Facebook like page thumb

Daily Archive : Saturday July 12, 2014

News

  •  
    Joseph McMahon

    Missing Arlington Hts. man, 89, found safe in Lockport

    An 89-year-old Arlington Heights man missing since Friday has been located safe in Southwest suburban Lockport, police said Sunday. Joseph McMahon was found in his car at 3:30 a.m. Sunday in what police described as “a state of mental confusion.”

  •  
    Smoke rises after a cargo crossing between Israel and Gaza was shelled on Saturday.

    Israel tells north Gaza to evacuate; Security Council urges truce

    Gen. Motti Almoz, said Saturday there would be more strikes, especially in northern Gaza near the Israeli border. “We are going to attack there with great force in the next 24 hours due to a very large concentration of Hamas efforts in that area,” he said. Late Saturday, the military said it was ordering Palestinians in northern Gaza to evacuate “for their own safety.”

  •  
    The St. Charles-based band Kampfire Kowboys feature David Piper of St. Charles, left, guitarist Tom Colton of Campton Hills, and Ray Henaughan of St. Charles on fiddle.

    St. Charles-based band singing a happy tune

    The Kampfire Kowboys, a Tri-Cities band that has been together since 1999, earns rave reviews from the Chicago Reader, columnist Dave Heun says.

  •  

    Boy hit by car near Lake in the Hills fest

    A teenage boy riding his bicycle was struck by a car on Miller Road in Lake in the Hills as crowds exited nearby Rockin' Ribfest Saturday night, police said. Heavy rains may have been a factor in the crash, Sgt. Ted Ziarkowski said. The boy suffered a minor leg injury.

  •  

    Kayaker rescued from Fox River in Aurora

    A man in his 30s flipped over in a kayak on the Fox River in Aurora and struggled underwater but made it back to shore with the help of an onlooker Saturday afternoon, Aurora fire officials said.

  •  

    Three-car crash in W. Chicago sends two to hospital

    Two people, one of whom was airlifted, were sent to the hospital after a three-car crash Saturday afternoon on Fabyan Parkway near Roosevelt Road in West Chicago.

  •  
    Chris Ivers of Crystal Lake carries a bag of water from the pond to fill a bucket at the RUNdezvous Saturday in Lippold Park in Crystal Lake. Racers must complete 14 skills, such as fire building, hatchet throwing, knot tying and water carrying, during the five-mile event.

    RUNdezvous puts survival skills to the test

    Competitors in Saturday’s RUNdezvous in Crystal Lake found out whether they had the skills to survive.Hatchet throwing, knot tying, trap setting and fire building were among the 14 tasks racers had to complete. The five-mile event at Lippold Park in Crystal Lake was organized by two McHenry County physical education teachers.

  •  
    Gypsy, a terrier mix, wasn’t able to walk Saturday morning in Batavia’s Windmill City Fest pet parade, which was canceled by the rain.

    Rain hurts Batavia Windmill Fest attendance; Taste of Chicago canceled

    Intermittent bursts of rain Saturday forced cancellation of the Taste of Chicago, Batavia’s Windmill City Fest pet parade and a dog show in Cary, and set many suburban events off to a soggy start. Chicago received three to four inches of rain earlier Saturday, and the Batavia area saw anywhere from a half inch to an inch and a half of rain.

  •  
    Men from the 1st Illinois battalion march through Lakewood Forest Preserve during the 23rd annual Civil War Days on Saturday near Wauconda.

    Gray skies ignored by true blue Civil War re-enactors

    Rain canceled the cavalry charge, but it couldn’t dampen the gun powder. So the battle between the North and South went off as scheduled Saturday at the 23rd annual Civil War Days at the Lake County Forest Preserve near Wauconda. The annual event, the largest Civil War re-enactment in Northern Illinois, brought together many re-enactors recounting the history of the war between the states.

  •  
    Gia Ruffolo, 8, of Grandwood Park adjusts his cool shades Saturday before leading a judged kids bike parade near Adams Park as part of the Grandwood Park Summerfest.

    Grandwood Summerfest goes retro

    The Grandwood Park District Summerfest went retro in 2014, organizers said, and included family games, pub-sized tables near the food and drink area, and bring it back to a neighborhood event where it had been in the past.

  •  
    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, center, speaks Saturday during a joint press conference in Kabul, Afghanistan

    Kerry brokers deal in Afghan election

    Both candidates agreed to respect the result, and the winner would immediately form a national unity government. The inauguration, which had been scheduled for Aug. 2, would be postponed, with Karzai staying on a little longer as president.

  •  
    Tom Doughty of Aurora, left, and Ginia Kuhajek of Crystal Lake, cross the finish line first and second Saturday in the Masters race of the Winfield Criterium.

    Rain adds ‘excitement’ to Winfield Criterium

    With earlier rain and the threat of more looming, the 15th annual Winfield Criterium bike race took a bit more significance. The dicey weather meant riders needed to be doubly diligent in avoiding crashes.

  •  
    Carolyn Finzer of Naperville looks over eclectic style recycled artwork made by Linda Russell, during the Naperville Woman’s Club’s 55th annual Juried Art Fair at Naper Settlement.

    Naperville art fair draws almost 100 artists

    More than 90 artists displayed their works in clay, fiber, glass, jewelry, mixed media, painting, photography, sculpture and wood at the Naperville Woman’s Club 55th Annual Juried Fine Art Fair. “This our largest fundraiser. Proceeds from this event are donated towards an art scholarship at North Central College and also to area local charitable organizations in the community...

