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Daily Archive : Sunday August 17, 2014

News

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    Barrington residents say cyclists hog the roads, curse drivers and even urinate in yards. Cyclists using the village's scenic roads say they've been confronted and even run off the road.

    Residents, cyclists feud over Barrington Hills roads

    While many suburbs are doing their best to provide a safe and welcoming atmosphere to cyclists, Barrington Hills residents are in a nasty battle with bikers over access to the town's scenic, tree-lined roads. They say their roads are being clogged by unlawful, unsafe riders. Cyclists, meanwhile, say they're being driven off the road, harassed and even pelted with objects as they ride by.

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    Round Lake Park gang unit charges teen with marijuana possession

    A Round Lake Beach teen was arrested on charges of marijuana possession Friday by Round Lake Park and federal law enforcement authorities conducting operations in the area of a recent shooting.

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    Rev. Al Sharpton speaks with parents of Michael Brown, Michael Brown Sr. and Lesley McSpadden during a rally Sunday at Greater Grace Church for their son who was killed by police last Saturday in Ferguson, Mo. Brown’s shooting in the middle of a street, following a suspected robbery of a box of cigars from a nearby market, has sparked a week of protests, riots and looting in the St. Louis suburb.

    Report: Teen shot 6 times, including twice in head

    A preliminary private autopsy has found that an unarmed black teenager killed by a white officer in Missouri was shot at least six times, including twice in the head. The New York Times reports that the autopsy by Dr. Michael Baden, a former New York City chief medical examiner, found that one of the bullets entered the top of Michael Brown’s skull, suggesting that his head was bent...

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    Police in riot gear move in on people Sunday as they staged a protest for Michael Brown, who was killed by a police officer, last Saturday in Ferguson, Mo. As night fell Sunday in Ferguson, another peaceful protest quickly deteriorated after marchers pushed toward one end of a street. Police attempted to push them back by firing tear gas and shouting over a bullhorn that the protest was no longer peaceful.

    Police, protesters clash ahead of Ferguson curfew

    Attorney General Eric Holder on Sunday ordered a federal medical examiner to perform another autopsy on a black Missouri teenager whose fatal shooting by a white police officer has spurred a week of rancorous and sometimes-violent protests in suburban St. Louis. As night fell Sunday in Ferguson, another peaceful protest quickly deteriorated after marchers pushed toward one end of a street. Police...

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    Tear gas was fired early Sunday morning to disperse a crowd protesting the shooting of teenager Michael Brown last Saturday in Ferguson, Mo.

    Police deploy tear gas to impose Ferguson curfew

    The first night of a state-imposed curfew in Ferguson, Missouri, ended with tear gas and seven arrests, after police dressed in riot gear used armored vehicles to disperse defiant protesters who refused to leave a St. Louis suburb where a black, unarmed teen had been shot by a white police officer a week earlier.

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    Main break leaves downtown Elgin residents without water

    Residents in downtown Elgin went without water for several hours Sunday after a water main broke, the city’s fire department reported. Officials said that at 4:30 a.m. large amounts of water were reported pouring onto State Street from Chicago Street, an area that has been undergoing sewer repairs and road work.

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    Health workers wearing protective gear Saturday go to remove the body of a person who is believed to have died after contracting the Ebola virus in the city of Monrovia, Liberia. New figures released by the World Health Organization showed that Liberia has recorded more Ebola deaths — 413 — than any of the other affected countries.

    Another Ebola problem: Finding its natural source

    A scary problem lurks beyond the frenzied efforts to keep people from spreading Ebola: No one knows exactly where the virus comes from or how to stop it from seeding new outbreaks. Ebola has caused two dozen outbreaks in Africa since it first emerged in 1976. It is coming from somewhere — probably bats — but experts agree they need to pinpoint its origins in nature. That has had to...

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    In this Aug. 11, 2014, photo, Charis Hill, who has a rare form of arthritis that affects the spine, poses in Capitol Park in Sacramento, Calif. Hill has health insurance under one of the new plans offered through the health care law, could not afford the medication required for her condition because of the plan’s high copays. As a result she’s has had to get financial assistance from the drug manufacturer. Hill says riding her bike helps manage her arthritic condition. Advocates for patients with serious health problems say that one of the main goals of the new health care law is being undermined.

    Have insurers found new ways to avoid the sick?

    Ending insurance discrimination against the sick was a central goal of the nation’s health care overhaul, but leading patient groups say that promise is being undermined by new barriers from insurers. The insurance industry responds that critics are confusing legitimate cost-control with bias. Some state regulators, however, say there’s reason to be concerned about policies that...

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    Haves, have-nots divided by apartment ‘poor doors’

    One new Manhattan skyscraper will greet residents of pricey condos with a lobby in front, while renters of affordable apartments that got the developer government incentives must use a separate side entrance — a so-called poor door. In another apartment house, rent-regulated residents can’t even pay to use a new gym that’s free to their market-rate neighbors. Other buildings...

