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updated: 7/1/2011 5:56 PM

Mt. Prospect storm cleanup continues

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By Sam Wagner
swagner@dailyherald.com

The Mount Prospect Public Works Department, still cleaning up after a tornado hit the village on June 21, will temporarily halt brush collection July 3 and 4 for the holiday, and will limit cleanup efforts on Saturday, July 2, to the removal of hanging limbs.

Street-by-street brush collection will resume on July 5, a news release said.

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More than 2,600 Mount Prospect trees are known to have been damaged after the tornado blew through with wind speeds of 86 to 110 m.p.h.

Public works crews have worked 12 hours or more each day to clean up the damage, a news release said.

The Mount Prospect Public Works staff's goal is to complete all street-by-street brush collection by Friday, July 8. As of Thursday night, the news release said, 45 percent of the brush had been collected.

Updates will continue to be posted on the village website.

Sandy Clark, forestry and grounds superintendent, said residents should check the village website to see if their area has already been cleared.

If the area is marked as complete, then residents should not bring any logs or brush out to the parkways and should instead follow village yard waste collection guidelines, she said.

At this point, the village does not have any estimate for how much the cleanup efforts will cost, or for how much overtime has been logged, Clark said Friday.

As of now, 244 parkway trees are scheduled to be removed and an additional 50 to 70 are expected to require removal, a news release said. Clark added that there are no current plans to replace them.

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