  •  
    Mike Limerick pretends to play a mock musical instrument Saturday at the Lower Keys Underwater Music Festival, in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. The subsea concert at Looe Key Reef, about six miles south of Big Pine Key, Fla., attracted almost 500 divers and snorkelers to listen to a local radio station’s four-hour broadcast piped beneath the sea via underwater speakers.

    Divers, snorkelers converge for undersea ‘concert’

    The water-themed playlist included such tunes as the Beatles’ “Octopus’s Garden” and the themes from Disney’s “The Little Mermaid” and television’s classic “Flipper.” Participants described the music as clear and ethereal, with underwater visibility of about 50 feet.

  •  
    Mark Welsh/mwelsh@dailyherald.comJade Peters and Jeff Votava both of Schaumburg are the first in line with about 800 other beer lovers waiting for the 11th annual Brew Fest in Barrington to open on Saturday.

    Hundreds turn out for Barrington brew fest

    As many as 800 beer connoisseurs descended on downtown Barrington Saturday to sample new concoctions and old favorites at the 11th annual Barrington Brew Fest. Jade Peters and Jeff Votava, both of Schaumburg, waited in line for more than an hour to be the first through the gate. “It’s great,” Peters said, “better than any beer fest in Chicago.”

  •  
    Ann and Richard Langrill, the Glenview couple in this wedding reception picture found on a roadside, are in the process of recovering the keepsake photos from the Arlington Heights couple who found them.

    Mystery solved! Couple claims lost wedding photos

    The mystery of four wedding photos found by the side of an Arlington Heights road has been solved. Ann Langrill saw pictures of her and her husband, Richard, on the television news after the Daily Herald initially reported on the discovery. “I was doing the dishes and I looked up and I thought, 'Oh my gosh, that's me!' I couldn't believe it,” said the Glenview resident. “I...

  •  
    Associated Press Rep. David Price, D-N.C. speaking the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C. Democrats long have claimed that Republicans abused their legislative powers to elect a disproportionate number of U.S. House members. A court in Florida is lending credence to their complaint, and North Carolina Democrats are fighting a GOP-drawn map in state court.

    GOP keeps House edge in Democratic-leaning states

    Several other states have sent more Republicans to Congress than their presidential voting patterns would suggest. Obama carried Ohio twice, but Republicans control its U.S. House delegation 12-4. Pennsylvania hasn’t backed a GOP presidential nominee since 1988, but it has 13 House Republicans and five Democrats.

  •  
    Melinda Bush

    New law to help students with dyslexia

    A new Illinois law aims to help dyslexic students by training educators on how to better identify and teach young people with the learning disability. The measure signed into law by Gov. Pat Quinn on Saturday entitles dyslexic students to special education services.

  •  
    A car drives through a flooded street Saturday in Chicago.

    Taste of Chicago canceled for day due to storms

    Authorities have canceled the entire day of events at the Taste of Chicago festival because of heavy rain and flooding on the festival grounds. Today’s events were to have included concerts by Wilco frontman Jeff Tweedy and roots-rock songwriter Lucinda Williams. The Taste says on its Facebook page that all tickets purchased online would be refunded automatically.

  •  

    U of I speeding up search for new president

    University of Illinois officials are speeding up the search for a new president, saying they now hope to select someone before Thanksgiving.

  •  
    Dan Rutherford

    Treasurer’s interns had political connections

    Illinois Treasurer Dan Rutherford’s office has offered paid internships to multiple young people with connections to influential politicians, campaign donors and lobbyists, according to a published report.

  •  
    Michael Mayes, CEO of Chicago-based Quantum 9 Inc., a medical cannabis consulting company, poses for a photo in his Chicago office. The prospect of adding jobs, even as few as 30, has led officials in many shrinking Illinois’ communities to set aside any qualms about the state’s legalization of medical marijuana and to get friendly with would-be growers.

    Illinois towns see jobs in medical marijuana

    In Illinois, city councils from Crystal Lake to Peru to Marion are considering marijuana zoning ordinances and special use permits, though the state is not tracking precisely how many. Permit seekers have simply moved on from the few communities that have voted down such proposals.

  •  
    Soccer fans Daniel and Maryan celebrate as they watch the semifinal of the 2014 soccer World Cup between Brazil and Germany on the sidelines of the ‘Bread & Butter’ fair in Berlin, Tuesday evening, July 8, 2014.

    Merkel thinks Germany will win World Cup

    Chancellor Angela Merkel is optimist about Germany’s chances of winning the World Cup final against Argentina, but is cautioning football fans that anything can happen.

  •  
    Police guard in front of Hotel Palais Coburg where closed-door nuclear talks with Iran take place in Vienna, Austria, Saturday, July 12, 2014. Decisions by the foreign ministers of Russia and China to skip talks on Iran’s nuclear program this weekend are further denting expectations that the stalled negotiations will produce a deal by July 20.

    Lavrov’s absence clouds Iran nuke talks

    Decisions by the foreign ministers of Russia and China to skip talks on Iran’s nuclear program this weekend are further denting expectations that the stalled negotiations will produce a deal by July 20.

