Daily Archive : Tuesday January 9, 2018

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Sports

Business

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    Grains lower, livestock mixed

    CHICAGO (AP) - Grain futures were lower Wednesday in early trading on the Chicago Board of Trade. Wheat for March delivery was up .40 cent at $4.3260 a bushel; March corn lost .40 cent 3.4840 a bushel; March oats lost 1.20 cents at $2.5020 a bushel while January soybeans lost 5.20 cents at $9.5040 a bushel. Beef mixed and pork was mixed on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. February live cattle was down .30 cent at $1.1738 a pound; January feeder cattle was down 25 cent at $1.4523 a pound; February lean hogs was up .05 cent at $.7323 a pound.

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    First American Bank merges with Kenosha bank

    First American Bank, headquartered in Elk Grove Village, said Tuesday that it has merged with Southport Bank in Kenosha.

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    FILE - In this Nov. 9, 2017, file photo, Steve Bannon, speaks during an event in Manchester, N.H. Breitbart News Network announced Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018, that Bannon is stepping down as chairman of the conservative news site. (AP Photo/Mary Schwalm, File)

    Bannon to exit Breitbart News Network after break with Trump

    Former White House strategist Steve Bannon is stepping down as chairman of Breitbart News Network after a public break with President Donald Trump

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    If you haven’t gotten a flu shot yet this season, it could still help you even though its effectiveness may be lower than in other years, says Dr. Guy Kochevar of Northwest Community Hospital in Arlington Heights.

    The flu is worse this year: 5 things you need to know

    The cold spell that kept everyone indoors and a predominant flu strain that’s less affected by the vaccine are making for a bad flu season. Here are five things to know about the flu and how to avoid it.

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    Lawmakers demand probe into Intel CEO's stock sales

    Two U.S. lawmakers are asking federal regulators to open an investigation into stock sales that reaped a $25 million profit for Intel's CEO before chipmaker disclosed serious security flaws affecting its products

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    Microsoft stops fixing security flaw on PCs with AMD chips

    Microsoft has temporarily stopped fixing a serious security flaw on personal computers powered by certain chips from Advanced Micro Devices because the repair is crippling the machines

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    Sales tax revenue in Gurnee failed to meet the village’s projections in five out of the first six months of the fiscal year. Gurnee Mills is one of the village’s biggest shopping destinations.

    Sales taxes revenues down in Gurnee halfway through fiscal year

    Sales tax revenues in Gurnee failed to meet the village’s modest projections five out of the first six months of the fiscal year according to a report presented to the village board Monday.

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    146-bed psychiatric hospital in Waukegan wins approval

    Lake County officials and mental health advocates are applauding a Tuesday ruling by the Illinois Health Facilities and Services Review Board to approve a $30.2 million proposal by New-York based US HealthVest to purchase Waukegan’s Vista Medical Center West and transform it into a state-of-the-art, 146-bed psychiatric hospital known as Lake Behavioral Hospital.

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    FILE - In this Aug. 10, 2015 file photo, Political Director for CBS News, John Dickerson, participates in the CBS News panel at the CBS Summer TCA Tour in Beverly Hills, Calif. CBS News has selected Dickerson as Charlie Rose's replacement on the "CBS This Morning" program, pairing him with current anchors Gayle King and Norah O'Donnell. (Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP, File)

    CBS appoints John Dickerson as Rose's replacement

    'Face the Nation' host John Dickerson will replace Charlie Rose as one of three co-hosts on the 'CBS This Morning' news program

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    Schaumburg Mayor Al Larson delivers his speech at the annual state of the village address before the Schaumburg Business Association at The Clubhouse restaurant on Tuesday.

    Topgolf, City Works restaurant coming to Schaumburg

    A Topgolf sports entertainment facility is the first specific business named for the redevelopment of Schaumburg’s former Motorola Solutions campus, while four restaurants are proposed for the land in front of the Hyatt Regency Schaumburg across Golf Road from Woodfield Mall.

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    ESPN reaches 28.4 million with football championship

    Nielsen says that 28.4 million people watched the NCAA football championship between Alabama and Georgia, which went into overtime

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    Nielsen's top programs for Jan. 1-7

    A list of the top 20 prime-time programs in the Nielsen ratings for Jan. 1-7

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    Peak Construction finishes project

    Peak Construction Corp. recently completed a tenant improvement for M. Block & Sons’ at its 900,000-square-foot facility in Tinley Park.

