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Daily Archive : Monday July 18, 2011

News

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    Jim Newton

    Newton announces bid for Lake County Board

    Appointed to fill a vacancy on the Lake County Board this spring, Jim Newton on Monday announced he’ll run for election in 2012.

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    The Illinois State Toll Highway Authority is pondering its next big project.

    Drivers may foot $1billion tollway budget gap

    Suburban drivers could face a toll increase down the road as the Illinois tollway grapples with a $1 billion gap in highway maintenance needs and contemplates billions of dollars in new construction.

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    Gurnee Mayor Kovarik warns of storm debris scams

    Gurnee Mayor Kristina Kovarik urges residents to be alert for potential scammers quoting inflated prices to remove storm-damaged trees from private property. "I was at public works Saturday and said I was worried every Tom, Dick and Harry would come out," she said.

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    Overpass nixed for Fairfield Road/Route 176

    An at-grade expansion rather than an overpass will be presented as the preferred option at a public open house from 5 to 7 p.m Wednesday at Mundelein High School.

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    Walter Kwiatek

    Four year sentence in South Elgin pot case

    Walter Kwiatek, a 70-year-old California man accused of shipping more than 80 pounds of marijuana to himself at a South Elgin warehouse last December, is sentenced to four years in prison. Kwiatek did not have a criminal record and pleaded guilty to drug charges in May.

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    Fatal Wheeling crash followed attempted traffic stop

    Police were trying to stop the motorcycle involved in Sunday morning’s fatal crash in Wheeling for speeding minutes before its driver lost control and struck a utility box, killing himself and a passenger, authorities said Monday.

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    The sailboat WingNuts floats upside down in Lake Michigan on Monday after it capsized during the annual Chicago-to-Mackinac sailing race. Two crew members died.

    Arlington Hts. man part of Mackinac race rescue crew

    A 12-person crew, including a 19-year-old Arlington Heights man, may have prevented an even greater loss of life when it pulled six sailors from the treacherous Lake Michigan waters that killed two people during the annual Race to Mackinac early Monday morning.

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    Southbound River Road traffic backs up to just south of Howard Street during the grand opening of the Rivers Casino Monday in Des Plaines.

    Thousands flock to new Des Plaines casino

    Sweltering heat, long lines, traffic jams, and not enough slot machines were complaints of some as hordes of gamblers flooded the new Rivers Casino, which opened Monday morning in Des Plaines.

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    Jack Siegel talks with Village President Arlene Mulder during a reception for Siegel on Monday night before the Arlington Heights Village Board meeting.

    Arlington Hts. honors attorney for 50 years of service

    Arlington Heights officials recognized Village Attorney Jack Siegel for his 50 years of service, which includes arguing before the U.S. Supreme Court and negotiating the deal that annexed Arlington Park.

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    The Dalai Lama participates in a multi-faith panel discussion with Jewish, Islamic and Christian leaders Monday in Chicago. The Dalai Lama praised Illinois on Sunday for recently abolishing the death penalty.

    Dalai Lama talks of oneness at Chicago theater

    The Dalai Lama and representatives of three other major religions shared their views of oneness, humanity and compassion during a panel discussion in a crowded Chicago theater.

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    Suspect charged in death of man who took him in

    First-degree murder charges have been filed against a formerly homeless man accused of beating to death a 94-year-old Chicago man who took him in.

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    U-46 lunch prices may rise a dime a day

    Students who buy their lunch in Elgin Area District U-46 schools may need to scrounge around the couch for an extra dime a day beginning next semester.

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    N. Aurora residents to pay less for electricity

    North Aurora residents will pay about 25 percent less for their electricity starting this fall. The village board on Monday authorized a deal with Integrys Energy Services. Residents will pay 5.75 cents per kilowatt hour for two years, and small commercial accounts will pay a little more.

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    Rep. David Dreier, chairman of the House Rules Committee, opens a hearing on the so-called “cut, cap and balance” plan proposed by tea party-backed House Republicanson Monday.

    House acts on doomed debt reduction plan

    Republican lawmakers moved ahead Monday on a doomed plan to amend the U.S. Constitution to require a balanced federal budget.

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    Hoffman Estates crash injures three

    Three people were treated for minor injuries after a three-vehicle crash tied up traffic at a Hoffman Estates intersection late Monday morning, police said.

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    Emil Jones Jr. will get expenses but not a salary as chairman of the Sports Facilities Authority.

    Former state Senate president to head stadium panel
    Gov. Pat Quinn has named the former president of the Illinois Senate to a panel that runs U.S. Cellular Field.

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    Barbara L. Rakow

    East Dundee matriarch is remembered

    Barbara L. Rakow, 81, died Saturday morning after a battle with lung cancer and is being remembered as the matriarch of a family with lengthy public service records in town.

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    Harper hosts bullying seminar Tuesday

    Harper College is hosting a seminar Tuesday, July 19 for parents and children that looks at the long- and short-term effects of bullying and ways to help children deal with the situation. The free seminar, entitled “Protect Your Child From Bullies,” will run from 4:30 to 5:15 p.m. college’s gym.

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    Hanover Township hosts Recycling Extravaganza on Aug. 13

    Hanover Township will host its second annual Recycling Extravaganza Saturday, Aug. 13 at the township campus in Bartlett. Vendors will be on-site collecting electronics, cellphones, car batteries, prescription drugs, eye glasses, clothing, fire extinguishers and many other items.

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    Hilda Estrada

    Visitors’ two cents on Rivers Casino

    Gamblers exiting the Rivers Casino Monday gave it mixed verdicts, with the first-day traffic and crowding being the big negatives.

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    Thousands line up in hope of something better at casino

    A brand new casino just like the state's old casinos opens Monday in the City of Destiny.

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    Rickey D. Woods

    Police: Chicago man stole two cars in Elgin

    What was a man from Chicago's far South Side doing in Elgin? Stealing a couple of cars, police said. Police say that on Sunday, Rickey D. Woods, 27, broke into and stole an Oldsmobile 88 in the 100 block of Henry Street and a Buick Century in the 200 block of Douglas Avenue.

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    Ibrahim Kibayasi

    Mount Prospect man sentenced to 35 years in infant son’s death

    Ibraham Kibayasi, a Mount Prospect man convicted in April of first-degree murder in the 2009 shaking death of his five-month-old son, is sentenced to 35 years.

