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Daily Archive : Wednesday July 2, 2014

News

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    Gurnee’s elected officials are addressing the future of Old Grand Avenue, which connects to busy Route 132 on its east and west sides. Old Grand is Gurnee’s original section called village center.

    Gurnee considering options to reinvigorate Old Grand Avenue

    Gurnee's elected officials once again are contemplating how best to reinvigorate the village's original section along Old Grand Avenue. “I’ve always seen that corridor as a bustling little downtown for us,” Trustee Greg Garner said.

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    Gov. Pat Quinn

    Email prompts Quinn to withhold $20 million in funding for COD

    The College of DuPage won't receive a $20 million state construction grant now that Gov. Pat Quinn has seen an email detailing President Robert Breuder's strategy to secure the long-promised funding for the Glen Ellyn school. “The tactics used by the president in his email” convinced the governor not to release the $20 million the school hoped to use for a Teaching and Learning...

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    The Rev. Emmy Lou Belcher a retired minister of DuPage Unitarian Universalist Church in Naperville, and the Rev. Mark Winter, minister of First United Church of Christ in Naperville, join other activists outside a Naperville/Aurora Hobby Lobby.

    Local clergy hand out condoms at Aurora Hobby Lobby store

    A group of local clergy and representatives from Planned Parenthood handed out condoms Wednesday at a Hobby Lobby store in Aurora in response to this week's Supreme Court ruling that the company is exempt from a federal birth control mandate due to religious beliefs. “You can make the religious freedom argument, you can make the argument about contraception, but ultimately, for me, this is...

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    San Juanita Pineda comforts her son Benjamin Hernandez, 15, in the pediatric intensive care unit at Loyal Hospital in Maywood on Tuesday. Benjamin was severly injured after the two drove into a sinkhole in Kane County early Tuesday morning.

    Elgin boy takes first steps after sinkhole accident

    The day after a horrifying sinkhole accident in which her son was severely injured brought some intense emotions, an Elgin mom said. Benjamin Hernandez, 15, took a few steps from his bed to a chair Wednesday morning in the pediatric intensive care unit of Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood, San Juanita Pineda said. “He's not ready to be sitting up, so he's back to the stretch...

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    Meghan Heinze

    Plea deal reached for Gurnee church vandal

    A Gurnee woman who was captured on video vandalizing several places of worship in Lake County pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor count of criminal damage to property Wednesday. Meghan Heinze, 22, was sentenced to two years of probation, 150 hours of community service, and she was ordered to remain in psychological treatment while on probation. Attorneys said she was misdiagnosed with a psychological...

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    Mark G. Lewis

    Agency: Geneva doctor's license suspended for having sex with patients

    A Geneva doctor’s medical license has been suspended for having sexual relations with patients and inappropriately prescribing controlled substances, according to the agency that oversees professional licenses in the state. Mark G. Lewis M.D. of St. Charles had his license suspended by the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation, effective June 26, for “sexually...

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    People enjoy the beach and heavy surf Wednesday at Jacksonville Beach, Fla. Tropical storm Arthur moved off the coast of Florida and headed to the Carolinas.

    Ahead of July 4th, East Coast eyes tropical storm

    As one of the year’s busiest travel weekends approaches, so does another visitor: Tropical Storm Arthur, expected to grow into a hurricane by the Fourth of July and hit most harshly at North Carolina’s Outer Banks, a popular getaway spot of thin barrier islands along the shore.

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    David and Barbara Green are co-founders of the Oklahoma-based Hobby Lobby chain of arts-and-craft stores. The U.S. Supreme court ruled 5-4 earlier this week that requiring closely-held companies such as Hobby Lobby to pay for methods of women’s contraception to which they object violates the corporations’ religious freedom.

    Gov’t: Ruling backs nonprofits’ birth control plan
    Obama administration on Wednesday urged the Supreme Court to deny a request from evangelical Wheaton College that the government says would block its students and employees from free access to emergency contraceptives. The Justice Department said the court’s Hobby Lobby decision earlier this week essentially endorses the accommodation the administration already has made to faith-affiliated...

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    An Arctic snowy owl sits near the site of the explore.org live camera set up in Barrow, Alaska. A high-definition camera on a burrow near the nation’s northernmost city is allowing researchers and any bird viewer with an Internet connection an unfettered view into the nesting den of an Arctic snowy owl.

    Live cam shows Arctic snowy owl, chicks in nest

    A high-definition camera trained on a burrow near the nation’s northernmost city is allowing researchers and any bird viewer with an Internet connection an unfettered view into the nesting den of an Arctic snowy owl.

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    Two injured in Naperville crash

    Two people were taken to area hospitals early Wednesday afternoon when a car and motorcycle crashed at Ogden and Iroquois avenues in Naperville, authorities said. Police did not immediately release the victims’ identities or the extent of their injuries.

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    Sen. Ted Cruz cast the Supreme Court decision allowing closely held businesses to opt out of funding employees’ birth control as a “repudiation” of President Barack Obama.

    Today’s political victories could vex GOP in 2016

    Conservative Republicans claimed victory this week in the Supreme Court ruling on religious freedom and the White House’s acceptance that an immigration overhaul won’t happen this year. Today’s victories could haunt the GOP in two years’ time, as the party’s presidential nominee looks for much-needed support among women and Hispanics in the 2016 election.

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    A Palestinian holds a Molotov cocktail during clashes with Israeli border police in Jerusalem on Wednesday. The suspected abduction of an Arab teen followed by the discovery of a body in Jerusalem on Wednesday ignited clashes between Israeli police and stone-throwing Palestinians, who saw it as a revenge attack for the killing of three Israeli teens in the West Bank.

    Palestinians say Israeli extremists killed teen

    The Palestinians accused Israeli extremists of abducting and killing an Arab teenager and burning his body Wednesday, sparking hours of clashes in east Jerusalem and drawing charges that the youth was murdered to avenge the killings of three kidnapped Israeli teens.

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    The bipartisan Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board concluded in a lengthy report that the NSA’s collection of Internet data within the United States passes constitutional muster and employs “reasonable” safeguards designed to protect the rights of Americans. Last January, the first time the board dissected an NSA surveillance program, it found fundamental flaws.

    A thumbs-up for NSA Internet spying on foreigners

    Endorsement of the NSA’s Internet surveillance programs by a bipartisan privacy board deeply disappointed civil liberties activists Wednesday while providing a measure of vindication for beleaguered U.S. intelligence officials.

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    Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson is ordering increased security measures at some overseas airports offering direct flights to the United States.

    U.S. seeks more security at some foreign airports

    Intelligence officials are concerned about a new al-Qaida effort to create a bomb that would go undetected through airport security, according to a counterterrorism official, prompting the U.S. to call for tighter security measures Wednesday at some foreign airports.

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    U.S. Marshals patrol the area outside federal court Wednesday in Washington, where Libyan militant Ahmed Abu Khattala, charged in the deadly attack at the U.S. diplomatic outpost in Benghazi, was being held for a detention hearing.

