Fittest loser

Daily Archive : Monday August 12, 2013

News

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    Wii bowling is a popular sport many compete in at the Silver Games.

    Go for the gold at Schaumburg Park District’s annual Silver Games

    Schaumburg Park District, Friendship Village of Schaumburg, Dundee Park District and Campanelli YMCA are teaming up for four sports-packed days for seniors.

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    Jacob Nodarse appeared in DuPage County court Monday, and was sentenced to 75 years in prison for the slayings of three members of a Darien family. He pleaded guilty but mentally ill to the 2010 shooting deaths of Jeffrey and Lori Kramer and their son Michael.

    75 'hopeless years' for shooter in Darien triple murder

    A DuPage County judge sentenced confessed killer Jacob Nodarse on Monday to 75 “hopeless years” in prison for his role in the murders of three members of a Darien family. The ruling by Judge Daniel Guerin spared Nodarse a formal life term but puts the 26-year-old shooter behind bars until he's about 98 years old.

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    Ruben Contreras is taken away Monday after Lake County Judge Mark Levitt sentenced him to 48 years in prison for the 2002 murder of his wife.

    Waukegan man sentenced to 48 years for murdering wife

    Calling the murder of Graciela Guijarro “incredibly shocking,” a Lake County judge sentenced a Waukegan man to 48 years in prison for killing his wife more than a decade ago. Ruben Contreras, 52, showed little emotion when the sentence was issued Monday at the Lake County courthouse.

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    With the help of the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Will Constable finally achieves his goal of catching a fish. Reaching the rest of our vacation goals also requires a little help.

    Fishing for bass and the right college during family road trip

    The goals of our family trip up north were to look at colleges for our older sons, get our youngest to catch a fish and allow all of us to have some fun, Burt Constable writes.

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    Federal cuts not as severe as expected at U of I
    Administrators at the University of Illinois were bracing for across-the-board cuts in federal research money, but say so far the impact hasn't been as severe as expected.The (Champaign) News-Gazette reports the school planned to lose more than $65 million in automatic budget cuts that went into effect in March. The school's three campuses get about $800 million in federal funding each year.

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    A new law takes gambling winnings away from deadbeat parents.

    Dead-beat parents would lose gambling winnings

    Gov. Pat Quinn on Monday signed legislation that would take gambling winnings away from deadbeat parents who are behind on their child support.

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    Environmental Protection Agency scientists use ground-penetrating radar equipment at Mount Baldy at the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore on Monday near Michigan City, Ind. They are gathering data todetermine the safety of a northern Indiana sand dune that collapsed and buried a young boy under 11 feet of sand.

    Crews start examining sand dune that collapsed on boy

    Crews examining the safety of an Indiana sand dune that collapsed on a 6-year-old Illinois boy last month are using ground-penetrating radar usually used to find buried barrels of toxic waste or broken underground pipelines.

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    The new $100 bill will have its first public showing in Chicago during the World's Fair of Money this week at the Donald E. Stephens Convention Center in Rosemont.

    New $100 bill part of money display in Rosemont

    Hundreds of professional coin and paper money dealers from around the world were busy Monday setting up shop in Rosemont to prepare for the opening day of the World's Fair of Money. One highlight of the fair is the new $100 bill, which is set to go into circulation Oct. 8. “We wanted to make sure this note was absolutely perfect,” said Kevin Brown, marketing manager for the Bureau of...

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    Patrick Lulling

    Arlington Heights man dies in motorcycle crash

    An Arlington Heights man was killed Sunday when his motorcycle collided with a minivan in Woodstock, authorities said. Patrick J. Lulling, 54, was a respected worker for the Arlington Heights Park District, who last year was recognized for his dedication to the agency.

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    Buffalo Grove ranks 46th on Money magazine's 2013 list of top small towns in America. The magazine, which included just one Illinois community on the list, praised Buffalo Grove for its open space, trails and economic stability.

    Buffalo Grove ranks among nation's best small towns

    Only one Illinois community made Monday magazine's list of America's top 50 small towns - Buffalo Grove. This is no surprise to Village President Jeffrey Braiman, who of course thinks his municipality should have ranked much higher than 46th. “Now the country knows what we always knew — Buffalo Grove is one of the great places to be," he said.

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    Howard Lazarus, 53 of Mundelein,

    Mundelein man pleads guilty to Vernon Hills police station shooting, agrees to pen apology letter to cop who shot him

    A Mundelein man who pulled a fake gun in the lobby of the Vernon Hills Police Department in April and wanted officers to kill him, pleaded guilty Monday and must write an apology to the officer who wounded him, under a plea agreement. Howard Lazarus, 53, of the 0 to 100 block of North Bristol Court, also agreed to spend six months on periodic imprisonment and 24 months on probation as part of the...

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    Randall S. Sinks

    6 years for Elgin Valentine's Day pipe beating

    A 27-year-old Elgin man accused of beating his estranged wife's new boyfriend on Valentine's Day this year with a metal pipe and then stepping in front of a truck recently was sentenced to six years in prison. Randall S. Sinks faced up to 30 years in prison, but reached a plea agreement in which other charges were dropped, records show.

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    Dale Earnhardt Jr. performs a burnout Monday morning in front of the Chicago Theatre in Chicago.

    Earnhardt Jr. makes his mark in downtown Chicago

    Race car driver Dale Earnhardt Jr. burned some rubber Monday morning in downtown Chicago to promote a triple-header chase weekend next month at Chicagoland Speedway.

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    Glen Ellyn OKs study of storm flooding fix

    A Glen Ellyn village consultant will be investigating ways to increase the rate at which stormwater leaves Lake Ellyn as one possible solution to reduce flooding in the neighborhood around the lake. Glen Ellyn officials have been looking to increase the discharge rate of the lake from its current level of 37 cubic feet per second to at least 61.4 cubic feet per second, which is the current...

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    Thomas Michael Enright

    Former pastor in Palatine, Wauconda dies

    The Rev. Thomas Michael Enright, former pastor of St. Theresa Parish in Palatine and Transfiguration Parish in Wauconda, has died.

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    What’s a ‘family’ when it comes to housing in Geneva?

    What is a family, when it comes to figuring out what people, and how many of them, can share a single-family house? Geneva officials are going to be talking about that, trying to update the city's Zoning Code to reflect changes in society and the law since it was last updated in 1995.

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    Missouri diocese identifies priest at accident scene

    A priest who seemed to appear from nowhere to pray at a northeast Missouri accident scene earlier this month came across the crash while driving between morning Mass assignments, the Roman Catholic Diocese of Jefferson City said Monday. The official identification of the Rev. Patrick Dowling as the clergyman who showed up when he was needed most ends a mystery that gripped many witnesses and...