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    Greg Mortenson has denied fabricating anything in his book “Three Cups of Tea.”

    Lake County woman joins Montana suit against Mortenson
    A Lake County woman who had dropped her lawsuit against “Three Cups of Tea” author Greg Mortenson has now joined two Montana plaintiffs in their suit against the writer.

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    Rich Garling

    Garling feels ‘vindicated’ after battery charge dropped in Island Lake case

    A misdemeanor battery charge has been dropped against former Island Lake trustee Richard Garling, who was accused in 2009 of hitting the wife of a political rival at village hall.

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    Streamwood man charged with intent to deliver cocaine

    A Cook County judge set bail at $90,000 Monday for a 22-year-old Streamwood man charged with multiple drug-related offenses following an undercover narcotics investigation conducted by Streamwood police.

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    Victim believed to be South suburban teen
    A college-bound South suburban teen reported missing on a coastal vacation had hoped to join the military, according to relatives who were grieving Monday even though police hadn’t confirmed a body found in a car trunk in North Carolina was hers.

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    Kristina “Kristy” Wesselman

    ‘New developments’ in ‘85 Glen Ellyn murder

    The DuPage County sheriff’s office will announce “new developments” this week in the investigation into the 1985 rape and murder of a 15-year-old girl near Glen Ellyn, officials said Monday. Authorities said details would be released at a news conference Thursday marking the 26th anniversary of Kristina Wesselman’s death.

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    Brinsley Lewis

    Hospital CEO leaving

    After 12 years as chief executive of Adventist GlenOaks Hospital in Glendale Heights, Brinsley Lewis is leaving to fill a similar role at a hospital in Florida.

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    Barbara I. Bond of Geneva is atop Little Huckleberry Mountain in the state of Washington during one of her hikes.

    ‘Take a Hike’ a must-have for those who like trails

    A Geneva woman writes 'Take a Hike Chicago' about all the cool places to hit the trails within a 2-hour drive of Chicago, columnist Dave Heun writes.

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    Crash victim identified as 18-year-old Round Lake man

    Round Lake Park police continue to investigate a Sunday afternoon crash that killed an 18-year-old Round Lake man and injured five others.

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    Arlington teens charged with overturning speed radar trailer

    Three Arlington Heights teens have been arrested on charges of turning over a village speed radar trailer, police said.

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    Chicago officials put fans in classrooms
    Chicago Public School officials say they’re making 1,500 fans available to schools that aren’t air-conditioned and asking teachers to take additional precautions as a heat wave settles over the city.

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    Learn about Native Americans

    You can learn about the Native Americans who lived in Lake County, especially how they used nature in ceremonies and medicine, in an Aug. 13 program at the Old School Forest Preserve near Libertyville. The program will run from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. The activity is open to families with kids ages 7 or older. Admission is $2 for county residents or $3 for anyone else.

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    Free-standing Emergency Center now open

    The Vista Freestanding Emergency Center opened at 7 a.m. Monday, July 18 in Lindenhurst.

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    Island Lake board to vote on budget

    The Island Lake village board will hold a special meeting Wednesday to approve the 2011-12 budget and discuss other business. The meting is set for 6:30 p.m. at village hall, 3720 Greenleaf Ave. The fiscal year began June 1.

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    Matt Murphy

    Murphy will run for Senate again

    Joining the growing list of state lawmakers declaring their 2012 election intentions early in the campaign season, Sen. Matt Murphy said Monday that he plans to run for re-election to the Illinois Senate.

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    Don Maxwell

    Former Wheaton mayor Don Maxwell dies

    Former Wheaton Mayor Don Maxwell died this weekend of congestive heart failure and an enlarged heart.

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    Teens charged with damaging police property

    Three teens were charged iwth criminal damage to government property, a class 4 felony, after Arlington Heights police say they damaged a traffic monitoring device near Heritage Park early Saturday morning.

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    Mount Prospect police investigating death of man found in car

    Mount Prospect police are investigating the death of a 39-year-old Des Plaines man found dead in the back seat of a car Friday. The cause of death remains undetermined, pending toxicology.

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    Police reports

    Fourteen brass vases, which cost $400 each to replace, were stolen between 12:01 a.m. and 11 a.m. Thursday from the River Hills Memorial Cemetery, 1650 S. River St., near Batavia, according to police.

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    Mount Prospect offers free wood chips

    Because of all the trees downed by recent storms, Mount Prospect has added about 80 yards of tub-ground wood chips, free for the taking, to the pile at Melas Park, 1326 W. Central Road, on Monday.

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    Members of the Financial Stability Oversight Commission talk after meeting in Washington on Monday. That’s Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner, center with his back turned, and Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke, to his left.

    Debt worries drag down the stock market

    Not even a string of better earnings reports could stave off worries about debt on Monday.

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    Claire LaTourette, as Millie, rehearses with the chorus.

    King’s Players put on ‘Thoroughly Modern Millie’

    The King’s Players will present “Thoroughly Modern Millie” at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday, July 21-23 and at 1:30 p.m. on Sunday, July 24, at the Forest View Educational Center, 2121 S. Goebbert Road, Arlington Heights.

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    Jay Jones of Antioch arrested and charged with car burglary by Antioch police.

    Antioch men arrested in GPS thefts, police say

    Two Antioch men have been charged with theft after stealing a bunch of GPS devices from cars on June 23, police said Monday. Derek Badger, 19, and Jay Jones, 18, are both charged with two counts of burglary to a motor vehicle following the weekend of "car hopping."

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    Support breast cancer walk in Mt. Prospect

    Mount Prospect residents can Adopt-a-Block to show support for the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Three-Day Walk For the Cure.

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    “We feel like we make a difference in people’s lives,” says Jane Hodgkinson, who recently retired as executive director of WDSRA.

    WDSRA chief leaves legacy of fun
    Jane Hodgkinson took the helm of WDSRA 30 years ago with the idea that children and adults with special need can - and should - enjoy recreational experiences.

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    Naperville cops hunt vandals

    Vandals shattered windows and doors and broke windows on construction equipment over the weekend at May Watts Elementary School, 800 S. Whispering Hills Drive, Naperville.Police said the vandalism occurred between 10 a.m. Saturday and 8 a.m. Sunday.