  •  
    This 2010 photo released by Decca shows Jazz bassist Charlie Haden. Haden died Friday, July 11, in Los Angeles after a long illness. He was 76.

    Jazz bass innovator Charlie Haden dies at 76

    Bassist Charlie Haden, who helped change the shape of jazz more than a half-century ago as a member of Ornette Coleman’s groundbreaking quartet and liberated the bass from its traditional rhythm section role, died Friday, July 11. He was 76.

  •  

    State storing blood samples without parents’ OK

    An Indiana Department of Health Department official says the state has blood samples from babies born since 1991 stored for possible use in medical research, saving it without permission from their parents.

  •  

    UIC notifies ex-students of information breach

    Officials have notified former students of the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Business Administration that personal information — including Social Security numbers — were found on a publicly accessible website from 2002.

  •  

    Chicago wants more people to drive electric cars

    The city of Chicago is trying to encourage more people to drive electric cars.

  •  

    Construction closes part of Chicago River bridge

    The Chicago River bridge at State Street will be closed for a week starting as construction continues for the Chicago Riverwalk.

  •  
    Tania Kothera of Schaumburg competes with her son Nate's golden retriever, Chevy, 3, in the DockDogs Big Air Dog Jumping event Friday during Pampered Pup'z Dog Days of Summer in Libertyville. The contest resumes at 10 a.m. today.

    Dogs make a big splash in Libertyville

    The Dog Days of Summer are underway in downtown Libertyville. Activities for your pooch run through the weekend, with Cook Park the center of much of the action. There is also an X-Treme Dog Park with a 30,000-gallon pool in the rear parking lot of PNC Bank. DockDogs jumping resumes at 10 a.m. today.

  •  
    Kane County officials reviewed the updated costs of a massive technology upgrade for its judicial system Friday and learned some good news from Chief Information Officer Roger Fahnestock.

    Kane Co. closing in on $6.8 million technology upgrade

    Kane County board members weighed in for the first time on a massive technology upgrade for the county's legal system Friday. The price tag is either more or less than advertised just a couple months ago, but every new estimate is far below the $12.6 million bill county officials feared just a couple of years ago.

  •  
    Fox Lake officials said a mistake was made in approving two grants for $8,000 to business property owner and village Trustee Ronald Stochl for facade improvements to his downtown storefront. The village ordinance limits eligible property owners to one grant per fiscal year.

    Fox Lake to review ‘mistake’ in $8,000 storefront facade grant

    Fox Lake officials said they may have mistakenly violated the village’s facade improvement ordinance that limits eligible business property owners to one storefront grant each fiscal year, by awarding two grants to an owner who also is a village trustee. “If it’s a mistake and he shouldn’t have received it, we can fix it,” Mayor Donny Schmit said.

  •  
    A fruit medley is served in the lunchroom in May at Fremont Intermediate School near Mundelein. Fremont School District 79 allows students to have sweet treats as long as healthy food is also on the table.

    Cupcakes or quinoa? How several school districts regulate snacks

    Jennifer Nickels’ complaints about a teacher rewarding her 7-year-old daughter and other Dundee Highlands Elementary School students with candy prompted a schoolwide survey to parents, who were fine with the sweets. Meanwhile, policies about candy and other treats doled out during the school day vary across the suburbs. “It’s the cupcake and quinoa wars,” Margaret Van...

  •  

    Naperville efforts continue to prevent sewer backups

    As one project to prevent extra water from sneaking into the sewer system wraps up in Naperville, a couple more initiatives are soon to begin. One involves fixing manhole covers so groundwater can’t leak into sanitary sewers, while the other will offer reimbursements to homeowners who fix a type of sump pump connection that’s illegal under Naperville’s building...

  •  
    Juli Aistars of Lake Zurich during the Western States 100-mile trail run. The oncology nurse currently is running a 314-mile race through Missouri, Tennessee and Georgia to raise money for Northwest Community Hospital’s lung program.

    Arlington Hts. nurse running 314-mile race to help fight cancer

    As an advanced practice oncology nurse at Northwest Community Hospital in Arlington Heights, Juli Aistars works with lung cancer patients who struggle just to take a deep breath. That’s why she doesn’t mind being a little out of breath herself this weekend as she runs a 500K — or 314 miles — through Missouri, Tennessee and Georgia.

  •  

    District 41 considering new technology policy

    The Glen Ellyn Elementary District 41 school board is considering a new technology policy that could place limits on students bringing their own electronic devices into the classroom. The new policy, written by the district’s legal counsel, has been reviewed by the board’s policy committee. It still must be approved by the full board, which received a draft earlier this week.

  •  

    Aurora to get long-awaited overpass near Waubonsie

    A long-desired proposal to separate trains from car and truck traffic at a railroad crossing in Aurora soon will become a reality. State and local officials on Friday announced plans to construct an overpass along Ogden Avenue where the road intersects the Canadian National Railway tracks. Work on the $40.9 million project is scheduled to begin this summer and be managed by the Illinois...

  •  

    Chilean visit to Elgin last year sparked interest

    Although it wasn’t a boon of economic opportunities, a visit to Elgin by a delegation of Chileans a year ago set in motion wheels that keep turning. The four-person delegation from Cauquenes, Elgin’s sister city, came over the Fourth of July holiday in 2013.

Sports

  •  

    Boomers sweep doubleheader

    The host Schaumburg Boomers took both ends of a doubleheader from the Joliet Slammers on Saturday night.