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    Peoria diocese pays $1.35 million to settle abuse case

    The Roman Catholic Diocese of Peoria will pay $1.35 million to settle a case of sexual abuse in Normal that took place when Newark Archbishop John J. Myers was in charge there, a former altar boy’s lawyer said Monday.

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    Former Congressman Jesse Jackson Jr. will be sentenced Wednesday.

    Ex-congressman makes his prison choice known

    Former Congressman Jesse Jackson Jr. has said where he wants to serve time for illegally spending $750,000 in campaign funds. Jackson is scheduled to be sentenced Wednesday. Lawyers for the Illinois Democrat say they will ask the sentencing judge that he be housed in an Alabama prison camp or a prison in North Carolina.

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    Pleviak School could have new uses, Dist. 41 officials say

    The new school year will be the last for Lake Villa’s J.J. Pleviak Elementary School, but the 103-year-old facility isn’t headed for demolition, District 41 officials said Monday.

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    Giant goldfish invade St. Zachary Church Augustfest as carnival patrons walk by the game Thursday in Des Plaines.

    Images: The Week in Pictures
    This edition of The Week in Pictures features swings at a T-ball camp, several end-of-summer festivals, a bike rodeo, and a free dental service for kids.

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    Authorities say this man robbed a Beach Park 7-Eleven on Sunday evening.

    Police seek robber of 7-Eleven in Beach Park

    Lake County police are searching for a man who robbed a Beach Park 7-11 at gunpoint Sunday evening and may be connected to other armed robberies in the area.

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    U.S. Sen Dick Durbin says he hopes the House takes action this year on immigration legislation the Senate approved to enhance border security and establish a legal path to citizenship for some of the nation’s estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants.

    Durbin calls for ‘cooperation’ on immigration reform

    Saying the country has “a rare“ opportunity to enact sweeping immigration reform, Sen. Dick Durbin said he hopes U.S. House members take action this year on legislation recently passed by the Senate. “But I’m a realist,” Durbin said. “We are a divided Congress with a Republican House and Democratic Senate. We know it’s going to take some time and a lot of cooperation.”

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    Mount Prospect Fire Department firefighter/paramedic Brad Bocox carries backpacks and school supplies to the village’s Community Connections Center.

    Mount Prospect firefighters donate backpacks, school supplies

    Mount Prospect firefighters didn't hesitate to answer a call from the village’s Community Connections Center to help some children in need. On Monday, they dropped off 18 backpacks loaded with crayons, scissors, calculators and plenty of other grade-appropriate school supplies to benefit the resource center’s annual School Supply Drive for families who are struggling financially.

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    Golf outing to benefit Schaumburg Park Foundation

    The sixth annual Links Technology Cup golf outing benefiting the Schaumburg Park Foundation will take place beginning at 9:30 a.m. Wednesday, Aug. 14, at Schaumburg Golf Club, 401 N. Roselle Road.

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    Mark Kirk

    Kirk to visit Illinois State Fair

    U.S. Sen. Mark Kirk is making his first trip to central Illinois since his January 2012 stroke. Kirk’s keynote appearance at Republican Day at the Illinois State Fair Thursday will be his first major political event since he revealed his intention to run for re-election in 2016.

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    Route 173 work in Wadsworth, Old Mill Creek

    Drivers need to be aware of more construction set for northern Lake County.

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    Proft to headline Schaumburg Republican event

    WLS-AM radio host and political commentator Dan Proft will be the special guest speaker later this month at the Schaumburg Township Republican Organization’s monthly breakfast meeting.

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    Mundelein High open house on Aug. 21

    Mundelein High School hosts its annual open house for parents and guardians of MHS students Wednesday, Aug. 21, from 7 to 9 p.m.

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    Grayslake Dist. 46 screenings set

    Grayslake Elementary District 46 plans to offer preschool screening.

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    Devin R. Hall, 21, of St. Charles Township, was charged with illegal transportation of alcohol, possession of drug paraphernalia, driving while his license is suspended and failure to signal a turn at 11:19 p.m. Aug. 3 on Fox Wilds Drive in St. Charles Township, according to a sheriff’s report. His passenger, Calee Pylypiw, 19, of Elgin, was charged with illegal consumption of alcohol by a minor,...

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    Fox Valley police reports
    Weston P. Tillman, 20, of Elgin, was charged with burglary to motor vehicles Aug. 2, according to a sheriff’s report. He is accused of stealing two purses and a coin purse out of two unlocked vehicles in the 14N400 block of Oliver Drive near Elgin.

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    Police on Monday released this composite sketch of a man who approached a teen girl last month near Wheaton. Anyone with information on the case is being asked to call (630) 407-2400.

    Cops looking for man who approached teen near Wheaton

    The DuPage County sheriff’s office is investigating a suspicious incident in which a teen girl was approached by an unknown man near Wheaton, police said Monday.

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    Judge denies class-action for Chicago schools suit

    The majority of the nearly 50 Chicago elementary schools slated for closure will likely proceed after a federal judge denied class-action status to the two main lawsuits at the center of a dispute pitting parents and education officials.

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    A portion of a building at the Summer Bay Resort rests in a sinkhole Monday in Clermont, Fla. The sinkhole, 40 to 50 feet in diameter, opened up overnight and damaged three buildings at the resort.

    Sinkhole causes Orlando-area resort villa to partially collapse

    As glass broke, the ground shook and lights went out, vacationers evacuated a central Florida resort building before a sinkhole caused a section of the villa to partially collapse early Monday. About 30 percent of the three-story structure collapsed around 3 a.m. Monday, Lake County Fire Rescue Battalion Chief Tony Cuellar said, and another section was sinking.

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    In this May 3, 2013 file photo, Vice President Joe Biden speaks during the South Carolina Democratic parties Jefferson Jackson Dinner in Columbia, SC. Biden may run for president in 2016, or he may not. But he wants you to know he could. Iowa. New Hampshire, South Carolina. Michigan. Three years out from the next presidential election, the vice president is polishing his connections and racking up favors in all the right states to ensure he stays part of the conversation, keeping his name near the top of a list of likely contenders even if the prime spot seems to have already been claimed by Hillary Rodham Clinton.

    Biden keeps his name in the game for 2016

    Joe Biden may run for president in 2016, or he may not. But he wants you to know he could. Iowa. New Hampshire, South Carolina. Michigan. Three years out from the next presidential election, the vice president is polishing his connections and racking up favors in all the right states to ensure he stays part of the conversation, keeping his name near the top of a list of likely contenders even if...

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    Sheriff: Suspect in Idaho exchanged gunfire

    A close family friend suspected of abducting a 16-year old girl after killing her mother and younger brother fired at least one shot at FBI rescuers before agents killed him deep in the Idaho wilderness, authorities said Monday. Hannah Anderson didn’t know her mother and brother were dead until she was rescued, San Diego County Sheriff Bill Gore said Monday. “It was clear from the information...

