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posted: 6/10/2013 2:45 PM

Lend a hand with farm chores at Garfield Farm's 1840s Day

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  • Helen Bauer of Campton Hills demonstrates candle making during a previous 1840s Day at Garfield Farm Museum in La Fox. This year's event is set for noon to 4 p.m. Sunday, June 16.

      Helen Bauer of Campton Hills demonstrates candle making during a previous 1840s Day at Garfield Farm Museum in La Fox. This year's event is set for noon to 4 p.m. Sunday, June 16.
    Daily Herald File Photo

  • Costumed interpreters will introduce visitors to farm life, 19th-century style, at Garfield Farm Museum's 1840s Day.

      Costumed interpreters will introduce visitors to farm life, 19th-century style, at Garfield Farm Museum's 1840s Day.
    Courtesy of Garfield Farm

 
Submitted by Garfield Farm Museum

On Sunday, June 16, from noon to 4 p.m., visitors can discover what life was like over 160 years ago during Garfield Farm Museum's 1840s Day.

The event offers children and adults the opportunity to learn about their rural heritage through guided tours and period demonstrations.

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Life in the 1840s was very different from it is today. Farm families like the Garfield family had to survive without electricity, running water, and many other modern conveniences. Farm work and household chores were physically demanding, and there was always more work to be done.

During the event, visitors will be able to experience daily life in the mid-19th century through period demonstrations by costumed interpreters.

The restored 1846 brick inn will be open for tours. Visitors will be able to see the kitchen, ladies parlor, taproom, ballroom, and customers' bedroom. Highlights of the tour include many original Garfield family items, such as the spinning wheel the family brought with them from Vermont when they moved to Illinois.

The tour often sparks conversations between family members as they recall childhood recollections of growing up on a farm.

In addition to the brick inn, visitors will be able to walk through the museum's historic barns. The 1842 barn is the oldest building on the property.

Although damaged by a lightning strike in 2005, this historic structure has survived and work continues on its restoration. The 1849 horse barn is almost fully restored and was built to house the horses that belonged to customers staying at the inn.

Children will delight in seeing the museum's farm animals. These include mostly rare heritage breeds of chickens, turkeys, sheep, hogs, and oxen.

Visitors can also tour the museum's prairie, giving them a chance to reconnect with nature while learning about native plants and the impact of human development on the landscape.

Admission to the 1840s Day event is $6 for adults and $3 for children.

For details, call (630) 584-8485, email info@garfieldfarm.org or visit [URL]www.garfieldfarm.org/;http://www.garfieldfarm.org/[URL]. Garfield Farm Museum is five miles west of Geneva, off Route 38 on Garfield Road.[/URL]

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