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Daily Archive : Friday April 18, 2014

News

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    Brittany Smith

    Send your child to Faith Christian Academy volleyball, basketball camps

    If your child is new to basketball or volleyball or wants to take their skills to the next level, Faith Christian Academy's summer volleyball and basketball camps are ready to help them learn and grow in an exciting and encouraging environment.

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    Tyrell L. Frazier

    Seven Northwest suburbs investigating trio in connection with wallet thefts

    Des Plaines police have charged a Chicago man with theft of a wallet from a purse in a restaurant. The man and two people who were picked up with him also are under investigation in connection with similar thefts in seven other Northwest suburbs, police said in a news release.

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    Magnitude-7.5 earthquake shakes Mexican capital

    A powerful magnitude-7.2 earthquake shook central and southern Mexico on Friday, sending panicked people into the streets, where broken windows and debris fell, but there were no early reports of major damage or casualties. The U.S. Geological Survey said it was centered northwest of the Pacific resort of Acapulco, where many Mexicans are vacationing for the Easter holiday.

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    Rubin Callajo, an actor playing Jesus, performs the 12th Station of the Cross to signify Jesus dying on the cross during a re-enactment on Good Friday at Mision San Juan Diego in Arlington Heights.

    Live performance of Jesus’ death staged in Arlington Hts., Palatine

    Christians for centuries have been performing the Stations of the Cross on Good Friday — the day Jesus was condemned to death and ordered to carry a cross upon which he was later crucified. For about 30 years, members of the Mision San Juan Diego and its predecessor, St. Teresita, have been performing living stations on the streets of Palatine and Arlington Heights. “The way we see...

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    A few members of Schaumburg High School’s state champion debate team pose with their state trophies and medals. From left are sophomores Jessica D’Souza and Raza Haque and junior Nathaniel Leonhardt, who was named captain of the All-State Debate Team.

    Schaumburg High School takes state debate title

    The Schaumburg High School Debate Team has captured the Illinois High School Association State Debate Title for the second time in the club’s history, with its students capturing half the top 10 positions on the All-State Debate Team. Junior Nathaniel Leonhardt missed only 10.5 points out of a possible 300 points for the best speaking record in the tournament. He was named captain of the...

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    John Abel Jr.

    Schaumburg man faces battery, hate crime charges

    A Schaumburg man whose 2012 drug charges were dropped last year following the arrest of three former undercover officers now faces battery and hate crime charges.

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    Palatine man pleads guilty to wire fraud

    A Palatine man pleaded guilty to wire fraud Wednesday in Chicago, court records show. ion exchange for his guilty plea, Karl Dinev, 45, was sentenced to four years in prison, records show.

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    Samantha Smith

    Gurnee cops want help to find missing teenage girl

    Gurnee police say they want the public’s help in locating a village teenager who’s been missing for a week. Police announced Friday that Samantha Smith, 16, was last seen about 3:15 p.m. April 11 near Warren Township High School’s freshman-sophomore O’Plaine Road campus in Gurnee.

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    The 12th Station, Jesus, portrayed by Rubin Callajo, dies on the cross during Stations of the Cross re-enacted on Good Friday by Mission San Juan Diego Catholic Church.

    Images: Good Friday Observances in the Suburbs
    Images of Good Friday observances in the suburbs of Chicago. Mission San Juan Diego in Palatine, Alleluia Lutheran Church in Naperville, and Santa Maria del Popolo in Mundelein offered dramatic presentations of the Stations of the Cross.

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    A barefoot Isidro Zuniga carried a wooden cross for more than mile through a Hanover Park neighborhood Friday.

    Hanover Park worshippers mark Good Friday with Via Crucis

    Saint Ansgar Catholic Church in Hanover Park traced the final moments of Christ's life during a solemn, outdoor procession Friday. Isidro Zuniga portrayed Jesus for the second straight year alongside more than a 1,000 onlookers. "It's all for my faith," he said.

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    U of I names presidential search committee

    University of Illinois trustees have named a 19-member search committee to look for President Robert Easter’s replacement. Easter plans to retire in June 2015.

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    Medicaid paid $12 million for dead people in Illinois

    The Illinois Medicaid program paid an estimated $12 million for medical services for people listed as deceased in other state records, according to an internal state government memo. The memo dated Friday, which The Associated Press obtained through a Freedom of Information Act request, says the state auditor compared clients enrolled in the Medicaid database last June with state death records...

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    Illinois approved for No Child Left Behind waiver

    The No Child Left Behind waiver will give the state more flexibility when it comes to setting standards for education. It also will let the state look at measures beyond test scores in determining whether schools are succeeding or failing.

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    Quinn grants 43 clemency requests

    Gov. Pat Quinn has taken action on more than 100 clemency petitions, granting 43 and denying 65.

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    Cook County issues 1,000th gay marriage license

    Cook County Clerk David Orr says he issued the county's 1,000th same-sex marriage license in downtown Chicago on Friday to a gay couple from Chicago’s Albany Park neighborhood.

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    Bond set for teen in shooting of 14-year-old

    Bond has been set at $950,000 for a Chicago teenager accused of shooting a 14-year-old after the victim denied being a street gang member.

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    University officials say pension reform had costly typo

    Illinois’ public universities have worried for months that contentious state pension reforms will push many employees to retire early. But a small mistake, essentially a typo in the legislation, is providing even stronger incentive.

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    Former informant charged with wire fraud

    A Chicago real estate developer who was a key government witness in corruption cases is facing federal charges after authorities say he stole $370,000 from South suburban Riverdale.

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    Pastor Justice Coleman, founder of Freedom Church in Highland Park, Calif., is using medical marijuana imagery and catchy word play to attract new worshippers to an Easter sermon series called “Medicated,” about seeking fulfillment through God, not drugs.

    Easter shares pot lovers’ high holiday

    Amid the online cracks about worshipping a “higher” power, tutorials on how to make a joint shaped like a cross and photos of Easter baskets piled with pot-filled eggs, a handful of churches nationwide are using the unfortunate coincidence of 4/20 to make much bigger points.

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    Naperville officer drives squad car atop rock

    Naperville police say they have launched an internal investigation into the circumstances that led a squad car to end up atop a large rock at a fast-food restaurant this week. About noon on Monday, an officer driving a squad car at a Taco Bell at 2775 Aurora Ave. accidentally drove over a curb and onto a large decorative rock, Sgt. Bill Davis said. “It looks like he may have over-steered...

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    Members of Alleluia! Lutheran Church in Naperville observe Good Friday with actors and members of the congregation going to different parts of the building to act out Jesus’ journey to the cross. In this scene, Jesus, as portrayed by Conor Hughes, carries his cross accompanied by Roman guards.

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    For Good Friday, Alleluia! Lutheran Church has a crosswalk at noon, 1:30 and 3 p.m. Participants go to different parts of the building acting out Jesus' journey to the cross.

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    All 3 Dist. 207 schools make ‘most challenging’ list

    All three Maine Township High School District 207 schools have been recognized on The Washington Post’s 2014 list of “America’s Most Challenging High Schools.” It marks the first time in the district’s history that all three schools have made one of the top high school lists at the same time.

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    Samuel E. Span

    Elgin man with violent history sentenced on cocaine charge

    An Elgin man with a history of violence -- including beating a store clerk with a pipe wrench -- was sentenced Thursday to 15 years in prison for dealing cocaine.

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    Mundelein High board meets:

    The Mundelein High School board will meet Tuesday to approve textbooks for the next school year and to consider an employee labor-union contract, among other business.

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    Grant Township budget:

    The tentative budget and appropriation ordinance for Grant Township and the Grant Township Road District for the fiscal year April 1, 2014 to March 31, 2015 is available for public viewing at the township administration building, 26725 W. Molidor Road, Ingleside.

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    Michael Madigan

    Watchdog asks for Metra-inspired reforms

    Legislative Inspector General Thomas Homer suggested lawmakers adopt the more strict practices that guide Congress when members want to help a constituent get a job. Homer called for more transparency when a lawmaker gets involved with hiring, including putting requests in writing.

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    Suicide reported in Lake County jail

    A Lake County jail inmate committed suicide early Friday, authorities said. Igor Karlukov, 36, was found hanging in his cell about 3 a.m., Undersheriff Raymond J. Rose said at a news conference.

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    Drug recycling event:

    The Lindenhurst Police Department and the Drug Enforcement Administration present the public with an opportunity to recycle dangerous, expired, unused and unwanted prescription drugs from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, April 26,

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    Semiautomatic handguns on display for purchase at Capitol City Arms Supply in Springfield, Ill.

    Authorities file objections to some concealed carry permits

    While new licenses to carry concealed firearms continue arriving in suburban mailboxes, some local law enforcement offices are objecting to permits for certain individuals. The Illinois State Police have received 1,669 objections from law enforcement agencies across the state.

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    Boy, 15, recovered from Crystal Lake pond is dead

    A 15-year-boy from Crystal Lake who jumped into a pond during a party in unincorporated McHenry County died Thursday night, authorities said. The teen was attending a party for another teen at a residence in the 6100 block of Haligus Road in Woodstock, the McHenry County Sheriff’s office said in a news release.

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    Route 21/137 work wrapping up:

    On Monday, northbound and southbound traffic on Milwaukee Avenue (Route 21), north of Route 137, will be shifted from Janas Court north to the end of the project to allow contractors to complete various work.

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    Annual arthritis walk:

    The 12th annual Walk to Cure Arthritis Lake County will be held from 8:30 a.m. to noon on Saturday, April 26, at Old School Forest Preserve on St. Mary’s Road east of Libertyville.

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    Bartlett officials have cut the salary and hours of the head of the History and Depot museums.

    Bartlett trustees cut funding for History, Depot museums

    Bartlett has slashed funding to the village's two museums in the 2014-2015 budget. Volunteers will take over some duties from a longtime director, whose salary and hours were cut. "We all believe our history museum is one of the most important ingredients to the charm of Bartlett," Mayor Kevin Wallace said. "But we also feel that every other department has been cutting back."

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    Kane Co. officials urge school closings on election days

    Kane County leaders will back pending state legislation that would encourage schools to either close or host institute days on election day. Supporters say keeping students out of the buildings when the public is voting is safer and cheaper.

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    Nikolai Anderson

    Man banned from Elmhurst park after exposing himself

    A 19-year-old Bellwood man will spend his 20th birthday behind bars after pleading guilty Friday in DuPage County to public indecency and lewd exposure. Nikolai Anderson will report to DuPage County Jail on June 1, three days before his birthday, to begin serving a 160-day sentence followed by two years of probation and a ban from Elmhurst's Pioneer Park.