    Lawyer for Libyan militant says evidence lacking

    A lawyer for a Libyan militant charged in the 2012 Benghazi attacks said Wednesday that she had seen no evidence tying her client to the violence, but a judge nonetheless directed Ahmed Abu Khattala to remain in custody as the Justice Department builds its case against him.

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    Medal of Honor recipient Allen J. Lynch of Gurnee speaks Wednesday at the dedication of the Allen J. Lynch Medal of Honor Overpass at Grand Avenue and the Tri-State Tollway in Gurnee.

    Tri-State Tollway overpass in Gurnee named for Medal of Honor recipient

    The north and southbound Tri-State Tollway lanes at Grand Avenue in Gurnee now feature signs for the newly named Allen J. Lynch Medal of Honor Overpass. Lynch, who was honored in 1967 for acts of valor during the Vietnam War, said he hopes the signs will help "keep vets and service before the public eye.”

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    David Templer and his wife, Ilene.

    Friends remember Arlington Hts. environmental activist

    David Templer was one of the original homeowners in the Northgate subdivision when it was built in Arlington Heights more than 40 years ago and an active environmentalist. Friends are remembering Templer, who died Saturday at age 73, as a thoughtful and dedicated community member.

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    Stacy Fiebelkorn

    Horse owner says Kane Co. animal control head lied in neglect case

    Kane County’s former animal control director is accused of falsely declaring a horse dead while its owner was under investigation for abusing animals at farms in Hampshire and Maple Park. Robert Sauceda "was aware that the horse was recovering, and knew that it would be hidden from public record so the ‘abusive owner’ would not get the horse returned to her,” according...

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    Staff worker Kelli Quinones walks golden retriever Ceili on a treadmill for dogs at the Morris Animal Inn in Morristown, N.J. Female goldens are supposed to weigh 55 to 70 pounds, but overweight Ceili weighs 126 pounds. The facility says she is very active but when they do stair climbing drills, she has to take a breather.

    Fat camps offer pudgy pets ‘pawlates’ to slim down

    It’s not just a people problem: Growing rates of obesity in pets have led to the emergence of fat farms offering “pawlates,” “doga” and “Barko Polo,” doggie versions of Pilates, yoga and Marco Polo to help slim down man’s best friend.

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    Fireworks are displayed for sale inside Hee Haw Fireworks in Goodlettsville, Tennessee. Revenue from fireworks sales was about $662 million in 2013 and could exceed $675 million this year, according to the American Pyrotechnic Association.

    Fireworks and July 4: When we injure ourselves celebrating

    It’s all pomp and patriotism until someone burns a limb. The number of fireworks-related injuries soared to their highest level in more than a decade last year, according to a U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission report released last week. An estimated 11,400 injuries were reported during 2013, a staggering 31 percent climb compared to 8,700 injuries reported the year before.

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    Particles of radioactive material and glass flew into this room on the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in Richland, Wash., Sept. 1, 1976, injuring one person and exposing nine others to radioactivity. The space, now dubbed the McCluskey Room, is located inside the closed Plutonium Finishing Plant and is scheduled for cleanup this summer.

    Feds to clean site of 1976 ‘Atomic Man’ accident

    Workers are preparing to enter one of the most dangerous rooms on the Hanford Nuclear Reservation — the site of a 1976 blast that exposed a technician to a massive dose of radiation, which led to him being nicknamed the “Atomic Man.”

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    Nancy Moran

    Family concerned for missing Lombard couple

    Lombard police ask for the public’s help in locating a Lombard couple who left their retirement home Tuesday and never returned.

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    Streamwood Fire Department awarded $200,000-plus grant

    The Streamwood Fire Department will receive a $200,000-plus grant to replace equipment, officials announced Wednesday. The Federal Emergency Management Agency awarded the financing for Streamwood's operations.

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    Help reduce mosquito problem:

    The Lake County Health Department has reactivated its West Nile virus Hotline, (847) 377-8300.

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    Gurnee/Wadsworth Relay for Life:

    American Cancer Society’s Relay For Life of Gurnee/Wadsworth is set for 6 p.m. July 12 to 6 a.m. July 13, at Warren Township High School’s Almond Road campus track.

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    July 4 police enforcement:

    Through Sunday, July 6, the Illinois State Police, Illinois Secretary of State Police, and more than 320 local law enforcement agencies are joining the Illinois Department of Transportation in a crackdown on drunk drivers and drunk motorcycle operators. Enforcement efforts will focus on speeding, seat belts, distracted driving and DUI.

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    Antioch Movies in the park:

    Residents are invited to attend Antioch’s first Movies in the Park of the summer to view “Frozen” on Wednesday, July 9, at Bandshell at 902 Skidmore Drive.

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    Hoffman H.S. band heard on Travel Channel show

    The 2008 Hoffman Estates High School Symphonic Winds’ performance of a John Philip Sousa march, “Foshay Tower,” will be used as part of the soundtrack for a segment on the Travel Channel show “Monumental Mysteries” at 8 p.m. Friday, July 4. In the episode, the story behind the building of Foshay Tower in Minneapolis will be featured.

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    Gacy investigator to discuss case

    The arresting officer and lead investigator in the John Wayne Gacy serial murder investigation will talk about the case during two upcoming events sponsored by the Des Plaines History Center.

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    The Palatine Jaycees’ 57th Hometown Fest gets underway Wednesday despite some showers.

    Palatine’s Hometown Fest kicks off with smiles despite rainy weather

    Despite the gloomy atmosphere Wednesday afternoon, Palatine residents were all smiles.News: Hometown Fest, sponsored by the Palatine Jaycees, kick-started the area’s Fourth festival season Wednesday afternoon at Community Park as a misty rain fell from the sky. It was the first of the six festivals this Independence Day weekend in Northwest Cook County to get underway.

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    Mount Prospect man faces $150,000 bond on DUI charge

    A Cook County judge set bail at $150,000 Wednesday for a Mount Prospect man charged with DUI, who goes by several different names. Lorenzo Gomez, of the 600 block of W. Dempster St., was arrested about 4:30 a.m. Monday, prosecutors said.

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    Members of the Elgin High School graduating Class of 1944 will celebrate their 70th reunion Aug. 16. This picture of some class members was taken in 1984 for the 40th reunion celebration.

    Elgin High Class of ‘44 celebrates 70th reunion

    After World War II, the surviving members of the 356-member Elgin High School graduating class of 1944 have stayed in touch through reunions every five years. “At our age that’s pretty good,” said Al Mink, 88, of Elgin, who served two years with the Air Force during the war. The class of 1944 will celebrate its 70th reunion from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 16 at Hickory...

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    Fox Valley police reports
    Fox blotter

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    Jennifer Widerstrom, right, of Lisle, will replace longtime trainer Jillian Michaels on the upcoming season of NBC’s “The Biggest Loser.” She’ll join new trainer Jessie Pavelka, right, and Dolvett Quince, not pictured.

    Lisle native to replace Jillian Michaels on ‘Biggest Loser’

    Former American Gladiator, health trainer and Lisle native Jennifer Widerstrom will replace longtime trainer Jillian Michaels on the upcoming season of NBC’s “The Biggest Loser.” Widerstrom, a former Naperville North High School gymnast, will help the show’s obese contestants shed weight and reclaim their health when the show’s 16th season debuts Sept. 11.

