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updated: 10/21/2012 8:26 PM

Gainey wins at Sea Island with course-record 60

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  • Tommy Gainey holds the trophy after winning the McGladrey Classic PGA Tour golf tournament Sunday in St. Simons Island, Ga.

      Tommy Gainey holds the trophy after winning the McGladrey Classic PGA Tour golf tournament Sunday in St. Simons Island, Ga.
    Associated Press

 
Associated Press

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Winning on the PGA Tour is what Tommy Gainey dreamed about when he held a job wrapping insulation around hot water tanks, when he was playing more mini-tours than he can remember, when he was taking part in a Golf Channel reality series where he was best known as the guy wearing two gloves.

"Two Gloves" never imagined his first win would unfold the way it did Sunday at Sea Island.

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Seven shots behind going into the final round of the McGladrey Classic, Gainey came within one putt of a 59, and then had to wait more than two hours as David Toms, Jim Furyk and tournament host Davis Love III -- who have combined for 49 wins, three majors and 17 Ryder Cup teams -- tried to catch him.

None of them could.

Gainey broke the course record at Sea Island with a 10-under 60, which carried him to a one-shot win over Toms. He became the fourth player this year to rally from at least seven shots in the final round to win, helped by seven straight 3s on his card on the back nine.

"Oh, man," Gainey said. "I tell you, you're out here on the PGA Tour. You're playing with the best players in the world. Ninety-nine percent of these guys have already won, and won majors, big tournaments. The only show I can say I've won is the `Big Break.' Now I can sit here and say I've won the McGladrey Classic here at Sea Island, and I'm very proud to be in this tournament and very proud to win. And wow, it's been a whirlwind day.

"I didn't know having 24 putts and shooting 60 would be like this," he said. "So I'm pretty stoked about it."

Furyk was pretty bummed.

He went 55 holes without a bogey, a streak that ended on the 18th hole when he needed a birdie to force a playoff. From the fairway, Furyk pushed an 8-iron right of the green and had to settle for a 69, a sour end to a season filled with bitter moments.

It was his fourth time with at least a share of the 54-hole lead. He lost in a playoff, made bogey on the 16th hole at Olympic Club that cost him a shot at the U.S. Open, and made double bogey on the 18th hole at Firestone to lose the Bridgestone Invitational. Furyk had said going into the week that even a win wouldn't erase memories of those losses, along with losing a 1-up lead to Sergio Garcia in the Ryder Cup.

This time, someone went out and beat him with a record score, and Furyk couldn't catch him. He had a 69.

"I think what I'm most disappointed about is when it came down the stretch, hitting the ball pretty much as good as I can, I made really, really poor swings at 17 and 18 with a 7-iron and 8-iron," Furyk said. "So to play those two holes and not get one good look at it for birdie was disappointing."

Love's hopes of winning before the home crowd -- he has lived at Sea Island since he was 14 -- ended with a tee shot into the water for double bogey on the 16th. He was trying to become the first Ryder Cup captain since Tom Watson in 1996 to win on the PGA Tour.

A gracious host even in defeat, Love recalled his last win at Disney in 2008, when he didn't look at a leader board until the 18th hole and saw Gainey making a run. Love held on with pars. This time, he saw Gainey's name appear out of nowhere again, and couldn't do anything about it. He closed with a 71 and tied for fourth.

Toms, who closed with a 63, also needed a birdie on the 18th hole, but he pushed his drive well right into the bunker and had little chance of reaching the green.

"I was thinking about what kind of putt I was going to have before I ever hit the fairway," Toms said. "You get ahead of yourself and that's what happens."

Gainey's round was nearly 9 1/2 shots better than the average score in the final round. He had a 20-foot birdie putt on the 18th to become the sixth player in PGA Tour history with a 59 and narrowly missed it.

The hard work came later. The last group was on the eighth hole when he finished, and all Gainey could do was take off his two gloves and wait.

"You got future Hall of Famers chasing me -- chasing ME now," he said. "I'm Tommy Gainey. I'm `Two Gloves.' I shot 60 today and you got Jim Furyk, Davis Love III and David Toms chasing me. I mean, I was nervous. ... I was paying attention, and you know, it just worked out for me."

The 37-year old Gainey, who grew up in South Carolina and fashioned a swing like no other, finished at 16-under 264 and won $720,000. He earns a spot in the field at Kapalua for the Tournament of Champions, and he is exempt on tour through the 2014 season.

David Mathis felt like a winner, even though he finished six shots behind and tied for 10th. He moved up to No. 116 on the money list, assuring him a PGA Tour card for next year. The final official event of the season is in three weeks at Disney. Boo Weekley shot 69 and tied for 27th to stay at No. 121, though he should be safe now.

Gainey went out in 31, despite missing a 6-foot birdie putt on the second hole and failing to make birdie on the reachable par-5 seventh. Starting with his 10-foot birdie putt on the 11th hole, he put together seven straight 3s on his score card. His 20-foot birdie putt on the 14th tied him for the lead. He holed out a bunker shot from about 40 feet on the par-5 15th to take a two-shot lead, and then holed a 20-footer on the 16th to bring golf's magic number into view.

Gainey hit wedge into about 20 feet on the 18th hole, leaving him a birdie putt for a shot at becoming the sixth PGA Tour player with a 59. He ran off to a portable bathroom before the big putt and gave it a nice roll. The pace was just a bit off and it turned weakly away to the right.

"I wasn't thinking about 59," Gainey said. "See, all I did all day was just try to make birdies -- and a lot of birdies -- because when you're seven shots back, your chances of winning a PGA tournament with the leaders, Davis Love III and Jim Furyk ... it don't bide in your favor, man. I'm in this position, and man, it feels like I'm in a dream. I'm just waiting for somebody to slap me upside the head or pinch me or something to wake me up."

Instead, he went over to the volunteer tent for a champagne toast. Gainey raised a bottle of beer.

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