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    Warrant issued for man accused of hiding camera

    A child pornography arrest warrant has been issued in Illinois for a Waukegan man now jailed in Wisconsin on accusations that he hid a video camera in a female locker room.

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    Mary, played by Mayela Correa, cries over her son, Jesus, portrayed by Miguel Angel Correa, after he is removed from the cross during a drama at Santa Maria del Popolo Catholic Church in Mundelein on Good Friday. It was the second consecutive year the husband and wife from Mundelein were in Via Crucis.

    Crowd packs Mundelein Catholic church for Spanish-language Via Crucis drama

    About 1,300 worshippers jammed Mundelein’s Santa Maria del Popolo Catholic Church for a Spanish-language drama to mark Good Friday. Common throughout Mexico, the Via Crucis — or Way of the Cross — depicted the final hours of Jesus’ life.

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    Fox Valley police reports
    Anthony J. Miller, 51, of Elgin, was charged with operating an uninsured motor vehicle, driving a vehicle with expired registration, driving while his license is suspended or revoked, and possession of cannabis (8.28 grams), at 2 a.m. Thursday at Foothill and Randall roads in Elgin, according to a sheriff’s report.

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    Prescription drug take-back boxes will be available outside Naperville’s 10 fire stations and inside the lobby of police headquarters beginning Tuesday. The boxes will accept prescription medications other than needles or syringes.

    Naperville offering 24/7 drop-boxes for unwanted prescriptions

    Communities battling the problem of heroin abuse have learned prescription drugs often are the “gateway.” Naperville soon will offer 11 prescription drug drop-boxes to increase the ease of removing unwanted or expired prescriptions before they can fall into the wrong hands. “The city wanted to offer ways for people to dispose of those drugs,” spokeswoman Linda LaCloche...

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    The public has 45 days to comment on the current draft rules for medical marijuana.

    Under medical marijuana rules, patients would pay $100 fee

    Illinois regulators crafting the first rules for the state’s new medical marijuana industry have lowered patient fees and deleted a section that had angered gun owners — changes that are going down well with the law’s supporters.

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    Kotowski to receive award from Des Plaines hospital

    Presence Holy Family Medical Center in Des Plaines will present State Sen. Dan Kotowski with its Inspire Award for exceptional community service on Tuesday, April 22, at the hospital.

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    Illinois prisons to use costly hepatitis C drug

    Illinois prison officials will be using Sovaldi, an effective but costly new drug, to treat inmates with hepatitis C. The therapy could cost tens of millions of dollars.

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    Lombard to require permits for new patios

    Anyone planning to build a new patio in Lombard will now have to acquire a permit from the village. The village board approved an amendment to the building code Thursday that requires a permit for any patio that is 100 square feet or larger. Patio permits will cost $75, which is the same price as a driveway permit. The change goes into effect April 28.

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    A Sugar Grove resident had $1,300 stolen Thursday in a telephone fraud, according to a sheriff’s report.

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    Spike in mumps cases reported across Illinois

    Public health officials are investigating a sharp increase in the number of mumps cases recorded in central Illinois. The reported cases are mostly in adults between 25 and 53.

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    David Brey

    Lake in the Hills to swear in new top cop

    Lake in the Hills village officials will be swearing in the town’s new police chief April 30. Deputy Chief David Brey was tapped to lead the department in March after the village board interviewed three internal candidates for the job. He succeeds James Wales, who is retiring after 35 years with the department. Wales' last day with the department also is April 30.

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    Portraying Jesus Christ a man takes part in a Way of the Cross procession, at the Saint Isidoro Agricola church in Palermo, Sicily.

    Images: Good Friday Around the World and Nation
    Images of Good Friday observances around the world and nation, as part of Holy Week which commemorates the last week of the earthly life of Jesus Christ. Holy Week culminates with the memory of the crucifixion on Good Friday followed by His resurrection on Easter Sunday.

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    Sunlight streams Tuesday onto the Maywood Solar Farm in Indianapolis.

    Largest solar farm on Superfund site goes online

    he Indianapolis property’s owner, Vertellus Specialties Inc., worked with the EPA, solar panel maker Hanwha Q CELLS, Indiana’s environmental agency, the local utility and other partners to develop the solar farm.

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    Warren Township High performs ‘Into the Woods’

    Warren students will perform Into the Woods April 24-26 with a matinee April 26 at the O'Plaine Auditorium.

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    Hawthorn Middle School North eighth-grade student Anmol Parande of Vernon Hills developed a trivia app called InstaQuiz.

    Want a fun way to study? Vernon Hills teen has an app for that

    Got a test coming up but want a fun way to study? Anmol Parande has got an app for that. The Vernon Hills 14-year-old has developed and released to the Apple store an application called InstaQuiz where children and adults who want to study or a quiz to challenge themselves.

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    An actor is silhouetted hanging on a cross during a performance Friday in Trafalgar Square in London. The play called ‘The Passion of Jesus’ was a free performance depicting the betrayal, capture, trial, crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus, performed by the Wintershall players.

    Five myths about Easter

    1. Jesus didn’t literally rise from the dead; 2. After the Resurrection, Jesus first appeared to Saint Peter; 3. Lent is all about sacrifice; 4. Easter eggs have nothing to do with Easter; 5. Easter is not as important as Christmas.

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    Glendale Heights offers a One-Stop Reuse and Recycle event on April 26. Residents can drop off electronics, batteries and more.

    Glendale Heights planning recycling event

    If you have unwanted, obsolete items cluttering your garage, storage and living areas, the village of Glendale Heights’ Green Team is hosting a “One-Stop, Re-use and Recycling Depot.”

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    Andy DuRoss

    District 54 adds ethics clause to superintendent's contract

    Schaumburg Township Elementary District 54 board members completed their reprimand of Superintendent Andy DuRoss Thursday following his conviction last month for aggravated driving by adding an ethics clause to his contract and reducing his severance pay if fired. DuRoss, in his first year as superintendent, was originally charged with two counts of driving under the influence early Feb. 1 in his...

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    The cashier at Wheeling High School’s lunch area serves students in August 2009.

    District 214 may drop out of National School Lunch Program

    Northwest Suburban High School District 214 may drop out of the National School Lunch Program next year due to what officials called restrictive changes in the law. “I’m sure everyone looking at this had the best of intentions,” said board President Bill Dussling, “but it falls off the edge when nobody’s going to eat it.”

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    Naperville Park District will offer kayaking this summer — as well as the traditional paddleboat rentals — in the Paddleboat Quarry along the downtown Riverwalk near Eagle Street.

    Kayaks join paddleboats at Naperville quarry

    Naperville Park District, in partnership with Naperville Kayak, will offer kayak rentals beginning May 10 at the Paddleboat Quarry along the downtown Riverwalk near Jackson Avenue and Eagle Street.

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    NCC speaker to address ‘Ghost of Emmett Till’

    One of the nation’s foremost scholars of American urban, cultural and social history will serve as a guest lecturer Wednesday, April 23, at Naperville’s North Central College.

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    The auto mall at Randall Road and Interstate 90 in Elgin only has one dealership so far.

    City: Despite Elgin auto mall foreclosure, land use still for car dealers

    A Kane County judge has ordered the developers of the auto mall off Interstate 90 and Randall Road in Elgin to repay $23.3 million owed to the bank within three days or begin selling off six outlots via public auction to help repay the debt. Randall 90 LLC was in foreclosure on the auto mall, which only has one dealership. City officials say any property sold still must be used for a car...

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    The Naperville Heritage Society will sponsor its annual wine dinner fundraiser April 28 at Sullivan’s Steakhouse in the city’s downtown.

    Fundraiser takes participants back to Roaring Twenties

    The Roaring Twenties will come to life when the Naperville Heritage Society presents its annual wine dinner fundraiser, Naper Wine & Dine, from 5:30 to 9 p.m. Monday, April 28, at Sullivan’s Steakhouse, 244 S. Main St. in downtown Naperville.

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    Naper Settlement honors dozens for volunteer service

    Naper Settlement has partnered with the White House to become a Certifying Organization for the President’s Volunteer Service Awards, a national program recognizing Americans who have demonstrated a sustained commitment to volunteer service.

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    Car fans will find plenty to keep them busy this summer when Lombard Cruise Nights returns for its 16th season in the village’s downtown.

    Lombard’s Cruise Nights returning for 16th season

    Lombard Cruise Nights will begin its 16th season, dubbed “License to Cruise,” on June 7 with its traditional Welcome Back Weekend.

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    Authorities are releasing 911 calls made after a FedEx struck slammed into a tour bus carrying high school students last week, killing 10 people. The crash is under investigation by state and federal officials who are trying to determine why the truck driver careened across an Interstate-5 median and struck the bus, leaving no tire marks to suggest he tried to brake.

    Student recounts fatal truck-bus crash in 911 call

    Most of the 911 calls from witnesses to last week’s fiery truck-bus collision that killed 10 were matter of fact. Then there was the one from a passenger: With shrieks in the background, the student struggled to recount how a truck came roaring toward them. The California Highway Patrol released the recordings Thursday as investigators returned to the scene about 100 miles north of...

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    Murder suspect Kassim Alhimidi reacts to being found guilty for the murder of his wife Shaima Alawadi, Thursday April 17, 2014. Alhimidi shook his head as the verdict was read Thursday. He was charged with murdering his 32-year-old wife, Shaima Alawadi, in El Cajon, home to one of the largest enclaves of Iraqi immigrants in the U.S.

    Court chaos: Iraqi man convicted in wife’s murder

    What began as a hate crime investigation two years ago has led to the murder conviction of an Iraqi immigrant whose wife was found badly beaten with a threatening note labeling her a terrorist. The verdict delivered Thursday against Kassim Alhimidi, who shook his head and wagged his finger as jurors were polled, spurred more of the drama that has surrounded the case from the start.

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    Clackamas County Sheriff Craig Roberts. A federal judge has ruled that Clackamas County in Oregon violated an immigrant woman’s constitutional rights by holding her in jail for two weeks at the request of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, so that the agency could investigate whether she is subject to deportation.

    Oregon ruling spurs halt on immigration detainers

    PORTLAND, Ore. — A federal judge in Oregon has found that an immigrant woman’s constitutional rights were violated when she was held in jail without probable cause at the request of U.S. immigration authorities, one of several recent federal court decisions to scrutinize the practice of keeping people in jail after they’re eligible for release so that they can be considered...