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    Kane Co. to oppose gambling expansion

    Kane County will earmark all future video gaming profits for capital projects. It's a revenue source expected to total $65,000 this year. And, in move to perhaps protect that revenue, the county board will likely pass a resolution opposing casino gambling expansion in Illinois.

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    Inocencio Hernandez-Reyes

    20 years prison for Aurora man who assaulted 2 children

    A 40-year-old Aurora man was sentenced Wednesday to 20 years in prison for sexually assaulting two children he knew. Inocencio Hernandez-Reyes, of the 600 block of East Galena Blvd., pleaded guilty to two counts of criminal sexual assault in exchange for Kane County prosecutors dismissing more than two dozen other sex charges.

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    Schaumburg man gets probation for molesting girl

    A 23-year-old Schaumburg man pleaded guilty to molesting a 10-year-old several years ago. In exchange for Jorge Martinez Jr.'s guilty plea to aggravated criminal sexual abuse, a judge sentenced him to two years probation and ordered him to play $2,829 in fines, court records show.

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    Demetrice Tompkins

    Chicago man seeks new trial in Lombard stabbing case

    A Chicago man found guilty last month of severely beating and stabbing the mother of his two young children wants a new trial. In court records, Senior Assistant Public Defender Kyle Rubeck said he believes the court erred more than a dozen times during the trial of Demetrice Tompkins by overruling numerous objections and allowing photos of a bloody footprint, never proven to belong to Tompkins,...

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    Floods left town homes in Bartlett’s Hearthwood Farms inundated with water in 2008. The village plans to begin a long-awaited project this fall to alleviate flooding in the subdivision.

    Bartlett wrapping up designs for flood-control project

    Bartlett officials are preparing for a long-awaited project this fall to address flooding on the village's northeast side. An engineering firm is wrapping up designs for a $5.1 million plan funded in large part by a federal grant. Construction could begin as early as November and wrap up a year later, officials say.

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    Elgin Community College earned first place in the recent “Be a Hero” organ/tissue donor campaign.

    ECC wins first place for organ donor campaign

    Illinois Secretary of State Jesse White recently honored the winners of his 'Be a Hero" Organ/Tissue Donor Campaign, which provided students at state community colleges the opportunity to create their own campaigns and earn community service hours while promoting the Organ/Tissue Donor Registry.

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    Mark Link of Uncle Bub's is looking forward to selling about 5,000 pounds of ribs in four days during the 27th annual Naperville Exchange Club Ribfest at Knoch Park.

    8 questions with longtime ribber Uncle Bub

    How many pounds of meat does the average ribber sell at Ribfest in Naperville? What's the secret to creating "award-winning BBQ"? Mark Link, owner of Uncle Bub's in Westmont, answers these and six other questions in advance of the 27th annual festival. "We're doing something a little different this year," Link said.

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    Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn, left, is running for re-election against Republican Bruce Rauner.

    Quinn wins backing from teachers whose pensions he cut

    Months after Gov. Pat Quinn signed a controversial plan to cut its members’ retirement benefits, the state’s largest teachers union is backing him for re-election. The Illinois Education Association today announced their pick over Republican Bruce Rauner, a Winnetka businessman.

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    Juliet Tassi and Sarah Zimmerman help post a welcome sign Wednesday inviting visitors into Knoch Park for the 27th annual Ribfest in Naperville. The festival runs from noon to 10 p.m. Thursday through Sunday.

    Countdown to Ribfest concluding in Naperville

    Rib vendors rolled into town Tuesday. Ribs were delivered Wednesday morning. And the countdown is on. The 27th annual Ribfest in Naperville opens at noon Thursday in Knoch Park at Martin Avenue and West Street and runs from noon to 10 p.m. until Sunday. So ribbers spent Wednesday "setting up the grills and getting everything running," Ribfest spokesman Don Emery said.

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    Elburn officials have ordered Asian Spa Massage to stop offering massages, until its employees can provide proof they have the required state licenses as massage therapists.

    Elburn spa told to stop massages until workers are licensed

    An Elburn business has been ordered to stop offering massages until its employees can provide proof they have been licensed by the state as massage therapists. Asian Massage and BodyWorks, 151 E. Route 38, had a business license to operate as a tanning salon and beauty parlor. But village officials have received complaints from people who suspect it is offering sexually oriented massages.

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    Jose Rebollar

    Text messages should result in new trial for Round Lake man in fatal shooting, attorney says

    The attorney for a Round Lake man found guilty in the murder of a Zion teen claims text messages sent from the victim’s girlfriend could potentially result in a new trial. Attorney Robert Ritacca said he will present new witnesses at a July 30 hearing for Jose Rebollar, 26, that could prove co-defendant Jose Garcia acted alone in the murder of Gabriel Gonzalez, 18, outside of a Round Lake...

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    Dist. 300 ensemble books parade gig

    The Dundee Middle School Street Ensemble in which kids learn music by beating garbage cans, paint buckets, metal chairs, pots and pans and the like, has booked a parade gig at Sleepy Hollow’s Fourth of July Celebration. The parade steps off at 11:30 a.m. What’s special about the ensemble is it's open to any student, regardless of musical ability or knowledge, according to an email...

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    Wauconda hires consultant for finance director search

    Wauconda trustees have hired a suburban firm to help them find a new finance director. The village has been without a money manager for nearly a year. Finding a new finance director is “incredibly important,” Trustee Chuck Black said.

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    Three held in Vernon Hills home, vehicle burglaries, police say

    Vernon Hills police say three people have been taken into custody in connection with several home and vehicle burlgaries reported last week. The identities have been withheld pending charges, police said.

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    Daily life in Tibet, an autonomous region of China. Tibetans can thank an extinct human relative for providing a gene that helps them adapt to the high altitude, according to a study released Wednesday.

    Ancient gene aids Tibetans with high altitude

    Tibetans living on the “roof of the world” can thank an extinct human relative for providing a gene that helps them adapt to the high altitude, a study suggests. Past research has concluded that a particular gene helps people live in the thin air of the Tibetan plateau. Now scientists report that the Tibetan version of that gene is found in DNA from Denisovans, a poorly understood...

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    Awards and flowers were presented to Maryville employees for working toward their master’s degree at awards night at Maryville’s Des Plaines campus.

    Maryville recognizes the special talents of its students

    Excitement was in the air last month at Maryville Academy in Des Plaines, as officials held their annual awards banquet for students from Maryville’s campuses in Bartlett, Des Plaines and Chicago. “We strive to recognize the achievements of our children — and celebrate their strengths,” said Sister Catherine Ryan, executive director of Maryville.

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    Alex Morris, left, congratulates Grace Lube, who won the girls 10 and younger age division in Alex’s 5K RAGE, a race that raised nearly $9,000 for the Celiac Foundation. Alex, who planned the race, and Grace both have Celiac disease and must eat a gluten-free diet.