  •  

    Bandits win 6-3

    The host Chicago Bandits took an early 3-0 lead in the game and ended things with a 3-0 lead in the series following Saturday night’s 6-3 victory over the Pennsylvania Rebellion.

  •  
    Instead of blocking his shot, Bulls center Joakim Noah will be joining forces next season with former Lakers forward Pau Gasol, who agreed to terms Saturday. Carmelo Anthony, the Bulls’ top free-agent target, announced he was staying with the New York Knicks.

    Pau but no pow for Bulls

    The long wait for Carmelo Anthony's decision came to an end Saturday. After all that time, Anthony did what everyone thought he'd do at the start of this process, took a near-maximum contract from the New York Knicks. The Bulls responded by securing Lakers power forward Pau Gasol.

  •  

    Cougars shut out by Snappers 7-0

    The Kane County Cougars were shut out for the first time since June 29 in a 7-0 loss to the Beloit Snappers on Saturday night.

  •  

    Fire holds on for 1-0 win over Revolution

    Quincy Amarikwa scored in the 3rd minute and Sean Johnson saved a penalty kick in the 86th to seal the Chicago Fire’s 1-0 win over the New England Revolution on Saturday.

  •  
    Argentina’s head coach, Alejandro Sabella, listens to questions during a news conference Saturday in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Argentina and Germany will play for the World Cup title on Sunday.

    Argentina: ‘Perfect game’ required against Germany

    Perfection is hard to attain in football. Argentina coach Alejandro Sabella says that’s what his team needs to achieve to have a chance of beating Germany in the World Cup final on Sunday. The Argentines lost one of their key players in the quarterfinals when Angel Di Maria limped off after straining his right thigh. Sabella said the Real Madrid winger’s condition was improving, but it was unclear whether he would be ready for the final.

  •  
    Arismendy Alcantara, left, celebrates with Justin Ruggiano after Ruggiano hit a game-winning RBI single, allowing Alcantara to score, Friday against the Atlanta Braves.

    Cubs face tough choice with Alcantara

    Cubs rookie Arismendy Alcantara looked like an old hand in center field Saturday during an 11-6 loss to the Braves at Wrigley Field. Alcantara made his first big-league appearance in center after starting three games at second base. He's off to a good start, and the Cubs may find it difficult to send him back to the minor leagues.

  •  
    Cubs starter Edwin Jackson saw his ERA climb from 5.05 to 5.64 after Saturday’s 11-6 loss to the Braves on Saturday.

    Jackson shoulders blame for ugly outing

    It was yet another rough outing Saturday for beleaguered Cubs pitcher Edwin Jackson. Jackson lasted just 3.2 innings against the Braves and gave up 7 hits and 9 runs as he saw his ERA go from 5.05 to 5.64. The Cubs tried to come back a couple of times, but they wound up falling 11-6.

  •  
    LeBron James is heading back to Cleveland and throwing the NBA East up for grabs.

    Bulls in pretty good spot

    The Bulls missed out on top free-agent target Carmelo Anthony. But looking at the top contenders in the Eastern Conference, the Bulls had a pretty good offseason, except for one Central Division rival who did better.

  •  

    With Wrigley decision, Cubs have a chance to win

    Finally, after years of old ownership that did nothing, and new ownership that tried to play a little too nice, this week brought resolution and the Cubs are in line to become a more viable baseball franchise. Matt Spiegel has more in his weekly baseball column.

  •  
    Sox slugger Jose Abreu is greeted in the dugout after hitting a two-run home run against the Indians Saturday in Cleveland.

    Abreu hits 29th HR as Sox down Indians

    Jose Abreu hit his major league-leading 29th homer, a two-run shot that sent the Chicago White Sox over the Cleveland Indians 6-2 on Saturday. The White Sox ended a three-game losing streak. Abreu, picked for the AL All-Star team in his rookie season, broke a scoreless tie in the fourth inning with his drive off Zach McAllister (3-5).

  •  
    Cubs starter Edwin Jackson didn’t make it out of the fourth inning on Saturday against the Braves.

    Braves rough up Cubs, 11-6

    Chris Johnson homered twice and pitcher Mike Minor hit his second career home run, leading the Atlanta Braves over the Chicago Cubs 11-6 on Saturday. Atlanta scored six times in the fourth inning for a 9-3 lead. Edwin Jackson (5-10) lasted just 3 2-3 innings after giving nine runs, seven hits and three home runs. The Cubs have lost seven of their last nine.

  •  
    Ian Thorpe

    Report: Thorpe to reveal he is gay

    Australian media report five-time Olympic swimming gold medalist Ian Thorpe will reveal he is gay in a television interview with English talk show host Michael Parkinson, to be broadcast in Australia on Sunday.

  •  
    When it comes to free kicks or penalty kicks, Argentina’s Lionel Messi has one of the most accurate kicks in soccer. His speed, patience, intelligence and balance also set him apart.