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    Opening arguments in Mustafa Kamel Mustafa’s terrorism trial began in New York on Thursday, April 17, 2014. Federal prosecutors accused Mustafa of training and aiding terrorists in the 1990s while hiding in plain sight as the leader of a London mosque, while Mustafa’s attorney told jurors his client had never harmed Americans and did not participate in any of the acts charged in the case.

    Views differ of imam accused in US terrorism case

    An Egyptian imam who led a London mosque more than a dozen years ago was portrayed in opening statements at his terrorism trial as an enthusiastic supporter of al-Qaida by a prosecutor and as a reasonable man who helped authorities in England keep people calm by his defense attorney.

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    Romualdo Alvarado, center, portrays Jesus in Via Crucis, The Way of the Cross, at the Shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe in Des Plaines.

    Moving Picture: Hoffman Estates man portrays Jesus every Good Friday

    For the past twelve years on Good Friday, tens of thousands have watched and walked with Hoffman Estates resident Romualdo Alvarado, who portrays Jesus in the final moments of his life before his crucifixion. Via Crucis, The Way of the Cross, takes place at the Shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe on the Maryville Campus in Des Plaines. “Now, I’m ready for the cross. I love the...

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    A car is removed by Kansas City police from the house, far right, of a Grandview man suspected in a series of shootings that have occurred on area roadways since early March, according to Police Chief Darryl Forté.

    Suspect arrested in Kansas City highway shootings

    Police arrested a suspect Thursday in a string of random vehicle shootings on Kansas City-area highways over the past few weeks that have wounded three motorists and frightened many more.

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    Average Kane County tax bill to fall for first time in recent history

    For the first in at least 15 years, the average Kane County property tax bill will decrease this year. It’s a small decrease, but the impact of the retirement or refinancing of a large chunk of bond debt in Elgin is so large that tax bills will decrease. Of course, that’s not true for all taxpayers. Aurora, Rutland and Sugar Grove township residents have the highest bills this year.

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    Grayslake village government will cut spending for the second consecutive year when the 2014-15 budget starts May 1.

    Grayslake reduces spending for second consecutive year in 2014-15 budget

    Grayslake village board members have passed a budget that calls for reduced spending over the next year. Similar to other towns, Grayslake's 2014-15 budget season begins May 1.

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    Police sergeant, service employee contracts approved in Lombard

    Two union contracts were approved during the Lombard village board meeting Thursday. The contracts are for nine police sergeants represented by the Fraternal Order of Police and 49 mostly clerical employees who are represented, for the first time, by the Service Employees International Union. “I think the positive is that both of these were agreed to without having to go to...

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    A buoy, right, is towed Friday by a South Korean Navy boat to be installed in addition to the other one, left, to mark the sunken 6,852-ton ferry Sewol in the water off the southern coast near Jindo, south of Seoul, South Korea. Rescuers scrambled to find hundreds of ferry passengers still missing Friday and feared dead, as fresh questions emerged about whether quicker action by the captain of the doomed ship could have saved lives.

    Doomed ferry’s sharp turn, slow evacuation probed

    The investigation into South Korea’s ferry disaster focused on the sharp turn it took just before it began listing and on the possibility that a quicker evacuation order could have saved lives, officials said Friday. Police said a high school vice principal who had been rescued from the ferry was found hanging Friday from a pine tree. He was the leader of a group of 325 students traveling...

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    Flight controllers confirmed early Friday April 18, 2014 that LADEE crashed into the back side of the moon.

    NASA’s moon-orbiting robot crashes down

    NASA’s robotic moon explorer, LADEE, is no more. Flight controllers confirmed Friday that the orbiting spacecraft crashed into the back side of the moon as planned, just three days after surviving a full lunar eclipse, something it was never designed to do. Researchers believe LADEE likely vaporized upon contact because of its extreme orbiting speed of 3,600 mph, possibly smacking into a...

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    Nicole Lynch, sister of slain Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer Sean Collier, at her home in Dracut, Mass. Collier will be remembered on the first anniversary of his death in a ceremony at the school Friday morning, April 18, 2014.

    Remembering an officer slain after bombs went off

    Like many other youngsters, Sean Collier wanted to be a police officer. Unlike most, he brought that dream to life — and then died doing it, becoming a central character in one of the most gripping manhunts the nation has ever seen after the Boston Marathon bombings. The loved ones of Sean Collier, the MIT police officer who investigators say was shot by the bombing suspects, are this week...

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    An avalanche swept down a climbing route on Mount Everest early Friday killing at least 12 Nepalese guides and leaving three missing in the deadliest disaster on the world’s highest peak.

    Avalanche sweeps down Everest, killing at least 12

    An avalanche swept down a climbing route on Mount Everest early Friday, killing at least 12 Nepalese guides and leaving three missing in the deadliest disaster on the world’s highest peak. The Sherpa guides had gone early in the morning to fix ropes for other climbers when the avalanche hit just them below Camp 2 at about 6:30 a.m., Nepal Tourism Ministry official Krishna Lamsal said from...

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    Retired Chief Air Marshal Angus Houston, chief coordinator of the Joint Agency Coordination Center, has become the global face of the massive monthlong search operation off Australia’s west coast to find the missing Boeing 777, which is believed to be resting somewhere on the silt-covered bottom of the Indian Ocean in a patch the size of Los Angeles.

    Australia’s Houston: Calm face of Flight 370 hunt

    Angus Houston has become the global face of the massive monthlong search operation off Australia’s west coast to find the missing Boeing 777, which is believed to be resting on the silt-covered bottom of the southern Indian Ocean, somewhere in a patch of sea the size of Los Angeles.

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    One of relatives of Chinese passengers on board the Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 prays Friday at a hotel conference room in Beijing, China. A robotic submarine headed back down into the depths of the Indian Ocean on Friday to scour the seafloor for any trace of the missing Malaysian jet one month after the search began off Australia’s west coast, as data from the sub’s previous missions turned up no evidence of the plane.

    Chinese relatives pray over lost Malaysian plane

    Six weeks into the extensive search for the lost Malaysia Airlines plane without so much as a piece of debris yet found, several Chinese relatives met Friday to pray for spouses who never came home, while begging for answers that could end their misery of not knowing.

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    Prosecutors seek arrest warrant for ferry captain

    SEOUL, South Korea — Prosecutors say they’ve asked a court to issue an arrest warrant for the captain of the South Korean ferry that sank two days ago, leaving hundreds missing and feared dead.Prosecutors said Friday that they have also requested arrest warrants for two other crewmembers.

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    Pro-Russian insurgents stand Friday at barricades at the regional administration building that they had seized earlier in Donetsk, Ukraine. Insurgents in Ukraine’s east who have been occupying government buildings in more than 10 cities said Friday they will only leave them if the interim government in Kiev resigns.

    Ukrainian militia rejects calls to leave buildings

    Pro-Russian insurgents in Ukraine’s east who have been occupying government buildings in more than 10 cities said Friday they will only leave them if the interim government in Kiev resigns. Denis Pushilin, a spokesman of the self-appointed Donetsk People’s Republic, told reporters that the insurgents do not recognize the Ukrainian government as legitimate.

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    SIU to keep fall tuition for newcomers unchanged

    CARBONDALE, Ill. — New students at Southern Illinois University won’t be paying more for tuition this fall.WSIU Radio reports the university system’s trustees on Thursday opted against raising the tuition by 3 percent for newcomers to the Carbondale campus and 5 percent for those in Edwardsville.

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    Ocean ships arrive at Indiana’s Lake Michigan port

    PORTAGE, Ind. — Oceangoing ships are cruising into Indiana’s main port along Lake Michigan now that this year’s international shipping season has launched.The first two ships of the season on Thursday brought shipments of steel from Holland to the Port of Indiana in Portage for use at Midwest manufacturers.

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    2 killed in Quincy fire identified as man, son

    QUINCY — Authorities have identified the two people who died in a Quincy house fire as a 25-year-old man and his infant son.Adams County Coroner James Keller tells the Quincy Herald-Whig that Daniel Disseler and 4-month-old Hunter John Steven Disseler died at a hospital after being pulled from their burning home early Wednesday.

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    Michigan prisoner who escaped scheduled for court

    IONIA, Mich. — A man who escaped from a Michigan prison in February is due in court next week to face escape, carjacking and kidnapping charges.Records show 41-year-old Michael Elliot is to be arraigned Wednesday in District Court in Ionia.

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    2 Indianapolis officers dead in murder-suicide

    INDIANAPOLIS — The Indianapolis police chief says two city officers are dead after one suspended from the force fatally shot his ex-wife before killing himself.Chief Rick Hite says police were called Thursday evening to Officer Kim Carmack’s home on the city’s far west side, where she and Sgt. Ryan Anders were found dead.

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    IU researcher helps Italian police fight crime

    BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — An Indiana University researcher is helping Italian police fight crime by analyzing the patterns of mobile phone calls.Post-doctoral researcher Emilio Ferrara’s method dissects digital phone traces obtained by Italian police through court warrants, looking for spikes in activity that often accompany criminal activity.

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    Another trial delay for man in wife’s death

    PEORIA — A trial for a Peoria man accused of killing his wife on Valentine’s Day 2013 has been delayed again. The Journal Star in Peoria reports that 38-year-old Nathan Leuthold’s murder trial was rescheduled for mid-July. Leuthold’s trial was to begin March 10 until it was rescheduled for May 5.

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    Attendance up 2 percent at Midwest Horse Fair

    MADISON, Wis. — Attendance was up this year at the Midwest Horse Fair in Madison.Officials say despite rain and thunderstorms last weekend attendance hit nearly 55,000 people at the three-day fair, an increase of 2 percent over 2013.

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    Film Office looks for short films for contest

    The Illinois Film Office is looking for entries for this year’s Shortcuts contest for makers of short films.The office said in a news release Thursday that entries will be accepted through Sept. 2.The seventh annual contest offers a cash prize and the winning entry will be screened at the 50th Chicago International Film Festival this October.

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    Indiana native donates black film materials to IU

    BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — An Indiana native who became an advocate for black filmmakers has donated a large collection of materials from the Black Filmmakers Hall of Fame to an Indiana University film center.

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    Lombard’s Lilac Time festival includes more than three weeks of events celebrating spring, but there’s plenty of time in the schedule to stop and smell the lilacs of Lilacia Park.

    Lilac Time quickly approaching in Lombard

    The Lilac Village’s favorite time of the year is quickly approaching. “It’s unique because it’s Lombard’s way to celebrate spring and tradition,” Jackie Brzezinski of the Lombard Park District said of the annual Lilac Time, which runs from the end of April to mid-May.