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    Nicole Lee of Chicago, left, and Laura Berry of Chicago before participating Sunday in the fourth annual Barrington Honor Ride. The event raised money for Ride 2 Recovery, a national effort to provide custom bicycles and cycling programs at VA hospitals across the country.

    Runners, cyclists help veterans at Barrington event

    The fourth annual Barrington Honor Ride and Run took place Sunday in a new location, Citizens Park, and participants gave both the site and the cause rave reviews. The event features a number of athletic events, and it raises money for Ride 2 Recovery, an organization that provides bicycles and cycling programs to injured military veterans.

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    In this undated photo released by the U.S. General Services Administration, Boon Island Light Station sits in the Gulf of Maine about six miles off the coast of York, Maine. The lighthouse, New England’s tallest at 133-feet, was up for auction.

    Top bid for tallest New England lighthouse is $78K

    The tallest lighthouse in New England will likely soon have a new owner. The federal government on Sunday closed out an auction for Boon Island Light Station, with the top bidder offering $78,000 for the lighthouse built in 1855 on a tiny rocky island 6 miles off Maine’s coast. Government officials now have 30 days to evaluate the top bid and close the deal, said Patrick Sclafani,...

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    SUVs collide in Lake Zurich, no serious injuries reported

    Traffic was tied up briefly on Route 12 in Lake Zurich Sunday afternoon after two SUVs collided, sending one of the vehicles onto its side and the other off the roadway, according to Lake Zurich Fire Department. No one was seriously injured in the collision.

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    In this July 24, 2014 photo, the Montelone family, from left, Grace, 8, Brooke, 10, Rob, Paulette, Brian, 10, Michael, 12, and Gavin, 8, pose for a family picture on the beach in San Clemente, Calif. Three of the Montelone’s five children, who have cystic fibrosis, are part of a growing number of people to take advantage of the health benefits that come with surfing.

    Camps take cystic fibrosis patients surfing

    Since researchers realized that the salt water in the ocean helps clear out the thick mucus that builds up in cystic fibrosis patients’ lungs, organizations have started around the world that teach those with the disease how to “hang 10." The average lifespan for someone with cystic fibrosis is about 40, but many patients don’t make it past their teens. The genetic condition,...

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    Experienced skydiver from Boston dies during jump

    Police say an experienced Boston skydiver has died during a jump, and it’s unclear whether his equipment malfunctioned. Police tell WCVB that 37-year-old Daniel Pelrine died Sunday morning at the Skydive Pepperell Center.Police say Pelrine died at the scene of blunt trauma.

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    Bat attack reported at Palatine theater

    The Palatine Fire Department responded to a call Sunday of a bat attacking a woman in a historic theater in the village’s downtown. The bite victim, according to preliminary reports, did not require transportation to a hospital.

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    In this Aug. 9 photo, a Ugandan man is seen during the third Annual Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Pride celebrations in Entebbe, Uganda. When a Ugandan court overturned the country’s Anti-Homosexuality Act this month, rights activists worldwide claimed a victory - but not gay Ugandans who fled persecution to live in a refugee camp in neighboring Kenya.

    Ugandan gays who fled to Kenya still feel danger

    When a Ugandan court overturned the country’s Anti-Homosexuality Act this month, rights activists worldwide claimed a victory. But not gay Ugandans who fled persecution to live in a refugee camp in neighboring Kenya. Of the 155,000 refugees at Kakuma camp, 35 are registered with the U.N. refugee agency as lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender Ugandans who fled because of the...

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    A Kurdish peshmerga fighter prepares his weapon at his combat position Sunday near the Mosul Dam at the town of Chamibarakat outside Mosul, Iraq. Kurdish forces took over parts of the largest dam in Iraq on Sunday less than two weeks after it was captured by the Islamic State extremist group, Kurdish security officials said, as U.S. and Iraqi planes aided their advance by bombing militant targets near the facility.

    Kurdish forces retake parts of Iraq’s largest dam

    Aided by U.S. and Iraqi airstrikes, Kurdish forces Sunday wrested back part of Iraq’s largest dam from Islamic militants who had captured it less than two weeks ago, security officials said. The U.S. began targeting fighters from the Islamic State with airstrikes Aug. 8, allowing Kurdish forces to fend off an advance on their regional capital of Irbil and to help tens of thousands of...

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    This undated photo provide by the Barajas family shows from left, Cindy Barajas, Jenessah Barajas, Caleb Barajas, David Barajas and David Barajas Jr. Caleb and David Jr. were killed during a Dec. 7, 2012, accident near their home in Alvin, Texas, as the boys and their father were pushing their truck on a rural road after it had broken down. Authorities say 20-year-old Jose Banda was intoxicated when he slammed his vehicle into the truck, killing the brothers. The boys’ father was charged with fatally shooting Banda minutes after the accident. His trial is set to begin Monday, Aug 18. (AP Photo/Courtesy Barajas Family)

    Did father shoot drunken driver after kids died in crash?