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    U.S. District Court Judge Shira Scheindlin has appointed a monitor to oversee the New York Police Department’s controversial stop-and-search policy, saying it intentionally discriminates based on race and has violated the rights of tens of thousands of people. On Monday, Scheindlin ruled in favor of four men who said they were unfairly targeted.

    U.S. judge says NYPD stop-frisk violates rights

    The New York Police Department deliberately violated the civil rights of tens of thousands of New Yorkers with its contentious stop-and-frisk policy, and an independent monitor is needed to oversee major changes, a federal judge ruled Monday in a stinging rebuke for what the mayor and police commissioner have defended as a life-saving, crime-fighting tool.

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    Supporters of Egypt’s ousted President Mohammed Morsi chant slogans during their sit-in around Rabaa Al-Adawiya mosque, which is fortified with multiple walls of bricks, tires, metal barricades and sandbags, where protesters have installed their camp in Nasser City, Cairo, Egypt, on Monday.

    Egypt postpones dispersing pro-Morsi protest camps

    Egyptian authorities on Monday postponed a move to disperse two Cairo sit-ins by supporters of the country’s ousted president to “avoid bloodshed,” an official said, as Islamist supporters stepped up rallies to demand his return to power. The postponement could, at least temporarily, defuse tensions that had escalated overnight as the country braced for a new bout of violence. Any moves by the...

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    Fayette County man mauled by captive bear

    A southern Illinois man was mauled by his black bear at a farm in rural Fayette County. Marion Julius suffered a broken hip and leg as well as bites to his arm when he went into the bear’s cage Sunday.

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    Jack McCullough

    McCullough planning appeal in 1957 murder case

    Jack McCullough says he has hope for success with his planned appeal of his conviction in the 1957 murder of a young girl in Sycamore.

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    United States Attorney Gen. Eric Holder speaks to the American Bar Association Annual Meeting Monday, Aug. 12, 2013, in San Francisco. In remarks to the association, Holder said the Obama administration is calling for major changes to the nation’s criminal justice system that would cut back the use of harsh sentences for certain drug-related crimes.

    Holder wants to scale back sentences for some drug crimes

    With the U.S. facing massive overcrowding in its prisons, Attorney General Eric Holder called Monday for major changes to the nation’s criminal justice system that would scale back the use of harsh sentences for certain drug-related crimes. In remarks to the American Bar Association in San Francisco, Holder said he also favors diverting people convicted of low-level offenses to drug treatment and...

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    Deerfield orders residents to boil drinking water

    The Village of Deerfield issued a drinking water alert Monday afternoon and ordered residents to boil water before drinking.

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    Former Penn State University assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky was sentenced to 30-60 years in prison for sexually abusing 10 boys.

    Illinois gets $188,000 from Penn State settlement

    The University of Illinois has received $188,000 as part of a legal settlement between the Big Ten Conference and Pennsylvania State University. The money comes after the Pennsylvania school’s child sex abuse scandal involving former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky. The Illinois money will go to four agencies that help families deal with child abuse trauma.

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    Kurtis Worley

    Judge grants camera access in Addison murder case

    A judge ruled Monday in favor of allowing in-court photography of an Addison man accused of stabbing his wife to death last month. DuPage County Judge Blanche Hill Fawell granted blanket access, meaning photography would be allowed at Kurtis Worley’s Aug. 26 arraignment and all other court dates.

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    This June 23, 2011 booking file photo provided by the U.S. Marshals Service shows James “Whitey” Bulger, who fled Boston in 1994 and was captured 2011 in Santa Monica, Calif., after 16 years on the run. A jury found Bulger guilty on several counts of murder, racketeering and conspiracy Monday, Aug. 12, 2013 in federal court in Boston.

    Jury convicts mob boss ‘Whitey’ Bulger

    Jurors have reached a verdict in the racketeering trial of James “Whitey” Bulger. The 83-year-old Bulger is charged in a sweeping racketeering indictment with participating in 19 killings during the 1970s and `80s while he led the Winter Hill Gang.

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    Agents: 44 gunned down in Nigeria mosque

    MAIDUGURI, Nigeria — Suspected Islamic militants wearing army fatigues gunned down 44 people praying at a mosque in northeast Nigeria, while another 12 civilians died in an apparently simultaneous attack, security agents said Monday.

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    The sun sets on the opening night of South Elgin’s RiverFest Express. This year, the festival runs Thursday, Aug. 15, through Sunday, Aug. 18, at Panton Mill Park.

    South Elgin festival reaches out to special needs families

    Years ago, when organizers with South Elgin RiverFest Express decided for the first time that they wanted to offer a special night with free rides and food for kids with special needs, it was no easy task — especially since they had under four weeks to plan it. After the idea came up at a meeting, organizers had to work fast to get food vendors and their carnival supplier on board, but it was...

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    Water pumps at the Central Lake County Joint Action Water Agency facility in Lake Bluff. The agency would supply Lake Michigan water to Lindenhurst, Lake Villa and two unincorporated areas under a pending plan.

    Some Lake County property owners get say on tax hike

    Lake County officials want to establish a special taxing district to raise up to $46 million to pay the costs associated with getting Lake Michigan water to taps in Lindenhurst, Lake Villa and two unincorporated areas. The 11,600 property owners in the proposed district can weigh in on the idea at a public hearing Tuesday.

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    Naperville to begin Bauer Road construction project

    Bauer Road in Naperville between Mill Street and Briargate Drive is set to be reconstructed beginning this week as part of the city’s $9.3 million roadway resurfacing program.

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    Daniel Huber

    Woodstock man gets 3 years probation for fatal 2012 street race

    A 21-year-old Woodstock man who left the scene after two teens crashed into a pole and died while street racing in July 2012 was sentenced to three years probation. Daniel Huber also served 180 days in jail, must complete 120 hours of public service and could be resentenced to up to three years in prison if he violates probation.

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    Douglas Larsson

    Wauconda board could vote on police chief Tuesday

    The Wauconda village board will hold a special meeting tonight to vote on a number of mayoral appointments that were delayed earlier this summer -- including the next police chief. Mayor Frank Bart ousted Chief Douglas Larsson and proposed promoting Sgt. Patrick Yost to chief after he took office in May, but the promotion was delayed after the community expressed outrage over the move.

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    Arlington Hts. Police Department takes first prize

    The Arlington Heights Police Department has been awarded first place in the 2012 National Law Enforcement Challenge for municipal police departments having 101-200 sworn officers, by the International Association of Chiefs of Police.