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    Karen Schlabach of Glen Ellyn is an avid user of DoggySpace, a social media site for dogs to express themselves on the Internet. She is the secretary for her three cocker spaniels and says she writes down what they dictate for the website.

    DoggySpace helps foster friendship, generosity

    With the help of social media outlets, Internet enthusiasts have learned how to tweet and yelp. But now technology-savvy canines can get in on the action with the help of the social networking site DoggySpace.

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    Cheryl Luchetta

    Evaluation ordered on Elmhurst mom accused of drugging son

    A judge ordered a mental health evaluation Monday for an Elmhurst mother accused of trying to drug her 7-year-old son to death. DuPage County Judge Daniel Guerin ordered the evaluation for 41-year-old Cheryl Luchetta over the objection of her attorney.

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    London’s Metropolitan Police Assistant Commissioner John Yates resigned Monday amid the firestorm surrounding the phone hacking scandal. He made a decision two years ago to not re-open police inquiries into phone hacking, saying he did not believe there was any new evidence to consider.

    London police reeling in hacking scandal

    Britain’s tabloid phone-hacking scandal enveloped the London police force Monday with the rapid-fire resignations of two top officers and claims of possible illegal eavesdropping, bribery and collusion.

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    Tea party takes its turn in debt battle

    Congressional leaders are giving tea party-backed Republican freshmen the run of the House this week with a plan to let the government borrow another $2.4 trillion but only after big and immediate spending cuts and adoption by Congress of a constitutional amendment requiring a balanced federal budget.

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    Rachelle Friedman tries on a veil during the fitting for her wedding dress. She was left paralyzed after a swimming pool accident that postponed her wedding plans. But a year later, she is ready for her trip to the altar on Friday.

    Paralyzed woman to marry year after accident

    A year after she was paralyzed in poolside horseplay at her bachelorette party, Rachelle Friedman knows one thing she would change about her life before the injury.

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    The sailboat WingNuts floats upside down in Lake Michigan, off the coast of Charlevoix, Mich., Monday, after it capsized during the annual Chicago-to-Mackinac sailing race. Officials with the annual race say two crew members of the boat are dead. Six other crew members were rescued.

    2 die in Chicago-Mackinac race

    Two experienced sailors, including the skipper, died after their boat capsized during the annual Chicago-to-Mackinac race, competition organizers confirmed Monday, hours after six other crew members were pulled to safety by a rival team.

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    Elgin Summer Theatre to stage ‘Annie’
    Elgin Summer Theatre continues its production of “Annie” at the Hemmens Cultural Center, 45 Symphony Way in downtown Elgin.

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    Dan Duffy

    Duffy will run for re-election

    Sen. Dan Duffy, a Lake Barrington Republican, said Monday he’ll run for a second term in the Illinois Senate in 2012.

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    Winemaker Andres Basso oversees bottles of Chardonnay coming off the line to be boxed up at Lynfred Winery in Roselle.

    Images: Lynfred Winery in Roselle
    Lynfred Winery opened in Roselle in 1979 as a winery and tasting room. It has since grown into a 24,000-square-foot facility that includes a bakery and four bed & breakfast suites. Lynfred operates three additional tasting rooms in Naperville, Wheeling and Wheaton.Fred Koehler, co-founder and CEO, died this weekend after a six-month battle with cancer. He was 83.

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    Cary Park District to host dog show
    Show off your best friend and let your doggy be the star of the show as the Cary Park District hosts a kids' dog show from 11 a.m. to noon Saturday, July 23.

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    The sailboat WingNuts, shown here in July 2010, capsized in Lake Michigan early Monday during the annual Chicago-to-Mackinac race, the Coast Guard said.

    Race officials: 2 boaters pulled from lake died

    Officials with the annual Chicago-to-Mackinac sailing race say two crew members of a boat that capsized in Lake Michigan are dead. A Charlevoix County dive team recovered the two boaters on Monday several about eight hours after their boat, WingNuts, was reported to have capsized.

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    Dmitry Smirnov

    DuPage murder suspect: “I want to plead guilty”

    A Canadian man accused of fatally shooting his ex-girlfriend in Oak Brook after researching the death penalty told a DuPage County judge Monday he wants to plead guilty. Dmitry Smirnov, 21, of Surrey, British Columbia, faces five counts of first-degree murder in the April 13 killing of 36-year-old Jitka Vesel.

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    West Chicago has renamed the Wilson Street Bridge as the A. Eugene Rennels Bridge to honor its former mayor. Rennels served from 1977-1989.

    West Chicago honors former mayor by renaming bridge

    The West Chicago city council voted unanimously to change the name of the Wilson Street Bridge to the A. Eugene Rennels Bridge, in honor of city's longest-serving mayor.

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    Naperville cops seek clues in home burglary

    Naperville Crime Stoppers is offering up to a $1,000 reward for information leading to an arrest in a residential burglary on the 300 block of Elmwood Drive.

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    Brace yourself. It's going to be hot this week.

    Today's going to be hot, but worst is yet to come

    Prepare for the heat. Officials are expecting a week of temps into the 90s during the day as sweltering weather will settle in over the Chicago area. Though, officials said, some passing thunderstorms could help cool things down throughout the week.

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    Matthew Meche, left, Dana Zolli, center and Noga Pnueli look for clues in one of the galleries at the Metropolitan Museum of Art during a Watson Adventures "Murder at the Met" scavenger hunt, in New York.

    Museum scavenger hunts ask who killed the curator

    An assistant museum curator who questioned the authenticity of a Leonardo da Vinci has been murdered — but before he died he left a code in his appointment calendar and a cryptic trail of clues connected to secrets in works of art that point to the killer.

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    Share your hot weather photos with us this week for in Sweatin' it out the Suburbs photo contest. The winner will receive six passes to Arlington Park.

    We want to see you sweat: Share your heat photos with us

    Share your hot weather photos with us this week for in "Sweatin' it out the Suburbs" photo contest. The winner will receive six passes to Arlington Park.

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    More than 20,000 visitors are expected to attend the Geneva Arts Fair Saturday, July 23, and Sunday, July 24.

    Artists display their wares at Geneva Arts Fair

    The Geneva Arts Fair will take place from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, July 23, and Sunday, July 24, on South Third Street, south of Route 38.

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    The new River Casino in Des Plaines opens to the public today.