    David Barajas denies killing a drunk driver in a fit of rage after his two sons were fatally struck in 2012 on a rural road in Southeast Texas. His defense attorney says Barajas is a good man, a grieving father and not a murderer. At the same time, his defense hasn’t publicly suggested who else might be responsible for Jose Banda’s shooting death. The trial will focus on...

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    Woman cited for climbing into zoo’s giraffe pen

    Police say a California woman was cited after climbing into the giraffe exhibit at a Madison zoo and getting kicked in the face.A police report says 24-year-old Amanda Hall, of San Luis Obispo, California, climbed over one fence and almost got over the second fence of the giraffe enclosure at the Henry Vilas Zoo about 5:30 p.m. Saturday.

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    These images provided by the St. Lawrence County Sheriff’s Office shows the booking photo of Stephen Howells II, left, and Nicole Vaisey, who was arraigned late Friday on charges they intended to physically harm or sexually abuse two Amish sisters after abducting them from a roadside farm stand.

    More charges planned against Amish-kidnap suspects

    More charges are expected soon against a northern New York couple accused of kidnapping two young Amish sisters and sexually abusing them, a prosecutor said Sunday.Computer hard drives and other potential evidence are still being collected Sunday from the home of Stephen Howells Jr. and Nicole Vaisey, said Mary Rain, district attorney for St. Lawrence County.

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    Protesters march down the middle of a street Friday in front of a convenience store in Ferguson, Mo. that was looted and burned following the shooting death of Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager, by a white police officer on Aug. 9. Demonstrators are demanding justice for the 18-year-old Brown, which they say can only be accomplished if Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson is charged and convicted in the shooting. Many also cite larger causes.

    Police shooting draws protesters from near, far

    Protesters who have for days lined a busy suburban St. Louis street not far from the place where a white police officer fatally shot an unarmed black teenager have walked from nearby apartments, driven from neighboring communities and flown in from states hundreds of miles away. Some are young parents carrying infants. Others, college students. Retirees. Professionals taking a break from their...

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    Members of the suburban Indian Community sang the Indian national anthem on Sunday to kick off the Indian Independence celebration at Central Park in Naperville.

    Naperville hosts Indian Independence Day celebration

    Hundreds of suburban residents gathered Sunday in Naperville to celebrate Indian Independence Day at Central Park, forming the largest crowd in the event’s history. For the past six years, members of the Indian community and others have come together on or around Aug. 15, the anniversary of the day in 1947 when India broke free from British rule.

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    Palestinian protesters face Israeli soldiers, following a demonstration to support people in Gaza and Palestinian negotiators in Cairo, Egypt, during clashes near the West Bank city of Nablus on Friday. Israel and Hamas are observing a five-day cease-fire which began at midnight Wednesday, in an attempt to allow talks between the sides in Cairo to continue. The negotiations are meant to secure a substantive end to the monthlong war and draw up a road map for the coastal territory of Gaza, which has been hard-hit in the fighting.

    Palestinian divisions emerge in Gaza truce talks

    The Palestinians appeared divided Sunday as the clock was winding down on the latest Gaza cease-fire, with officials saying Hamas was still opposed to a compromise Egyptian proposal that would ease the closure of the territory, while other factions, including delegates representing President Mahmoud Abbas, were inclined to accept. Hamas officials said they were holding out in hopes of getting...

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    Pro-Russian rebels ride on an APC Sunday in the town of Krasnodon, eastern Ukraine. A column of several dozen heavy vehicles, including tanks and at least one rocket launcher, rolled through rebel-held territory on Sunday.

    Ukraine says troops entered rebel-held city

    Army troops have penetrated deep inside a rebel-controlled city in eastern Ukraine in what could prove a breakthrough development in the four-month conflict, the Ukrainian government said Sunday. However, the military acknowledged that another one of its fighter planes was shot down by the separatists, who have been bullish about their ability to continue the battle and have bragged about...

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    Aurora police seek leads in fatal weekend shooting

    Aurora police continue to ask for the public’s help as authorities investigate a fatal shooting that occurred early Saturday morning. Nathan Gonzalez, 20, of Aurora was killed in the shooting, which police believe was gang-related.

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    Rosemont homeowners eligible for grants

    Rosemont property owners are eligible to receive up to $4,055 in individual grants from the village as part of a program now in its 20th year.

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    Dist. 59 to host back-to-school event

    A back-to-school celebration for Elk Grove Township Elementary District 59 families is scheduled for Saturday at Grove Junior High School.

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    In this Saturday, Dec. 4, 2010 file photo, German Rolf Buchholz shows his face with 168 piercings as he visits the 20th Tattoo Convention in Berlin. A Dubai nightclub that hoped to feature Buchholz, who holds the world record for having the most piercings, said in an emailed statement Sunday, that he was refused entry to the Gulf city because of security concerns. The German man now has 453 piercings, according to Guinness World Records.

