Daily Archive : Wednesday September 6, 2017

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Sports

Business

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    Jeff Meltzer is the founder and president of Applied Ergonomics, a full service contract furniture dealership and ergonomic consulting firm.

    Furniture dealership finds a fit with ergonomics
    Jeff Meltzer matches bodies with furniture. The Skokie business owner started doing this more than 25 years ago, before ergonomics was really talked about.

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    John E. O’Connor

    Getting your new business started

    While starting a new business is never an easy task, technology has made startups and, in many cases, forming new business ventures much easier.

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    FILE - In this June 6, 2017, file photo, Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee, speaks after a closed meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington. Hundreds of fake Facebook accounts, probably run from Russia, spent about $100,000 on ads aimed at stirring up divisive issues such as gun control and race relations during the 2016 U.S. presidential election, the social network said Sept. 6, 2017. Schiff said Facebook’s disclosure confirmed what many lawmakers investigating Russian interference in the U.S. election had long suspected. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)

    Facebook: Accounts from Russia bought ads during US campaign

    Facebook says it has identified nearly 500 fake accounts, probably run from Russia, that it says spent about $100,000 on thousands of ads that amplified politically divisive issues during the 2016 US presidential campaign

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    US won't punish United over passenger-dragging incident

    Transportation Department finds no cause for fining United Airlines over passenger dragged from overcrowded plane

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    FILE -This May 11, 2017 file photo shows a Kohl's department store, in Doral, Fla. Kohl's says it will open up Amazon shops in 10 of its stores, making it the latest department store operator to make a deal with the e-commerce giant. Kohl's Corp., based in Menomonee Falls, Wis., said Wednesday, Sept. 6, the Amazon shops will open next month in Chicago and Los Angeles stores.(AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

    Selling with the enemy? Kohl's to open in-store Amazon shops

    Kohl's to open Amazon shops in some stores, the latest department store to make a deal with the e-commerce giant

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    The Village Market Place grocery store in Carol Stream is preparing to close within the next two weeks.

    Family-owned Carol Stream grocery store closing

    A family-owned Carol Stream grocery store will close after almost nine years catering to a diverse neighborhood near the border with Wheaton.

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    First Bank & Trust to open Libertyville branch
    First Bank & Trust will open its new Libertyville branch at 111 W. Church St. on Sept. 18.

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    FILE - In this Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2017, file photo, a United Airlines plane is towed at George Bush Intercontinental Airport in Houston. United Airlines said Hurricane Harvey and a fare war contributed to a loss of $400 million in expected revenue, and the storm saddled the company with higher prices for jet fuel. The company said Wednesday, Sept. 6, that a key revenue-per-seat figure would fall by up to 5 percent for the third quarter. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)

    United Continental cuts outlook on Harvey impact, fuel costs

    United Airlines' parent says Harvey and lower fares will cut 3Q revenue by $400 million

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    CSX says its rail service is improving after major delays

    CSX railroad says its service is improving after a summer marked by delays as it overhauled its operations, but the company is trimming its profit outlook

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    House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of Calif. accompanied by members of the House and Senate Democrats, gestures during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017. House and Senate Democrats gather to call for Congressional Republicans to stand up to President Trump's decision to terminate the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) initiative by bringing the DREAM Act for a vote on the House and Senate Floor. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

    Trump's harsh message to immigrants could drag on economy

    Trump's harsh message on immigration could drag down economic growth, business leaders say

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    Dave Hight

    The world’s most important number to retire by 2021
    The London Interbank Offered Rate, known as LIBOR, will be phased out by 2021.

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    Nielsen's top programs for Aug. 28-Sept. 3

    A list of the top 20 prime-time programs in the Nielsen ratings for Aug. 28-Sept. 3

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    College football helps ABC win in television ratings

    Football season has just begun, and it has already had an impact on another competition _ for ratings among television networks

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    Hurricane impacts talks between pipeline company, state

    Hurricane Harvey has impacted the pace of negotiations between the company that built the Dakota Access oil pipeline and North Dakota regulators investigating potential violations of state rules during construction

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    Ameren to try again for Missouri approval of new power line

    An Ameren Corp. subsidiary plans to try again to get state approval for a high-voltage power line after changing its route and getting consent from the northeastern Missouri counties it would cross

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    FILE - This Feb. 10, 2017 file photo shows the sign on a Gap store in the Shadyside shopping district of Pittsburgh. Gap Inc. says it will shift its focus to its growing brands Old Navy and Athleta, and away from the Gap and Banana Republic. The company said Wednesday, Sept. 6, that it will close about 200 Gap and Banana Republic stores in the next three years and open about 270 Old Navy and Athleta stores during the same period.(AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)

    Gap to shift focus to Old Navy, Athleta stores

    Gap shifting focus to its growing brands Old Navy and Athleta, away from Gap and Banana Republic

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    Chamberlain online program receives certification
    Chamberlain University’s RN to BSN Online Degree Completion Option has received the nationally recognized Quality Matters Certification Mark for achievements in both Online Teaching Support Certification and Online Learner Support Certification.