    Tips on playing the odds at new Des Plaines casino

    Before you cough up your hard-earned money at the new Rivers Casino in Des Plaines, which opens Monday, see what a mathematician says about your odds of winning.

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    Kirsten Halvorsen tends to peppers in the greenhouse at Natural Environments nursery in Hawthorn Woods.

    Teen farmer heads to market

    Call Kirsten Halverson a young entrepreneur with green thumbs. The 17-year-old has used her experience maintaining her family’s Kildeer home garden and her desire to begin her own business and started Kirsten’s Garden.

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    Merv Roberts

    Roberts named Lincolnshire’s citizen of the year

    Veteran Stevenson High School board member Merv Roberts has been named Lincolnshire’s 2011 Citizen of the Year by the Lincolnshire Community Association.

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    Troupe Namaste and its director Jenny Hennek, bring the world of Middle Eastern Dance to the Indian Trails Public Library at 7 p.m. Thursday, July 21.

    Troupe Namaste brings Middle Eastern dance to library

    Middle Eastern Dance includes the grace and beauty of belly dance with is flowing veils, the excitement and thrill of Turkish sword dancing with real swords balanced on the dancer’s head and body, and cane dancing using the sticks of the martial arts to create a dance that is both playful and fun.

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    Kimberly Lechner

    Dist. 96 brings on new administrator

    At its regular business meeting on June 21, the District 96 Board of Education approved the appointment of Assistant Director of Student Services Kimberly Melton Lechner.

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    Jimmy Buffett tribute band brings the beach party to Arlington Heights

    Need a getaway? Get out your Hawaiian shirts and grass skirts and let this fantastic Jimmy Buffett tribute band take you miles away.

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    Palatine Park District goes to the dogs

    The Palatine Park District hosts the FlyDogs — training and disc dog entertainers — at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, July 20 at Ost Field, Fremont and Colfax streets, Palatine. The show features trained dogs who entertain the crowd while demonstrating their skills in agility, flyball, tricks and freestyle. The dogs jump, weave, spin, vault and more.

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    This panoramic view was taken from the International Space Station, looking past the docked space shuttle Atlantis' cargo bay and part of the station including a solar array panel toward Earth. The space shuttle will undock Tuesday for the last time.

    Last space shuttle crew bids historic goodbye

    The crew of the last space shuttle has floated out of the International Space Station, forever. Before disappearing into Atlantis on Monday morning, commander Christopher Ferguson presented a pair of commemorative items to the space station fliers.

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    Actor Jim Belushi attends the VIP party at the Rivers Casino in Des Plaines to gamble and sing with his band in the Cube Room on Sunday.

    Rivers Casino VIP party draws thousands

    Several thousand VIPs flooded the Rivers Casino in Des Plaines Sunday night at an exclusive party ahead of today's public opening. From politicians to big and small-time TV celebrities, to those who helped make the $445 million casino a reality, the awe and excitement was evident on the sea of smiling faces.

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    Traffic is back to the normal grind on southbound Interstate 405 in Los Angeles Monday morning. Bridge work on the Los Angeles roadway was completed 16 hours ahead of schedule, so the predicted "Carmadeggon" didn't happen.

    L.A. commuters return to Monday morning grind

    A major Los Angeles freeway construction shutdown and breathless warnings of "Carmageddon" gridlock were in the rearview mirror Monday morning for motorists heading into the four-hour commuter rush.

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    Oil below $97 amid debt crisis, U.S. economy jitters

    Oil prices slipped below $97 a barrel on Monday as weakening U.S. consumer confidence and more signs of financial stress in Europe renewed concerns about demand for crude.

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    Casey Anthony walks out of the Orange County Jail with her attorney Jose Baez, left, during her release in Orlando, Fla., early Sunday, July 17. Anthony was acquitted last week of murder in the death of her daughter, Caylee.

    Lawyer: Elaborate plans made to keep Anthony safe

    Casey Anthony's whereabouts for her first week of freedom were a closely guarded secret Monday, known only to a select few as she tries to start a new life after being acquitted of killing her daughter. One of her lawyers says an elaborate plan was made to protect her from people with "the lynch-mob mentality."

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    Chicago to deploy more police officers to streets

    Chicago city officials say more police officers will be redeployed to the streets as part of a safety improvement effort. Mayor Rahm Emanuel and Chicago Police Department Superintendent Garry McCarthy say 92 officers will be shifted from administrative positions, including from City Hall, to police beats.

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    Job fair for veterans at CLC

    A job resource fair for veterans will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, July 20 at the College of Lake County conference room, 1120 S. Milwaukee Ave., Vernon Hills. Hosted by state Rep. Carol Sente, the fair will provide information on what jobs are available at state agencies for veterans, how to earn Veterans Preference Points for employment, how to apply for a commercial drivers...

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    6-year-old Illinois girl dies at NW Ind. beach

    The mother of a 6-year-old suburban Chicago girl says she didn't realize lifeguards were no longer on duty at the northwestern Indiana beach where her daughter drowned.

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    Carol Stream Village President Frank Saverino oversees the village and also runs his own business, which he started out of his home in 1981. The company, which supplies items for vending machines and convenience stores, is now headquartered in Carol Stream’s industrial park.

    A close look at the man running Carol Stream

    Frank Saverino operates a successful food brokerage business, donates to charitable causes and has spent the last 14 years in public service. But the current Carol Stream village president wasn’t always in that position.

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    Arlington Park, home of “The Arlington Million,” a nationally televised horse race, says that casino gambling is hurting the horse racing industry, and Rivers Casino in Des Plaines is likely to take another bite out of its revenue.

    Des Plaines casino not a boon for everyone

    While the new Rivers Casino is expected to generate millions of dollars for Des Plaines, other towns are expecting to lose out as the Rivers Casino draws patrons and gambling revenues from their attractions. Elgin officials believe revenues from Grand Victoria casino will drop from almost $16.5 million to $10.5 million in the first year.

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    What’s on the menu at Rivers Casino
    What's on the menu at Rivers Casino in Des Plaines.

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    Security almost everywhere at new Des Plaines casino

    The Rivers Casino in Des Plaines opens Monday, and security experts spell out their plan to keep the facility and surrounding areas crime-free.

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    D303 planning enhanced foreign language at grade level center

    St. Charles Unit District 303 school board members had their first peek at the new foreign language curriculum for the controversial grade level centers they recently created. Board members pressured district staff to create a program that sees kids actually become fluent in the languages or risk the grade level centers being a bust.