    Man with more than 100 facial piercings denied entry to Dubai

    A heavily tattooed German man whose face is embellished with horn implants and more than 100 piercings said Sunday he was refused entry to Dubai without reason, forcing him to skip a planned appearance at a nightclub. His look may have been a step too far for the Gulf’s most liberal city, where a carefully cultivated reputation for tolerance and cutting-edge cosmopolitanism occasionally...

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    Arlington Heights Mayor Thomas Hayes

    No term limits in Arlington Heights’ near future

    With a referendum on term limits off the November ballot, the idea may be dead in Arlington Heights for the foreseeable future. Last week, the village’s electoral board for the second time in two years threw out a petition asking that voters decide the term-limit question. Mayor Tom Hayes said it is not likely the village board will take up the issue anytime soon.

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    Russian solders with their several military vehicle gather at the rail road crossing early Friday about 19 miles from Ukrainian border at Rostov-on-Don region, Russia.

    Putin threat stirs European tank ambition dormant since cold war

    The Ukraine crisis is pushing European governments to review the role of the weapon that dominated Cold War defenses as the strength of Russian ground forces stirs political concerns: the battle tank. Vladimir Putin’s annexation of Crimea and massing of troops on the Ukraine border has left frontline nations pondering the strength of armored brigades that have shrunk since the collapse of...

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    Hitzeman: Carpentersville SUV ramming case set for trial

    A Chicago woman accused of running down two teens in Carpentersville with her sport utility vehicle last year because they were bullying her nephew is scheduled for trial Oct. 20.

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    Lake County police academy

    Lake County Sheriff’s Office will host a Citizen Police Academy course starting Sept. 18.

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    Farm image exhibition

    “The Farm: Images from the Heartland” art exhibition will open Sunday, Aug. 24 with a public artist’s reception from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Lake County Discovery Museum, at the Lakewood Forest Preserve in Wauconda.

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    Volunteer for Lake Zurich football

    Lake Zurich Quarterback Club members are seeking volunteer assistance on game days for high school football games.

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    People pass by Ebola virus health warning signs Sunday in the city of Monrovia, Liberia. Liberian officials fear Ebola could soon spread through the capital’s largest slum after residents raided a quarantine center for suspected patients and took items including blood-stained sheets and mattresses. The violence in the West Point slum occurred late Saturday and was led by residents angry that patients were brought from other parts of the capital to the holding center, Tolbert Nyenswah, assistant health minister, said Sunday.

    Liberia: Ebola fears rise as clinic is looted

    Liberian officials fear Ebola could soon spread through the capital’s largest slum after residents raided a quarantine center for suspected patients and took items including bloody sheets and mattresses. The violence in the West Point slum occurred late Saturday and was led by residents angry that patients were brought to the holding center from other parts of Monrovia, Tolbert Nyenswah,...

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    An Iraqi woman and her son from the Yazidi community sleep at a park near the Turkey-Iraq border at the Ibrahim al-Khalil crossing, as they try to cross to Turkey.

    Constable: Worried refugees in suburbs help families in Iraq

    Settling into their new lives as suburbanites iin DuPage County, recent Iraqi immigrants worry about the loved ones who remain in the war-torn nation, targeted by Islamic militants. World Relief in Wheaton has offered support.

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    So far, so good for Mount Prospect’s bottom line

    Halfway into 2014, Mount Prospect is trending toward a financial surplus for the current budget year. Officials say village revenues are projected $567,500 over expectations, thanks in part to growth in sales tax receipts.

Sports

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    Little help for Sale in White Sox loss

    It's not easy beating the White Sox when ace Chris Sale is on the mound, but the Orioles got some strong starting pitching from Bud Norris, excellent defense from Nick Markakis, and they took advantage of the Sox' brutal bullpen Monday night in an 8-2 win at U.S. Cellular Field.

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    Bears running back hopeful Jordan Lynch isn't getting caught up in the numbers, which don't favor him.

    Rozner: For Lynch, Bears camp a long way from NIU

    Jordan Lynch was on stage for Heisman ceremony pictures in December, but Thursday night he was being stepped over by reporters wanting to talk to another undrafted rookie running back.

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    White Sox manager Robin Ventura is ejected by umpire Fieldin Culbreth for arguing a call on the Giants’ Gregor Blanco last week. Blanco originally was ruled out at home but then ruled safe after review.

    Rongey: Common sense must prevail in new rule

    Home-plate collisions don’t make baseball better. Losing Buster Posey for a year as the result of a single, pointless moment does not make baseball better. However, something is getting lost in those plays because of the new rule this season.

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    Double-shutout sweep for Cougars

    The Cougars (35-20, 80-45) pitching staff did not allow a run in the final 18 innings of a three-game series sweep over the Wisconsin Timber Rattlers (29-26, 65-59). A double-header shutout sweep of 9-0 and 3-0 at Fox Cities handed the Cougars their seventh straight win.