    5 reasons Messi is one of the best

    RIO DE JANEIRO — A four-time world player of the year, Argentina’s Lionel Messi is gifted with talents that most footballers can only dream of. What makes him special is that he possesses not just one or two but a combination of special skills that give him an edge over just about everyone.Although he hasn’t played brilliantly in every game of this World Cup, Messi’s talents have been on display on Argentina’s road to Sunday’s final against Germany. Here are five traits that explain what makes the Argentina captain so difficult to stop.• Speed: There are plenty of players who could outrun Messi in a 100-meter dash. But running with the ball is a different story. Messi can control the ball at close to top speed, making him an excellent dribbler. Also, it’s his acceleration rather than his top speed that cuts up defenses. Few defenders can keep up when Messi revs up from standstill, creating space for his left-foot shot.• Balance: Like former Argentina great Diego Maradona, Messi uses his short stature to his advantage. His low center of gravity enables him to make quick turns and to stay on his feet when challenged. Often, the only way to knock him off balance is to foul him. Defenders at the World Cup have been taking turns tackling Messi to spread the risk of getting booked around the team.• Accuracy: Messi is one of the world’s top free-kick takers, striking the ball with impressive accuracy with his magic left foot. Almost always he hits the target or just misses it — you rarely see Messi blast a free kick five meters over the crossbar. In Argentina’s final group-stage match, Nigeria gave Messi two free kick opportunities near the penalty area toward the end of the first half. He elegantly curled the first one over the wall, but goalkeeper Vincent Enyeama was well-positioned and stopped it. By the second free kick, Messi had fine-tuned his aim, and struck the ball perfectly inside the post. Enyeama jokingly asked the referees during the break to not give Messi any more free kicks.• Patience: Patience is a perhaps and underrated virtue for a football player, and it’s one that has served Messi well in the World Cup. Every opponent has come with a plan to stop him, by closing down his space and tackling him as soon as he touches the ball. As a result, Messi has looked out of the game for long periods. But instead of hanging his head and getting frustrated, Messi keeps looking for openings, patiently awaiting a moment when defenders take their focus off him for just a split second. That’s when he strikes. Against Iran, that moment came in injury time when he scored his second goal of the tournament. Against Switzerland, it happened in extra time as he set up Angel Di Maria’s winning goal with a piercing run down the middle.• Intelligence: He also stands out for his ability to read the game, mapping out paths to the opponent’s goal in his mind before the opponent does. That’s key to understanding why he’s such a prolific scorer. Knowing by instinct where a gap will open up for a quick pass or shot gives him an advantage over others, though it can also complicate things for the team. Sometimes Messi lets chances slip away by being too smart for his Argentina teammates, who aren’t in sync with him to the same degree as Andres Iniesta and Xavi Hernandez in Barcelona.

  •  
    If home-field advantage in the World Series hinges on the outcome of the All-Star Game, then perhaps the NL should pitch Clayton Kershaw all nine innings. That won’t happen, of course, but Scot Gregor believes other changes are in order.

    3 things to change about the All-Star Game

    Major-league baseball's All-Star Game is still the best showcase event in pro sports, but White Sox beat writer Scot Gregor says a few tweaks could make the MidSummer Classic even better.

  •  
    It doesn’t make any sense that all-star pitcher Jeff Samardzija won’t get to play in Tuesday’s All-Star Game. Bruce Miles has some changes in mind for the Midsummer Classic.

    Samardzija deserves to play in All-Star Game

    Even though Major League Baseball's All-Star Game has lost some of its luster in recent years, it's still the best of its kind among the major sports. Daily Herald Cubs writer Bruce Miles offers a few suggestions to make the All-Star Game matter again. First off, how about letting Jeff Samardzija pitch this year.

  •  
    The Netherlands’ Robin van Persie celebrates after scoring during Saturday’s third-place World Cup match against Brazil at the Estadio Nacional in Brasilia, Brazil.

    Netherlands beats Brazil for 3rd in World Cup

    Robin van Persie and Daley Blind scored early goals to help give the Netherlands a 3-0 win over host Brazil in the third-place match at the World Cup on Saturday. With the result, the Netherlands finishes a World Cup unbeaten in regular play for the first time, having lost to Argentina on penalties in the semifinals. After finishing runner-up in 2010, the third place is the best position for the Dutch squad since it lost the final in 1974 and 1978.

  •  

    Rose tied for lead after 3 rounds of Scottish Open

    Justin Rose set up a chance to capture back-to-back titles by shooting a 5-under 66 at the Scottish Open on Saturday to move into a share of the lead with Marc Warren after three rounds.

  •  
    South Korea’s Inbee Park holds a one-shot lead over a pair of major champions at the Women’s British Open.

    Inbee Park has 1-shot lead in Women’s British Open

    One year later, Inbee Park is still chasing history at the Women’s British Open. Instead of trying to win an unprecedented fourth straight major, Park has a chance to become only the seventh woman to win four of the LPGA’s majors. Instead of photographers capturing her every move at St. Andrews, the 26-year-old South Korean has gone about her work without fanfare at Royal Birkdale.

  •  
    Los Angeles Lakers power forward Pau Gasol of Spain

    Gasol tweets that he’s joining Bulls

    Free-agent center Pau Gasol announced via Twitter Saturday that he was looking forward to the “new chapter” of his career in Chicago. He says the choice wasn’t easy and he decided on the Bulls “after meditating a lot.”

  •  
    Lindsay Davenport holds her plaque as she waves to the crowd Saturday after being inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame in Newport, Rhode Island.

    Tennis hall opens doors for Davenport

    Lindsay Davenport remembers picking up a tennis racket as a child and the feeling that came with the ease of a powerful return. After giving up on two other sports, she found something she liked. On Saturday, she reached her sport’s highest honor, with her induction into the International Tennis Hall of Fame.

