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updated: 4/8/2013 10:59 AM

Human Race benefits range of DuPage charities

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  • The Human Race, started last year by Giving DuPage, features a 5K run and 2-mile fitness walk in which participants choose which DuPage County cause benefits from their entry fees.

       The Human Race, started last year by Giving DuPage, features a 5K run and 2-mile fitness walk in which participants choose which DuPage County cause benefits from their entry fees.
    Daniel White | Staff Photographer, APRIL 2012

  • Roughly 50 nonprofit organizations serving DuPage County have signed up to be part of the Human Race. When runners and walkers register, they choose which organization they're supporting.

      Roughly 50 nonprofit organizations serving DuPage County have signed up to be part of the Human Race. When runners and walkers register, they choose which organization they're supporting.
    Courtesy of Giving DuPage

  • Video: The first Human Race

 
 

The thing about the human race is that we're all here together and, different as we may be, we can make life better for each other.

The same is true about the Human Race.

The 5K organized by Giving DuPage brings together runners and walkers for a charity fundraiser. But rather than raising money for a single cause, the participants in the Human Race each are supporting their own cause; collectively, they're helping about 50 nonprofit organizations working to make DuPage a better place.

When runners register for the April 27 race, they're asked which group they'd like their entry fee to benefit. The choices include prominent charities like Habitat for Humanity's Illinois chapter, Literacy DuPage and the Northern Illinois Food Bank, but most charities on the list are smaller, more grass-roots organizations that don't have the resources to run a successful fundraising 5K on their own.

The event fits perfectly with the mission of Giving DuPage, which exists to connect volunteers and donors with charitable organizations that need time, talent and resources.

Today we hear from two people who participated last year in the inaugural Human Race. Linda Shea, who runs on behalf of the DuPage Homeownership Center, and Robert Dobosz, who walks for Glen Ellyn Youth and Family Counseling, share their experience with the race and a bit about their organizations.

Read Linda Shea's story.

Read Robert Dobosz's story.

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