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    Lilac Time event schedule
    The schedule of events for this year's Lilac Time in Lombard.

  •  
    Elgin Community College Theatre’s production of Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet” focuses on Juliet and her family. Romeo is played by Kevin Stoffel of Algonquin and Juliet is played by Sonya Madrigal of Elgin.

    ECC’s ‘Romeo and Juliet’ focuses on Juliet

    Elgin Community College Theatre's production of "Romeo and Juliet" puts more of its focus on Juliet and her family than typical productions. Director Azar Kazemi says, "I really see Juliet as this strong female protagonist who makes strong choices that propel this story forward and I think that her strength sometimes gets lost in productions."

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    St. Charles has had some iconic success along its portion of the Fox River. The Hotel Baker and part of a major downtown development called First Street are the major, non-festival river draws for the business area.

    St. Charles boasts iconic riverfront buildings, beautiful views

    More than a decade ago, a group of residents with a passion for the Fox River joined with St. Charles officials to create a master plan that would transform the city from a place by a river into a place where people flock to enjoy the river. But today, when residents associated with that plan talk about it, their voices are laced with frustration.

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    Stacy Fiebelkorn, left, confers with her attorney, Alexis Costello, during an appearance before Kane County Associate Judge Elizabeth Flood in an animal neglect case Thursday at the St. Charles branch court.

    Dawn Patrol: Gag order in animal neglect case; Hawks lose in 3OT

    Gag order in Kane animal neglect case. Water rescue in Crystal Lake. Road projects coming to DuPage. Horses escape Wauconda-area farm. Record Store Day tomorrow. Hawks lose in triple overtime. Sox lose.

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    Illinois GOP leaders to urge immigration reform

    Candidate for governor Bruce Rauner and other top Illinois Republicans will join the Illinois Business Immigration Coalition at a gathering next week to urge Congress to adopt immigration reform.

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    State to spend $10 million on Cook County projects

    The state of Illinois is investing more than $10 million for construction projects in Cook County.Gov. Pat Quinn’s office announced Thursday the projects will be funded by the Illinois Jobs Now! construction program.

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    Chicago plans playground improvements at parks

    Chicago officials held groundbreaking ceremonies for new playgrounds at three city parks, kicking off a project to refurbish or build 103 playgrounds around the city this year. Mayor Rahm Emanuel helped break ground Thursday at Lindblom Park and Murray Park in the West Englewood neighborhood, and Kucinski-Murphy Park in the McKinley Park community.

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    Hawks’ Wirtz creates Northwestern endowment fund

    Blackhawks Chairman Rocky Wirtz and his wife, Marilyn, are creating an endowment fund for Northwestern University’s theater program.University officials say the multimillion dollar gift will fund student and faculty projects in the Theatre and Interpretation Center on the Evanston campus.

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    Indianapolis police officer kills ex-wife, self

    INDIANAPOLIS — Authorities say an Indianapolis police officer shot and killed his estranged wife, also an officer, and then turned the gun on himself.Indianapolis Police Chief Rick Hite identified the two dead officers as Sgt. Ryan Anders and his ex-wife, Officer Kim Carmack.

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    Libertyville school to issue laptops to students in fall

    A Libertyville private school is the latest to launch a program that equips students with personal laptop computers. Starting this fall, all sixth- through eighth-grade students at St. Joseph Catholic School will be given Chromebook computers.

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    Dan Kotowski

    Gun owners fill Roselle meeting, but guns not the focus

    A debate about gun control never materialized during a Thursday night town hall meeting after the crowd dominated by gun rights activists instead vented about pensions, incomes taxes and other state issues. It was the outcome state Sen. Dan Kotowski was hoping for after the Illinois State Rifle Association this week released an alert that called the gathering at Roselle Village Hall a “gun...

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    Rod Blagojevich

    Blagojevich makes one final campaign donation

    More than a decade after he served in Congress and two years into his prison sentence, Rod Blagojevich’s federal campaign account made its final donation this week. In closing down, the federal fund Friends of Rod Blagojevich gave $709.85 to the Serbian Orthodox Church’s New Gracanica Monastery in Third Lake on April 14.

Sports

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    Chicago Blackhawks' Kris Versteeg (23) scores past St. Louis Blues goalie Ryan Miller and Blues' Alex Pietrangelo (27) during the first period in Game 1 of a first-round NHL hockey Stanley Cup playoff series Thursday, April 17, 2014, in St. Louis. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

    Versteeg beat Miller, but it wasn’t enough

    Kris Versteeg thought he had it.Virtually everyone else in the Scottrade Center thought so, too.But even though Versteeg’s shot in the final minutes of overtime beat Blues goalie Ryan Miller, it didn’t turn out to be the game-winner because St. Louis forward Maxim Lapierre was playing the role of goalie No. 2 and blocked it from going in.

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    Detroit Red Wings’ Pavel Datsyuk lets go a shot as Boston Bruins defenseman Zdeno Chara (33) defends during the third period of Detroit’s 1-0 win in Game 1 of a first-round NHL playoff hockey series, in Boston on Friday, April 18, 2014. (AP Photo/Winslow Townson)

    Datsyuk’s late goal lifts Detroit over Boston 1-0

    The Boston Bruins worked all season to get home-ice advantage throughout the playoffs. It vanished with a flick of Pavel Datsyuk’s wrist. Just like that, on Datsyuk’s goal with 3:01 left, the Detroit Red Wings got the upper hand with a 1-0 win in the opener of the best-of-seven playoff series Friday night.

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    Texas Rangers’ Alex Rios (51) slides into home ahead of the tag from Chicago White Sox catcher Tyler Flowers (21) during the third inning of a baseball game Friday, April 18, 2014, in Arlington, Texas. The Rangers won 12-0. (AP Photo/The Dallas Morning News, Brad Loper) MANDATORY CREDIT, NO SALES, MAGS OUT, TV OUT, INTERNET USE BY AP MEMBERS ONLY

    Paulino, Sox rocked by Rangers 12-0

    Felipe Paulino gave up six hits and a walk, hit a batter and threw two wild pitches in the first seven-run inning in the majors this season. There was barely any sign of help for the White Sox right-hander during his third-inning ordeal.Paulino allowed 13 hits and 10 runs in 3 2-3 innings, Martin Perez threw a three-hitter for his first career shutout and the Texas Rangers routed the White Sox 12-0 on Friday night.

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    Chicago Blackhawks coach Joel Quenneville, center, and assistant coach Jamie Kompon, left, watch the action in the final seconds of an NHL hockey game against the Nashville Predators Saturday, April 12, 2014, in Nashville, Tenn. The Predators won 7-5. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

    Quenneville’s gesture earns him a $25,000 fine

    It was a moment Joel Quenneville wishes could take back.It was also a moment which social media simply took and ran with.

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    Boys gymnastics scoreboard: Friday’s results
    *Friday’s results*Willowbrook 139.6, Hinsdale South 131.1

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    Girls soccer: Friday’s results
    *Friday’s results*Waubonsie Valley 2, Naperville North 0Waubonsie Valley 0 2 —2Naperville North 0 0 —0Scoring — WV: Dodson, Kemmerling (Fuller); Goalkeepers — WV: Rigby (3). NN: Baenziger (10)

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    Softball: Friday’s results
    *Friday’s results*Batavia 12, Oswego 6Batavia 033 001 5 —12-13-5Oswego 100 000 5 —6-8-32B: B: Offutt; WP: Lovestrand (2-3); LP: Prentice.*Yorkville 1, West Aurora 0*Neuqua Valley 15, Larkin 0Neuqua Valley 347 01 —15-13-0Larkin 000 00 —0-4-32B: NV: Hill, Budds. HR: NV: Lange. WP: Gale LP: Rojo*Yorkville 5, Metea Valley 1Yorkville 002 120 0 —5-5-1Metea Valley 000 000 1 —1-5-12B: Y: Thomas, Avery. WP: Jaros; LP: Hall.*Waubonsie Valley 11, Streamwood 0Waubonsie Vall. 211 033 —10-11-0Streamwood 000 000 —0-2-62B: WV: Kurth, Koulos 2, Lack, Hohman. HR: WV: Hohman, Sanchez. WP: Hohman; LP: Hedger.*St. Charles East 4, West Chicago 3West Chicago 210 000 000 —3-8-3St. Charles East 000 100 201 —4-5-32B: SCE: Peterburs. 3B: WC: Foreman. WP: Beno; LP: Goldsmith.*Lincoln-Way Central 2, Naperville North 1Lincoln Way Cen, 000 101 0 —2-7-0Naperville North 010 000 0 —1-7-02B: LWC: Farbak, Rote. NN: Budicin, Martin, Hillier. WP: Mikolajceoki; LP: Rechenmacher (2-2).*Thursday’s resultLAKES 17, NORTH CHICAGO 0Lakes 255 05 —17-15-0North Chicago 000 00 —0-0-02B: Lks: M. Mang, C. Mang, Schaar, Perdue, Reed.3B: Lks: Hohenstatt 2, Perdue.WP: Perdue; LP: Collins; S: Rotunno.*Wednesday’s resultLAKES 8, round lake 5Lakes 600 002 0 —8-7-1Round Lake 001 004 0 —5-5-22B: Lks: Dinger, M. Mang, Schaar, Houghton; RL: Olson.HR: RL: Bart (grand slam).WP: Dishinger; LP: Wagner; S: Perdue.

