Breaking News Bar
updated: 5/29/2014 4:19 PM

Chicago Executive Airport board moving ahead with runway study

hello
Success - Article sent! close
  • Chicago Executive Airport board members say they're moving forward with a study that will analyze the benefits and impacts of lengthening the airport's longest runway from 5,000 to 7,000 feet. Proponents say a longer runway is needed to accommodate large corporate jets.

       Chicago Executive Airport board members say they're moving forward with a study that will analyze the benefits and impacts of lengthening the airport's longest runway from 5,000 to 7,000 feet. Proponents say a longer runway is needed to accommodate large corporate jets.
    Bob Chwedyk | Staff Photographer, 2013

 
By Kevin Modelski
kmodelski@dailyherald.com

A pair of Wheeling residents raised concerns Wednesday about jet noise coming from the Chicago Executive Airport runway as the board that oversees the facility's operations said they are moving ahead with a study to determining its potential benefits and impacts.

The board said last week that the study will examine adding 2,000 feet to the airport's longest runway, lengthening it from its current 5,000 feet to 7,000 feet long.

Order Reprint Print Article
 
Interested in reusing this article?
Custom reprints are a powerful and strategic way to share your article with customers, employees and prospects.
The YGS Group provides digital and printed reprint services for Daily Herald. Complete the form to the right and a reprint consultant will contact you to discuss how you can reuse this article.
Need more information about reprints? Visit our Reprints Section for more details.

Contact information ( * required )

Success - request sent close

Board member Ray Lang said Wednesday officials should have an employment contract in place to pursue the study by the next board meeting on June 18.

The board shared the idea of the study last week with the Wheeling village board and the Prospect Heights council. Representatives from the two municipalities, which have owned the airport since 1986, supported the study, though a few members expressed concern about the nearby businesses and homes that would be displaced if the runway were lengthened.

Charlie Priester, whose family once owned the airport, said last week that large corporate planes, which need runways of 7,000 feet, are the future for airports like Chicago Executive,

Nearby residents Steve and Nancy Neff raised concerns about the day-night sound level contour map on the airport's website, which displays noise exposure for the airport's surrounding areas. Steve Neff, whose Wheeling home sits beneath air traffic flow, asked if the board would be updating the map because of noise exposure.

"We're experiencing a high frequency of jets flying over," he said, adding that sound levels are getting worse, and the contour map is no longer accurate.

Airport Executive Director Jamie Abbott said he would find out when the map's study was completed to see if the information needs to be updated.

"After it is re-evaluated and recertified, we can once again pursue the program," he said.

"It's not a quick process, but if the board wants me to proceed with that, we definitely will," he added.

Board members on Wednesday briefly discussed installing signs at the airport to designate the airport's surrounding communities of Prospect Heights and Wheeling.

"It's a great way to recognize where you're at, but it should be something spectacular," board member David Kolssak said. "That's the gateway to both of our communities for a majority of people."

Share this page
Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.
    help here