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updated: 7/13/2011 6:13 PM

Ruling on Buffalo Grove landfill delayed again

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The decision whether to free the former Land and Lakes landfill site in Buffalo Grove from future monitoring has again been delayed.

At the request of the operators of the landfill, located along Milwaukee Avenue north of Lake-Cook Road, the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency agreed to postpone its ruling by another 90 days, until Oct. 12.

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The IEPA was to decide by Thursday whether to extend its oversight of the property. The decision had already been delayed once, from its initial deadline in January.

The delay gives the site's owners more time to review data from ongoing monitoring there.

"They've installed additional monitoring wells in accordance with agency's request and are continuing data collection and evaluation," IEPA spokeswoman Maggie Carson said Wednesday.

Land and Lakes closed about 16 years ago and has more recently been used as a transfer station and composting site, which has prompted complaints of noxious odors. An IEPA-imposed 15-year monitoring period came to an end in July 2010.

Buffalo Grove annexed the former landfill in 2008 with the idea of developing the property, but some experts have said the site deserves more scrutiny based on past documents citing contaminants found in the groundwater, along with other deficiencies.

Village President Jeffrey Braiman said a second round of tests completed in June showed no signs of environmental hazards. He said the board won't interfere with the IEPA's job, but hopes for a resolution soon.

"We're obviously concerned about the health, safety and welfare of our citizens, but if testing shows it's prime for release, then they shouldn't hold back on the permitting process," Braiman said. "We want to be fair to the developer without compromising the safety of the village and its citizens."

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