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    Girls track: Friday’s results
    *Friday’s results*Ottawa Girls ABC InviteTEAM SCORES1. Dunlap 267, 2. Kaneland 255, 3. Huntley 237, 4. Burlington Central 195, 5. Oregon 133.5, 6. Ottawa 112, 7. LaSalle-Peru 108.5, 8. Morris 79.INDIVIDUAL RESULTS3200 relay: Dunlap (Unseth, Olmstead, Noll, Gunn) 10:15.79, Kaneland (Richtman, Lodwig, Espino, Kucera) 10:24.81, Huntley (Chan, Cazel, Daly, Celli) 10:34.46; 400 relay: Kaneland (Elliot, Heinzer, Zick, Sreenan) 50.64, Huntley (Miller, Zielinski, Bushman, Driscoll) 52.14, Dunlap (Leuallen, Netters, Kim, Stout) 52.15; 3200: Jockish (Dun) 11:24.00, Bower (Kane) 11:26.19, Rocha (Lasa) 11:46.85; 100 high hurdles: Tramblay (Hunt) 15.61, Weinrich (BC) 16.63, Long (Ore.) 17.37; 100: Sreenan (Kane) 13.25, Burton (Morr) 13.51, Driscoll (Hunt) 13.52; 800: Rocha (Lasa) 2:26.21, Mitchell (Hunt) 2:27.85, Strang (Kane) 2:29.78; 800 relay: Dunlap (Leuallen, Netters, Kim, Stout) 1:50.46, Burlington Central (Spencer, Westergaard, Goehrke, Weinrich) 1:53.15, Oregon (H. Long, Horn, Skoumal, C. Long) 1:54.63; 400: Sreenan (Kane) 59.12, Driscoll (Hunt) 1:01.52, Taiwo (Dun) 1:04.55; 300 int. hurdles: Tramblay (Hunt) 48.77, Long (Ore.) 49.87, Weinrich (BC) 50.58; 1600: Rocha (Lasa) 5:29.88, Bower (Kane) 5:30.28, Bush (BC) 5:38.56; 200: Zick (Kane) 26.72, Stout (Dun) 28.46, Zielinski (Hunt) 28.81; 1600 relay: Kaneland (Galor, Sreenan, Heinzer, Strang) 4:09.01, Huntley (Tramblay, Miller, Bushman, Driscoll) 4:13.58, Dunlap (Leuallen, Taiwo, Babcock, Unseth) 4:15.62; Long jump: Zick (Kane) 17-2, Burton (Morr) 16-3, Lyman (Hunt) 15-2; High jump: Knapp (Morr) 5-2, Long (Ore.) 5-0, Palmer (Dun) 4-10; Triple jump: Taiwo (Dun) 34-4.5, Tramblay (Hunt) 33-6, Keifer (Kane) 30-5; Shotput: Cullen (Ore.) 35-2, Tattoni (Kane) 34-9, Williams (BC) 32-2; Discus: Cullen (Ore.) 97-11, Tattoni (Kane) 92-3, Williams (BC) 90-6; Pole vault: Delach (Kane) 10-6, Lyman (Hunt) 8-6, Gatliff (Dun) 8-0.*Barrington inviteTEAM RESULTSNew Trier 102, Barrington 101, Warren 88, Hoffman Estates 66, Grant 58, Plainfield North 52, Conant 50, Crystal Lake South 18, Prairie Ridge 14, Lake Zurich 9RACE RESULTS100 — Santos (Warr) 12.65; 100 hurdles — Iroegbulem (Con) 15.96; 200 — Ellis (Warr) 25.07; 3,200 relay — Hoffman Estates 9:30.71; 400 relay — Warren 49.49; 3,200 — Smith (NT) 10:56.50; 800 — Schmidt (NT) 2:23.48; 800 relay — Barrington 1:46.32; 400 — Ellis (Warr) 57.20; 300 hurdles — Schau (CLS) 47.69; 1,600 — Smith (NT) 5:09.39; 1,600 relay — Barrington 4:07.37; High jump — Cossio (Barr) 5-2; Long jump — Smart (NT) 16-8.5; Triple jump — Laudizio (PN) 33-2.75; Pole vault — Karabas (NT) 9-6; Discus — Donnell (Con) 134-2; Shot put — Oginni (HE) 45-1.5.

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    Baseball: Friday’s results
    *Friday’s results*Kaneland 9, Rochelle 2Kaneland 000 006 3 —9-10-2Rochelle 020 000 0 —2-5-6*Bartlett 3, St. Charles North 2STC North 000 200 0 -2-8-2Bartlett 010 002 x -3-5-12B: B — Pfaender (2). 3B: B — Svetic.WP: Paris; LP: Wright.*Batavia 6, South Elgin 0South Elgin 000 000 0 -0-0-3Batavia 002 220 x -6-10-12B: B — Niemiec. WP: Green (2-0); LP: Weiss (0-1).*Waubonsie Valley 8, Streamwood 3Waubonsie Vall. 012 000 5 —8-13-0Streamwood 201 000 0 —3-7-32B: WV: Ellam, Drago. S: Campbell. WP: Petersen; LP: Caminetti.*Larkin 4, West Chicago 0West Chicago 000 000 0 —0-5-00Larkin 002 011 X —4-6-12B: L: Lenz. 3B: L: Kalusa. WP: McCracken; LP: Seidler.*Naperville North 3, Glenbard North 1Glenbard North 100 000 0 —1-2-0Naperville North 200 100 X —3-7-2WP: Brennan; LP: Orze.*Neuqua Valley 13, Elgin 2Neuqua Valley 241 042 —13-11-0Elgin 010 010 —2-6-12B: NV: Piotrowski, Hicks, Bromer. E: Valadez. HR: NV: Hilgemann. E: Sobeksi. WP: Cherney; LP: Koeckritz.*Lisle 10, Plano 6Lisle 024 027 4 —19-13-2Plano 031 110 0 —6-8-42B: L: Loconsole, Krause 2, Swedie, Grego. WP: Swedie; LP: Martinez.*

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    Boys water polo scoreboard: Friday’s results
    *Friday’s results*Naperville Central Best of the West InviteNaperville Central 13, Lincoln-Way central 4Scoring — NC: Donahue 3; Walker 2; Bigenwald 3, Hunter 2, May 2. Goalkeepers — NC: Nussbaum, Lawrence*St. Charles North 8, Riverside Brookfield 3*Sandburg 11, St. Charles North 5SCN: Prefet 7 goals, 1 steal; Traxler 3 goals, 1 assist

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    Waubonsie Valley turns up the pressure, gets win

    It was just a matter of time until Waubonsie Valley broke the ice in Friday night’s nonconference girls soccer game at Naperville North.

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    After nine seasons as Hersey’s defensive coordinator, Joe Pardun is embracing the challenge of leading the program as head coach.

    Pardun eager to complete coaching transition at Hersey

    New Hersey football coach Joe Pardun knows all about transitioning. When he was a high school football player at Fremd in the mid 1990’s, Pardun was a member of a Viking football team that went from Joe Samojedny to Mike Donatucci. Then at Hersey, where he was the defensive coordinator for nine years, he worked under Mike Mullaney, then Mark Gunther and most recently Dragan Teonic. Last Monday night, it was Pardun’s turn to transition after being named head coach of the Huskies.

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    Naperville Central surges to win

    It was understandable that Naperville Central might be a little winded at halftime of its water polo match with Lincoln-Way Central on Friday night, but it was no time to lose track of the basics.

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    St. Charles North rallies past Bartlett

    Baseball is a game where if you can sometimes forget about what happened the day before the better off you will be. After committing 4 errors in a disappointing 3-2 loss to South Elgin on Thursday, St. Charles North (9-2, 4-1) bounced back with improved defense and capitalized on a crucial sixth-inning throwing error during Friday’s 3-2 Upstate Eight Conference crossover triumph over Bartlett (4-5, 3-2) Friday in St. Charles.

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    Batavia’s Andrew Siegler, left, congratulates teammate Kyle Niemiec as he returns to the dugout after his home run in the fourth inning on Friday.

    Good Friday for Batavia’s Green

    It was certainly a nice Friday for Colby Green. Ryan Weiss deserved a better Friday. But Green was the one who received all the attention after firing his first career no-hitter as Batavia scored all of its runs with two outs in a 6-0 Upstate Eight Conference crossover baseball game on Friday afternoon.

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    Several things working in ticket brokers’ favor

    Just days before the Blackhawks play their first home playoff game since Game 5 of the Stanley Cup Final last June, ticket madness has yet to kick in at Chicago-based Front Row Tickets.Which isn’t necessarily unusual for a secondary ticket marketplace.The Blackhawks may be the defending Stanley Cup champions, but plenty of tickets remain available for next week’s two playoff games at the United Center.After opening the postseason in St. Louis on Thursday night, the Blackhawks face the Blues in their home rink again Saturday, before the best-of-seven series moves to Chicago for Games 3 and 4 on Monday and Wednesday.“The early rounds are usually a little softer,” Front Row Tickets manager Dale Soderholm said. “People nowadays kind of wait until the last minute because the cost of everything is so expensive.”The good news for ticket brokers is, with the Blackhawks playing the rival Blues, the tickets should sell.“I’m glad we’re playing St. Louis in the first round because people like to watch St. Louis,” said Max Waisvisz, a partner at Gold Coast Tickets in Chicago. “Ticket (sales) are actually pretty good for a first round. Usually, it could be very slow. What makes it much better is that we don’t have home-ice advantage. For me, as a ticket broker, that’s always better, because it’s not (a situation) where the game is announced and then it’s played right away.”National websites such as stubhub.com, vividseats.com and cheapseatstickets.com show available standing-room tickets for Game 3 ranging in price from $63 to $108. Which doesn’t include parking.As of Thursday afternoon, according to its website, StubHub! had 1,403 tickets available for Game 3, with the cheapest standing-room ticket costing $80.22. On its website, frontrowchicago.com, Front Row Tickets shows Game 3 tickets priced similarly.“It looks like you got a million seats, but you really don’t,” Soderholm said. “When you see them at (a certain price), generally what you’re going to see is another percentage being added to that when you go to close out.”This week, Vivid Seats released a report for the NHL’s first round of the playoffs. It showed the most expensive matchup is Game 4 of the Blues-Blackhawks series, which has a median ticket price of $340. The report includes prices for each of the first four games for every series.Waisvisz appreciates that the series is not opening in Chicago, as it buys Gold Seat more time to sell tickets.“Monday and Wednesday night is actually good. I didn’t want Easter night,” Waisvisz said. “A Sunday (game) would have killed us. (Monday-Wednesday) usually allows more corporate America to get to the game.”

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    Samardzija keeps working, pitching, going

    Jeff Samardzija has been flat-out the ace of the Cubs pitching staff this year. Despite a 1.29 ERA, all he has to show for it is a record of 0-2. Still, he does not seem to be letting the lack of support get to him.

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    Chicago Sky center Sylvia Fowles, right, had arthroscopic surgery last month on her hip and won’t be able to open the WNBA when the Sky plays its first game on May 16 against Indiana.

    Sky coach optimistic surgery won’t stop Fowles

    The Chicago Sky opens the season against the Indiana Fever on May 16 and will be without star center Sylvia Fowles, who is out indefinitely with a hip injury.

