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updated: 7/8/2013 10:35 PM

Palatine council delays vote on apartments for disabled

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  • Palatine council members could vote tonight to approve Catherine Alice Gardens, the proposed 33-unit supporting housing development for residents with disabilities. The $10.5 million project has generated opposition from among its potential neighbors just north of Palatine's downtown.

      Palatine council members could vote tonight to approve Catherine Alice Gardens, the proposed 33-unit supporting housing development for residents with disabilities. The $10.5 million project has generated opposition from among its potential neighbors just north of Palatine's downtown.
    Courtesy of Hugh Brady

 
Daily Herald report

Palatine council members have delayed a vote on a controversial plan to build a three-story, 33-unit supportive housing residence that would serve people with disabilities.

The $10.5 million proposal, backed by advocates for the disabled but opposed by many of its potential neighbors, calls for the affordable apartments complex named Catherine Alice Gardens to be built at 345 N. Eric Drive, just north of the village's downtown.

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But Monday night the village council sent the proposal back to the plan commission so a lawyer's cross examination of an evaluation expert could be finished. The proposal is expected to return to the council Aug. 5.

Despite some vocal objections from residents, the village's plan commission last month voted 7-1 to recommend that council members rezone the site from manufacturing to residential to allow for the project.

Opponents have cited concerns including resident safety, the project's fit in a largely manufacturing part of town, and its impact on neighboring property values.

But the project's developers say several studies and opinions by appraisers and real estate brokers concluded that the building wouldn't negatively affect property values.

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