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    Boomers go boom in 18-7 win

    The Schaumburg Boomers broke out the bats and set new franchise standards in an 18-7 road win over the Gateway Grizzlies on Sunday to win the key series.

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    Picking Billy Butler and the Kansas City Royals to win the AL Central on the final day of the season makes as much sense any other baseball prediction.

    Kasper: Making predictions makes very little sense

    I always chuckle to myself when people ask me to make predictions in this game. When will Kris Bryant be here? Who’s going to win the National League Central? Do you think Javier Baez will make the proper adjustments and become more patient? We live in an opinionated world, our thoughts quickly conveyed in 140 characters or less. I am as guilty as anyone, especially when watching an NFL or NHL game in the off-season. That’s when I can just react to each moment with overblown, unreasonable proclamations.

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    Cautious Sky rests stars in anticipation of playoffs

    The stars weren't shining as the Chicago Sky lost to the San Antonio Stars on Sunday at Allstate Arena, 84-72. Head coach Pokey Chatman elected to not play Elena Delle Donne, Sylvia Fowles and Epiphanny Prince in order to rest them for the playoffs, which begin on Friday.

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    Running back Matt Forte has 7 carries for minus-7 yards in the Bears’ first two preseason games. Coach Marc Trestman admits the running game needs work but says he’s not concerned about it.

    Bears running on empty so far

    The Bears' running game has limped along for the most part through the first two preseason games, but coach Marc Trestman believes it's not far from where it needs to be. Meanwhile, the competition for backup spots behind running back Matt Forte will continue for the final two preseason games.

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    Conor Gillaspie celebrates his first career grand slam with teammates Avisail Garcia, right, and Adam Dunn, left, during the White Sox’ 6-run first inning Sunday against the Blue Jays.

    Gillaspie making case to be White Sox mainstay at 3B

    Conor Gillaspie hit his first career grand slam in Sunday's 7-5 win over the Blue Jays, and he also continued making a strong case to remain the White Sox' starting third baseman in the future.

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    White Sox’ Petricka learning perils of closing

    Current White Sox closer Jake Petricka notched his ninth save of the season in Sunday's 7-5 win over the Blue Jays, but the rookie right-hander is learning how difficult it can be to pitch in the ninth inning.

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    The White Sox’s Conor Gillaspie, left, celebrates his grand slam with teammate Adam Dunn, right, during the first inning of Sunday’s baseball game against the Toronto Blue Jays at U.S. Cellular Field.

    White Sox hang on to beat Jays

    Conor Gillapsie hit his first career grand slam in the first inning Sunday, and Jordan Danks followed with a 2-run shot as the White Sox hung on to beat the Toronto Blue Jays 7-5 at U.S. Cellular Field. Gillaspie has hit for a very good average this season, but his power has been down. The third baseman’s bases-loaded shot off Jays starter Drew Hutchison was just his fifth home run of the season.

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    Cubs relief pitcher Hector Rondon (56) and shortstop Starlin Castro (13) celebrate after the ninth inning of a baseball game against the New York Mets at Citi Field, Sunday, Aug. 17, 2014, in New York. The Cubs won 2-1.