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    St. Louis Blues right wing Adam Cracknell, right, reacts after scoring against the Chicago Blackhawks during the first period of Game 1 of an NHL hockey opening-round playoff series, Thursday, April 17, 2014, in St. Louis. (AP Photo/St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Chris Lee) EDWARDSVILLE OUT ALTON OUT

    Hawks know there’s no reason to panic

    The more you listen to the players and coaches following St. Louis’ thrilling 4-3 victory over the Blackhawks in three overtimes in Game 1, this much is clear:The Blues gained confidence.And the Hawks haven’t lost theirs.

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    Emilio Bonifacio strikes out swinging during the seventh inning of the Cubs’ 4-1 loss to Cincinnati on Friday at Wrigley Field.

    Renteria has message for his 4-11 Cubs

    Cubs manager Rick Renteria has been Mr. Positive since taking the job last off-season. But after Friday's 4-1 loss to the Reds at Wrigley Field, he made public for the first time some unhappiness over what he termed sloppy play by his team.“I’ll be honest with you,” Renteria said.. “I concern myself more with the way we approach the game. If our approaches are good, if we’re really focusing on what we’re supposed to be doing, both at the plate and in the field, I’m good with it."

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    Kirk Hinrich eyes Washington Wizards point guard John Wall during their game on Jan. 17, 2014. Hinrich served as a mentor of sorts for Wall during part of the 2010-11 season, Wall’s rookie campaign.

    Bulls guard must shut down Wizards’ Wall

    It only lasted a few months, but when the Bulls traded Kirk Hinrich to Washington in 2010, one of his roles was to help mentor young point guard John Wall. Now it will be Hinrich's job to slow down Wall, who blossomed into an all-star this season.

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    Chicago Bulls forward Taj Gibson, left, celebrates with center Joakim Noah after scoring a basket during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Detroit Pistons in Chicago on Friday, April 11, 2014. The Bulls won 106-98. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

    Bulls won’t be fooled by blowout win at Washington

    The last time the Bulls faced the Wizards, they rolled up a 52-26 halftime lead and own by 18 points in Washington on April 5. The first step in playoff preparation might be forgetting all about that result, because it doesn't mean anything now.

  •  

    LeBlanc looking to make Elgin CC competitive

    Jason LeBlanc is hitting the ground running. The recently appointed Elgin Community College women’s volleyball coach is hot on the recruiting trail. He takes over a program that won 5 matches in 2013 and finished the year with a threadbare roster of 7 players.

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    Stevenson playing through challenges

    It’s happened again. The bad news keeps piling up at Stevenson. Another top player for the Patriots has gone down with a serious injury. Left fielder Austin Black, who will be playing at Harvard next season, hurt his shoulder in a recent game. He was out on the base path and dove back into a base and jammed up his shoulder as he hit the bag.

  •  
    Warren infielder Dominic Cuevas, right, along with teammates Ben Dinter and Wes Gordon, will play next year for the College of Lake County.

    Shared baseball future for Warren trio

    As three of only six seniors on Warren’s 22-player roster, veterans Ben Dinter, Dom Cuevas and Wes Gordon stick close together. “The three of them have become this vocal group of leaders for our team,” Warren coach Clint Smothers said. “They are doing a great job of showing our younger guys how to play.” Next year, they’ll be the young guys. But at least they’ll still be together. Dinter, Cuevas and Gordon will continue their strong connection in college. All three of them signed this week to play baseball next season at College of Lake County.

  •  

    Softball/Fox Valley roundup

    Neuqua Valley 15, Larkin 0: Sophie Young was 2-for-2 for Larkin in this Upstate Eight crossover loss. Rachel Martinez and Lexi Price each had hits for the Royals (2-7, 0-4) while Maria Rojo was the losing pitcher.Waubonsie Valley 11, Streamwood 0: Shannon Hohman allowed the Sabres (1-6, 1-5) just 3 hits, two by Jessica Daley and one from Taylor Williams in this Upstate Eight crossover. Kaitlyn Hedger took the loss for Streamwood.

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    Chicago Cubs' Emilio Bonifacio, right, strikes out swinging during the seventh inning of a baseball game against the Cincinnati Reds in Chicago, Friday, April 18, 2014. The Reds won 4-1. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

    Cubs bats remain ice cold in 4-1 loss

    Alfredo Simon lowered his ERA to 0.86, and the Cincinnati Reds beat the Cubs 4-1 Friday for their 16th win in their last 17 games at Wrigley Field.Making his third start, Simon (2-1) allowed an unearned run in six-plus innngs and sent the Cubs to their fifth straight loss. Simon is in the rotation while Mat Latos recovers from elbow and knee injuries.

  •  

    Baseball/Fox Valley roundup

    Waubonsie Valley 8, Streamwood 3: Tyler Hasper’s RBI single snapped a 3-3 tie in the top of the seventh inning, and the Warriors tacked on 4 more runs to win this Upstate Eight crossover. Losing pitcher Chad Caminitti allowed 7 runs (6 earned) on 12 hits, walked one and struck out two. Offensive leaders for Streamwood (4-7, 2-4) included Matt Grens (3-for-3), Eric Hamlin (2-for-4, 2 R) and Zach Campbell, who doubled and drove in 2 runs.Neuqua Valley 13, Elgin 2, 6 inn: The visiting Wildcats scored 11 earned runs on 11 hits and 8 walks in this Upstate Eight crossover. Omar Valadez went 2-for-3 with a double, and pitcher Jack Koeckritz took the loss for Elgin (3-5, 1-5).

  •  

    McCracken hurls Larkin past West Chicago

    Larkin right-hander Jack McCracken mainly pitches to contact, but key strikeouts helped him escape two jams in a 4-0 home win against West Chicago Friday morning. McCracken (3-1) struck out 5 Wildcats overall to notch his first career shutout, three at critical junctures.

  •  
    A defensive-minded Chicago Bulls team will have to slow down a Washington Wizards that averaged 100 points per game this season. The two temas open the first-round of the NBA playoffs on Sunday at the United Center.

    Bulls can handle Wizards’ offense

    With the NBA playoffs ready to begin, Mike North expects the Chicago Bulls defense to contain the Washington Wizards and win the series 4-2. The two teams open their best-of-seven game series on Sunday in Chicago.

  •  
    St. Louis Blues right wing Vladimir Tarasenko, left, reacts after scoring a goal against the Chicago Blackhawks during the first period of Game 1 of an NHL hockey opening-round playoff series, Thursday, April 17, 2014, in St. Louis. At right is Blackhawks' Marian Hossa. (AP Photo/St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Chris Lee) EDWARDSVILLE OUT ALTON OUT

    Blues’ Tarasenko applauded by his coach

    For the past few days everyone seemed focused on the health of injured Blues’ stars T.J. Oshie, who didn’t play Thursday, and David Backes, who did.Kind of lost in the shuffle was the return of St. Louis forward Vladimir Tarasenko.

Business

  •  

    Mount Prospect pizza place expanding

    Crave Pizza, 106 E. Northwest Hwy., has acquired the space formerly occupied by Anna’s Alure salon, allowing the business to expand from 1,600 to 2,500 square feet. With the new space, Crave will be able not only to continue to offer casual family pizzeria dining with carryout on one side, but also introduce a lounge with a sports entertainment component on the other side. “It is still going to be an awesome family place,” owner Rafael Dickson said.

  •  
    Trader Anthony Carannante, left, works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange a week ago Friday. Traders who allegedly work faster than the indexes can keep up are the target for a lawsuit filed Friday.

    Providence, RI sues firms over rapid stock trades

    The suit’s defendants include the Nasdaq Stock Market and the New York Stock Exchange; major banks such as JPMorgan Chase, Goldman Sachs and Citigroup; and trading firms including Chopper Trading and Jump Trading.

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    U.S. Airways CEO Doug Parker, right, and American Airlines CEO Tom Horton pose after a news conference at DFW International Airport.

    Judge says American can’t end retiree benefits yet

    “American will review his ruling and consider next steps related to the retiree health and life insurance benefits,” American spokesman Casey Norton said in an emailed statement.

  •  
    A sign reading “Stop the Transcanada Pipeline” sits in a field near Bradshaw, Neb.

    U.S. delays review of Keystone pipeline

    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., accused President Obama of kowtowing to “radical activists” from the environmental community, while House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, called the decision “shameful” and said there were no credible reasons for further delay.

  •  
    Charlie McCarthy hangs a banner announcing the Boston Marathon on a lamppost along Boylston Street in Boston. With an expanded field of runners and the memory of last year’s bombings elevating interest in one of the world’s greatest races, the 118th Boston Marathon, scheduled for Monday, could bring an unprecedented wave of visitors and an influx of tourism dollars to the area.

    Boston prepares for huge wave of marathon visitors

    Patrick Moscaritolo, president of the Greater Boston Convention & Visitors Bureau, expects the marathon will generate more than $175 million in economic activity over about five days. That’s up from previous year projections of $130 million to $140 million.

  •  
    The Amazon logo on display at a news conference in New York. Rumors of an Amazon smartphone reached a fever pitch this week.

    Five features an Amazon phone might offer

    Amazon hasn’t confirmed that it has plans for a smartphone, and it isn’t clear what such a device might offer in the way of distinctive features. Some unconfirmed reports say the phone could have a 3-D interface and multiple front-facing cameras.

  •  
    Nineteen-week-old sows stand in a group house pen.

    USDA orders farms to report pig virus infections

    Dr. Paul Sundberg, vice president of science and technology for the National Pork Board, said the new reporting requirements would provide better information on how many farms have been infected by PED and where. They also set a model for how similar diseases could be handled.

  •  
    More than two-thirds of the states reported job gains in March, as hiring has improved for much of the country during what has been a sluggish but sustained 4 1/2-year recovery.

    Unemployment rates fall in 21 U.S. states; IL lags

    More than two-thirds of the states reported job gains in March, as hiring has improved for much of the country during what has been a sluggish but sustained 4 1/2-year recovery. Unemployment remains elevated in Illinois at 8.4 percent.

  •  
    A surge of eleventh-hour enrollments has improved the outlook for President Barack Obama’s health care law, with more people signing up overall and a much-needed spark of interest among young adults.

    Late sign-ups improve outlook for Obama health law

    A surge of eleventh-hour enrollments has improved the outlook for President Barack Obama’s health care law, with more people signing up overall and a much-needed spark of interest among young adults. Nonetheless, Obama’s announcement Thursday that 8 million have signed up for subsidized private insurance, and that 35 percent of them are younger than 35, is just a peek at what might be going on with the nation’s newest social program.

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    Venture investments highest since 2001

    Funding for U.S. startup companies soared 57 percent in the first quarter to a level not seen since 2001, as venture capitalists piled more money into a growing number of deals, according to a report due out Friday.

