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updated: 9/23/2017 1:21 PM

Fermilab event offers behind-the-scenes look at its work

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  • Euphemia Derian traveled all the way from Toronto Canada Saturday to get a glimpse of the giant magnet that was recently installed at Fermilab in Batavia. The Community Open House offers a rare opportunity to see the science of the laboratory up close and to tour areas not normally open to the public.

      Euphemia Derian traveled all the way from Toronto Canada Saturday to get a glimpse of the giant magnet that was recently installed at Fermilab in Batavia. The Community Open House offers a rare opportunity to see the science of the laboratory up close and to tour areas not normally open to the public.
    Brian Hill | Staff Photographer

  • Elliott McCrory takes a group through the Main Injector Particle Accelerator Tunnel Saturday during the Fermilab 50 years of scientific discovery event, which is the largest open house in 20 years. The Community Open House offers a rare opportunity to see the science of the laboratory up close and to tour areas not normally open to the public.

      Elliott McCrory takes a group through the Main Injector Particle Accelerator Tunnel Saturday during the Fermilab 50 years of scientific discovery event, which is the largest open house in 20 years. The Community Open House offers a rare opportunity to see the science of the laboratory up close and to tour areas not normally open to the public.
    Brian Hill | Staff Photographer

 
Daily Herald report

Fermilab in Batavia Saturday hosted what it called its biggest open house in decades, encouraging everyone to celebrate the lab's 50 years of science. The Community Open House offered a rare opportunity to tour areas not normally open to the public.

The event, which was filled to capacity, offered a chance to get a look at Fermilab's particle accelerators and get explanations about the experiments, including those using the "giant Muon g-2 magnet," a spinning magnet that monitors virtual particles. It helps researchers determine if subatomic particles that we don't even know about actually exist.

The lab is open for self-guided tours every day of the week, and public drop-in tours are offered at 10 a.m. Wednesdays.

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