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    Sean Stephenson was born with the most severe form of osteogenesis imperfecta, or brittle bone disease. Virtually every bone in his body broke during his birth, and doctors expected him to die. Today, he is a successful motivational speaker who makes $15,000 to $20,000 for talks in the U.S., up to $30,000 internationally.

    Oak Brook therapist lives life one way: Big

    Sean Stephenson, an Oak Brook therapist, author and motivational speaker who's only 3 feet tall due to brittle bone disease, is now a celebrity in Korea and Mexico. He's achieved some of the goals on his birthday "bucket" list -- including a private meeting with the Dalai Lama. And most exciting of all, he's getting married.

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    County launches new veterans initiative

    The Lake County Health Department has been awarded $734,500 per year for five years in support of the collaborative Lake-McHenry Veteran’s and Family Strategic Initiative. This new program is designed to transform community mental health systems to provide better care for veterans and their families who are experiencing trauma and/or adjustment issues related to veterans returning home. This...

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    Classic car show in Libertyville

    MainStreet Libertyville hosts its third classic car show of the season from 6 to 9 p.m. Wednesday, July 20. Classic cars 25 years and older in mint condition will line Church Street in downtown Libertyville. Visitors can get a sandwich from Bonkers on Main or dessert or popcorn from Tropik Sun, all while listening to live music provided by the Downhome Sophisticates. MainStreet Libertyville is a...

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    Island Lake trustee kills sticker plan

    Island Lake Trustee Laurie Rabattini has withdrawn a proposal to put advertisements for local businesses on the town’s vehicle stickers. Rabattini publicly suggested the plan July 6 as a way to generate revenue for the town. Later, in a posting at dailyherald.com, Rabattini said she pulled the plug after objections from residents and other people surfaced.

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    Cary debates next village administrator’s role

    Over the last few weeks, Cary village board members have been debating the role of the next village administrator. Should the next administrator supervise the department heads or merely coordinate their work?

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    Palatine fire groups to host blood drive Aug. 1

    The Palatine Fire Department, Board of Health and Medical Reserve Corps/Fire Rehab Team will host a “Fire Fighter Blood Donor Challenge” from 1 to 7 p.m. Monday, Aug. 1 at Palatine Fire Station No. 84, 220 W. Illinois Ave.

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    Buffalo Grove collects used bikes

    The Buffalo Grove Environmental Action Team, in cooperation with the organization Working Bikes, will host a used bicycle collection drive from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Sunday, July 24, at the Buffalo Grove Farmer’s Market.

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    Finance company opens Des Plaines office

    Personal Finance Company, a new business in Des Plaines, is officially celebrating its opening at 2 p.m. Wednesday, July 20, at 1151 S. Lee St.

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    Anderon Animal Shelter holds microchip benefit
    Anderson Animal Shelter is hosting a microchip event from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, July 23 at the shelter, 1000 S. LaFox (Route 31) South Elgin.

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    Elk Grove Village’s Mike Gregory dresses up Eric Socha,11, of Itasca letting him experience first hand how hot and heavy the wool uniforms are on a hot summer day during the first day at the 20th annual Civil War days in the Lake County Forest Preserve on Saturday.

    Images: The week in pictures
    This installment of the Week in Pictures photo gallery features images from around the Chicago suburbs including festivals, and a wide variety of other events.

Sports

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    White Sox starter Mark Buehrle throws during Monday's first inning in Kansas City.

    Buehrle strong again in Sox' win

    Mark Buehrle, and the veteran left-hander was brilliant again as the Sox won the opener of a three-game series against the last-place Royals.

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    Charvat comes through for Schaumburg

    Justin Charvat's RBI double gave Schaumburg an 8-7 victory in 8 innings over Hoffman Estates in the first round of the Illinois High School Baseball Coaches Association Phil Lawler Summer Classic.

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    Cougars snap losing streak

    Geulin Beltre drove in the first and last runs of Monday’s game and helped the Kane County Cougars snap a five-game losing streak.

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    It’s time for Cubs’ Hendry to get it done

    Cubs' general manager Jim Hendry has a couple weeks to be imaginative and creative before baseball's trade deadline. His assignment is to figure out a way to move those immovable contracts. He can because there's always a way, obvious or otherwise.

  •  
    Cubs pitcher Carlos Zambrano, center, leads the applause as starting pitcher Rodrigo Lopez exits the game during the seventh inning Monday against the Phillies at Wrigley Field. Lopez pitched 6⅔ innings, allowing 1 run on 5 hits.

    Time for Hendry to make some moves

    Cubs fans should be hoping GM Jim Hendry makes room on the plane for some of the kids he watched play Monday at AAA Iowa.

  •  
    NFL Players Association spokesman George Atallah pauses as he speaks to media in Washington on Monday.

    NFL club execs to be briefed Thursday is deal OK’d

    The NFL told club executives they could be schooled in the ins and outs of the new labor contract as early as Thursday, and the players association summoned its leadership for a potential vote the strongest signs yet the lockout might be nearing an end.

  •  
    White Sox outfielder Juan Pierre runs home to score on a sacrifice fly by Alexei Ramirez during the first inning Monday in Kansas City.

    Buehrle pitches White Sox to win over Royals

    Mark Buerhle lasted 7 innings in another impressive start, and the White Sox capitalized on an error by young shortstop Alcides Escobar to beat the Kansas City Royals 5-2 on a steamy Monday night.

  •  
    Cubs starter Rodrigo Lopez delivers during the first inning Monday against the Philadelphia Phillies at Wrigley.

    Lopez, Cubs outlast Halliday’s Phillies

    Aramis Ramirez and Carlos Pena homered to back a dominant start by Rodrigo Lopez, and the Cubs beat Philadelphia 6-1 Monday on a night when Phillies ace Roy Halladay left the game because of the heat at Wrigley Field.

  •  

    Lineman competition at W. Aurora on Thursday

    Started years ago when Mike Powers and Buck Drach coached football at St. Charles East, the Battle of the Big Butts lineman competition enters its 13th year on Thursday at West Aurora.

  •  

    Barrington Legion travels tough road to success

    Barrington won the 10th District championship Sunday and will begin play in the Second Division tournament at 5 p.m. Tuesday against host Lena.

