Breaking News Bar
updated: 7/31/2013 10:37 AM

Cost of K-9 program a concern in Buffalo Grove

hello
Success - Article sent! close
 

Buffalo Grove may need to take a bite out of its 2014 budget to balance it. It may have to take some of its bark out as well, in the form of the K-9 program.

To aid village board members in looking at the budget, which faces a funding gap in future years unless services are cut or taxes are raised, Deputy Village Manager Jennifer Maltas presented an analysis Monday to the board's committee of the whole of the cost of what the village calls its Tier 3 services -- those that go beyond the village's core mission.

Order Reprint Print Article
 
Interested in reusing this article?
Custom reprints are a powerful and strategic way to share your article with customers, employees and prospects.
The YGS Group provides digital and printed reprint services for Daily Herald. Complete the form to the right and a reprint consultant will contact you to discuss how you can reuse this article.
Need more information about reprints? Visit our Reprints Section for more details.

Contact information ( * required )

Success - request sent close

Maltas said 132 services were analyzed, broken down into such factors as direct costs, revenues, salaried time in hours and dollars, and total net annual costs. Only eight services break even.

"The highest total cost program that we have right now is the K-9 program," she said. "Without including staff time, it is costing the village $1,200 per search."

When you include staff time associated with the program, the cost per search is more than $5,800, she said. In 2012, Maltas said, there were 31 searches conducted in Buffalo Grove and 51 searches externally. The net cost to run the program is in excess of $182,000.

Police Chief Steven Casstevens said that the program incurs such costs as food, health care and officer training.

Trustee Steven Trilling wondered if the village could recoup the cost of providing the service to other towns that do not have their own K-9 program. But Casstevens said that when the canine officer is on vacation or off duty, the village uses the K-9 services of another community.

"It's kind of a trade back and forth," he said. "Communities do it for each other."

Casstevens added that in some cases, a dog boosts productivity.

"An officer may have found just a pipe in the car -- a marijuana pipe. Rather than me tearing this car up (looking for drugs), it's easier if I walk a dog around it," he said.

Share this page
Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.