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    Oak Brook-based McDonald’s said it plans to sell some of its McCafe drinks in bottles at supermarkets and other stores.

    McDonald’s to bring bottled McCafe drinks to store shelves

    Oak Brook-based McDonald’s says it will soon sell some of its McCafe drinks in bottles at supermarkets and other stores, catching up with coffee rivals Starbucks and Dunkin’ Donuts.

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    SureWerx merges two subsidiaries to create new group

    SureWerx, a supplier of professional tool, equipment and safety products for workers, has merged subsidiaries American Forge & Foundry and Sellstrom Manufacturing to create SureWerx USA Inc, expanding its presence in the U.S marketplace.

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    Option Care named a home provider of new ALS drug
    Option Care Enterprises, an independent provider of home and alternate treatment site infusion services, has signed an agreement to become a national contracted home infusion provider for Radicava, an intravenous infusion treatment for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

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    Inland buys multifamily property in Florida
    Inland Real Estate Acquisitions negotiated and closed the purchase of Magnolia Village Apartments, a 168-unit multifamily property located in Jacksonville, Florida.

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    New Nissan LEAF electric vehicle is displayed after the world premiere in Chiba, near Tokyo, Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017. Nissan's new Leaf electric car goes farther on a charge and comes with autonomous drive technology and single-pedal driving. But whether it can catch on with anyone but the most zealously green-minded remains to be seen. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

    Nissan adds range to cheaper Leaf, but new drivers are key

    Nissan's new Leaf goes farther on a charge, but the world's top-selling electric car won't match the driving range of its more expensive competitors

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    In this Sunday, Sept. 3, 2017, photo, Lino Saldana looks out his window towards the bayou that overflowed into his home as volunteers from the Ahmadiyya Muslim Youth Association help him clean out debris in Houston. Like many of his neighbors on flood-ravaged Minden Street, Saldana knows that if he doesn't work, he doesn't get paid. Harvey's epic 52 inches of rain didn't discriminate between rich and poor areas with its flooding, but in working-class neighborhoods where many live paycheck to paycheck, the cleanup and recovery could be an even tougher slog. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

    Working poor on Minden Street exhausted after Harvey

    Those living paycheck to paycheck face a tougher road back from Hurricane Harvey

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    Philadelphia law firms announce national mergers

    Two Philadelphia-based law firms have announced separate mergers that will expand their nationwide presences

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    Danish drugmaker reaches settlement with US authorities

    Danish drug maker Novo Nordisk says it has reached a $46.5 million settlement with U.S. authorities over allegations that it hadn't properly communicated safety information when marketing a medicine to treat type 2 diabetes

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    Naperville sales tax talk turns to internet sales

    Naperville could increase its home-rule sales tax beginning Jan. 1, but officials wish they already were receiving sales taxes from all internet purchases made in town.

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    Whose opportunity, is it? An introduction to the corporate opportunity doctrine

    Simply stated, the corporate opportunity doctrine is a rule which requires disclosure and prohibits a fiduciary from stealing an opportunity from an entity. It prevents a fiduciary from taking advantage of an opportunity related to the entities’ business without first offering the opportunity to the entity. This doctrine applies to small businesses as well as large businesses.While the doctrine itself is not outlined in any of the applicable statutes (the Illinois Business Corporate Act, the Illinois Limited Liability Company Act or the Illinois Uniform Partnership Act), it arises from a fiduciary’s duty of loyalty to an entity. Specifically, the requirement that a fiduciary act in the best interest of the entity; and that they deal openly, honestly and in good faith in all dealings with the entity.In order to be considered an “opportunity” for the Corporate Opportunity Doctrine, the opportunity must be one that is reasonably related to the entities’ current business and which the entity is capable of taking advantage of. The opportunity can be: related to a current contract or relationship of the business; related to the purpose of the business; and/or an easy, natural or logical expansion of the business.When considering if an opportunity existed, the courts will consider the items above as well as: the nature of the opportunity (if harmful or unfair); whether the entity has the financial ability to take advantage of the opportunity; and whether the entity has the knowledge and ability to pursue the opportunity.It is important to remember that the burden of proving that an “opportunity” existed is on the person who is claiming that the actions taken by the fiduciary were wrong.However, the courts have repeatedly held that if a fiduciary fails to tell an entity about an opportunity that fiduciary is barred from taking advantage of the opportunity even when the fiduciary reasonably believed that the entity was not capable (or allowed) to take advantage of the opportunity.The process of disclosing an opportunity to an entity is relatively simple; the fiduciary has to provide the entity with all of the information available to the fiduciary regarding the opportunity and then the remaining disinterested fiduciaries have to review the information and determine whether the entity should pursue the opportunity or not.Problems arise in small businesses as each of the fiduciaries may want to pursue the opportunity for themselves. This may cause a conflict among the fiduciaries. Another major issue for small businesses is when the fiduciaries fail to properly observe the corporate formalities while considering an opportunity and fail to properly document the process. A failure such as this often ends up as the basis for a disagreement or lawsuit later. This can arise if the disinterested fiduciaries choose not to pursue an opportunity and it becomes extremely profitable later or if the fiduciaries have a falling out and a disgruntled fiduciary claims that the opportunity was not fully or properly disclosed to the entity. The basic underlying principal of the corporate opportunity doctrine is that a fiduciary cannot compete with an entity to which they owe a duty of loyalty and that if they wish to compete, they must obtain the permission of the entity prior to doing so.• For more information, contact Waltz, Palmer & Dawson LLC at (847) 253-8800. Waltz, Palmer & Dawson, LLC is a full-service law firm.