  •  
    White Sox GM Ken Williams should have a lot on his mind right now — including whether to trade fan favorite Mark Buehrle.

    More at stake for White Sox than division

    The next 10 days will have a big say in whether White Sox GM Ken Williams tears up his starting rotation, or lets it try to pitch them to a division title.

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    Cubs slugger Aramis Ramirez says he’s not interested in being traded to another team.

    Trade-wise, Ramirez holding all aces

    Cubs third baseman Aramis Ramirez reiterated his stance Monday that he does not want to be traded. Ramirez cannot be traded without his consent.

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    Abby Wambach, talking to reporters in New York’s Times Square on Monday after the team’s return from Germany, says its too early to think about her future with the U.S. team.

    Plenty of optimism for U.S. women’s soccer team

    Once the Americans get over the disappointment of coming up just short at the Women’s World Cup, they’ll find plenty of reasons for optimism.

  •  

    NBA labor situation and how to fix it
    NBA teams spent millions on free agents in 2010 and the league enjoyed a surge in popularity last season. Now the league claims it lost $300 million last year and could be looking at a long lockout. A solution exists if NBA owners can fix their mistakes of the past.

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    (No heading)
    Sky scout for Tuesday

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    AP sources: Labor seminar set if NFL deal approved

    Two people familiar with talks to end the NFL lockout tell The Associated Press that if an agreement is ratified by Thursday, team executives will be updated on the deal's terms that day.The people said the league's 32 clubs were told Monday that topics would include the rookie salary system and guidelines for player transactions. They spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity because the process is supposed to remain confidential.Owners are meeting in Atlanta on Thursday, when they could ratify a new deal — if one is reached by then.Lawyers for players and owners are meeting Monday in New York in an attempt to end the four-month lockout.

  •  
    Alexandr Kolobnev of Russia, left, rides in the breakaway group during the 8th stage of the Tour de France. Kolobnev became the first cyclist at this year's Tour de France to fail a doping test, the International Cycling Union said Monday. The UCI said a urine sample collected from Kolobnev last Wednesday tested positive for a substance called Hydrochlorothiazide, which is a diuretic that can also be used as a masking agent that hides the presence of other drugs. The samples were analyzed at the Chatenay-Malabry laboratory, which is accredited by the World Anti-Doping.

    Cycling chief: positive test not such a bad thing

    The head of cycling's governing body says a positive drug test or two at the Tour de France wouldn't necessarily be a "bad thing" as it would suggest anti-doping efforts are working.

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    Armstrong wants hearing on feds' ties to media

    Lance Armstrong's attorneys say illegal government leaks of grand jury information have sullied the cyclist's reputation, and have asked a court to order federal agents to discuss their contacts with the media.

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    Alex Morgan, center, celebrates with Abby Wambach and Megan Rapinoe, left, after scoring the opening goal during World Cup final Sunday.

    US women have optimism despite loss

    Once the Americans get over the disappointment of coming up just short at the Women's World Cup, they'll find plenty of reasons for optimism.

  •  
    Texas Rangers President Nolan Ryan is in a Houston hospital undergoing tests on his heart.

    Nolan Ryan hospitalized with heart pain

    Texas Rangers President Nolan Ryan is in a Houston hospital undergoing tests on his heart. The Rangers said in a statement Monday the 64-year-old Ryan is "resting comfortably and reports he is feeling better." He is expected to be released from the hospital in a few days.

  •  

    Women's World Cup final breaks Twitter record

    The Women's World Cup final between Japan and the United States set the record for tweets per second, eclipsing the wedding of Prince William and Kate and the death of Osama bin Laden.

  •  
    Darren Clarke kisses the Claret Jug trophy Monday beside the 18th green after he won the Open Golf Championship on Sunday at Royal St George's Sandwich, England.

    Clarke: Very good night following Open triumph

    The party began shortly after Darren Clarke walked off the 18th green at Royal St. George's with the claret jug in hand. Beer and red wine flowed through the night, the revelry not letting up until Clarke had to return Monday morning for a few more interviews.

  •  
    Cincinnati Bengals running back Cedric Benson. Benson was released from jail on Sunday following an arrest on an assault charge, the second year in a row he has gotten into trouble in his home state.

    RB Cedric Benson arrested on assault charge

    Running back Cedric Benson was released from jail on Sunday following an arrest on an assault charge, the second year in a row he has gotten into trouble in Texas. Benson was a free agent after leading the Cincinnati Bengals in rushing each of the last three seasons.

  •  
    Fans cheer the Japanese team playing with the United States in their Women's Soccer World Cup final match, at the Rooney2008 sports bar in Tokyo. Japan became the first Asian nation to win the Women's World Cup on Sunday.

    Japan's WCup players kept homeland in their hearts

    FRANKFURT, Germany — Their country's misery was never far from their hearts.Thousands dead or missing. Villages erased. Homes destroyed.The players on Japan's women's World Cup team invoked the slow recovery from a devastating tsunami and earthquake time and again. Whatever they could do, they vowed, they would.True to their word, the gleaming World Cup trophy will ride back on the plane with them — a prize, they hope, that will lift the gloom, even if only for a short while.“Before we went to the match tonight we had some commentary on television and we heard comments on the situation in Japan,” coach Norio Sasaki said after Japan upset the Americans for the World Cup title in a riveting final Sunday night, 3-1 on penalty kicks, after coming from behind twice in a 2-2 tie.“We wanted to use this opportunity to thank the people back home for the support that has been given.”This was Japan's first appearance in the final of a major tournament, and it hadn't beaten the Americans in their first 25 meetings, including a pair of 2-0 losses in warm-up games a month before the World Cup. But the Nadeshiko pushed ahead, playing inspired soccer and hoping their success could provide even a small emotional lift to their nation, where nearly 23,000 people died or were reported missing in the March 11 catastrophe.Following each of their games in Germany, the players made a solemn parade around the field with a banner that read, “To our Friends Around the World — Thank You for Your Support.” Before Japan upset Germany in the quarterfinals, Sasaki showed his players images of the destruction to remind them of their higher purpose.“They touched us deep in our souls,” star Aya Miyama said about the photos at the time.And they responded in kind. Joyous fans wearing Japan jerseys hugged and sang in Tokyo as they watched the players hold the trophy aloft, confetti swirling around them and flecking their hair with gold. Special newspaper editions were printed by the national papers and handed out to pedestrians in Tokyo on Monday morning, while scenes from the game were replayed constantly on television.It was the first World Cup title won by an Asian country.“If any other country was to win this, then I'm really happy and proud for Japan,” Carli Lloyd said. “Deep down inside I really thought it was our destiny to win it. But maybe it was Japan's.”As the Japanese players celebrated, the Americans watched in stunned silence. Through every comeback, to every last second, they believed they were meant to be World Cup champions after their rocky year — needing a playoff to qualify, a loss in group play to Sweden, the epic comeback against Brazil.They simply couldn't pull off one last thriller.“The players were patient. They wanted to win this game,” Sasaki said. “I think it's because of that the Americans scored only two goals.”The Americans squandered countless chances before Abby Wambach scored in the 104th minute of overtime to give the U.S. a 2-1 lead.But Homare Sawa, flicked in a corner kick in the 117th to tie it. It was the fifth goal of the tournament for Sawa, who led all scorers in her fifth World Cup.“We ran and ran,” Sawa said. “We were exhausted, but we kept running.”The Americans had beaten Brazil on penalty kicks in a quarterfinal, but they didn't have the same touch Sunday. Give feisty goalkeeper Ayumi Kaihori credit for some of that. Chirping and yelling, she showed no fear as she faced the Americans. Never mind that she is just under 5-foot-7, and the goal is 8 feet high and 24 feet across.