    Naperville 12-year-old’s race raises $9,000 for Celiac Foundation

    Alex Morris wore bib No. 001 and finished in first place among women in a new 5K race this summer — one the Naperville 12-year-old planned herself that raised nearly $9,000 for the Celiac Foundation. “We had a lot of people there and we raised a lot of money,” Alex said. “It was just a really good day. It was a really nice day for running.”

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    Jose M. Becerra

    Man gets probation for role in Aurora teen’s murder

    The second of three people charged in the 2013 murder of an Aurora teen pleaded guilty to reduced charges and was sentenced to 18 months probation. Jose M. Becerra, 22, of Oswego, pleaded guilty to attempted obstruction of justice in the death of Abigial Villalpando, 18. Juan Garnica, 20, was sentenced to 30 years last month for her murder.

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    Serena's Song is specially designed for riders with physical or mental disabilities who otherwise can't navigate baskets that are often cramped or lack doors. Special-needs children and adults may reserve a ride in Serena's Song by contacting SEASPAR at seaspar.org or (630) 960-7600 for a registration form.

    Serena's Song carries special-needs riders to new heights

    Amid the rocket ship and parrot balloons that will float over Lisle's Eyes to the Skies festival this holiday weekend, none will make more of an impact than the round, blue balloon with a handicap symbol and a small, simple heart. This is Serena's Song, the country's first wheelchair-accessible hot air balloon.

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    Lisle Eyes to the Skies: Festival by the numbers

    Some numbers you can use to dazzle your friends at Eyes to the Skies.

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    Dave Reinuke will be one of many balloonists demonstrating his craft at this year’s Eyes to the Skies festival in Lisle.

    6 questions with balloonist Dave Reineke

    Eyes to the Skies veteran Dave Reinuke discusses his passion and history with hot air balloons.

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    Barbecue ribs will be available from 12 vendors during the 27th annual Ribfest from July 3 to 6 at Knoch Park in Naperville.

    17 facts about the food at Naperville's Ribfest

    Going to Naperville's Ribfest for the food? There's plenty to choose from as 12 ribbers and 18 other food vendors will set up shop in Knoch Park offering barbecue, Mexican food, gyros, pizza and plenty more.

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    Doctors: 12-year-old Wis. stabbing suspect incompetent to stand trial

    Doctors have found one of two 12-year-old girls accused of stabbing a classmate to please a fictional online horror character mentally incompetent to stand trial, attorneys said Wednesday. The doctors’ reports have not been made public, but the girl’s defense attorney, Anthony Cotton, said a doctor for the state of Wisconsin and a doctor hired by her defense agree that she is not...

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    Geneva-based Sergio's Cantina will serve Mexican food for the first time during the 27th annual Ribfest in Naperville, which runs July 3 to 6 at Knoch Park.

    Mexican food at Ribfest? 9 questions with Sergio's Cantina

    Ribfest in Naperville will welcome a Mexican food vendor for the first time this year as Sergio's Cantina sells tacos, tostadas, homemade chips and salsa and even fried ice cream with churros. So what is a Mexican restaurant from Geneva doing at a Naperville festival for ribs? Owner Lindsey De Los Santos tells us.

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    Oscar Pistorius does not display the narcissism associated with men in abusive relationships and linked to “rage-type” murders, according to a psychologist’s report read Wednesday at the athlete’s murder trial.

    Pistorius is not a narcissist, psychologist says

    Oscar Pistorius does not display the narcissism associated with men in abusive relationships and linked to “rage-type” murders, according to a psychologist’s report read Wednesday at the athlete’s murder trial. The report adds to conflicting evidence about the character of the double-amputee runner, who killed girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp by firing his pistol through a...

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    A Delta 2 rocket with the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 satellite launches at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., Wednesday morning, July 2, 2014. The goal of the $468 million mission, designed to last at least two years, is to study the processes behind how the environment absorbs carbon dioxide.

    NASA launches satellite to study carbon dioxide in atmosphere

    A rocket carrying a NASA satellite lit up the pre-dawn skies Wednesday on a mission to track atmospheric carbon dioxide, the chief culprit behind global warming. The Delta 2 rocket blasted off from California at 2:56 a.m. and released the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 satellite in low-Earth orbit 56 minutes later, bringing relief to mission officials who lost a similar spacecraft five years ago.

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    Former Illinois Gov. George Ryan

    Ex-Gov. Ryan ends post-prison supervision
    Former Illinois Gov. George Ryan has finished a year of supervision following his release from home confinement last summer after a prison sentence for corruption convictions. Ryan was released from prison in January 2013 and was confined at home until last July. At the time his lawyer and friend former Gov. Jim Thompson said Ryan was subject to another year of supervision and some travel...

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    FBI report analyzes Wisconsin heroin problem

    Wisconsin’s heroin problem continues to grow because traffickers have figured out how to meet the demand for a cheaper alternative to prescription drugs with an inexpensive but highly pure product, the FBI said Tuesday. Law enforcement officials have seen a spike in heroin usage since about 2008, but the actual scope of the problem is hard to quantify because of differences in how usage is...

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    Haruko Obokata, the lead author of a widely heralded stem-cell research paper by the Japanese government-funded laboratory Riken Center for Development Biology. The scientists who reported in January that they’d found a startlingly simple way to make stem cells have withdrawn that claim, following accusations of falsified data.

    Scientists withdraw claim about making stem cells

    Scientists who reported that they’d found a startlingly simple way to make stem cells withdrew that claim Wednesday, admitting to “extensive” errors in the research. In two papers published in January in the journal Nature, the researchers said that they’d been able to transform ordinary mouse cells into versatile stem cells by exposing them to a mildly acidic...

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    Indiana woman sentenced for throwing infant

    A northeastern Indiana woman has been sentenced to six years in prison after pleading guilty to throwing her infant daughter against a wall because the child wouldn’t stop crying. An Allen County judge sentenced 28-year-old Ashley A. Strong to 10 years in prison on Tuesday, but ordered that four years be served on probation. Strong had pleaded guilty to felony battery and neglect of a...

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    Kelseyville firefighters prepare to pull back from the fire outside Middletown, Calif., at the border between Lake and Napa counties.

    Crews battling 2,700-acre wildfire in California

    Crews have worked through the night to build containment lines around a wildfire in rural Northern California that has burned more than 4 square miles, damaged five structures and prompted mandatory evacuations.

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    Water leak forces flight to return to Los Angeles

    LOS ANGELES — Qantas Airways says a water leak aboard a flight bound for Australia has forced the plane to return to Los Angeles.The company says in a statement that the flight bound for Melbourne on Tuesday night returned to Los Angeles International Airport about an hour after takeoff.

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    8-year-old Urbana boy shot in head

    Authorities say an 8-year-old Urbana boy is expected to survive after he was shot in the head, allegedly by a 15-year-old relative. The News Gazette in Champaign reports that Urbana police say the boy underwent surgery after Tuesday night’s shooting. They did not immediately know his condition.