    Castro’s homer in 9th lifts Cubs over Mets

    NEW YORK — Starlin Castro hit a tiebreaking homer on the first pitch of the ninth inning to lift the Cubs over the New York Mets 2-1 Sunday.Cubs starter Jake Arrieta allowed two hits and struck out nine in seven smooth innings. He left with a 1-0 lead following Luis Valbuena’s run-scoring single in the fourth.Slumping slugger Curtis Granderson tied it with a two-out RBI single off winner Pedro Strop (2-4) in the eighth, snapping skids of 0 for 17 and 1 for 29. A diving catch by rookie center fielder Arismendy Alcantara moments earlier prevented more potential damage.Castro led off the ninth and greeted closer Jenrry Mejia (5-6) with his 13th home run, an opposite-field drive that barely cleared the wall near the right-field corner.Hector Rondon got three quick outs for his 17th save, finishing a four-hitter that ended Chicago’s three-game losing streak.Valbuena returned to the lineup and broke out of his slump with an RBI single off Mets rookie Rafael Montero, still looking for his first win after six major league starts. Montero delivered an encouraging performance, though, going 7 1-3 innings for the longest outing of his career. Arrieta struck out three straight in the second and whiffed the 3-4-5 hitters in the fourth. He started a 1-6-3 double play after a leadoff walk in the seventh and was helped out of his toughest jam by Castro in the third. With runners at the corners, the shortstop made a slick pickup and a nifty flip to start an inning-ending double play against Juan Lagares. Cubs rookie Javier Baez drew a leadoff walk in the fourth, his first in 55 major league plate appearances. Two outs later, Valbuena snapped a 1-for-32 slide with an RBI single. Baez also walked in the eighth. TRAINER’S ROOMCubs: Valbuena, who had been fighting a cold, was back at 3B after not starting the first two games of the series. ... Prized prospect Kris Bryant was expected to have an MRI after leaving Saturday’s game with Triple-A Iowa because of a sore left big toe. The team said Bryant had been playing through the injury for a few days, and X-rays were inconclusive. “All indications are he’s OK,” manager Rick Renteria said. Mets: As expected, 3B David Wright was out of the lineup with a sore left shoulder. Wright left Saturday’s game one inning after he was hit by a fastball in the back of the shoulder, aggravating an area that’s bothered him all summer. Eric Campbell started at third. ... Rookie RHP Jacob deGrom (rotator cuff tendinitis) threw about 20 pitches, all fastballs, in a bullpen session and said he had no problems. He’ll throw a regular bullpen Tuesday or Wednesday, and so far it appears he’s on track to come off the 15-day disabled list this weekend for a start at Dodger Stadium. ... Manager Terry Collins said he thinks RHP Daisuke Matsuzaka (elbow inflammation) will make another rehab start, this time for Class A Brooklyn. Matsuzaka allowed one run and three hits in six innings Saturday for Double-A Binghamton, throwing 69 pitches. “Right now we’re not sure where the fit’s going to be when he’s ready to pitch here,” Collins said. UP NEXTCubs rookie Kyle Hendricks (4-1, 1.73 ERA) starts the four-game series finale Monday afternoon against 41-year-old Bartolo Colon (11-10, 3.85), who is 0-2 with a 4.73 ERA in five career starts against Chicago. Valbuena has two homers in five at-bats against Colon.

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    Toronto’s Mark Buehrle was practicing effective velocity long before it could be measured.

    Spiegel: How to measure learned pitching wisdom

    Now there is a scientific concept on pitching, only recently coming to public awareness, that puts a measure on learned wisdom. It supports an oft-quoted maxim from the great Warren Spahn: “Hitting is timing. Pitching is upsetting timing.”

Business

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    Matt Cottle, owner of Stuttering King Bakery, works a new batch of chocolate chip banana muffins in his parents’ kitchen in Scottsdale, Ariz.

    Entrepreneurship the answer for some with autism

    Many autistic people can run businesses if they’re given the chance to discover something they like and develop skills around their interests. Matt Cottle's boss told him he’d never do anything more than collect grocery carts, but today he’s an entrepreneur.

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    In this July 15, 2014 photo, Matt Cottle, owner of Stuttering King Bakery, works a new batch of chocolate chip banana muffins in his parents’ kitchen in Scottsdale, Ariz. Cottle is one of a few known small business owners with autism, a brain disorder that affects a person’s ability to comprehend, communicate and interact socially.

    Autistic business owners capitalize on strengths

    A growing movement to find work for autistic people is helping some start their own businesses. Work requiring an attention to detail and with repetitive tasks is ideal for an autistic person who wants to start a business.

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    Worries are increasing that some managers will have a tough time finding buyers for their bonds if a flood of investors tries to pull out of their funds at the same time.

    What happens to bonds when everyone aims to sell?

    If bonds start to tumble, should I sell my bond mutual fund? It’s a question investors are asking as expectations rise for a more volatile bond market. But a better question may be: How difficult will it be for my fund manager to sell?

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    Understanding the limits of your insurance, before you seek care, will help you avoid the frustration of having your claim denied.

    4 keys to appealing a rejected insurance claim

    Keep calm and take notes. Stay true to this principle and you can improve your odds of successfully fighting a health insurer’s claim rejection. If you get to the point where you need to appeal, here are some important points to remember.

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    Lenders are applying standards that are more conservative than what is required for home loans, experts say. FHA allows credit scores that can be as low as 500, but most lenders insist on a minimum of 620 or 640 because they think it’s risky to do anything under that.

    Why some banks don’t want to take a chance on some borrowers

    For at least a year, the Obama administration has been pushing lenders to make mortgages more widely available to responsible people looking to buy homes. But many potential buyers are getting shut out of the market because lenders don’t want to take a chance on them because of “credit overlays.”

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    Finding a way into India’s vast but vexing market has long frustrated foreign retailers. Now, overseas investors are pouring billions of dollars into e-commerce ventures that are circumventing the barriers holding back retail powers such as Wal-Mart and Ikea.

    Online sites shake up hidebound retailing in India

    Finding a way into India’s vast but vexing market has long frustrated foreign retailers. Now, overseas investors are pouring billions of dollars into e-commerce ventures that are circumventing the barriers holding back retail powers such as Wal-Mart and Ikea.

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    The challenges facing prospective buyers of the least expensive homes in the U.S. are getting harder to overcome. Already beset by stagnant wages, growing student debt and competition from investors who are snapping up listings, those looking to purchase moderately priced houses must also provide more cash up front.