Business

  •  
    U.S. Rep. Robert Dold addresses the audience at the Multi-Chamber Legislative Lunch in Northbrook Monday.

    Dold says small business key to easing debt

    Freshman Congressman Bob Dold speaks to North and Northwest suburban businesspeople at a luncheon sponsored by several area chambers of commerce

  •  
    Motley Crue rocker Tommy Lee signed books in 2004 at the Borders store in Oak Brook.

    Local Borders to start liquidation sales

    Remaining Borders stores in Oak Brook, Schaumburg, Wheaton, Naperville, Geneva, Gurnee, Algonquin and elsewhere are expected to close under a plan announced Monday by the bookstore chain’s parent company.

  •  

    Earnings Preview: Coca-Cola Co.

    As its business continues to expand around the globe, Coca-Cola Co., the world's largest beverage maker, is expected to report a gain in profit and revenue when it announces its second-quarter results before the stock markets open Tuesday.

  •  
    Wayne B. Meyer, President of Sunroad Automotive in San Diego, leans on a car at his Chula Vista, Calif. dealership where a diminished inventory for small cars is evident in his near empty lot.

    Switching to a smaller car? Wait til fall

    Thinking of trading in the clunker in your garage for something that gets better gas mileage? Wait a little longer. Small car prices, which have set record highs this year, are expected to come down this fall.

  •  

    Pew study examines emergence of non-profit news

    More than half of emerging nonprofit news sites produce content with a clear ideological bent, according to a study released Monday by the Pew Research Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism.

  •  

    Hasbro ex[amdomg into downtown Providence

    Hasbro Inc. is expanding into downtown Providence in a project expected to bring 284 jobs over three years and an investment of $24 million in the city.

  •  

    President of Allstate Protection unit leaves

    Nortthbrook-based Allstate Corp. said Monday that the president of its struggling Allstate Protection subsidiary was leaving the company immediately. Its shares fell more than 5 percent in midday trading.

  •  

    Stock futures drop ahead of busy earnings week

    Stock futures are falling ahead of a busy week for corporate earnings reports.Toy maker Hasbro Inc., newspaper chain Gannett Co. Inc. and broker Charles Schwab Corp. report on Monday. Hasbro said net income rose in the second quarter on stronger sales of Transformers action figures and other products.

  •  
    Brian S. Mihelich, co-owner of True North Consultants in Naperville, says his business partners with clients spanning both the private and public sectors to address their environmental management, land development, and public infrastructure needs locally and nationally.

    True North Consultants growing in Naperville

    True North Consultants is growing in Naperville. Brian S. Mihelich talks about its future.

  •  
    Huntley-based Genesis Medical Imaging, Inc., helped Field Museum researchers peer inside mummies.

    Huntley executive helps museum go under wraps

    Robert Dakessian of South Barrington never thought he would have anything in common with 2,300-year-old Egyptian mummies. But then his Huntley-based company was called upon to provide a mobile CT scanner so the Field Museum could discover ancient secrets for its exhibits.

  •  

    Business orientation helps nonprofit succeed

    Developing a business focus is key to nonprofits' success.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Country music superstar Dolly Parton brings her Better Day world tour to the Rosemont Theatre on Thursday, July 28.

    Parton's Better Day tour aims for the uplifting

    "I don't have the heart to write any sad songs," in these tough times says country music legend Dolly Parton, who brings her "Better Day" world tour to the Rosemont Theatre on Thursday, July 28. Parton hopes her new uplifting tunes provide a respite for audiences dealing with poor economy, bad weather and "doomsday talk."

  •  
    Dave Eich rebuilt this 1967 Chevrolet Chevy II to be exactly what he wanted.

    Classic recollections: 1967 Chevy II

    When the snow starts to fall around here in the Midwest, Chicagoans, and their metal machines, escape Mother Nature's frozen wrath by retreating to heated garages. Drop south a few states and you'll find auto enthusiasts aren't afforded that same luxury when wet, turbulent weather comes their way.

  •  
    Michael "The Situation" Sorrentino talks to Michelle Diaz, left, and Patricia Garcia, both of Philadelphia, on the boardwalk in Seaside Heights, N.J., during a break while taping an episode of the MTV series "Jersey Shore" on Friday.

    Poll: 'Jersey Shore' not hurting New Jersey image

    Here's the real situation: It turns out MTV's "Jersey Shore" isn't killing New Jersey's reputation after all. It may even be helping a bit by bringing attention to the real Jersey shore.

  •  
    The "Harry Potter" finale topped the previous best domestic debut of $158.4 million for "The Dark Knight."

    'Harry Potter' record weekend climbs to $169.2M

    Harry Potter had an even bigger weekend than his Hollywood headmasters first projected. Sunday revenues for "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2" came in higher than anticipated, giving the film a $169.2 million opening weekend domestically.

