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updated: 9/25/2012 8:05 PM

Spectator fashion also part of Ryder Cup show

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  • Wendy Pellegrino, of Downers Grove, anchor of Comcast's Golf Chicago TV, sported colorful Loudmouth brand pants, similar to those worn by actor Bill Murray Tuesday. Pellegrino, who also wore orange-framed eyeglasses, said she owns six pairs of the bright patterned pants and plans to wear a different one every day of the Ryder Cup. "You have no idea how much I've been stopped. People want their picture taken with me," she said. "They'll say, 'Oh my God, you look awesome!'"

       Wendy Pellegrino, of Downers Grove, anchor of Comcast's Golf Chicago TV, sported colorful Loudmouth brand pants, similar to those worn by actor Bill Murray Tuesday. Pellegrino, who also wore orange-framed eyeglasses, said she owns six pairs of the bright patterned pants and plans to wear a different one every day of the Ryder Cup. "You have no idea how much I've been stopped. People want their picture taken with me," she said. "They'll say, 'Oh my God, you look awesome!'"
    George LeClaire | Staff Photographer

  • Sandee Plescia, of St. Charles, looks put together in head-to-toe golf gear she bought during her annual trips to the Masters golf tournament in Augusta, Ga. Her black-and-white ensemble matched from her visor down to her golf shoes, with most items bearing the tiny Masters logo. "I head straight to the pro shop when we go to the Masters," she said, laughing. "I think I spend more time there than on the golf course."

       Sandee Plescia, of St. Charles, looks put together in head-to-toe golf gear she bought during her annual trips to the Masters golf tournament in Augusta, Ga. Her black-and-white ensemble matched from her visor down to her golf shoes, with most items bearing the tiny Masters logo. "I head straight to the pro shop when we go to the Masters," she said, laughing. "I think I spend more time there than on the golf course."
    George LeClaire | Staff Photographer

  • Scott McCreadie, left, and Mike Brown, of Carnoustie, Scotland, wore a dressed down version of the traditional Scottish outfit, pairing their kilts, wool socks and sporran (a type of kilt purse) with T-shirts. They wore kilts to show support for Team Europe's Scottish golfer Paul Lawrie. "The idea is to look European straight off," Brown said. "There's no question who we're routing for."

       Scott McCreadie, left, and Mike Brown, of Carnoustie, Scotland, wore a dressed down version of the traditional Scottish outfit, pairing their kilts, wool socks and sporran (a type of kilt purse) with T-shirts. They wore kilts to show support for Team Europe's Scottish golfer Paul Lawrie. "The idea is to look European straight off," Brown said. "There's no question who we're routing for."
    George LeClaire | Staff Photographer

  • Sporting the "regular guy" suburban golfing outfits are, left to right, Jeffrey Thompson of Orlando, Fla., ("I've been traveling all week and these are the only clean clothes I have"); Curt Thompson of Winnetka (It's just full color coordination"); Robert Rossi of Winnetka ("It's clean and hopefully matching") and Rick Adler of Winnetka ("It was the first thing I grabbed.").

       Sporting the "regular guy" suburban golfing outfits are, left to right, Jeffrey Thompson of Orlando, Fla., ("I've been traveling all week and these are the only clean clothes I have"); Curt Thompson of Winnetka (It's just full color coordination"); Robert Rossi of Winnetka ("It's clean and hopefully matching") and Rick Adler of Winnetka ("It was the first thing I grabbed.").
    Jamie Sotonoff | Staff Photographer

 
 

Tuesday's Ryder Cup crowds flocked around Justin Timberlake at every tee, snapped cellphone photos of Bill Murray putting near the clubhouse, and watched a few pros play a practice round.

But another part of the entertainment at the Ryder Cup is people-watching. With thousands of spectators mulling around Medinah Country Club all day, it's easy to spot some fashion risk-takers mixed in among the golf shirt-and-khakis crowd.

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Spotted at Tuesday's celebrity and practice rounds were American flag pants, high heels, Scottish kilts and bright colors -- the latter of which is a big trend in golf apparel now.

Bold colored golf clothes, including 1980s neon yellow, pink and green, are hot sellers, along with spikeless shoes (made popular by pro Freddie Couples), according to Katie Birger, merchandise manager of the 32,000-square-foot Golfsmith store in Schaumburg. It's one of three enormous golf apparel stores in a one-mile stretch along, yes, Golf Road.

"White is always in style ... but the bright neon color is definitely 'in' right now. Even the more traditional golfer is going into it a little bit," Birger said. "It might not be a bright pink, but a bright green, or bright blue, or something that pops. It might be gray pants with a white belt and bright colored shirt. I would probably say that's what 80 percent of the golfing world wears."

You'll see that, and more, this week at the Ryder Cup. Just remember, if you're going Sunday, wear red in support of Team USA.

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