    Bigger down payments add to first-time homebuyer blues

    The challenges facing prospective buyers of the least expensive homes in the U.S. are getting harder to overcome. Already beset by stagnant wages, growing student debt and competition from investors who are snapping up listings, those looking to purchase moderately priced houses must also provide more cash up front.

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    Amazon blocked preorders of Disney’s summer hit movie “Captain America: The Winter Soldier” and other titles in disk form.

    Amazon takes on Disney’s superheroes in pricing fight

    Amazon.com Inc. is taking on Walt Disney Co. and its superheroes in its quest to gain more control over pricing online. Amazon blocked pre-orders of Disney’s summer hit movie “Captain America: The Winter Soldier” and other titles in disk form, repeating a tactic used in recent disputes with book publisher Hachette and film studio Warner Bros.

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    The more welcome a new hire feels, the faster they will be able to be productive and contribute to the organization’s mission. In addition, good onboarding leads to higher employee engagement and greater retention rates.

    Career Coach: Embracing new employees increases productivity

    The more welcome a new hire feels, the faster they will be able to be productive and contribute to the organization’s mission. In addition, good onboarding leads to higher employee engagement and greater retention rates.

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    SEC examining ‘alternative’ mutual funds

    Federal regulators are scrutinizing a type of mutual fund that’s potentially riskier than conventional funds and is growing in popularity, prompting concerns over possible harm to ordinary investors.

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    Does you boss not invite you to meetings because she thinks you overshare? You can ask her to give you specific examples or you can disregarding her opinion.

    Work Advice: When your boss thinks you’ll blab

    What do you say when a boss doesn’t want to send you to a meeting or let you speak with a VIP because she thinks you can’t keep your mouth shut?

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    Revel Casino Hotel, the city’s newest casino — and one of its most opulent — is joining other older Atlantic City gambling establishments in the casino graveyard.

    Revel Casino latest to close in Atlantic City

    When the pressure of an oversaturated market became unbearable this year, some of Atlantic City’s oldest casinos either closed their doors or announced plans to do so. Now, Revel Casino Hotel, the city’s newest casino — and one of its most opulent — is joining them in the casino graveyard.

Life & Entertainment

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    Moviegoers continued to shell out for “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles,” while Sylvester Stallone’s “The Expendables 3” was easily outgunned in its weekend debut, according to studio estimates Sunday.

    ’Turtles’ tops weak debut for ‘Expendables 3’

    Moviegoers continued to shell out for “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles,” while Sylvester Stallone’s action ensemble “The Expendables 3” was easily outgunned in its weekend debut. Paramount Pictures’ rebooted reptiles took in $28.4 million in the film’s second weekend, according to studio estimates Sunday. That far surpassed the limp $16.2 million earned by Stallone’s gang of aged but buff warriors.

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    Crowds gather to cheer for Thomas The Tank Engine as the Illinois Railway Museum in Union.

    Sunday picks: Get the kids stoked for Thomas

    If your little ones love all things train-related, then you shouldn't miss the Day Out with Thomas events starting this weekend at the Illinois Railway Museum in Union. Head to the Festival of the Horse & Drum, a multicultural, multimedia equestrian festival for horse lovers at the Kane County Fairgrounds, St. Charles.

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    Viewers will be able to see parts of Kim Kardashian’s wedding to Kanye West in two upcoming “Keeping Up with the Kardashians” episodes, airing Sunday, Aug. 31 and Monday Sept. 1 on E!

    Did Kimye baby North West say ‘mama’ or ‘dada’ first?

    Recently Kim Kardashian West sent her stepfather Bruce Jenner a text because of something she read online. “I text(ed) Bruce, ‘I saw on TMZ that you got pulled over. Are you OK?’” she recalled during a recent interview with The Associated Press. Keeping tabs on one another through blogs and headlines has become normal for a family that’s anything but: a mom, stepdad, five daughters, one son, step siblings, assorted spouses, ex-spouses, boyfriends, girlfriends and grandchildren who have become a prominent part of U.S. pop culture since they began putting their lives on display for TV cameras in 2007.

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    Humans are typically infected when a tick has been attached for more than 48 hours, so prompt removal of ticks is critical.

    Watch out for insect bites, stings this summer

    Now that the “dog days” of summer have arrived, families must be watchful for infections carried by mosquitoes and ticks, such as Lyme disease, West Nile virus, and insect bites.

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    Lunge with arms overhead is an effective exercise if pressed for time.

    Short on time? Try this workout

    How much time must you commit to exercise for it to be effective? This is obviously dependent on your goals, but a recent study found health benefits can be had in as little as 5 minutes a day.

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    Many online companies sell pre-manufactured building kits, like this Vermont Cottage by the Jamaica Cottage Shop. This easy-to-assemble structures have many creative uses.

    Small cottage kits have an endless number of uses

    Getaway houses are considered a true luxury these days. Therefore, if you can find a way to build a little piece of heaven, you might consider an affordable kit cottage. There are dozens of companies in the U.S. that sell pre-manufactured structures.