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    Chobani to expand offerings amid competition

    Chobani plans to expand beyond its Greek yogurt cups this summer as it faces intensifying competition in the fast growing category. Starting in July, the company plans to offer Chobani Oats, which is yogurt mixed with fruit and oats; a dessert called Chobani Indulgent and new flavors for kids.

  •  

    Chocolate egg Easter surprise is sticker shock after cocoa surge

    The world’s growing love of chocolate means more expensive treats for the Easter holiday.Demand is rising at the fastest pace in three years, according to Euromonitor International Ltd., and farmers in West Africa aren’t growing enough cocoa to keep up. The cost of beans used to make chocolate reached a 30-month high in March, forcing confectioners to charge their customers more.Lucy Armstrong, who sells sweets online from Chichester, England, said the cost of a 10-kilogram (22-pound) pack of bulk chocolate she uses to make champagne truffles, pralines and salty caramels surged 18 percent this year to 59 pounds ($98). She’s raised the price of chocolate Easter eggs by 50 percent from last year, just before demand picks up for the holiday on April 20, and she plans another increase in the next six months.“It’s definitely the first time where the chocolate has gone up quite noticeably,” said Armstrong, who started Lucy Armstrong Chocolates three years ago and now charges 7.5 pounds for a 170-gram Belgian milk-chocolate egg containing six hand- made chocolates, up from 5 pounds in 2013. “It is hard to try and work out what you can sell and at what price. The problem is it’s only going to go up and up and up.”Cocoa may rally to $3,210 a metric ton on ICE Futures U.S. in New York by the end of December, the highest since July 2011, according to the average estimate of 14 traders and analysts surveyed by Bloomberg News. That would be up 6.3 percent from yesterday’s closing price and top this year’s high of $3,039, reached on March 17.Ingredient CostsThe U.S. price of cocoa butter, the byproduct of crushed beans that accounts for 20 percent of the weight of a chocolate bar, rose 86 percent in the 12 months through April 11 and is the highest on average for any year since at least 1997, data from the Cocoa Merchants Association of America show. The cost of other ingredients also are rising, after milk reached records this year in the U.S. and Europe and sugar futures rallied 20 percent from a 43-month low in January.While global bean production will rise for the first time in three years, reaching 4.104 million tons in the 12 months that end Sept. 31, that will be less than demand for a second straight year, with processors set to use 4.178 million tons, the International Cocoa Organization in London said. Supply concerns are being compounded by increasing prospects of an El Nino weather pattern, which can bring dry winds to West Africa, including top growers Ivory Coast and Ghana.Long-term output deficits are fueling “bullish momentum” for prices, according to an April 3 earnings statement from Zurich-based Barry Callebaut AG, the world’s top processor and biggest maker of bulk chocolate. The “significant” increases in cocoa and milk-powder costs were passed on to customers, so profitability wasn’t affected, Chief Executive Officer Juergen Steinemann said on a conference call the same day.Seasonal SalesEven with higher prices, global demand is growing, especially in developing markets including Asia. Seasonal sales of chocolate on holidays including Easter and Christmas will jump 5 percent this year to $12.7 billion, Euromonitor said.“The underlying concern is that there will not be enough cocoa available to satisfy the appetite of consumers,” said Andreas Christiansen, managing director of Hamburg Cocoa & Commodity Office GmbH, a consultant to the confection industry. “The growing appetite for cocoa or cocoa-based products in emerging markets is what is driving expectations that consumption will outpace production.”More Bunnies

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    Chinese trade group to mediate shoe factory strike

    BEIJING — Chinese police hauled away dozens of workers Friday to break up a march on a factory complex targeted by tens of thousands of laborers striking against the world’s largest maker of athletic shoes, while a government trade union said it would mediate the labor dispute. More than 40,000 workers went on strike this week against Yue Yuen Industrial (Holdings) Ltd., bringing production to a halt at the manufacturer, which makes shoes for companies including Nike and Adidas. About 1,000 workers marched down a street Friday after workers rejected a company proposal.The Guangdong Federation of Trade Unions urged the workers to act rationally, but said it was “taking a clear-cut stand” that the workers’ rights must be protected. The federation said it had instructed its municipal agency in the southern city of Dongguan — where the factory complex is located — to mediate.The workers have been striking since April 5 to demand the Taiwanese-owned company make social security contributions as required by Chinese law and meet other demands. Management of Yue Yuen could not immediately be reached for comment, but in a public announcement Thursday, the company offered to make social security payments only if the workers would agree to retroactively pay their own required contributions into the fund. It said those refusing to return to work on Thursday would be punished, but did not specify how.Advocates for the workers said the company had deceived its workers and violated the rules by failing to pay into the country’s social security program and should be held accountable for the missed contributions. However, some labor experts have noted that workers in the past have preferred to forgo social security benefits in return for higher wages.China’s official Xinhua News Agency said thousands of workers stormed out of the main plant and walked along a major road Friday morning before police rushed to the front of the parade and took away dozens of workers. There was no clash, and most workers had since returned to the factory premises, Xinhua said.Zhang Zhiru, an advocate for the workers, said about 1,000 Yue Yuen workers protested Friday morning, and that more than 20 of them were taken away by police.Zhang is skeptical that the trade union can resolve the dispute. Companies in the Pearl River Delta routinely skip social security payments with tacit approval by the local government, which wants to see the plants stay local instead of moving overseas, Zhang said.“Comparatively speaking, Yue Yuen offers some of the best benefits among local companies,” Zhang said. “If their workers should get their demands met, could it be the last straw for Yue Yuen to relocate overseas? They already are under pressure with rising labor costs in China, an issue faced by those in the labor-intensive manufacturing sector.”“The trade union does not have the ability to protect the workers’ benefits or to solve the problem,” Zhang said. “The case in Dongguan is not a small question to be solved by a small union.”

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    A woman walks Friday by an electric stock board outside a securities firm in Tokyo. Asian stocks were mostly higher Friday after mixed U.S. earnings reports with most of the region’s exchanges closed for Good Friday. Tokyo’s Nikkei 225 gained 0.6 percent to 14,504.47.

    Asia stocks rise in abbreviated trading

    BEIJING — Asian stocks were mostly higher in trading muted by Good Friday observance.Markets in Europe, the U.S. and many countries in Asia were closed for the holiday. Oil trading also was suspended. Among the markets that traded, Tokyo’s Nikkei 225 gained 0.7 percent to 14,516.27 while China’s Shanghai Composite Index shed 0.1 percent to 2,097.75 after data earlier this week showed economic growth slowed to its lowest level since 2012. Seoul’s Kospi added 0.6 percent to 2,004.28 and Taiwan’s Taiex rose 0.3 percent to 8,966.66. Benchmarks in Malaysia and Thailand were slightly higher.On Thursday, global stocks were subdued after Google and IBM reported weak results, even though General Electric was optimistic and Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley beat expectations.On Wall Street, the Standard & Poor’s 500 rose two points, or 0.1 percent, to close at 1,864.85. The Dow Jones industrial average, however, fell 16 points, or 0.1 percent, to close at 16,408.54, hurt by the big drop in IBM.The euro inched down to $1.3820 from $1.3816 late Thursday. The dollar was little changed at 102.42 yen from 102.43 yen.

  •  

    Mazda recalls 109,000 older SUVs for rust problem

    Mazda is recalling 109,000 Tribute SUVs in cold-weather states to fix rusting frame parts. The recall covers SUVs from the 2001 through 2004 model years. Mazda says in documents filed with U.S. safety regulators that the frame can rust and a wheel control arm can separate from it. That could result in a loss of steering control.

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    China says one-fifth of its farmland is polluted

    BEIJING — Faced with growing public anger about a poisonous environment, China’s government released a yearslong study that shows nearly one-fifth of the country’s farmland is contaminated with toxic metals, a stunning indictment of unfettered industrialization under the Communist Party’s authoritarian rule.The report, previously deemed so sensitive it was classified as a state secret, names the heavy metals cadmium, nickel and arsenic as the top contaminants.It adds to widespread doubts about the safety of China’s farm produce and confirms suspicions about the dire state of its soil following more than two decades of explosive industrial growth, the overuse of farm chemicals and minimal environmental protection.It also points to health risks that, in the case of heavy metals, can take decades to emerge after the first exposure. Already, health advocates have identified several “cancer villages” in China near factories suspected of polluting the environment where they say cancer rates are above the national average.The soil survey was conducted from 2005 until last year, and showed contamination in 16.1 percent of China’s soil overall and 19.4 percent of its arable land, according to a summary released late Thursday by China’s Environmental Protection Ministry and its Land and Resources Ministry.“The overall condition of the Chinese soil allows no optimism,” the report said. Some regions suffer serious soil pollution, worrying farm land quality and “prominent problems” with deserted industrial and mining land, it said. Contamination ranged from “slight,” which indicated up to twice the safe level, to “severe.” The report’s release shows China’s authoritarian government responding to growing public anger at pollution with more openness, but only on its own terms and pace. Early last year, Beijing-based lawyer Dong Zhengwei had demanded that the government release the soil findings, but was initially rebuffed by the environment ministry, which cited rules barring release of “state secrets.” That led to criticism from the Chinese public, and even from some arms of the state media. The Communist Party-run People’s Daily declared that, “Covering this up only makes people think: We’re being lied to.” The ministry later acknowledged the information should be shared, said Dong, who attributed this week’s release of the report to public pressure. Without a release of the information, “the public anger would get stronger, and soil contamination would deteriorate, while news of cancer villages and poisonous rice would continue to spring up,” Dong, an anti-trust lawyer, said in an interview Friday.Because some of the samples in the survey, which is the first of its kind in China, date back nearly a decade, the results would likely be much worse if tests were taken today, Dong said.He said the government should conduct soil surveys and release the results on an annual basis and respond with immediate remediation measures.China’s leaders have said they are determined to tackle the country’s pollution problem, though the threat to soil has so far been overshadowed by public alarm at smog and water contamination. However, recent scandals of tainted rice and crops have begun to shift attention to soil. A key concern among scientists is cadmium, a carcinogenic metal that can cause kidney damage and other health problems and is absorbed by rice, the country’s staple grain. Last May, authorities launched an investigation into rice mills in southern China after tests found almost half of the supplies sold in Guangzhou, a major city, were contaminated with cadmium.

  •  
    This Screen grab from the website WhiteHouse.gov taken Friday shows the screen explaining a new Obama administration privacy policy released Friday explaining how the government will gather the user data of online visitors to WhiteHouse.gov, mobile apps and social media sites, and it clarifies that online comments, whether tirades or tributes, are in the open domain.

