Breaking News Bar
updated: 6/22/2014 11:30 PM

Fallen tree endangers Wauconda history

hello
Success - Article sent! close
  • A large oak tree toppled by Saturday's storms landed on the porch of the Andrew C. Cook house, the first non-log cabin home built in Wauconda Township. Fortunately, the home itself, which dates back to 1850, did not suffer extensive damage.

       A large oak tree toppled by Saturday's storms landed on the porch of the Andrew C. Cook house, the first non-log cabin home built in Wauconda Township. Fortunately, the home itself, which dates back to 1850, did not suffer extensive damage.
    Steve Zalusky | Staff Photographer

  • A large oak tree toppled by Saturday's storms landed on the porch of the Andrew C. Cook house, the first non-log cabin home built in Wauconda Township.

       A large oak tree toppled by Saturday's storms landed on the porch of the Andrew C. Cook house, the first non-log cabin home built in Wauconda Township.
    Steve Zalusky | Staff Photographer

  •   
    Steve Zalusky | Staff Photographer A large oak tree toppled by Saturday's storms landed on the

 
 

Saturday afternoon's storm took its toll on trees and power lines in Wauconda.

It also threatened the village's history.

Order Reprint Print Article
 
Interested in reusing this article?
Custom reprints are a powerful and strategic way to share your article with customers, employees and prospects.
The YGS Group provides digital and printed reprint services for Daily Herald. Complete the form to the right and a reprint consultant will contact you to discuss how you can reuse this article.
Need more information about reprints? Visit our Reprints Section for more details.

Contact information ( * required )

Success - request sent close

A huge oak tree behind the Andrew C. Cook House, the first permanent non-log cabin home built in Wauconda Township, toppled over Saturday and landed on the historic home's back porch.

Fortunately the building itself, built in 1850 and now owned by the Wauconda Township Historical Society, appears to have suffered little damage.

Residents stopped by the house Sunday, which is adjacent to the public library, to survey the damage. Visitors included Cheryl Thiel, who said she was interested because of her family's historical roots.

"My grandfather was the iceman in Wauconda," she said. "This tree has been here for so long. It just caught my eye when I went by."

The timing of the oak tree's tumble is problematic for the historical society, which has been renovating the Cook House over the past several weeks in preparation for an open house next weekend.

Steve Pedersen, a member of the society's board of directors, said members have been busy repainting, restoring and redecorating the interior of the house.

"It kind of sets us back with this tree going down," Pedersen said Sunday afternoon.

The group will likely convene today to discuss their options, he said.

Because of the damage elsewhere in Wauconda Township, removing the tree from the home's destroyed back porch may not be a priority for work crews.

Wauconda police said the storm that swept through the village also caused tree damage in the Lake View Villa subdivision.

ComEd crews were called out after two power poles were canted sideways, with Bonner Road closed between Garland Road and Monroe Avenue.

The Cook House open house is scheduled to run from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday.

The event coincides with Wauconda Fest.

Share this page
Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.