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updated: 5/1/2013 10:54 PM

Suter played how many minutes for the Wild?!?

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Even the Blackhawks' defensemen did a double take when the official statistics arrived after Game 1 and they saw Minnesota defenseman Ryan Suter had played more than 41 minutes.

"He's a tremendous defenseman," said the Hawks' Johnny Oduya. "There aren't many guys around who can do that. We want to force him to make as many tough plays as possible, try and wear him down, even though that's very tough.

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"We have enough forwards to keep him busy. If we keep playing our game eventually we'll eventually break through him."

Hawks workhorse Brent Seabrook had nothing but praise for Suter.

"During the game we noticed he was out there quite a bit,"Seabrook said. "Then we saw the sheet after the game and he had 41 minutes, it was unbelievable. I remember Dunc (Keith) and I played 30 minutes at the end of overtime and it felt like a lot. Forty one is pretty crazy."

Suter joked that he is a good glider.

"You don't think about it, you're just going out there and playing," Suter said. "I enjoy playing a lot of minutes. I feel the more you play, the more you are into the game."

Let's get physical:

Minnesota coach Mike Yeo was pleased with his team's play in Game 1 for the most part.

"One thing I thought that we did well is we played a good structured game," Yeo said. "But for me one key is take that structure and to add a physical element to it. We definitely need to bring a nastiness to our game. There were situations where we could have done that.

"The flip side is you have to make sure against a team like that, you start running around and take yourself out of position, they'll gladly take a hit to make a play to score a goal.

"But that's one area we can improve as a team is bringing that physical element within the structure of our game. We have to make sure that we're making their defense pay a price."

Stifling style:

It's not exactly the same as when Jacques Lemaire coached the Wild and played a neutral zone trap, but Minnesota is known for playing tight games like Tuesday's 2-1 overtime loss to the Hawks.

"That's how they've played us all season," Jonathan Toews said. "We kind of expected that in Game 1 and it's not going to change. We have to keep wearing them down as much as we can. We like to think of ourselves as an offensive team that can score in a lot of different ways."

Brent Seabrook sees it the same way.

"I expected a tight series, low-scoring games," Seabrook said. "Minnesota has always defending the front of their net extremely well. The clean looks through the middle of the ice in their end are going to be hard to find."

Hits-ville:

The Hawks were credited with 40 hits in Game 1, a season high for them. Minnesota had 36. Andrew Shaw led the Hawks with 7.

"It's playoff hockey and obviously a lot more physical and intense," Shaw said. "In a seven-game series you've got to wear down the opponent."

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