  •  
    Blel Kadri strains on his way to winning Saturday’s eighth stage of the Tour de France.

    Kadri wins 8th stage of Tour

    In a solo breakaway, Blel Kadri gave France its first stage winner at the Tour de France in the entree to the Vosges mountains on Saturday. Meanwhile, Vincent Nibali extended his lead over his biggest rivals except an important one: two-time champion Alberto Contador, who sped ahead thinking he might win the stage and trying to test the response of the Italian in the yellow jersey.

  •  
    Arismendy Alcantara has been impressive in his debut with the Cubs. The 5-foot-10, 170-pounder has considerable power and speed to contribute.

    Alcantara impresses Cubs with his speed, power

    While former No. 1 draft picks Kris Bryant and Javier Baez wait for their chance to be called up to the Cubs from Class AAA Iowa, former I-Cubs teammate Arismendy Alcantara has been playing big in his first big-league shot. And his Iowa manager isn't surprised given the skills he's witnessed.

  •  
    The World Cup watch parties in Chicago's Grant Park, Soldier Field and elsewhere around the country were a great move by U.S. Soccer to boost interest in the sport.

    Sorting out World Cup winners and losers

    Every once in a while a big event lives up to the hype. Take a bow, World Cup 2014. Forgetting about the Argentina-Netherlands semifinal for a minute, this tournament has been fantastic, ranking as perhaps the best ever. Orrin Schwarz offers up his winners and losers during the World Cup, along with his prediction for the World Cup Final between Germany and Argentina.

Business

  •  
    A Crumbs cupcake shop sits empty Tuusday on Federal Street in Boston.

    Crumbs Cupcake chain files bankruptcy

    Crumbs was hailed as a “breakout company” by Inc. magazine in 2010 and became a publicly held business the following year through a merger with 57th Street General Acquisition Corp. The company, then run by Crumbs co-founder Jason Bauer, planned to open 200 locations in the top 15 markets by the end of this year.

  •  
    Light from a digital projector beams from the projection house last June at the Saco Drive-In in Saco, Maine. Drive-in movie theater operators say more than 200 of the remaining 348 drive-ins in the country have made the costly switch from film to digital.

    Drive-ins use creativity to afford digital switch

    Drive-in movie theater operators say more than 200 of the remaining 348 drive-ins in the country have made the expensive conversion from film to digital, which typically costs more than $70,000. Theater owners say conversions escalated quickly in 2013 and will help keep the drive-ins in business for now, promising news for an industry that peaked in the 1950s and ‘60s, then with more than 4,000 drive-in theaters nationwide.

  •  
    Trump Plaza Hotel and Casino in Atlantic City N.J.

    Owners of Trump Plaza casino expect it to close

    Notices warning employees of the expected closing will go out to the casino’s 1,000-plus employees Monday.If Trump Plaza closes, Atlantic City could lose a third of its casinos and a quarter of its casino workforce in less than nine months.

  •  
    Andrew Pittz of the Sawmill Hollow aronia berry farm carries aronia berry seedlings in Missouri Valley, Iowa. A few years ago, few people had ever heard of the Aronia berry, a pretty, but tart fruit.

    Aronia berry gaining market foothold

    Consumers are taking notice of the potential health benefits, said Stacey Loftus, Hy-Vee’s health and wellness supervisor. Research published last year in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry says aronia’s oxygen radical absorbance capacity — a standard measurement of antioxidant strength — shows the berry has one of the highest values ever recorded for a fruit.

  •  
    Typic Kids is a photo editing program aimed squarely at children, which lets users pick filters to lay over photos, custom frames, text and digital stickers to customize pictures from a smartphone camera roll.

    App reviews: Typic Kids, Merlin Bird ID

    Typic Kids is a photo editing program aimed squarely at children, which lets users pick filters to lay over photos, custom frames, text and digital stickers to customize pictures from a smartphone camera roll.

  •  
    Google is grappling with how to apply a European Union court decision that said citizens have a so-called right to be forgotten when Internet searches throw up results that are “inadequate, irrelevant, no longer relevant, or excessive.”

    Google struggles with hiding it under EU’s right to be forgotten

    “Google it” is synonymous with seeking information. Now Google Inc. is struggling with a new rule: “Hide it.” The world’s biggest search-engine company is grappling with how to apply a European Union court decision that said citizens have a so-called right to be forgotten when Internet searches throw up results that are “inadequate, irrelevant, no longer relevant, or excessive.”

  •  
    A member of the media tries out a new Samsung Galaxy Tab S after the tablet’s debut at a news conference in New York. The new display technology in Samsung’s Galaxy Tab S tablet brings colors to life and reduces the device’s bulk.

    Galaxy Tab S review: The tablet may be too late

    Samsung is taking another big swing at the tablet market with the launch of the Galaxy Tab S, just as many consumers are questioning whether they need a tablet at all. The popularity of the big-screened phones, including Samsung’s Galaxy Note line, have slowed tablet sales growth to a snail’s pace.

  •  
    A Samsung Gear Live watch running the latest edition of Android software is displayed during the Google I/O Annual Developers Conference in San Francisco last month.

    Is this the year to buy a smartwatch?