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    How alcohol testing will work at St. Viator High School

    Although St. Viator High School has been conducting random drug testing for several years, the technology that allows scientists to determine how much alcohol a student has consumed in the past 90 days is fairly new. Here's a detailed, step-by-step look at how the testing works.

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    In this Feb. 4, 2009 file photo, the sun beats down on construction workers constructing the border wall in Granjeno, Texas. If Congress agrees on a comprehensive immigration reform bill, it will probably include a requirement to erect fencing that would wrap more of the nation’s nearly 2,000-mile Southwest border in tall steel columns.

    Immigration debate renews debate over border fence

    If Congress agrees on a comprehensive immigration reform bill, it will probably include a requirement to erect fencing that would wrap more of the nation’s nearly 2,000-mile Southwest border in tall steel columns. “It doesn’t do what proponents think it does,” said Rep. Filemon Vela, of Brownsville, who resigned from the Congressional Hispanic Caucus in protest. “Building more fence makes no...

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    This June 23, 2011 booking photo provided by the U.S. Marshals Service shows James "Whitey" Bulger, who fled Boston in 1994 and wasn't captured until 2011 in Santa Monica, Calif., after 16 years on the run. Jurors have reached a verdict in the racketeering trial of Bulger.

    'Whitey' Bulger guilty in gangland killings

    James "Whitey" Bulger, the feared Boston mob boss who became one of the nation's most-wanted fugitives, was convicted Monday in a string of 11 killings and other gangland crimes, many of them committed while he was said to be an FBI informant.

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    Bryant Scharenbroch has been honored for his work as an urban soil scientist at the Morton Arboretum in Lisle.

    Arboretum scientist honored for work with urban soils

    An urban soil scientist at the Morton Arboretum in Lisle, Bryant Scharenbroch, is this year’s recipient of the International Society of Arboriculture’s Early Career Scientist Award.

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    Morton Arboretum
    The following events and programs are offered at Morton Arboretum, 4100 Route 53, Lisle. Activities are free with admission, unless noted. Admission is $12 for adults, $11 for seniors 65 and older, $9 for ages 2 to 17, free for younger children. On Wednesdays, admission is $8 for adults, $7 for seniors, $6 for ages 2 to 17. Members are always free. Info: (630) 968-0074 or mortonarb.org.

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    The first phase of renovations to Elmhurst College’s Arthur J. Schaible Science Center will center around improvements to classrooms and science labs. The work is being made possible, in part, by $1.5 million in state grants.

    Grant to help Elmhurst College expand science center

    Elmhurst College has received $1.5 million in state grants to help finance the renovation and expansion of the Arthur J. Schaible Science Center.

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    Mexico’s President Enrique Pena Nieto, right, greets the audience as his Interior Secretary Miguel Angel Osorio Chong, left, applauds upon his arrival to the ceremony to announce his proposal that would allow private firms in the oil industry in Mexico City, Monday, Aug. 12, 2013. Pena Nieto is making his most daring gamble yet, with a proposal to lift a decades-old ban on private companies in the state-run oil industry, a cornerstone of Mexico’s national pride.

    Mexico proposes private firms in oil industry

    Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto is making the most daring gamble yet of his 8-month-old presidency, with a proposal to lift a decades-old ban on private companies in the state-run oil industry, a cornerstone of Mexico’s national pride. Cesar Camacho, the national leader of Pena Nieto’s party, said that “it isn’t much use saying that the country’s natural resources belong to Mexicans, if they...

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    Dr. Rebecca Carl, pediatric sports medicine physician at Ann and Robert H. Lurie children’s Hospital of Chicago, examines Ethan Valenciana, 12, of Chicago.

    Skeleton is the scaffolding that supports the human body

    “Is it possible to be born without all the bones in your body?” asked students in Nancy Sullivan's sixth-grade class at Frederick Nerge Elementary School, Roselle.

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    Zimbabwean President-elect Robert Mugabe reads his speech during the country’s commemoration of Heroes’ Day in Harare, Monday. Zimbabwe’s longtime president says his party will not yield its victory in elections that although disputed were endorsed by African observers and conducted without the violence that marred previous polls.

    Zimbabwe president: ‘Enemy’ tossed like ‘garbage’

    Zimbabwe’s longtime President Robert Mugabe says his party will not yield its victory in elections that although disputed were endorsed by African observers and conducted without the violence that marred previous polls.

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    Two men were arrested in a double homicide and the abduction of two-year-old Isaiah Perez from a Rhode Island home.

    Police ID victims in RI slayings, abduction

    Authorities believe Daniel Rodriguez broke into the home of Evelyn Burgos, 40, before shooting Burgos and her 25-year-old daughter, Vanessa Perez, and abducting Burgos’ 2-year-old son, Johnston Police Chief Richard S. Tamburini said Monday. Police arrested a second man, Malcolm Crowell, 22, in Fall River, Mass., but released him after determining he had no involvement in the crime.

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    Indian army soldiers carry the coffin of their colleague Naik Kundalik Mane, allegedly killed by Pakistani soldiers Tuesday, during his funeral procession at Pimpalgaon village, in the western Indian state of Maharashtra, Thursday, Aug. 8, 2013. India has directly accused Pakistani army troops of killing five Indian soldiers in the disputed Himalayan region of Kashmir and implied this could hit peace efforts by the two countries. Pakistan accused Indian troops of shelling its territory along the disputed Kashmir border on Monday and killing a civilian, the latest in a series of allegations of cross-border attacks made by both sides over the past week.

    Pakistan accuses India of shelling, killing man

    Pakistan accused Indian troops of shelling its territory along the disputed Kashmir border on Monday and killing a civilian, the latest in a series of allegations of cross-border attacks made by both sides over the past week. The Pakistani Foreign Ministry summoned India’s deputy high commissioner in Islamabad to protest the incident and called on the country to uphold the 2003 cease-fire...

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    People walk past a trash bin in central London, Monday. Officials say that an advertising firm must immediately stop using its network of high-tech trash cans, like this one, to track people walking through London's financial district.

    UK: Firm must stop tracking people with trash cans

    Officials say that an advertising firm must immediately stop using its network of high-tech trash cans to track people walking through London's financial district. The company tested the technology in May but received a burst of publicity last week, with some wondering whether the technology was legal.

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    Artist R.J. Ogren works on his mural, “Pearls of the Universe,” on a wall at 1026 College Ave. in Wheaton. Inspired by a poem by Wheaton resident Mehret Asgedom, the mural aims to celebrate the city's diversity and the impact immigrants have had on its growth and success.

    Supporters hope new Wheaton mural celebrates diversity, togetherness

    A sprawling 70-foot-wide mural taking shape this summer just east of Wheaton's downtown aims to celebrate the city's diversity and the impact immigrants have had on its growth and success. When it's finished, supporters hope the mural will help in some small way to bring the community closer together; to remind us of what we have in common rather than what sets us apart.