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    Brenda Berkman, in blue, leads a tour of the 9/11 Memorial in Lower Manhattan. The guides include people who survived the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, or who were connected to the events in some way. Berkman, a retired fire lieutenant, was one of many firefighters who responded to the disaster and who lost many colleagues that day.

    Visiting 9/11 sites in New York: Memorial, museum, tours

    Out-of-towners and locals alike have shown enormous interest in sites connected to the Sept. 11th attacks. More than 700,000 people from all 50 states and 131 countries have been to the National Sept. 11 Museum since it opened May 21. In addition, nearly 15 million people have visited the September 11 Memorial since it opened three years ago on the footprints of the twin towers. And yet the very idea of 9/11 tourism remains controversial to some.

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    British actor Daniel Radcliffe doesn’t see what all the fuss is about when it comes to interest in actors.

    Daniel Radcliffe finds interest in actors ‘weird’

    Daniel Radcliffe says he finds the concept of celebrity and the level of interest in the trivia of actors’ lives “weird.” While promoting his first romantic comedy — “What If,” directed by Michael Dowse — the 25-year-old British star was keen to keep the conversation away from his own love life. “People ask me about my relationship and I try to give as little away as possible,” Radcliffe explained. “People are dying in the world, give time to that.”

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    Paleontologist Peter Larson brushes up on “Sue,” the T-rex fossil in the new doc “Dinosaur 13.”

    Dinosaur documentary digs into finding Sue — and serving time

    In 1990, Pete Larson and his volunteer team discovered a T-rex skeleton that would become known as “Sue,” now on display at Chicago’s Museum of Science and Industry. Then Larson spent 18 months in the federal slammer, not for dino-napping, but for failing to fill out customs forms. This whole, unbelievably true story is the subject of Todd Douglas Miller’s new documentary “Dinosaur 13.”

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    Shows like PBS' “Downton Abbey,” starring Maggie Smith, have fans unapologetically glued to their TV sets.

    Guiltless pleasure: TV's image improves, along with its programming

    For years, polls uncovered a certain shameful attitude toward watching television. But attitudes have changed, and binging on your favorite shows is no longer considered a "guilty" pleasure — thanks to both better programming and the ability to watch what you want when you want it.

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    Leave ‘professional installations’ to the professionals

    Q. I wanted to let you know I installed 10 Magnetite windows — several were cut wrong and they sent me a YouTube installation video after my installation. I was looking for soundproofing and cold protection.

Discuss

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    High school drinking still strikes a chord

    When it comes to teens and drinking and enforcement thereof, everyone seems to have a strong opinion -- as evidenced by the tumult over the suspension of about 30 athletes at Glenbard West High School, writes Jim Davis, DuPage and Fox Valley news director.

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    A’s for everyone

    Columnist Cathering Rampell: Grade deflation is dead. Long live grade inflation! Starting around the mid-20th century, a pandemic of meaninglessly high grades swept the nation. Steadily, the Gentleman’s C was replaced by the Gentleman’s B-pluses.

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    Responsible citizens key to strong nation
    A Schaumburg letter to the editor: How will America survive with the way our country is being run? Unfortunately, it seems government expects nothing from its citizens when it comes to being reliable and responsible, so guess what, that’s what it will get — nothing. I truly believe people who earn their own way in life are much better off than those who are handed everything.

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    Boomers, let’s take back our pound sign
    A Des Plaines letter to the editor: I want to know, when did the pound sign (#) become a hash tag? In my 60-plus years we have always been told press the pound sign at the end of the conversation. So who now has decided this is a hash tag?

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    ‘Best ... worst of times’ applies today as well
    A letter to the editor: Charles Dickens said, “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.” And in my humble opinion, we could say the same thing today. What do we celebrate? Robin Williams and Philip Seymour Hoffman, both considered great actors and great people, each died by their own hands.

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    Young people came to rescue at difficult time
    A Gurnee letter to the editor: On Saturday, Aug. 2, we had an unusual and heartwarming experience.

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    Current policies insult previous immigrants
    A Mundelein letter to the editor: I’m responding to the article regarding Immigration from our south border by Greg Hose. Mr. Hose doesn’t understand the meaning of country.

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    Other churches have links to Jesus
    A Fox River Grove letter to the editor: Rosemary Orbegoso’s impassioned letter regarding the role of the Roman Catholic church makes a mistake by stating an exclusive link to Jesus Christ for the Roman Catholic church.

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    Gay pride opposite of humble contrition
    A Glendale Heights letter to the editor: The Daily Herald reported a meeting at the Inverness Holy Family Catholic Church of a large crowd in support for the music director who was fired due to his gay engagement. One parishioner called the meeting, “Bigger than Christmas.” How inappropriate to compare this gathering with that of the angels who announced Christ’s birth.

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