    White House updating online privacy policy

    A new Obama administration privacy policy released Friday explains how the government will gather the user data of online visitors to WhiteHouse.gov, mobile apps and social media sites, and it clarifies that online comments, whether tirades or tributes, are in the open domain.

  •  
    This former grocery store and home improvement store in Elgin is expected to open sometime this summer as a Butera Market grocery store.

    Butera’s new Elgin stores delayed, but on the way

    Two new Butera Market stores are still in the works in Elgin. Paul Butera Jr. said he hopes a new store at 20 Tyler Creek Plaza will open this summer. The company also is working on concept drawings for a new store to be built at 880 Summit Street, for which it expects to break ground this summer, Butera said.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Malcolm (Marlon Wayans, right) involves his neighbor (Gabriel Iglesias) when weird things start happening in “A Haunted House 2.”

    ‘Haunted’ sequel a stupendously stupid comedy

    “A Haunted House 2” is so bombastically stupid that its well-earned R rating doesn’t seem sufficient. The movie should come with another warning: The following 87 minutes would be better spent alphabetizing your spice rack.

  •  
    Chicago’s Theater Wit has extended its production of “Seven Homeless Mammoths Wander New England” through May 17.

    Theater events
    "Motown the Musical" comes to the Oriental Theatre; the Chicago Commercial Collective revives The Inconvenience's hit "Hit The Wall;" and First Floor Theater debuts its all ages theater piece "Tollbooth: A Clown Show" this week in Chicago theater.

  •  
    Emmanuel de Merode, Virunga National Park director and chief warden, poses at the park headquarters in Rumangabo in eastern Congo in 2012. The Belgian director of Africa’s oldest national park, a reserve in conflict-ridden eastern Congo, was shot and seriously wounded Tuesday. The documentary “Virunga,” about those who protect Virunga National Park from armed poachers and encroaching oil interests, premiered Thursday at the Tribeca Film Festival.

    Days after shooting, ‘Virunga’ debuts at Tribeca

    Days after the director of Africa’s oldest national park was shot by gunmen, a documentary about those who protect Virunga National Park from armed poachers and encroaching oil interests premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival. The debut Thursday night of “Virunga,” named after the eastern Congo park, followed the shooting Tuesday of Emmanuel de Merode, the chief warden of Virunga. He is in serious but stable condition after being attacked by three gunmen while driving through the park.

  •  
    Miley Cyrus had to cancel more concerts this weekend on her “Bangerz” tour after remaining hospitalized for a severe allergic reaction to antibiotics.

    Ill, hospitalized Miley Cyrus postpones more shows

    Miley Cyrus is postponing more concerts as she remains in a hospital for a severe allergic reaction to antibiotics. A representative says the singer won’t perform in Nashville, Tenn., on Friday and Louisville, Ky., on Saturday. Those concerts will be rescheduled.

  •  
    The gelatin-sugar mixture is ready when thick ribbons slowly flow off the beater.

    Move over Mom: Make marshmallows at home. Really!

    Jerome Gabriel has loved marshmallows his whole life — from small ones in his hot chocolate to big ones on s’mores to the colorful Peeps in his Easter basket. Making your own marshmallow treats at home is a sweet and sticky undertaking.

  •  
    Johnny Depp, right, poses with director (and Elmhurst native) Wally Pfister. The two worked together on “Transcendence.”

    Elmhurst native reteams with Depp for ‘Transcendence’

    For more than a decade, cinematographer and Elmhurst native Wally Pfister brought director Christopher Nolan’s cinematic visions to life. Now, he’s the one calling the shots. His directorial debut, the new sci-fi mystery “Transcendence,” has many elements of a Nolan blockbuster — eye-popping visual effects, a mind-bending story and an A-list lead in Johnny Depp. All of those things translate into high expectations for Pfister, who jokingly likens his newly christened director’s seat to an “electric chair.”

  •  
    “You Can Date Boys When You’re Forty” by Dave Barry (2014, Putnam), $26.95, 224 pages.

    Humorist shares lighter side of parenting

    You never wanted to grow up to be a zookeeper. And yet, your home is filled with wildlife. In other words, you have kids and since you’ve spent all this time taming them, you’re a bear about who they hang out with. So you’ll understand the sentiment behind “You Can Date Boys When You’re Forty” by Dave Barry.

  •  
    Veterinarian Christie Pace plays with Naki’o, a red heeler mix breed, the first dog to receive four prosthetic limbs. Naki’o was found in the cellar of a Nebraska foreclosed home with all four legs and its tail frozen in puddles of water-turned-ice. What frostbite didn’t do, a surgeon did, amputating all four legs and giving him four prosthetics.

    More vets turn to prosthetics to help legless pets

    A 9-month-old boxer pup named Duncan barreled down a beach in Oregon, running full tilt on soft sand into YouTube history and showing more than 4 million viewers that he can revel in a good romp despite lacking back legs. More veterinarians are using wheelchairs, orthotics and prosthetics to improve the lives of dogs that have lost limbs to deformity, infection or accident, experts say.

  •  
    Doug McDade stars as an intersex visual artist facing death in Rob Winn Anderson’s world-premiere drama “A Fine Line” at Clockwise Theatre in Waukegan.

    ‘A Fine Line’ at Clockwise goes awry

    Clockwise Theatre's world-premiere drama "A Fine Line" about an Intersex artist facing death is certainly ambitious. Unfortunately, this Waukegan-based company can't fully meet the challenges of the script, which has its own structural problems as well.

  •  
    Dust cut marshmallows with a mixture of cornstarch and powdered sugar to keep them from sticking together during storage.

    Lemony Marshmallows
    Lemony Marshmallows that you can make at home.

  •  
    This year, try shaving cream and liquid food coloring to dye hard-boiled eggs, which gives them a tie-dyed effect.

    Frothy fun: dyeing Easter eggs in shaving cream

    If dyeing Easter eggs with vinegar and color tablets is feeling old, reach for a new duo: shaving cream and liquid food coloring. It’s a tactile project many kids will enjoy — especially swirling the colors into the cream. “They thought it was really cool to drop the food coloring into the shaving cream and take the toothpick and swirl it,” Sarah Barrand of Caldwell, Idaho, says of her four children.

  •  
    Alt-country artist Bobby Bare Jr. will perform on Wednesday, April 23, at Schuba’s in Chicago next week.

    Music notes: Bobby Bare Jr. plays Schuba’s

    The great Bobby Bare Jr. returns to Chicago in support of his latest album, "Undefeated." Plus, Chicago rapper Twista will bring his rapid-fire vocal style to Durty Nellie's in Palatine this weekend.

  •  
    Jimmy B’s Ale House in Naperville sports a large bar and several TVs.

    Jimmy B’s sets the table for summer and sports

    Jimmy B’s Ale House, which opened in October in what once was Boston Blackie’s and for a short while City Island along Route 59 in Naperville, has already become a destination for families and other locals looking for some comfort food while they watch the game. With a new patio open for business, the bar also offers a place to lounge and enjoy the warming weather.

  •  
    Visitors can trace baseball heritage along the Louisville Slugger Walk of Fame, stretching about a mile from the Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory to the city’s minor-league ballpark in Louisville, Ky.

    Louisville: 5 free things for visitors to do

    When it’s Kentucky Derby season in Louisville, money seems to flow faster than the Ohio River. Hotels and restaurants fill up; bars serve mint juleps and Kentucky bourbon. Parties are thrown, and wagers are plunked down on the famous race at Churchill Downs. Yet there are other sure bets for entertainment that don’t cost a thing as Kentucky’s largest city offers a mix of free contemporary and historic sites — along with blooming dogwood trees.

  •  
    Sydney Morton stars as Florence Ballard, Valisia LeKae as Diana Ross and Ariana DeBose as Mary Wilson of The Supremes in the original 2013 Broadway cast of “Motown The Musical.” The show about Berry Gordy tells the story of how his Motown Records empire rose and fell and then rose again. The North American tour of “Motown The Musical” launches in Chicago at the Oriental Theatre from April 22 to July 13.

    How Chicago lured 'Motown The Musical' away from Motor City

    "Motown The Musical" launches its North American tour at Chicago's Oriental Theatre for a 12-week run starting Tuesday, April 22. The tour is notable for being eligible for the Illinois Live Theatre Production Tax Credit (part of the reason the show's producers chose Chicago versus other cities), while Chicago native and Broadway veteran Allison Semmes has been cast in the starring role of Diana Ross.

  •  
    The Robie model at Prairie Park features a kitchen, left, and a multipurpose room, right, off the main living area.

    Robie model opens at Prairie Park

    A new model home — The Robie — steps into the spotlight at Prairie Park, an upscale condominium community where several other models are also on display. “People can have a luxury lifestyle at an affordable price in this multifunctional unit,” said Nick Blackshaw, sales rep.

Discuss

  •  
    Associated Press Gov. Pat Quinn announced last week the development of Amtrak service from Chicago to Rockford. The route will include stops in Huntley and Elgin.

    Editorial: Potential for train service is welcome news
    A Daily Herald editorial says news of train service between Rockford and Chicago is welcome for Elgin and Huntley, but more details are needed.

  •  
    Madeleine Doubek

    A freshman Democrat’s daring move

    Guest columnist Madeleine Doubek: An astonishing thing just happened. A freshman Democrat dared to say no to the state’s most powerful politician, Democratic House Speaker Michael Madigan. State Rep. Scott Drury, a Highwood Democrat, was one of a few Democrats who killed Madigan’s millionaire tax.

  •  
    Madeleine Doubek

    A freshman Democrat’s daring move

    Guest columnist Madeleine Doubek: An astonishing thing just happened. A freshman Democrat dared to say no to the state’s most powerful politician, Democratic House Speaker Michael Madigan. State Rep. Scott Drury, a Highwood Democrat, was one of a few Democrats who killed Madigan’s millionaire tax.

  •  

    Strong business sector will get state on track
    A Barrington letter to the editor: Taxpayers should not be punished for the failed leadership in Springfield. Taxpayers have done their part. The only viable option for the state to grow economically is to have a strong private sector and the pathway to a strong private sector and a strong economy begins with tax relief, not more tax increases.

  •  

    Maintain tax rate to keep schools strong
    A letter to the editor: I believe if we do not maintain the current tax rate, it is not a pretty picture for our schools. We need to stand up and say, enough of the cuts. We cannot expect excellent schools while starving education. Our children and state deserve better.

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