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    The Elmhurst Symphony Orchestra has a total budget of about $270,000, including about $22,000 from a community grant from the city of Elmhurst. The orchestra is pictured in a past performance at The Elmhurst Christian Reformed Church.

    Why the Elgin Symphony Orchestra is atypical in the suburbs

    The Elgin Symphony Orchestra is atypical among its suburban counterparts because it received direct funding from the city of Elgin — on average $125,000 yearly from the community's share of revenues from Grand Victoria Casino — until a couple of years ago. Those days are over, though, and the ESO may soon have to join its peers in seeking community grants instead.

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    Associated Press An election worker tallies votes in a polling station, after the close of polls in Mali’s presidential runoff, in Bamako, Mali, Sunday, Aug. 11, 2013. From the ancient desert town of Timbuktu to refugee camps in neighboring countries, voters chose Sunday who should lead Mali out of the political upheaval that left the country’s north in the hands of al-Qaida-linked militants for much of last year. Mali’s next president will be tasked with not only rebuilding the country’s shattered economy but also resolving a simmering separatist movement in the far north.

    EU mission says Mali second-round vote calm

    The head of the European Union observer mission is praising Malians for holding a peaceful presidential runoff vote only months after a military operation in the north. Mali has suffered a separatist rebellion, a coup and a war against Islamic insurgents in less than two years.

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    In this July 18, 2013 file photo demonstrators, holding images depicting National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden, demonstrate outside the regional office of the presidency in Sao Paulo, Brazil, to show their discontent for Brazil’s rejection of Snowden’s asylum application. As U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry travels to Colombia and Brazil this week to build on efforts to deepen relations with Latin America, he can expect a curt reception from two U.S. allies, both Brazil and Colombia, after reports that the NSA spy program widely targeted data in emails and telephone calls across the region.

    Kerry trip to Brazil, Colombia could be chilly

    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry is visiting Brazil and Colombia this week, his first trip to South America as the Obama administration’s chief diplomat. It comes at a time that disclosures by National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden could chill talks. Colombia’s president said that he wanted clarification on whether U.S. intelligence-gathering in Colombia had overstepped the countries’...

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    Anthony Weiner, running in the New York Mayors race, right, reacts after sharing a moment with a spectator and her plantains, left, as he takes part in the Dominican Day Parade on New York’s Avenue of the Americas Sunday.

    Most N.Y. voters embarrassed by Weiner, Spitzer

    Most New Yorkers watching Anthony Weiner and Eliot Spitzer in political races dominated by sex scandals want to forget about them, according to a poll released Monday. The Siena College poll found that 68 percent of state voters and 62 percent of New York City voters are embarrassed by the national attention to the men’s candidacies.

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    Members of the Baguio City Disaster Risk Reduction Management Council and local police clean up the screen of the City Camp Lagoon Tunnel in Baguio city, as powerful typhoon Utor batters the northern Philippines on Monday, toppling power lines and dumping heavy rain across mountains, cities and food-growing plains.

    Typhoon batters Philippines; 2 dead, 45 missing

    A powerful typhoon battered the northern Philippines on Monday, toppling power lines and dumping heavy rain across cities and food-growing plains. The storm left at least two people dead and 45 missing. Typhoon Utor, described as the strongest globally this year, slammed ashore in mountainous eastern Aurora province with sustained winds of 109 miles per hour and gusts of up to 130 mph.

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    Sophie Mortner, foreground right, reads aloud for youngsters attending LitCamp, a summer reading program offered through the nonprofit literacy organization LitWorld, in the Harlem neighborhood of New York.

    Not vacation: Summer learning programs crucial

    For many students and teachers, summer vacation was more like summer term.Reading lists. Science camps. Portfolio development. The to-do list for kids and teachers sound remarkably alike. Schools are on the hook to improve student performance on high-stakes tests, administrators are eyeing more science and technology instruction, and parents are demanding more for their children.

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    Mount Rokatenda spews volcanic smoke on Palue island, Indonesia, Monday. The volcano spewed more hot ash and lava on the tiny Indonesian island Monday after causing six deaths during its eruption over the weekend.

    Volcano spews more hot ash, lava in east Indonesia

    A volcano spewed more hot ash and lava on a tiny Indonesian island Monday after causing six deaths over the weekend. More than 500 Palue island residents who had earlier refused to leave the 1.9-mile exclusion zone around Mount Rokatenda have been evacuated to the neighboring island of Flores, said Mutiara Mauboi, an official at a disaster command post.

  •  

    More human remains found in Mackinaw River

    More body parts were found in a central Illinois river and authorities believe they belong to a 74-year-old man whose remains were found in two counties. The two more sets of remains were found Sunday afternoon in the Mackinaw River near Kappa. They were found about a quarter mile from the spot where a man’s torso was found Aug. 3. He’d been shot. Other remains were found in a Woodford County...

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    Chicago announces first 12 automated speed locales

    The Chicago Department of Transportation is announcing the first 12 automated speed enforcement sites as part of the city’s “Children’s Safety Zones.” Cameras will monitor speed and revenue from violations will go toward afterschool programs, anti-violence and jobs programs, crossing guards and police around schools, and more.

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    Girl, 4, wounded in Chicago shooting

    A 4-year-old girl was one of three people who were wounded during a shooting on Chicago’s northwest side. Chicago Police say the girl was in a car with two other people when she was shot in the hip around 10:30 p.m. Sunday. She’s in stable condition.

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    Holocaust survivors remembers parents with Torah

    An 88-year-old Holocaust survivor is honoring her parents and those of her late husband by giving a $40,000 handwritten Torah she commissioned to a Skokie synagogue. The Chicago Sun-Times reported Sunday that Marge Fettman was 17 when she was separated from family members at the Auschwitz Nazi death camp. They died but she was spared.

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    ‘Valor Games’ for disabled veterans to begin

    Hundreds of veterans and service members are set to compete in the annual Valor Games Midwest. The event for the disabled begins Monday and ends Wednesday. The events include cycling, archery, powerlifting and indoor rowing.

  •  
    Nasser al-Wahishi, the leader of the Yemen-based al-Qaida offshoot, vowed in a message posted Monday to free fellow militants from prisons.

    Yemen’s al-Qaida leader vows to free prisoners

    The leader of the Yemen-based al-Qaida offshoot vowed in a message posted Monday to free fellow militants from prisons and urged jailed fighters to remain faithful to the terror group’s ideology. The note by Nasser al-Wahishi, a onetime aide to Osama bin Laden, came after last week’s closure of 19 U.S. diplomatic missions in the Middle East and Africa. The shutdowns were triggered by the...

  •  
    Greg Myerson, of North Branford, Conn., shows one of the record striped bass he caught off the Connecticut coast. Myerson consistently catches striped bass 50 pounds and much larger by methodically studying his prey and developing devices to lure the fish to him.