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    3-year-old central Illinois boy electrocuted
    The Lee County Sheriff says a 3-year-old boy was accidentally electrocuted in the small town of Amboy.7 Lee County Sheriff John Varga says Landyn Gerald Keener was pronounced dead Monday morning. The sheriff says the boy was leaving a trailer on his parents’ property when the accident happened.

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    Storm clouds hang over the downtown Chicago skyline Monday. The National Weather Service is now reporting five tornadoes touched down in Illinois during a storm that dumped heavy rain as it swept across the state.

    5 tornadoes hit Illinois Monday, weather service says

    The National Weather Service is now reporting five tornadoes touched down in Illinois during a storm that dumped heavy rain as it swept across the state. The weather service confirmed a tornado touched down in Plainfield, causing some damage.

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    Don’t act on impulse when emotionally drained

    When emotionally challenged, we’re more apt to submit to devil’s temptations. Annettee Budzban says remember to "HALT."

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    Chicago police: Shootings up, homicides down

    The number of homicides in Chicago fell during the first half of the year compared with the same period last year, but the total number of people shot and the number of shooting incidents climbed, according to statistics released Tuesday by the police department. The statistics offer a snapshot of what is happening in a city that has been the subject of widespread media attention since 2012 when...

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    State land purchase expands popular hunt area

    A state-funded land purchase has expanded a popular hunting area in northwestern Illinois. Sauk Valley Media reports 275 acres are being added to the Big Bend State Fish & Wildlife Area. It’s in Whiteside County near Prophetstown along the Rock River.

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    Illinois couple accused of robbing credit union
    southwestern Illinois couple recently imprisoned on burglary convictions are accused of robbing a credit union more than a year ago.. A federal grand jury has indicted 45-year-old Steve Dodson and 43-year-old Denise Dodson on charges of bank robbery and conspiracy to commit bank robbery. A judge ordered the Collinsville couple jailed without bond.

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    Chicago police seize more than 3,200 firearms

    Chicago police officers seized more than 3,200 firearms during the first half of the year.Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy made the announcement Tuesday. He says the number shows the need for “stronger laws to keep illegal guns off” the city’s streets and “to punish the dangerous criminals carrying them.”

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    President Barack Obama nominates former Procter & Gamble executive Robert McDonald as the next Veterans Affairs secretary as he makes a statement to reporters at the Department of Veterans Affairs in Washington, Monday, June 30, 2014.

    New VA secretary nominee not a health care expert

    A onetime Army Ranger and former CEO of a Fortune 500 consumer products company, Robert McDonald may face his toughest challenge yet in fixing the huge, scandal-plagued Veterans Affairs Department. Veterans groups worry that the former Arlington Heights resident may have trouble adjusting to a far-flung bureaucracy of more than 300,000 employees. “Procter & Gamble is going to feel like a...

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    Associated Press Gridlock in Washington will lead to gridlock across the country if lawmakers can’t quickly agree on how to pay for transportation programs, Obama administration officials warn. States will begin to feel the pain of cutbacks within weeks ­— peak summer driving time.

    Dead ahead: A pothole in highway construction aid?

    As the summer driving season swings into full gear, states can expect a large pothole in their construction budgets if Congress doesn’t reach an agreement quickly on how to pay for federal highway and transit programs, President Barack Obama and his top officials are warning. States will begin to feel the pain of cutbacks in federal aid as soon as the first week in August if lawmakers...

  •  
    Mitt Romney insists he’s not running for president a third time, but he is campaigning again in New Hampshire. The former Republican presidential nominee is set to endorse Senate candidate Scott Brown on July 2, 2014, in New Hampshire.

    Politics brings Romney back to New Hampshire

    He insists he’s not running for president a third time, but Mitt Romney is campaigning again in New Hampshire. The former Republican presidential nominee is set to endorse Senate candidate Scott Brown on Wednesday, campaigning publicly in New Hampshire for the first time since the early hours of Election Day 2012 as he continues a larger effort to re-emerge as a force in Republican...

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    DNA testing is taking a bite out of the Bigfoot legend. After scientists analyzed more than 30 hair samples reportedly left behind by Bigfoot and other related beasts like Yeti and almasty, they found all of them came from more mundane animals like bears, wolves, cows and raccoons.

    Bigfoot hair samples mostly from bears, wolves

    DNA testing is taking a bite out of the Bigfoot legend. After scientists analyzed more than 30 hair samples reportedly left behind by Bigfoot and similar mythical beasts like the Himalayan Yeti, they found all of them came from more mundane creatures like bears, wolves, cows and raccoons.

  •  
    A black flag used by the al-Qaida inspired lslamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) waves from a damaged police station in the northern city of Mosul, Iraq, Tuesday, July 1, 2014.

    Iraqi leader says Islamic state threatens region

    An extremist group’s declaration of an Islamic state in territory it has seized in Iraq and Syria poses a threat to the entire region, Iraq’s prime minister warned Wednesday, saying that “no one in Iraq or any neighboring country will be safe from these plans.” The Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant announced this week that it has unilaterally established a caliphate...

  •  
    Gilberto Francisco Ramos Juarez

    Chicago-bound boy’s death highlights danger of border
    The body of Gilberto Francisco Ramos Juarez was found with a rosary around his neck and a brother’s Chicago phone number scribbled on the inside of his belt buckle about two weeks ago. He was alone in brush less than a mile from the nearest U.S. home, a South Texas sheriff said Monday. He had apparently gotten lost on his way north and likely died from the elements. An autopsy did not...

  •  
    Air travelers wheeling their luggage toward Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport Tuesday after sudden rains flooded the Kennedy Expressway Desperate travelers were forced to get out of taxis and haul their luggage the rest of the way to the airport.

    O'Hare bound business, vacation travelers stranded

    A massive traffic backup caused by standing water on the expressway into Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport prompted desperate business and vacation travelers to get out of cars and walk along the roadway, with their luggage in tow. Flooding closed Interstate 190 to one lane about a mile from the domestic terminals on Tuesday after heavy rains hit the area overnight. O’Hare...

  •  

    Lake Street closed in Addison after police chase ends in crash

    Addison Police are investigating a crash and a man fleeing the scene on Lake Street between Lombard Road and Central Court.

  •  
    The Johnson and Dumele families of Cary and the Barnum family of Barrington camp out listening to music while they wait for the fireworks at Cary’s Summer Celebration in Lions Park — which is always held on July 3.

    Yes to fireworks, but not on the Fourth

    Not every town has its fireworks show on the Fourth of July. Take Fox River Grove, which always has its show on the Saturday after Fourth of July weekend. “There are always so many other venues during (Fourth of July weekend), it is nice to have it later,” said village clerk Donna Brouder. “And we seem to draw more people.”

  •  
    Sue Sturm, left, and her daughter, Natalie, are happy Tuesday night after the Grayslake village board voted to allow backyard hens for single-family homes.

    Grayslake to allow backyard hens for eggs

    Grayslake residents needing a dozen eggs may not need to look farther than their backyard. Village board members Tuesday night approved a one-year pilot program allowing backyard chickens. Residents Evan Mittlestaedt, 11, and 15-year-old Natalie Sturm helped bring the chicken idea to Grayslake’s elected officials. “It’s really exciting, so we’re ready to go,” Natalie...