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    What will happen to my business if I get a divorce?
    While most people do not go into business as a couple expecting to divorce, statistically speaking about half of all marriages do not last.

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    Vickie Austin

    Biz book review “The Click Moment”
    Vickie Austin is a business and career coach, author and professional speaker. She reviews “The Click Moment: Seizing Opportunity in an Unpredictable World.”

Life & Entertainment

Discuss

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    Suburban police departments from Elgin, Naperville, Gurnee and St. Charles have had officers undergo training that deals with implicit bias.

    Editorial: Simple concept, important bias training for police
    It’s so simple, yet so effective.It seems to boil down to an adage that has much truth to it: Don’t judge a book by its cover. Or another: Looks are deceiving.That’s what local police departments are trying to impart to their officers through specialized training to help them recognize implicit bias — those unconscious thoughts about race, gender, age, socio-economic status, sexual orientation and appearances that can lead to false assumptions. If it’s such a simple concept, why training? Because everyone has implicit biases and it’s important to filter them in situations officers face on a daily basis.“Never totally lock onto a theory that you can’t change as soon as the facts change,” Elgin police Deputy Chief Bill Wolf told a group of officers in training earlier this month.Elgin, Gurnee, St. Charles and Naperville officers all have taken the training in the last few months. This kind of training has become vitally important in the last few years, especially after the August 2014 shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. And those who have been trained recognize its importance in helping them do the best job they can.“It gave me more self-awareness, and opened my eyes to these implicit biases everybody has,” St. Charles police officer John Losurdo told the Daily Herald’s Elena Ferrarin. “If you understand them and you don’t let them dictate what you do, that’s how you benefit.”The training is money well spent in these suburban departments, and we encourage other police departments to find a way to provide it for their officers as well.The training also shows, Ferrarin reported, that residents can have their own bias against police officers. It encourages cops not to take it personally nor to react to it.“Just because I might have been fair to the people I deal with, the people on the receiving end may not have had those same good experiences with policing,” said Elgin Detective Jamie Marabillas. Keeping that in mind would likely keep a volatile situation more under control.Just agreeing to attend the training may mean having to overcome some implicit bias about why it’s necessary. Losurdo, the St. Charles officer, said he thought it wouldn’t be worthwhile. “I thought it was going to be kind of like a political response to what’s happening now, where people say all officers are racist.” But, he added, “it’s not accusatory at all.”Everyone has baggage they bring to a situation that might make it worse in the end. We are appreciative of these police officials who want to work with their residents and in their communities to communicate better and address problems in a more positive way.

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    The worst is yet to come

    Columnist Kathleen Parker: It has become axiomatic that when Donald Trump says or does something over the top or below the belt, beware the unseen.

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    Working for solutions
    A Vernon Hills letter to the editor: Public service is defined by our challenges and opportunities.

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    Climate change’s role
    A Rolling Meadows letter to the editor: Hurricane Harvey is still destroying whole communities around Houston, Texas, and east from there.

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    Parents for peace?
    A Schaumburg letter to the editor: I wonder if Donald Trump married Vladimir Putin and if they adopted the wee man who is in charge in N. Korea.

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    Need to call violence by right name: terrorism
    A Glendale Heights letter to the editor: In the aftermath of the horrific events in Charlottsville, it is imperative that all who share our American ideals speak out against hatred and the violence this hatred inevitably breeds. It is equally imperative that we identify this violence by its name; terrorism.

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