    Conn. man snags striped bass records over and over

    When Greg Myerson heads out in his boat, some fishermen will follow him. The famous want to fish with him. He’s the Warren Buffett of the fishing world, giving seminars in which he’ll tell some but not all his secrets. The Connecticut man has achieved a rare feat: He consistently catches striped bass 50 pounds and much larger.

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    Kevin Selchert shows how a hair sample is taken from volunteer Whitney Kreeps for a drug test at the Alexian Brothers Medical Group Immediate Care center in Palatine. The test requires three samples, each about the width of a pencil head, of about 20-30 strands of hair.

    Drug and alcohol testing rare in suburban schools, but views evolving

    While St. Viator High School in Arlington Heights made national news last week with its announcement it would test students for alcohol use, many suburban high school districts say they have not had discussions about testing students for drugs or alcohol. The few that do test say it's worth it. “The testing program gives students one more reason to say 'no' to peer pressure," Dist. 127...

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    From left, Alicia Ziller, of Highland, Ind., and Mike Carbondaro, of Tonawanda, N.Y., pose for a photo Sunday at Wizard World Chicago in Rosemont.

    Dawn Patrol: Officer held on sex abuse charges; Comic Con wraps up

    Officer from Cary held on sex abuse charges; celebs, costumed heroes pack Rosemont convention; crowdfunding campaign begins for Naperville Navy sculpture; Ryder Cup star Dufner now a major champion

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    Students at Lincoln Elementary School in Palatine Township Elementary District 15 will use two mobile classrooms due to a space shortage. The unit on the left, which is in the process of being painted and updated, will house a full-time regular classroom. The unit on the right will continue to be used part-time for some subjects.

    Dist. 15 makes adjustments to cope with space shortages

    Although space is at a premium throughout Palatine Townshp Elementary District 15, officials have made several moves to ease the burden at some of the more crowded schools.

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    Karen Leinen is a special-education teacher at Dundee-Crown High School in Carpentersville. She recently finished her dissertation this summer for a doctorate in adolescent literacy.

    Dundee-Crown special education teacher stresses literacy

    Karen Leinen's 15 years moving up the corporate ladder with FedEx gave her plenty of leadership training and recognition, but “I found that no matter how much personal success I had achieved, there was something still missing. I was doing it all for me,” Leinen said. “None of it was in the service of others.” She now teaches special education at Dundee-Crown High School in...

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    Lea Michele speaks on stage at the Teen Choice Awards at the Gibson Amphitheater on Sunday in Los Angeles. Pictured in background from left, are her “Glee” co-stars Jenna Ushkowitz, Amber Riley and Kevin McHale.

    Weekend in Review: Officer from cary charged; Teen Choice Awards
    What you may have missed over the weekend: Addison officer saves man with defibrillator. Palatine vocalist takes top spot in Suburban Chicago's Got Talent; Schaumburg police on look out for woman's attackers; Quentin Road expansion back on track; Trestman says Bears' O-line shift expected: Cubs can't pull off sweep against Cardinals; White Sox drop 3 of 4 in series against Twins; and the Teen...

  •  
    Your Metra fare paid for a trainload of consultants to offer a hand with the up-to $718,000 compensation package for former CEO Alex Clifford.

    Consultant spending worries remaining Metra leaders

    Damage control over Metra’s latest scandal has cost $18,000 so far, and it’s only a small piece of the consulting pie that’s surpassing $300,000 as the agency deals with fallout from the exit of CEO Alex Clifford and allegations of corruption. And what troubles some remaining members of Metra’s greatly diminished board is they had no idea money was flying out the door.

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    Sen. Heather Steans, a Chicago Democrat, co-sponsored legislation requiring schools that teach sex education to include birth control and sexually transmitted diseases as part of the curriculum.

    Sex ed law may mean little change for most schools

    Illinois schools that teach sex education will be required to provide information about birth control and sexually transmitted diseases — not just abstinence — under a bill that Gov. Pat Quinn has said he’ll sign into law. Some districts say they’re already meeting the bill’s requirements, though some statistics suggest that many others are not.

Sports

  •  
    Baseball fans look over a railing at Turner Field near the scene where a man fell 65 feet to his death Monday in Atlanta.

    Man killed in stadium fall was lifelong Braves fan

    The mother of a Georgia man who died after falling from the upper deck of Turner Field in Atlanta says her son was a lifelong Braves fan who followed the team through losing seasons as well as winning ones. Ronald Lee Homer Jr., 30, fell about 65 feet at Monday night's game, authorities said.

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    Offensive linemen Jordan Mills (67) and Kyle Long earned the praise of Bears coach Marc Trestman for their performance in practice Monday.

    Rookies Long, Mills earn Trestman's praise

    Bears rookie offensive linemen Kyle Long and Jordan Mills continued to work with the first team and acquitted themselves well in an intense practice, according to coach Marc Trestman.

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    Third baseman Kris Bryant was the Cubs' first-round pick in the 2013 draft.

    Bryant makes the grade, moves to high-A Daytona

    The Cubs on Monday promoted this year's top draft pick, Kris Bryant, from Class A Boise to high-A Daytona. Bryant had a 15-game hitting streak at Boise. He will bypass the Kane County Cougars, but he will have a chance at the playoffs in Daytona.

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    White Sox starter Chris Sale delivers on the way to his league-best fourth complete game Monday against the Detroit Tigers at U.S. Cellular Field.

    Sale provides another winning answer

    The Tigers' Torii Hunter called Chris Sale the "best left-hander in the game," and the White Sox' ace showed why in Monday night's 6-2 win over Detroit at U.S. Cellular Field. Sale pitched his fourth complete game, tops in the American League.

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    Cincinnati’s Todd Frazier tags out the Cubs’ Junior Lake at third base after a single by Anthony Rizzo during the sixth inning Monday at Wrigley Field.

    Runless run continues at Wrigley

    The Cubs haven’t been home in awhile, so it might be easy to forget how long it’s been since they scored a run at Wrigley Field. “Three games,” said manager Dale Sveum after Monday night’s 2-0 loss to the Cincinnati Reds. The Cubs were shut out for the third straight home game. The Dodgers blanked them Aug. 3 and 4. The last Cubs run at Wrigley came in the fourth inning of the Aug. 2 game against L.A.

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    White Sox catcher Josh Phegley talks with starter Andre Rienzo during a recent game in Cleveland.

    Phegley fighting to regain early flair

    New White Sox catcher Josh Phegley understands why he's been slumping after getting off to a fast start. Phegley took some early batting practice Monday and made some adjustments before going 2-for-4 with 2 RBI in the Sox' 6-2 win over the Tigers.