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    Dawn Patrol: Baby born on I-90 near Elgin; sinkhole victim in hospital

    Marengo woman gives birth on tollway. Boy still in hospital after he, his mother fall into sinkhole. Aurora Sportsmen's Club sued over contamination at Sugar Grove site. Des Plaines plans to restructure special tax district. U-46 educators to train teachers in Ghana. Police: Boy accidentally shoots brother with rifle. DuPage Forest Preserve approves early retirement program. U.S. soccer team far...

  •  
    Robert Breuder

    COD president defends push for state grant money

    College of DuPage President Robert Breuder is defending himself from charges by a government watchdog group that he's seeking state money for an unplanned building project. “For someone to say this building was fabricated at a moment's notice to be able to justify the $20 million wouldn't be aware of all that had been done before this,” he said.

  •  
    Visitors take a spin on the swing ride during opening day of Taste of Lombard on Tuesday.

    Taste of Lombard opens five-day run

    Lombard-area residents keeping a close eye on their waistlines can be excused this week if they cheat just a little on their diets. The village’s Taste of Lombard opened Tuesday night and continues through Saturday at Madison Meadow Park near Madison Street and Ahrens Avenue. Roughly 50,000 visitors are expected to sample the goodies from about 20 restaurants — along with carnival...

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    Vehicle-fee-for-roadwork idea a no-go in Sugar Grove

    Sugar Grove residents and businesses won't be paying a vehicle fee anytime soon. The village board has put off further discussion of the idea, intended to raise money for roadwork, until it starts making its 2014-15 budget early next year.

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    Bartlett weighs options on water suppliers

    Bartlett officials are taking a hard look at the future of the village's drinking water supply. Under one proposal, the town could get all of its water from Elgin's treament plant, which taps the Fox River.

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    COD commits $30 million to new classroom building

    College of DuPage trustees have committed $30 million to build a Teaching and Learning Center to provide more classroom space for students on the Glen Ellyn campus. Preliminary plans call for the center to house a large number of 35-seat general purpose classrooms, a smaller amount of 25-seat general purpose classrooms, two 50-seat general science classrooms, four 25-seat computer classrooms and...

  •  
    “It’s kind of interesting: You see black and white, right here today,” said Ernie Broadnax, right, about him and Phil Broxham working together in what was once a very segregated Elgin.

    How the Civil Rights Act changed the suburbs

    Today, on the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act, ripples of racism remain in the suburbs. The act allowed black residents to shop and dine where they wanted, apply for more jobs, and buy houses where they wanted. Some local residents look back on how the act changed the suburbs. “If you got a loan from a bank out here? Man, that was Happy New Year. They wouldn’t loan (to)...

  •  
    A protester, left, argues with American citizen Lupillo Rivera, brother of Mexican-American singer Jenni Rivera, right, as three buses carrying 140 immigrants attempt to enter the Murrieta U.S. Border Patrol station for processing Tuesday.

    California protesters block bus carrying migrants

    A flight carrying migrants from overcrowded facilities on the Texas border with Mexico arrived Tuesday in Southern California but protesters blocked immigration authorities from taking the group to a suburban Border Patrol facility for processing.

Sports

  •  
    The Lakers’ Pau Gasol, back, shares a momemt with teammate Kobe Bryant.

    No Carmelo Anthony? Bulls have options

    The Bulls are in a holding pattern with top free-agent target Carmelo Anthony, who met with Houston and Dallas on Wednesday. While they wait for a decision, this is a good time to consider what the Bulls will do if Anthony doesn't sign on. The alternate plan is not as predictable, but a few steps, including clearing cap space and signing Nikola Mirotic, seem likely.

  •  
    Candice Dupree had 26 points and 14 rebounds to lead the Phoenix Mercury to their sixth straight win, 87-69 over the Sky on Wednesday night.

    Mercury torch Sky 87-69

    Candice Dupree had 26 points and 14 rebounds to lead the Phoenix Mercury to their sixth straight win, 87-69 over the Sky on Wednesday night.

  •  
    Alexei Ramirez hits a two-run single against the Los Angeles Angels during the fourth inning of a baseball game in Chicago on Wednesday, July 2, 2014.

    Sox playing better, still have ways to go

    While the White Sox are not nearly as bad as they were last year, they've been up-and-down all season. On Wednesday night, starter John Danks and pinch-hitter Leury Garcia gave the Sox a needed lift in a 3-2 win over the Angels.

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    The Cubs’ Justin Ruggiano delivers an RBI-single in the sixth inning Wednesday against the Red Sox. Ruggiano had homered earlier in the game.

    Cubs bats explode for 16-9 Boston beatdown

    After struggling mightily for most of the season to score runs, the Cubs exploded Wednesday night at Fenway Park. They hit 4 homers and piled up 19 hits in a 16-9 victory over the Red Sox in a nine-inning game that took 4 hours and 19 minutes to play.

  •  

    Fire’s draw ‘disappointing, frustrating’

    From the point of view of Fire captain Jeff Larentowicz, not much changed for the team during its World Cup break.

  •  
    Chicago White Sox's Alexei Ramirez hits a two-run single against the Los Angeles Angels during the fourth inning of a baseball game in Chicago on Wednesday, July 2, 2014. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

    Garcia single lifts White Sox over Angels 3-2

    Leury Garcia drove in the winning run with a pinch-hit single off Michael Morin in the ninth inning to lift the White Sox to a 3-2 victory over the Los Angeles Angels on Wednesday night.The White Sox shook off a doubleheader sweep and finally took out the Angels after dropping their first five games this season and seven straight overall to them.

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    Chicago White first baseman Jose Abreu (79) celebrates his three-run home run against the Los Angeles Angels on Tuesday. Abreu earned top rookie honors for June.

    Abreu grabs AL rookie honor for June

    White Sox first baseman Jose Abreu earns American League Rookie of the Month honors for June.

  •  
    Derrick Rose leaves the United Center after the Bulls met with NBA free agent Carmelo Anthony at the facility Tuesday.

    Rose the reluctant recruiter

    All sorts of questions are swirling around Derrick Rose's participation in the Bulls' pitch to Carmelo Anthony. Did he do this or did he do that? The answer is he should have done everything possible.

  •  

    Perch opportunity beckons on the lakefront

    Perch fishing is a good bet along the Lake Michigan shoreline in July.

  •  
    This smallmouth bass was recently caught in the Chicago River.

    Watch what you eat, but enjoy the urban fishery

    The Chicago River certainly has pollution problems, but there's no doubt that some more desirable game fish are showing up in its waters.

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    United States head coach Jurgen Klinsmann addresses the press in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Wednesday, July 2, 2014. The U.S. was eliminated from the second round of the 2014 soccer World Cup in a 2-1 loss to Belgium in Salvador, Brazil. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

    Klinsmann was right: U.S. not ready to win World Cup

    Turns out Jurgen Klinsmann was right: The United States isn’t ready to win the World Cup.The Americans were eliminated in the round of 16 for the second straight tournament. They’ve been ranked 13th or 14th every month since September, which means their exit was pretty much at the stage it’s expected to be.“Clearly it gives you the message you have a lot of work still ahead of you,” the U.S. coach said Wednesday, a day after the 2-1 loss to Belgium in extra time.