  •  
    Charlie Sheen is planning a return to series television in “Anger Management,” a new sitcom based on the 2003 film of the same name.

    Charlie Sheen to return in new sitcom

    Charlie Sheen, who was fired from "Two and a Half Men" in March, aims to launch another hit sitcom — this time, on his own terms. The tempestuous star is planning to return to series television in the aptly titled "Anger Management."

  •  
    People run for cover after the main stage at the Ottawa Bluesfest collapsed Sunday, July 17, in Ottawa, Ontario, when a severe thunderstorm swept through the area.

    Stage falls at Ottawa Bluesfest; 8 injured

    The main stage at Ottawa Bluesfest collapsed Sunday night during a Cheap Trick concert as a severe thunderstorm sent the musicians and thousands of fans running for cover. At least five people were injured, one seriously.

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    If you've hit the beach, chances are you've experienced an unfortunate rite of summer — sunburn.

    Science seeks ways to take sting out of sunburn

    Dermatologists say the best bet for sunburn: Ibuprofen or naproxen. If that sounds too simple, well, scientists don't know exactly what causes this kind of touch-sensitive pain. But research is getting them closer to some answers.

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    Peppers, which are rich in antioxidants, make great summer snacks.

    Your health: Pretty peppers pack a punch

    Bell peppers are nutritious summer vegetables and they're pretty, too, says The Washington Post. Peppers of all varieties make great summer snacks because their taste and crunch are satisfying, but their calorie count is low.

  •  

    Reducing salt may not affect death rate

    No strong evidence exists that advising people to eat less salt or putting them on a low-salt diet reduces their death rate or cuts cardiovascular events, an analysis of seven studies found.

  •  

    Health briefs: Cardiologist talks about artery disease

    Dr. David Bromet, a cardiologist, will present a lecture on “What is Peripheral Artery Disease and Why is it Important?” from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, July 19, in the Prairie Room of Advocate Good Shepherd Hospital in Barrington.

  •  

    Grandpa’s gait abnormality puzzles loved one

    My 75-year-old grandpa has been having a great deal of difficulty walking for about a month. His doctor ordered an MRI of the brain, indicating ataxia as a diagnosis. I can’t understand what an MRI of the brain has to do with difficulties walking, and I sure don’t know what ataxia is. Can you fill in the blanks?

  •  

    Autopsies becoming more rare, despite TV popularity

    Television crime shows have helped popularize autopsies, but in reality these postmortem exams are becoming rarer every year. Today, hospitals perform autopsies on only about 5 percent of patients who die, down from roughly 50 percent in the 1960s.

  •  
    Billy Gensel counts on service dog Remy to detect any trace of peanuts, to which he’s acutely allergic. His mom, Karen, guides the dog, which sits to indicate possible danger. Wiping down the piano bench with alcohol eliminates the threat so Billy can play with the Patel Conservatory Jazz Ensemble.

    Dog sniffs out potential dangers for allergic boy

    Billy Gensel doesn’t open doors or shake hands. The 11-year-old, who is severely allergic to peanuts, uses his specially trained dog to sniff out potential dangers wherever he goes.

  •  

    Adenovirus may be cause of summer illnesses

    Adenovirus, a common and very contagious virus that generally can’t be “fixed” with medication, can hit kids in the summer. This common respiratory illness will usually fade away after a week of mild to moderate misery.

  •  
    Water births in bathtubs have become a popular delivery option at home.

    Home birth on the rise by a dramatic 20 percent

    One mother chose home birth because it was cheaper than going to a hospital. Another gave birth at home because she has multiple sclerosis. Whatever their motivation, all are among a striking trend: Home births increased 20 percent from 2004 to 2008, according to a study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released in May.

Discuss

  •  

    A needed champion in fight against distracted driving

    Cheryl Miller is a champion in the fight against distracted driving, a role a Daily Herald editorial says is vital to make the driving public aware of the tragic consequences that can happen when motorists try to multi-task.

  •  

    First, take care of those outside prison

    Pelican Bay is the name of a maximum-security prison in California, where prisoners in the Security Housing Unit (SHU) -- reserved for the worst of the worst -- have gone on a hunger strike to seek better conditions, including better food. When I heard the news on the radio the other day, I had to struggle not to start laughing.

  •  

    No kids? No kidding

    In your private space, you can do what you want and ask anyone who comes into that space to do what you want as well: “Before you enter my home, please take off your shoes.” But when you step into a public space, you have to give up any expectation that you’ll be able to control the behavior of others to make yourself more comfortable.

  •  

    Palatine parade story missing important detail
    Thanks, Ed Sutarik, for shedding light on the reasons behind the Palatine Jaycees' refusal to allow the Respect Life group's banner in the 4th of July parade.

  •  

    Palatine Jaycees took correct stand
    Hoffman Estates letter writer says Palatine Jaycees are correct, and that the “in your face” anti-abortion banner had no place in the 4th of July parade.

  •  

    Does Barrington lag in old-age planning?
    Letter writer is worried that Barrington doesn't have enough plans in place for dealing with its aging population.

  •  

    Elk Grove doesn’t need fire consultant
    Former Elk Grove Fire Chief Dave Miller left the department in strong shape, so strong it doesn't need a consultant in there now, letter writer says.

  •  

    Keep dogs away from Mt. Prospect market
    Letter writer complains about the number of dogs at the Mt. Prospect farmers market, and how close to the food they get.

  •  

    Jaycees violated their own creed
    By denying Respect Life the right to carry their pro-life banner in the July 4th parade, the palatine Jaycees violated its own creed, this letter writer says.

  •  

    No tax increase in sight for District 57
    Dist. 57 and Supt. Aumiller just don’t get it. Too many Mt. Prospect residents have lost their jobs during this horrible recession. When they start giving back to this community, maybe we will be more responsive to their request for a tax increase.

  •  

    Why we’re not close to an energy crisis
    By misperceiving energy security, this crowd has got it wrong. Americans are angry about high gasoline prices and unfair barriers to domestic energy production. But politicians who think that the American public believes oil imports are necessarily bad ought to rethink that assumption.

  •  

    Thank British system for Harry Potter
    In return for its commitment to invest in its citizens, Great Britain yielded dividends from a multibillion-dollar industry, creating thousands of jobs and, perhaps more importantly, watching millions of children in Great Britain and the rest of the world, put down their iPods and pick up books.

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