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    White Sox starting pitcher Chris Sale, left, celebrates his complete game win over the Tigers with Jeff Keppinger, center and Alexei Ramirez on Monday at U.S. Cellular Field.

    Sale goes the distance in 6-2 win over Detroit

    Chris Sale scattered nine hits in his fourth complete game of the season, and the Chicago White Sox overcame Miguel Cabrera’s fourth homer in fourth games to beat the Detroit Tigers 6-2 on Monday night. Josh Phegley, Gordon Beckham and Alexei Ramirez singled in runs in a three-run fifth inning as Chicago handed AL Central-leading Detroit its third loss in four games.

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    Cincinnati’s Todd Frazier tags out the Cubs’ Junior Lake at third base after a single by Anthony Rizzo during the sixth inning Monday in Chicago.

    Latos, Reds handcuff Cubs, 2-0

    Mat Latos threw eight scoreless innings and Brandon Phillips hit a two-run homer in the seventh inning to lead the Cincinnati Reds to a 2-0 win over All-Star Travis Wood and the Chicago Cubs on Monday night. Latos, who had been 3-0 with a 1.73 ERA since the All-Star break, allowed six hits and struck out nine for the Reds, who gained a half-game on idle Pittsburgh and St. Louis in the NL Central.

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    PGA Tour pro Luke Donald, right, congratulates Northwestern University men’s basketball coach Chris Collins after his putt on the first hole as they play against pro Mark Wilson and Bulls guard Kirk Hinrich during an exhibition Monday at Conway Farms Golf Club in Lake Forest. The exhibition was held in advance of the BMW Championship at the course Sept. 9-15.

    NU stars score big for charity in BMW exhibition

    With the BMW Championship at Conway Farms Golf Club just a month away, PGA Tour pros Luke Donald and Mark Wilson joined Bulls guard Kirk Hinrich and Northwestern basketball coach Chris Collins in golf exhibition Monday to benefit the Evans Scholars Foundation.

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    Track announcer John Dooley can easily reel off the details of each of the previous 13 runnings of the Arlington Million. The 47-year-old will call Arlington’s signature race and three Grade I races on Saturday’s card.

    Dooley’s mantra: A bad day at the track is still good

    When track announcer John Dooley took over the reins at Arlington in 2000, he brought with him an intense passion for the game. That hasn't changed a bit as Saturday's Arlington Million approaches. "It’s exciting. This year is a true global race. Horses are coming from all parts of the world,” Dooley said. “Outside of the Breeders’ Cup, when are you going to have such talent in North America on one day?”

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    Ninth-inning rally helps Cougars demote Kernels

    Entering Monday’s game against the Cedar Rapids Kernels at Fifth Third Bank Ballpark in Geneva, the Kane County Cougars were 0-53 when trailing after 8 innings. After Monday’s game, the Cougars are 1-53. They scored twice in the bottom of the ninth to defeat the Kernels 4-3.

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    Baseball history in the making as the Schaumburg Boomers and the Florence Freedom players take the field at Boomers Stadium in Schaumburg on Friday.

    A fan’s guide to Schuamburg Boomers baseball

    The Schaumburg Boomers' team goal is to win, but their organization's goal is to help fans enjoy their time from the moment they park to whenever they leave. And with so many different types of fans, the Boomers try to offer something for everyone. Here's a guide to picking the right experience for you.

  •  
    Bears defensive linemen Nate Collins (93) and Shea McClellin (99) are vying for playing time in Bears training camp at Olivet Nazarene University in Bourbonnais. Both should see plenty of action in Thursday’s second exhibition game.

    Journeyman Collins’ stock climbing

    Defensive tackle Nate Collins made a great first impression in the Bears' preseason opener, and because of the concussion suffered by starter Henry Melton, the backup should continue to get opportunities to make a case for his spot on the final roster.

  •  
    T.J. Edwards will again play quarterback at Lakes this season, but his collegiate future is at linebacker for Western Michigan.

    Lakes’ Edwards has Western Michigan’s backing

    After he threw for nearly 1,800 yards and 19 touchdowns for Lakes last season, T.J. Edwards’ ability to throw the football is clear. Western Michigan University likes his ability to run to the football, as well, apparently. With the first official day of high school football practice set for Wednesday, Edwards will look to direct the Eagles to another successful season as a second-year starting quarterback. Once the senior graduates, he will head to Western Michigan, which plans to switch the 6-foot-1, 215-pound athlete to linebacker.

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    Prospect’s Ally Scaccia, left, and Kacie O’Donnell recently placed 1-2 in the IJGA Player of the Year championship at Bowes Creek Country Club in Elgin.

    Karabetsos enjoys profitable trip out west

    You could say Eclipse Select Soccer Club midfielder Katy Karabetsos, a native of Buffalo Grove, hit a jackpot in Las Vegas. Karabetsos’ performance at the Las Vegas Players Showcase in March paid big dividends. The member of the Eclipse Select’s U-17 Elite Clubs National League team caught the eyes of coaches for San Jose State’s women’s soccer program. After they contacted Eclipse president Rory Dames to get the ball rolling, the Spartans are now looking forward to having Karabetsos on the pitch in the fall of 2014. “It was just luck, I guess,” Karabetsos said in the club's news release. “We were at the showcase in Vegas and their coach happened to be walking by and saw me stand out during a game. He contacted Rory and showed interest.”

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    Delle Donne nets 3rd WNBA weekly honor

    After averaging 21 points in three games, Sky rookie Elena Delle Donne was named the WNBA Eastern Conference Player of the Week for games played Aug. 5-11. It’s the third Player of the Week award for Delle Donne, who averaged 21 points and 5.67 rebounds in the contests.

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    Wolves’ 20th home opener set for Oct. 12

    The Chicago Wolves will celebrate their 20th home opener on Oct. 12 at the Allstate Arena in Rosemont. “We’re embarking on the 20th season of Chicago Wolves hockey, and it promises to be a special one,” said Wolves president of Business Operations Mike Gordon. “With all of our offseason changes, including the return of four-time champion John Anderson as our head coach, we expect to have a memorable season at Allstate Arena.”

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    Blackhawks hire Weeks to coach goalies

    The Chicago Blackhawks have hired Steve Weeks as the team’s goaltending coach. Weeks, 55, has more than 25 years of NHL experience as a player, coach and scout, most recently as an assistant coach and goaltending specialist with the Atlanta Thrashers from 2001 to 2010.

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    Mike North video: Tiger will never pass Jack

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    Talking White Sox trades and Konerko's future

    Chris Rongey discusses the recent flurry of White Sox trades and ponders the future of one of the franchise's all-time best hitters, Paul Konerko.

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    St. Louis Cardinals’ Matt Holliday, right, is congratulated by Carlos Beltran, after his 3-run home run against the Cubs in the fourth inning Saturday.