  •  
    FILE - In this May 27, 2013 file photo, Memphis Grizzlies coach Lionel Hollins gestures during the first half in Game 4 of the Western Conference finals NBA basketball playoff series against the San Antonio Spurs, in Memphis, Tenn. The Brooklyn Nets say they have reached an agreement in principle with Hollins to become their coach, moving quickly after the departure of Jason Kidd. The deal with the former Grizzlies coach comes just two days after they made a trade with Milwaukee to allow Kidd out of his contract so the Bucks could hire him. The Nets then met with Hollins on Monday night and again Tuesday before agreeing to the deal on Wednesday, July 2, 2014. (AP Photo/Danny Johnston, File)

    Nets reach agreement with Hollins to become coach

    The Brooklyn Nets reached an agreement in principle Wednesday with Lionel Hollins to become their coach, moving quickly after the departure of Jason Kidd.The deal with the former Memphis Grizzlies coach comes two days after the Nets made a trade with Milwaukee to allow Kidd out of his contract so the Bucks could hire him.

  •  
    Andy Murray reacts Wednesday after missing a point against Grigor Dimitrov during their men’s quarterfinal match at Wimbledon.

    Defending champion Andy Murray loses at Wimbledon

    The silence at Centre Court made abundantly clear that Andy Murray's time as Wimbledon champion was coming to a close. Out of sorts from the start of his quarterfinal against up-and-coming Grigor Dimitrov on Wednesday, Murray — who in 2013 ended Britain's 77-year wait for one of its own to win the men's title at the All England Club — sailed an awkward backhand slice long to fall behind by a set and a break.

  •  
    Cubs icon Ernie Banks graces the cover of this week’s Sports Illustrated magazine for its ‘Where Are They Now?’ issue.

    Mr. Cub lands on Sports Illustrated’s cover

    Mr. Cub, Ernie Banks, made the cover of Sports Illustrated’s annual ‘Where Are They Now?’ issue, which comes out this week.

  •  

    Kristufek’s Arlington selections for July 3

    Joe Kristufek's selections for July 3 racing at Arlington International.

  •  

    Mike North video: Doug McDermott a plus for Bulls
    New Bulls player Doug McDermott is a great addition as a scorer, and Mike North believes McDermott will improve on defense because that can be learned.

Business

  •  
    A job-seeker meets a possible employer at a job fair in Rolling Meadows in May 2013. Even though economists declared the recession over in June 2009, Illinois is still down 184,000 jobs from pre-recession levels.

    Illinois among 32 states still short on jobs

    Five years after the Great Recession officially ended, most states still haven't regained all the jobs they lost, even though the nation as a whole has.In May, the overall economy finally recovered all 9 million jobs that vanished in the worst downturn since the 1930s. Another 288,000 jobs were added in June. But Illinois is still down 184,000 jobs from pre-recession levels.

  •  
    Sheryl Sandberg, chief operating officer of Facebook, speaks at an event organized by the Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry in New Delhi on Wednesday. She apologized on behalf of Facebook Tuesday after it was learned the social network had manipulated the news feeds of about 700,000 randomly selected users to study the impact of “emotional contagion,”

    UK opens probe into Facebook’s psych experiment

    British regulators are investigating revelations that Facebook treated hordes of its users like laboratory rats in an experiment probing into their emotions. The Information Commissioner’s Office said Wednesday that it wants to learn more about the circumstances underlying a 2-year-old study carried out by two U.S. universities and the world’s largest social network.

  •  
    ASSOCIATED PRESS Target, the second-largest U.S. discount retailer, said in a statement on its website Wednesday that while it will follow local laws, it will “respectfully request” guests not bring guns into stores to maintain a “safe and inviting” atmosphere.

    Target asks customers to leave firearms at home

    Target is “respectfully” asking its customers to not bring firearms into its stores, even where it is allowed by law. In a statement posted Wednesday on the retailer’s corporate blog, interim CEO John Mulligan said that Target wants a “safe and inviting” atmosphere for its shoppers and employees.

  •  
    A board at the New York Stock Exchange shows the closing number for the Dow Jones industrial average Wednesday. Stocks held at record levels Wednesday following a report that business hiring surged in June.

    Stocks close at all-time highs as hiring surges

    Stocks closed at their latest all-time highs Wednesday following news that business hiring surged in June, adding to evidence that the U.S. economy is picking up momentum.

  •  

    Tyson moving forward with Hillshire deal

    Tyson Foods Inc. has signed a definitive deal to purchase Chicago-based Hillshire Brands Co. for $7.75 billion, two days after the maker of Jimmy Dean sausages and Ball Park hot dogs was let out of its agreement to buy Pinnacle Foods.

  •  
    The exterior of a proposed new $223 Million LINQ Hotel & Casino, the latest addition to its portfolio of Las Vegas resorts. An aging Las Vegas Strip resort is getting a $223 million upgrade to match the hip new dining and entertainment district next door.

    2 hotels get overhauls in sign of Sin City upswing

    wo major Las Vegas resorts will be completely overhauled and rebranded in another sign that the entertainment capital is emerging from its recession doldrums. Caesars Entertainment announced Tuesday that it’s investing $223 million to overhaul The Quad, an aging 2,256-room hotel on the Las Vegas Strip, and will rename it the LINQ Hotel & Casino effective Oct. 30. In a separate announcement, timeshare company Westgate Resorts said it had purchased the LVH, a hard-hit property that was formerly known as the Las Vegas Hilton and hosted more than 800 Elvis Presley concerts during its heyday in the 1970s.

  •  
    U.S. auto sales grew at the fastest pace in eight years in June, surprising the industry and setting it up for a strong second half of the year.

    U.S. auto sales grew at the fastest pace in eight years in June

    U.S. auto sales grew at the fastest pace in eight years in June, surprising the industry and setting it up for a strong second half of the year. Sales rose 1.2 percent over last June to 1.4 million cars and trucks, according to Autodata Corp. GM, Toyota, Hyundai and Nissan all saw increases over last June. Honda sales were flat, while sales at Ford and Volkswagen were down.

  •  

    Survey: U.S. companies added 281,000 jobs in June

    A private survey shows U.S. business hiring surged in June, a sign of stronger economic growth. Payroll processer ADP says private employers added 281,000 jobs last month, up from 179,000 in the previous month.

  •  
    The long-idle Antioch Corporate Center will see activity beginning this summer with the planned construction of a 454,276-square-foot office/warehouse/distribution center.

    Antioch hails $25 million business park investment

    It has been ready for six years with no takers but activity is soon expected at the long-idled Antioch Corporate Center on Route 173. Owner IDI Gazeley plans to make a $25 million investment with a 454,276-square-foot speculative building. “It's a pretty big deal,” said Dustin Nilsen, Antioch's director of community development.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Dan Rich, of Elgin, hugs Food Editor Deborah Pankey after winning the 2013 Daily Herald Cook of the Week Challenge.

