teachers, like us, will surely doubt that based upon Governor Quinn’s recent actions.On June 30, at a major press conference, he announced his amendatory veto of the fiscal year 2012 budget passed by the state legislature. Specifically, he vetoed the line item for state support of our 44 regional offices of education. His action in this matter not only shocks us, but it also makes our ability to serve the students of DuPage County effectively much more difficult. Article 3 of the Illinois School Code (105 ILCS 5/3 et seq.) clearly outlines the state’s expectations for duties of regional superintendents and their assistants. It also clearly defines the state’s responsibility for funding the salaries of those individuals. Their duties are related not to local laws but to state regulations. Those individuals have now worked for one month without pay. It would appear the fate of their continued existence now lies with the state legislature in its veto session. However, that session will not convene until late October. How many Illinois workers in other fields would continue to work without pay for four months?In DuPage County we are blessed to have a regional office of education that is a true partner in improving public education for our communities. Leadership makes a difference, and our regional superintendent, Dr. Darlene Ruscitti, has created an office that not only ably handles regulatory duties, but also provides high quality educational support services. According to state law, that is the state’s responsibility.We strongly encourage the governor to work most expediently with the legislature to rectify this matter. Kim PerkinsSuperintendent, Bloomingdale Elementary District 13and the 38 other public school superintendents of DuPage County

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    Obama’s plans could destroy the economy
    If one were to deliberately devise a plan to destroy the American economy, Obama’s policies would be the most effective. So how do we explain this? I believe the president’s plan is to bring the American economy to its knees by the destruction of capitalism.

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    Don’t cut Social Security benefits
    U.S. Rep. John Boehner, a Republican, wants to cut benefits to people who receive Social Security and Medicare. These benefits, by the way, were paid for by the recipients.

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    Some space advice from the Russians?
    Thank God that that useless space shuttle program is over. NASA said the shuttle would lead us to a manned landing on Mars by the 1990s — we aren’t even close.

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    Raise tax on hedge fund managers?
    If we restore progressive taxation and if we place a tax on Wall Street transactions we can contain the greed. However, this simple solution has been rendered impossible by the Greedy Old Party.

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    Games played as people suffer
    A Zion letter to the editor: Like millions of other Americans, I didn’t realize what an economic abyss the people of our nation were about to fall into.

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    Get the facts on taxes, debt
    A Gurnee letter to the editor: Dear tea party, I have a little history lesson for you.

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    Lake fair a forum for special interests
    A Round Lake letter to the editor: The Lake County Fair stooped to a new low on Saturday evening during the rodeo event. The fair literally brought politics into the rodeo.

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    When laws broken, accept consequences
    If the workers' termination is based solely on immigration status and it is determined they are here legally, then I support efforts to draw attention to the matter. Equally, if it is concluded that laws have been broken, will “our community feels disrespected” and abide by the consequences?

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    Gacy story merely sensationalism
    Certainly there is enough material in the world that you can report on rather than to dredge up a horrific crime from 40 years ago, bringing nothing but more pain to the families of this criminal’s victims. Haven’t they been through enough?

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    Harry Potter will always be part of us
    I think that I am part of a special generation. While there are avid Harry Potter fans of every age around the world, I am of the generation who grew up with Harry Potter. It feels as though not only my favorite book series is over, but part of my childhood.

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    ‘Made in America’ brought prosperity
    If employment doesn’t improve, the so-called recovery will eventually implode. After all, it’s the working middle class that buys the goods found in the big box stores. Where are they supposed to get the money to buy these goods if they’re not working?

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    Republican leaders’ actions should make us proud
    Don’t believe big-government leftists who call the tea party “terrorists” from fear of curtailed, chronic spending (not exactly the civil, toned-down rhetoric called for after the heinous shooting of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords of Arizona).

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    Zombie strip is just gross
    Letter to the Editor: It is by no means clear what sort of sense of humor would enjoy the current Zombie story line in the Monty comic strip by Jim Meddick.

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    Repeat after me, Rahm: SHI CAW GO
    Letter to the Editor: This is SHI CAW GO, so if you wish to be one of Da Natives, just pronounce it correctly. Otherwise, there is a very good chance that we natives may get offended and then restive, especially this one.

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    One-term limits will right the ship
    Letter to the Editor: I’m not going to vote for these politicians who only serve themselves. And I, for one, don’t believe we’ve been represented for years by either party. The only way to get rid of corrupt politicians is to demand one-term limits.

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    The case for Obama as a Republican
    Letter to the Editor: There is an impostor in the White House who has been masquerading as a Democrat. Who? President Obama, who talks like a Democrat but acts like a Republican.

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    Corn for fuel not the answer
    Letter to the Editor: By using corn for fuel we have pushed the cost of corn from a base of $2.40 per bushel to $7.40 per bushel today. This increase is not only seen in corn but it is reflected in the price of beef, pork, eggs, milk, bread and beer.

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    Faulty thinking of the left
    Letter to the Editor: First, the left creates most of the costly programs, then they mandate enrollment and garnish wages to pay for it all. In time, they mismanage them to the point of bankruptcy, and then they want those who are upset with all the corruption and inefficiency to foot the bill for fixing it, too.

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    Don’t mess with Social Security
    Letter to the Editor: The Republican representatives who ran for office last November saying that jobs were going to be their first priority have not brought up one jobs bill to be voted on. Now they are playing games with a fragile world economy and the lives of people who depend on Social Security to live.

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    Education at a reasonable cost?
    Letter to the Editor: I’m seriously sick of being harassed by the schools for payment of fees. I make payments in full and on time. I got a call today asking why I sent only $100 instead of the $547. I am well aware of the fees and literally have no more money.

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    A word of warning from Churchill
    Barack Obama uses the phrase “shared sacrifice” as a nice way of stating his agenda for socialism. On the other hand, Winston Churchill was more plain spoken.

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    Debt ceiling debate nothing but a ploy
    This is the nation that began World War II tottering on the edge of bankruptcy, with its warriors training with broomsticks, with barely a plane that would fly, and a severely crippled Pacific fleet, but always with a spirit of confidence and patriotic fervor unmatched anywhere in the pages of world history.

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    Bush tax cuts should not be permanent
    And why were the tax cuts set for 10 years, despite what actually transpired over this time frame? When George W. Bush was elected, he inherited a surplus and said, “a surplus is the tax revenue, after all, means that the taxpayers have been overcharged.”

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    What liberals really think of us
    Once in a while liberals slip and tell us what they really think of us. When the House of Representatives was unsuccessful in rescinding the ban on incandescent light bulbs, Energy Secretary Steven Chu explained that we, the American voters, are “too stupid” to make decisions for ourselves.

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    Voters have only themselves to blame
    When asked in 1960 at the University of Hawaii whether Kenya was ready for self-government, our president’s father, Barack Obama, Sr., answered, “If the people cannot rule themselves, let them misrule themselves. They should be provided the opportunity.” Ironic, isn’t it, that the House of Representatives should be giving an example?

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