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updated: 12/13/2012 3:58 PM

Roselle alters apartment plans after resident concerns

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A proposed apartment development at the southwest corner of Hattendorf Avenue and Prospect Street has won approval from the Roselle village board.

But the vote came only after several changes were made to the plan in response to concerns about parking and aesthetics.

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Trustees Ron Baker and Kory Atkinson opposed the plan.

The 10-unit building will cost roughly $2.1 million and be constructed by Kaper One, LLC, part of the companies run by architect Perry Janke. Janke is responsible for several developments in Roselle, including the mixed-use New Leaf Development at Roselle and Irving Park roads.

Several residents expressed concerns about a perceived lack of parking spaces, while planning and zoning committee members said they were concerned with aesthetic issues such as curb cuts and garage doors facing the town center.

Ultimately, the developers agreed to a series of modifications. Community Development Director Patrick Watkins said two units were eliminated from the initial 12-unit building proposal, making way for more parking. The location of the sidewalk also was shifted and garage doors were moved farther from the sidewalk to keep all cars on private property.

Watkins said the changes also enhance safety.

"Now they have a good sightline to see pedestrians coming on the sidewalk," he said.

Another change included expanding the driving area on the west side of the building from 16 feet to 18 feet to allow for easier movement and easier fire engine access.

Currently, a house and small public parking lot sit on the land. Watkins said the property tax bill from both the house and lot add up to less than $1,800 a year for Roselle.

But the new development is slated to generate roughly $38,000 in annual property tax revenues, he said.

In addition, the three-story building has architecture that is more similar to rowhomes than traditional apartments.

"It's a very different product for the rental market," Watkins said. "There's nothing else like it in town."

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