    Get your recipes ready: Enter the 2014 Cook of the Week Challenge now

    The Daily Herald is opening up the entry window for the annual Cook of the Week Challenge. Now in its fourth year, the elmination-style contest seeks 16 home cooks to participate in this year's secret-ingredient cooking challenges. After two rounds of match-ups, four finalists will compete in a live cook-off Oct. 29 in Schaumburg.

  •  
    Alt-pop band the Gin Blossoms will be among the headliners Friday, July 4, at Frontier Days in Arlington Heights.

    Music notes: Gin Blossoms, Blue Oyster Cult play weekend fests

    The July 4 weekend is always jam-packed with live music here in the suburbs. Among the bigger acts making an appearance will be blues-rock guitar hero George Thorogood in Naperville and alt-pop band the Gin Blossoms in Arlington Heights.

  •  
    Butler (Joel McHale), left, and Sarchie (Eric Bana) confront something strange at the zoo.

    'Evil' delivers strong cast, scary moments

    “Deliver Us From Evil” offers some scary scenes of mounting dread, but they're diminished by animals and bloody humans suddenly popping into view for cheap theatrics. Instead of creating a standard horror tale with a detective subplot, director/co-writer Scott Derrickson uses Ralph Sarchie's non-fiction book “Beware the Night” as the basis to tell a detective mystery with a demonic subplot.

  •  
    George Thorogood and his backup band The Destroyers will return to the main stage at Naperville's Ribfest on Sunday night. He'll headline a lineup that also features Foghat and Blue Öyster Cult.

    When suburbs compete for acts, music fans win

    Not so long ago, suburban festivalgoers were content to sit back on their blankets or lawn chairs and watch a local cover band, a has-been one-hit wonder or some high schoolers in the town's battle of the bands. No more. As the suburbs — and the number of festivals — have grown, so have the expectations for big names, still relevant artists and star-quality performances.

  •  
    Paul Mazursky, the writer-director of such films as “Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice” and “An Unmarried Woman,” died of pulmonary cardiac arrest Monday, June 30, 2014, at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. He was 84.

    Oscar-nominated writer-director Mazursky dies

    Paul Mazursky, the innovative and versatile director who showed the absurdity of modern life in such movies as “Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice” and “An Unmarried Woman,” has died. He was 84. Later in life, Mazursky acted in such TV series as “The Sopranos” and “Curb Your Enthusiasm.”

  •  
    Actor Shia LaBeouf, shown leaving Midtown Community Court after being arrested the previous day for yelling obscenities at the Broadway show “Cabaret,” Friday in New York, is now being treated for alcoholism.

    Publicist: Shia LaBeouf being treated for alcoholism

    A publicist says Shia LaBeouf is being treated for alcoholism. Melissa Kates said Tuesday the 28-year-old actor has not checked into a rehab facility but is receiving voluntary treatment for alcohol addiction.

  •  
    Two lost souls, Mark Ruffalo and Keira Knightley, come together to make music in “Begin Again.”

    Music powers rebirth in 'Begin Again'

    Filmmaker John Carney's latest film, “Begin Again,” which opens Wednesday, is a love letter to the transformative power of music — the way it can chart our lives and provide solace for trying times. It's an earnest reminder of the simple majesty of music, even in the disposable age of iTunes. The original title was “Can a Song Save Your Life?” and there's no doubt as to the film's answer. It's a follow-up of sorts to Carney's 2006 Oscar-winning indie sensation “Once.”

  •  
    President Kennedy approaches a helicopter at the family home in Hyannis Port, Mass., for the first leg of his journey back to Washington in August 1963. Accompanying him are Sydney Lawford, left, John F. Kennedy Jr., Caroline Kennedy, the President, Secret Service Agent Sam Sulliman, David Kennedy, and Agents Jerry Behn and Tom Wells. The JFK library opened a special exhibit Friday featuring some never-before displayed artifacts from the Kennedy family’s summers on Cape Cod.

    JFK Library spotlights family’s summers on Cape

    Never-before-displayed artifacts from the Kennedy family’s summers on Cape Cod are now on display at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in Boston. The library, located next to the University of Massachusetts-Boston campus, opened a special exhibit Friday featuring the golf cart Kennedy used to get around the family’s Hyannis Port compound, among other items the museum has not previously showcased.

  •  
    Art pieces by Jeff Koons are on display in “Jeff Koons: A Retrospective” at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York.

    Jeff Koons’ whimsy takes over NYC museum

    Jeff Koons has taken over the Whitney Museum of American Art. The contemporary artist’s oversized toy-like sculptures and other works spanning a three-decade career now fill nearly the entire museum, in an exhibit that runs through Oct. 19. Some pieces were completed just days before the opening, including a 10-foot-high sculpture called “Play-Doh.”

  •  
    With colonial-inspired spirits like, Cristina Jerez Xeres Sherry, from left, The Muse Angry Orchard “gluten free” carbonated apple wine, Appleton Estate Reserve Jamaica Rum and Blandy’s Special Dry Madeira at your Fourth of July gathering you can drink like the founding fathers.

    Toast our founding fathers in true colonial fashion

    You know George Washington and John Hancock as founding fathers. But what about George Washington, successful whiskey distiller? Or John Hancock, fortified wine importer? Turns out some of that patriot spirit came in bottles.

  •  
    Colt Ford lets listeners know about all the fun he’s having on “Thanks for Listening.”

    Country rapper Colt Ford brings the party

    Country music’s pre-eminent singer/rapper Colt Ford is out with his fifth studio album, “Thanks for Listening,” a release thick with featured vocals from other artists and a keen ear toward the caricature of the country lifestyle. This is mostly good old boy territory, with an occasional hip-hop backing beat thrown in for good measure.

Discuss

  •  

    Editorial: O’Hare noise complaints deserve action

    A Daily Herald editorial says new studies and hearings on noise issues are called for now that a new runway and new flight pattern rules are in use at O'Hare International Airport.

  •  

    Believe your own eyes, not the deniers

    Columnist Richard Cohen: A friend of mine worked for a small-town newspaper years ago and had to write the weather report. The county fair was approaching but the prediction was for rain. So the editors, fearing the wrath of local merchants, ordered my friend to change “rainy” to “sunny.” That was the newspaper’s policy. It has since been adopted by much of the Republican Party.

  •  

    Guest View full of inaccuracies
    A Pingree Grove letter to the editor: I hope the Daily Herald charged advertising rates for Mr. Lance Izumi’s Guest View published June 25. It is nothing more than a school privatization scam from an executive of the Pacific Research Institute. PRI has direct and indirect ties to ALEC and the Koch Brothers. They are funded by the Kochs, directly and through other foundations.

  •  

    The British example on health care
    A Wheaton letter to the editor: The British health care system, which is the most socialized and least privatized and which has been much maligned by American conservatives, has been delivering the world’s best health care as reported recently by the American Medical Association, whereas our health care system ranks last (on both quality and access) among the top 11 industrialized nations.

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