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updated: 3/29/2014 3:20 PM

'Fabulous Frogs' still in hiding in Elgin

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  • Tyler Bouchard, 9, right, of Carpentersville and other kids take a look as naturalist Josh Libman points out a type of frog during a program called "Fabulous Frogs" on Saturday, March 29, at Burnidge Forest Preserve in Elgin. Due to the cold temperatures, frogs were still dormant.

       Tyler Bouchard, 9, right, of Carpentersville and other kids take a look as naturalist Josh Libman points out a type of frog during a program called "Fabulous Frogs" on Saturday, March 29, at Burnidge Forest Preserve in Elgin. Due to the cold temperatures, frogs were still dormant.
    Bev Horne | Staff Photographer

  • Kiera Morrison, 5, of Bartlett takes a hike with naturalist Josh Libman and a group during a program called "Fabulous Frogs" on Saturday, March 29, at Burnidge Forest Preserve in Elgin. Due to the cold temperatures, frogs were still dormant.

       Kiera Morrison, 5, of Bartlett takes a hike with naturalist Josh Libman and a group during a program called "Fabulous Frogs" on Saturday, March 29, at Burnidge Forest Preserve in Elgin. Due to the cold temperatures, frogs were still dormant.
    Bev Horne | Staff Photographer

 
 

On a normal spring day, visitors to the Burnidge Forest Preserve in Elgin would hear the mating chirps and croaks of the frogs, but due to the extreme weather this winter and spring, they are still dormant and buried under the mud.

A group of about 20 adults and children were bundled up for the blustery weather Saturday, prepared to learn all about frogs from Kane County Forest Preserve naturalist Josh Libman in a program called "Fabulous Frogs." But with temperatures in the mid 30s, the only frogs to be seen were on a poster at the beginning of the program.

Still, Libman gave the group plenty of frog statistics and explained that frogs absorb toxins in the water.

"They are excellent environmental indicators. If you have a lot of frogs in a given area, that means you don't have pollution in a given area," he said.

Libman took the group on a half-mile hike around the preserve and told them about frogs' tongue and hopping abilities. He also pointed out good places to spot the frogs on a warmer day when they are finally awake.

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