    The LG G Watch and the Samsung Gear Live both went on sale last week, providing the first test for Google’s just-for-wearables version of its mobile operating system, called Android Wear. If a Google-run life sounds great to you -- let’s be honest, a lot of us are already there -- there are still a few more things to consider before you buy. Unless you’re really, really into the whole smartwatch thing, you may want to hold off for now, reviewers say.

  •  
    This product image provided by Scribd shows the Scribd e-book app. Scribd and Oyster let you read as many books as you want for a monthly price _ $9 for Scribd and $10 for Oyster.

    Review: Unlimited e-book services offer plenty

    Two startups are trying to do for e-books what Netflix does for movies. Oyster and Scribd let you read as many books as you want for a monthly price — $10 for Oyster and $9 for Scribd. I was skeptical at first, but they surprised me.

  •  
    A Sony Mobile Communications Inc. SmartWatch MN2, top, is displayed with the company’s Xperia smartphone at the Sony Corp. headquarters in Tokyo, Japan.

    Ad agencies target wearable tech devices

    Even before wearable technology gains widespread popularity, advertising companies are devising ways to deliver marketing messages directly to people who don watches, glasses and headgear that double as computers.

  •  
    Since the Federal Communications Commission proposed in May to let cable and telephone companies offer special Internet fast lanes for companies willing to pay extra, lobbyists for Google haven’t visited the agency to intervene, FCC records show. Facebook, the largest social network, also has been absent.

    Google fades into background in fight to save open Internet

    Google, once boastful that it was the leading defender of a free and open Internet, has gone into the shadows. Since the Federal Communications Commission proposed in May to let cable and telephone companies offer special Internet fast lanes for companies willing to pay extra, lobbyists for Google haven’t visited the agency to intervene, FCC records show.

  •  
    Facebook’s news-feed study isn’t just controversial among Internet users and academics, it turns out. Now, even the journal that published Facebook’s research says it has reservations about having done so.

    Publisher of Facebook study airs concern about methodology

    Facebook’s news-feed study isn’t just controversial among Internet users and academics, it turns out. Now, even the journal that published Facebook’s research says it has reservations about having done so.

  •  
    Buzz Aldrin, left, Neil Armstrong and Michael Collins, pose for a photograph in front of the Apollo 11 lunar module at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington on July 19, 2009. That year they also met with President Barack Obama in the White House, continuing a tradition.

    Buzz Aldrin launches lunar landing social media campaign

    Buzz Aldrin's big focus right now is the 45th anniversary of the first lunar landing. His company has launched a social media campaign, featuring a YouTube video in which celebrities and scientists relay their memories of July 20, 1969. “I feel we need to remind the world about the Apollo missions and that we can still do impossible things. The whole world celebrated our moon landing, but we missed the whole thing because we were out of town,” he says.

  •  

    How professors are using Facebook to teach

    Technology is an established part of the lives of students. But university lecturers are becoming increasingly frustrated at how they must compete with tablets and laptops for students’ attention in the lecture hall. In the U.S., Dartmouth computer science professor Dan Rockmore has recently stoked debate in a “New Yorker” article arguing that laptops should be banned in the classroom.

  •  
    Former Internal Revenue Service official Lois Lerner speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. Two federal judges are ordering the IRS to explain — under oath — how it lost a trove of emails.

    Second federal judge wants info on lost IRS emails

    Federal Judge Reggie Walton’s order came a day after another federal judge ordered the IRS to explain under oath how it lost the emails. U.S. District Judge Emmet G. Sullivan, who issued his order on Thursday, gave the tax agency a month to submit the explanation in writing.

  •  
    Whirlpool will pay more than $1 billion for a controlling stake in Indesit, the appliance maker’s counterpart in Italy.

    Whirlpool buys big stake in Italy’s Indesit
    Whirlpool will pay more than $1 billion for a controlling stake in Indesit, the appliance maker’s counterpart in Italy.The deal announced Friday will put the U.S. company in possession of shares representing 66.8 percent of Indesit’s voting stock. Whirlpool, which also owns Maytag, KitchenAid and other brands, will pay $15.06 per Indesit share.

Life & Entertainment

  •  

    Leave boyfriend with red flags before he becomes husband
    Q. My boyfriend and I have been together for five years. However, I’m not sure if staying with him is the best decision for me. He was diagnosed with ADHD and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) as a child, and I feel as though this is really detrimental to our relationship.

  •  
    Tracy Morgan is suing Wal-Mart over the June 7, 2014, highway crash that seriously injured him and killed a fellow comedian. The lawsuit, filed Thursday, July 10, 2014, in U.S. District Court in New Jersey, claims Wal-Mart was negligent when a driver of one of its tractor-trailers rammed into Morgan’s limousine.

    Tracy Morgan sues Wal-Mart for crash that killed 1

    Tracy Morgan is suing Wal-Mart over last month’s highway crash that seriously injured him and killed a fellow comedian. The lawsuit, filed Thursday in U.S. District Court in New Jersey, claims Wal-Mart was negligent when a driver of one of its tractor-trailers rammed into Morgan’s limousine bus.

  •  
    Tommy Ramone, ex-drummer and manager of The Ramones, smiles as he is interviewed backstage Jan. 8, 2005, at the Knitting Factory in New York. A business associate says Ramone, a co-founder of the seminal punk band The Ramones and the last surviving member of the original group, has died. Dave Frey, who works for Ramones Productions and Silent Partner Management, says Ramone’s wife called to tell him he died on Friday, July 11.