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    Cort Carlson, executive director of the Aurora Area Convention & Visitors Bureau.

    Ultimate Frisbee championships planned for Aurora area

    USA Ultimate, the national governing body for the sport of ultimate frisbee in the United States and member of the U.S.

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    The owners of the Park Street Restaurant in downtown Mundelein will receive a village grant to purchase new awnings.

    Mundelein restaurant gets village grant

    A Mundelein restaurant is the latest recipient of a village grant program designed to help local businesses improve their properties.

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    Harley Jones

    360 Youth Services in Naperville names new CEO

    The 360 Youth Services board of directors said Harley Jones will take the helm as chief executive officer this week.

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    Life Time Fitness has decided to eliminate all national cable network news stations from the TV screens at its 128 fitness centers in the U.S. and Canada.

    Why Life Time Fitness is banning cable news networks at its gyms

    Life Time Fitness has decided to eliminate all national cable network news stations from the TV screens at its 128 fitness centers in the U.S. and Canada.

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    Report: 18 states may introduce sports betting bills in 2018

    A new report predicts states will introduce bills to regulate sports betting this year, with 11 having a good chance of passing one

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    A Starbucks briefly closes after hoax about a barista defiling white people’s food goes viral

    The admissions from a Starbucks employee were apparently too revolting not to share. Spitting in a woman’s coffee, sprinkling dog feces in a child’s hot chocolate, mixing blood into jam — all were disgusting acts, presumably committed by a black woman, Shanell Rivers, targeting white customers in the Atlanta area and detailed on Facebook for the world to see.By Sunday night, as images of the post mushroomed on social media, Starbucks was trying to reassure customers that the post was a fake that was “maliciously” created. But that was after a store’s phone started ringing in an Atlanta suburb, with threats coming from the other end of the line.The digital outrage spurred real-life consequences Sunday, forcing the store in Brookhaven, north of Atlanta, to close two hours early, a Starbucks corporate staffer told The Washington Post. Maj. Brandon Gurley, a Brookhaven Police Department spokesman, said police responded with additional patrols in the area. Authorities have also launched an investigation to determine how the false information spread, Gurley said.The incident marks a growing headache for law enforcement: accusations or claims of salacious behavior weaponized on social media and taken offline to produce real-world potential for harm.Such targeted false accusations are reminiscent of #Pizzagate, the debunked conspiracy theory that suggested that Washington, D.C., pizza restaurant Comet Ping Pong was harboring a child sex ring involving Hillary Clinton. That online hoax sparked hundreds of death threats against the restaurant’s owner and culminated on Dec. 4, 2016, when Edgar Welch fired three shots inside Comet Ping Pong as part of a self-proclaimed mission to rescue children.A Starbucks spokeswoman said Monday that the Facebook post “is completely false” and that Starbucks does not have an employee named Shanell Rivers. “We are working with local authorities,” said Sanja Gould, the spokeswoman. Gould said “a few” threats were made to the store, but she did not have a specific count. She said that she was not aware of any new threats Monday but that the company’s first priority was the safety of its employees.One Twitter account posted the image Sunday afternoon and racked up thousands of retweets from that post and other updates. Messages sent to two moderators of the Facebook page with the purported message were not immediately returned.Other recent police incidents also appear to have roots on the internet. Police said Andrew Finch of Wichita was killed Dec. 28 after a fellow online gamer “swatted” him - prank-calling police with a fake description of an armed assailant, prompting a response by officers. Finch was unarmed when he was shot by police, and the incident is under investigation.

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    FILE - This May 3, 2017, file photo shows a Target store in Omaha, Neb. Target is raising its fourth-quarter and full-year earnings outlooks, following strong sales in its stores and online during the critical holiday season. The retailer said Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018, that its outlook changes also reflect recently-enacted federal tax reform. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik, File)

    Target leveraged stores to raise its online game

    Target has leveraged its stores to take on online competition, and it's getting results

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    Irene Sánchez will anchor the 11 a.m. Telemundo Chicago newscast.

    Feder: Telemundo Chicago adds midday newscast

    Chicago’s first Spanish-language midday newscast will premiere January 22 when Telemundo Chicago WSNS-Channel 44 launches “Noticias Telemundo, Mediodía,” Robert Feder writes.

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    Oprah Winfrey won over the Golden Globes, and that was good news for Weight Watchers International Inc. investors.

    ‘Oprah for president’ talk boosts Weight Watchers shares

    Oprah Winfrey won over the Golden Globes, and that was good news for Weight Watchers International Inc. investors.