    Tommy Ramone, last of the Ramones, dies at 65

    Tommy Ramone, a co-founder of the seminal punk band the Ramones and the last surviving member of the original group, has died, a business associate said Saturday. Dave Frey, who works for Ramones Productions and Silent Partner Management, confirmed that Ramone died on Friday, July 11. Ramone was 65.

  •  
    A small can will help you measure how long it takes your sprinkler to deliver 1 inch of water.

    Pruning, watering will help keep your yard looking sharp

    Prune shrubs as needed to keep them in the proper scale for your garden. New stems and branches that grew this spring will be mostly hardened off in early July, so pruning them now should not stimulate much new growth.

  •  
    A flower-inspired wallpapered screen politely blocks the neighbor’s view.

    Screening out the curious

    Q. We have a little porch just off the living room of our new house. The trouble is, this is a new development, and the neighbors’ houses are really close. What can we do for some privacy in the meantime?

  •  
    Cracking grout and blistering paint can be signs that a bathroom remodel is in order.

    Seven sure signs it’s time to remodel

    When it comes to diving into a home remodeling project, homeowners take their time. Often, a long, long time. Procrastination seems to come with the territory.

  •  
    “Close Your Eyes, Hold Hands” author Chris Bohjalian stops at Anderson's in Naperville on Thursday, July 17.

    Book notes: Chris Bohjalian stops at Naperville's Anderson’s

    “Close Your Eyes, Hold Hands” author Chris Bohjalian discusses and signs copies of his book at 7 p.m. Thursday, July 17, at Anderson’s Bookshop in Naperville.

  •  
    The TKTS app provides a list of which New York City live theater shows are offering discounted tickets for that night’s performance. The app also lists other information including the show’s description and monthly schedule, theater location, directions, closest subway stops and a link to purchase full-price tickets.

    Mobile apps offer last-minute travel deals

    While new technology and mobile applications have made old-fashion road trips easier, the thrill of spontaneity and surprise still remains. If travelers are flexible, apps can offer ease with last-minute deals, especially good for day trips and overnight stays. Need a hotel room immediately? There’s an app for that.

  •  
    Woodstock, Illinois hosts its 29th annual Folk Festival July 20.

    On the road: Folk Festival brings the tunes to Woodstock

    Woodstock's 29th annual Folk Festival features contemporary acoustic performers, folk circuit mainstays and plenty of bluegrass, Americana, country and Southern blues tunes. If you're feeling more urban, visit more than 80 lush neighborhood gardens during the 46th annual Sheffield Garden Walk & Festival in Chicago.

  •  
    Blu (voiced by Jesse Eisenberg) and Jewel return in “Rio 2.”

    DVD previews: ‘Rio2,’ ‘Under the Skin’

    Like the first movie, “Rio 2” looks great with vibrant colors and lovely animation that pop off the screen. And among the many layers of plots, some are winners. The film comes to DVD July 15.

  •  
    Country star Josh Turner performs at Festival Park adjacent to the Grand Victoria Casino in Elgin on Saturday, July 12.

    Weekend picks: Country star Josh Turner to rock Festival Park

    Fans of country star Josh Turner won't want to miss the Roughstock and Rambler Tour on Saturday outdoors at Festival Park adjacent to Grand Victoria Casino, Elgin. Comedian Kristen Toomey likes to bill herself as your favorite blue-collar aunt, so get some grounded and working-class humor this weekend when she performs at the The Comedy Shrine in Aurora. Head back in time with large-scale re-enactments of famous Civil War battles at Civil War Days at the Lakewood Forest Preserve, Wauconda.

  •  

    President should run board meetings

    Q. Our condominium association recently hired a new property manager. The property manager, rather than the board president, runs the board meetings. As an owner, this is a concern. Am I overly concerned?

Discuss

  •  

    The Soapbox

    Daily Herald editors write about several topics of the week, including improvements to a special trail, ugly campaigning and a story that just won't quit.

  •  

    Tablets for all students unfair to taxpayers
    A Gilberts letter to the editor: This is a follow-up to a letter in the Your Views section regarding the purchase of 4,000 electronic devices for Elgin Area School District U-46. I agree that this should not be a purchase that is passed on to the taxpayers of Elgin.

  •  

    Recycled products not always easy on budget
    A Lombard letter to the editor: I remember years ago when recycled plastic milk jugs went beyond school, public and park benches, becoming available to homeowners in the form of outdoor furniture (“Milk jugs make fine backyard furniture,” July 5).After extensive shopping, it became clear the cost was beyond my outdoor-living budget.

  •  

    Page 1 story on fireflies brightened the day
    An Elk Grove Village letter to the editor: Every morning I pull my Daily Herald out of its wrapper and peruse the headlines about violence, corrupt politicians, calamity and evil. Thank you for making the lead article on July 8 about fireflies.

  •  

    Scary carnival ride prompts a warning
    A Palatine letter to the editor: The height requirement was 48 inches for the Zipper, and my son is 52 inches, so I figured this was the perfect next challenge. We entered the cage with excitement, but this quickly turned to sheer terror at the first flip. My son immediately flew out from under the restraining bar, flying forward from underneath.

«Jun

Jul 2014

Aug»
S M T W T F S
29 30 1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31 1 2