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    Diane Swonk, who has spoken at many suburban economic events, has joined Grant Thornton as chief economist.

    Grant Thornton accounting firm hires Diane Swonk

    Diane Swonk, one of the most recognizable faces in economic forecasting, joined Grant Thornton as its first chief economist, the company said.

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    DuPage County Board Chairman Dan Cronin, left, and county Clerk Paul Hinds announced plans more than a year ago to merge the clerk’s office with the DuPage Election Commission.

    Editorial: The importance of persistence in government consolidation

    A Daily Herald editorial emphasizes the importance of local leaders remaining diligent in effots to root out redudancy in local government and consolidate units for more efficiency.

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    DuPage County Board Chairman Dan Cronin, left, and county Clerk Paul Hinds announced plans more than a year ago to merge the clerk’s office with the DuPage Election Commission.

    Editorial: DuPage, Kane persistence in government consolidation

    A Daily Herald editorial emphasizes the importance of local leaders remaining diligent in effots to root out redudancy in local government and consolidate units for more efficiency.

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    The increasing signs that president isn’t up to the job

    Columnist Kathleen Parker: I’m almost beginning to feel sorry for him. Donald Trump, that is.

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    Where are reforms?
    A Palatine letter to the editor: Since tax talk is all the recent rage, let’s not forget that Illinois passed a 32 percent tax hike this past July without any changes to the way Illinois operates.

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    Who owns corporations?
    A Palatine letter to the editor: Some people are complaining about the GOP’s tax cut helping big corporations.

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    Thanks for action on county pensions
    A McHenry letter to the editor: Kudos to the McHenry County Board and Chairman Jack Franks for moving pension reform forward and not sitting around and waiting for our do-nothing state legislature to act.

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    Freedom’s principles on our campuses
    By Walter WilliamsA frequent point I have made in past columns has been about the educational travesty happening on many college campuses. Some people have labeled my observations and concerns as trivial, unimportant and cherry-picking. While the spring semester awaits us, let’s ask ourselves whether we’d like to see repeats of last year’s antics. An excellent source for college news is Campus Reform, a conservative website operated by the Leadership Institute (https://www.campusreform.org). Its reporters are college students. Here is a tiny sample of last year’s bizarre stories.Donna Riley, a professor at Purdue University’s School of Engineering Education, published an article in the most recent issue of the peer-reviewed Journal of Engineering Education, positing that academic rigor is a “dirty deed” that upholds “white male heterosexual privilege.” Riley added that “scientific knowledge itself is gendered, raced, and colonizing.” Would you hire an engineering education graduate who has little mastery of the rigor of engineering? What does Riley’s vision, if actually practiced by her colleagues, do to the worth of degrees in engineering education from Purdue held by female and black students?Sympathizing with Riley’s vision is Rochelle Gutierrez, a math education professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. In her recent book, she says the ability to solve algebra and geometry problems perpetuates “unearned privilege” among whites. Educators must be aware of the “politics that mathematics brings” in society. She thinks that “on many levels, mathematics itself operates as Whiteness.” After all, she adds, “who gets credit for doing and developing mathematics, who is capable in mathematics, and who is seen as part of the mathematical community is generally viewed as White.” What’s worse is that the university’s interim provost, John Wilkin, sanctioned her vision, telling Fox News that Gutierrez is an established and admired scholar who has been published in many peer-reviewed publications. I hope that the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign’s black students don’t have the same admiration and stay away from her classes.Last month, the presidents of 13 San Antonio colleges declared in an Op-Ed written by Ric Baser, president of the Higher Education Council of San Antonio, and signed by San Antonio Mayor Ron Nirenberg and 12 other members of the HECSA that “hate speech” and “inappropriate messages” should not be treated as free speech on college campuses. Their vision should be seen as tyranny. The true test of one’s commitment to free speech doesn’t come when he permits people to be free to make statements that he does not find offensive. The true test of one’s commitment to free speech comes when he permits people to make statements he does deem offensive.Other campus good news is a report on the resignation of George Ciccariello-Maher, a white Drexel University professor who tweeted last winter, “All I Want For Christmas is White Genocide.” He said that he resigned from his tenured position because threats against him and his family had become “unsustainable.” If conservative students made such threats, they, too, could benefit from learning the principles of free speech.© 2018, Creators

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    Today’s Opinion Page editorial cartoon
    Today’s Daily Herald Opinion page editorial cartoon

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