    Cardinals offer view of Cubs’ hopes

    Every time Len Kasper sees the Cardinals he asks himself, how in the world do they do it year after year? While in St. Louis over the weekend, he sought out some answers.

Business

  •  
    Gretchen Hoffer Farb

    South Elgin executive a third-generation in plastics industry

    Kukec's People features Gretchen Hoffer Farb worked as an accountant for a few years, she realized it was't the career she really wanted. So she approached her father, William Hoffer, president of Hoffer Plastics Corp. in South Elgin, a privately held family owned manufacturer that started in 1953. He found a spot for her and now, more than 9 years later, she has learned about the plastics business inside out and was recently selected to join the Plastics Environmental Council as a company representative.

  •  
    Video gamblers in Illinois lost $106 million in the first half of the year, meaning tens of thousands of dollars for the bars and clubs that have the machines and extra cash for state and city governments.

    Bars, clubs rush to get a piece of video action

    Video gamblers in Illinois lost $106 million in the first half of the year, meaning tens of thousands of dollars for the bars and clubs that have the machines and extra cash for state and city governments. The Chicago Sun-Times reported Sunday that since video poker and slot machines were legalized last year, 1,800 licenses have been granted and 2,000 more applicants are waiting in line.

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    This image released by Tesla Motors shows a conceptual design sketch of the Hyperloop passenger transport capsule. Billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk on Monday, Aug. 12, 2013 unveiled the concept for a transport system he says would make the nearly 400-mile trip in half the time it takes an airplane. The “Hyperloop” system would use a large tube. Inside, capsules would float on air, traveling at over 700 miles per hour.

    Inventor Musk unveils high-speed transit capsule

    Twice as fast as an airplane, cheaper than a bullet train and completely self-powered: that’s the mysterious transportation system that inventor and entrepreneur Elon Musk is promising to reveal design plans for Monday. Musk has been dropping hints about his “Hyperloop” system for more than a year during public events, mentioning that it could never crash, would be immune to weather and would move people from Los Angeles to San Francisco in half an hour.

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    In this Wednesday, July 31, 2013 file photo, specialists Joseph Dreyer, left, and Donald Civitanova work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. After a losing week for the three major stock indexes, investors are hoping for a rebound on Wall Street, Monday, Aug. 12, 2013.

    Miners, deal stocks, Apple rise on Wall Street

    NEW YORK — Corporate deal stories and technology stocks were bright spots on Wall Street Monday on a day when the indexes ended relatively flat. BlackBerry jumped after the struggling smartphone maker said it would consider a sale. Dole Foods rose after its CEO said he would take the company private and Steinway Musical Instruments gained after receiving a new buyout offer.Apple, another smartphone maker, was also in the news. The tech giant’s stock rose after the blog AllThingsD said the company would release the latest version of its iPhone on Sept. 10. The stock’s rise helped make technology stocks the leading gainers in the Standard & Poor’s 500 index. Still, those gains weren’t enough to push the broad-market index up for the day.The S&P fell 1.95 points, or 0.1 percent, to close at 1,689.47. The Dow Jones industrial average closed down 5.83 points, or less than 0.1 percent, at 15,419.68. Stocks had opened lower after logging their biggest weekly loss in almost two months. By late morning the losses had been pared, and the S&P and Dow remained marginally lower throughout the day.Apple rose $12.91, or 2.8 percent, to $467.30. The company makes up 7.9 percent of the Nasdaq composite and its advance pushed the index up 9.84 points, or 0.3 percent, to 3,669.95. Newmont Mining was the biggest gainer in the Standard & Poor’s 500 index after the prices of gold and silver advanced. Gold rose for a fourth day on reports of increased demand from China. Silver gained the most in three weeks. Stocks have been treading water this month as companies finished reporting earnings for the second quarter and investors considered when the Federal Reserve will start to ease back on its economic stimulus. The U.S. central bank is buying $85 billion a month to keep long-term interest rates low. Many analysts expect that it will start reducing those purchases as soon as next month. The tepid August follows big gains for stocks for July, when the S&P 500 rose 5 percent, its best month since January. Stocks climbed last month after Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke reassured investors that the Fed would only ease back on its stimulus once the economy is strong enough to handle it. The Fed’s stimulus has been a major factor driving a bull market for stocks that has lasted more than four years. Any pullback in stocks now is presenting investors with a buying opportunity, said Doug Cote, chief market strategist with ING U.S. Investment Management.“There will be some near-term volatility, but it’s a buying opportunity and a chance to get fully invested in the market,” Cote said.The S&P 500 is up 0.2 percent this month. For the year, it’s up 18.5 percent.Investors will get further clues about the strength of the economy this week when the U.S. Commerce Department publishes its July retail sales figures Tuesday. There will also be data on the housing market, industrial production and the Philadelphia Fed’s survey of manufacturing on Thursday. The market’s reaction to the reports may be muted as many market participants are likely to be on vacation this week, said David Kelly, chief global strategist at JPMorgan Funds.“When everybody is at the beach, it takes a louder bang to get the BlackBerries to start humming,” Kelly said.Sluggish economic growth figures from Japan, the world’s third-largest economy, disappointed investors and weighed on the stock market in early trading. The 2.6 percent annualized second-quarter growth rate recorded in Japan was below the 3.8 percent rate recorded in the first quarter and the 3.6 percent predicted by analysts. Japan’s main stock index, the Nikkei, fell 0.7 percent on the news. In commodities trading, the price of gold rose $22, or 1.7 percent, to $1,334.20 an ounce. Silver gained 93.2 cents, or 4.6 percent, to $21.34 an ounce. Among mining stocks, Newmont Mining advanced $1.39, or 4.7 percent, to $30.90. The price of oil fell 14 cents, or 0.1 percent, to $106.11 a barrel.

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    A computer screen displays Bitcoin currency exchange rates for the British pound on an internet website in London, U.K., on Wednesday, April 10, 2013. Bitcoin, developed in 2009 by a mysterious programmer known as Satoshi Nakamoto, is a form of virtual cash that’s made secure by complex computations and isn’t backed by any government.

    N.Y. subpoenas bitcoin firms in probe on criminal risk

    New York’s top banking regulator last week sent subpoenas to 22 digital-currency companies, including BitInstant and Dwolla Corp., to determine whether new regulations should be adopted to govern the emerging industry, according to a person familiar with the matter. Bitcoin is a virtual currency created four years ago that can be used to buy and sell a broad array of items, from electronics to illegal narcotics, according to the agency.

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    CEO to take Dole Food private in $1.21B deal

    Dole Food said Monday its CEO will take it private, in a deal that values the company at approximately $1.21 billion. Dole shareholders will receive $13.50 per share, a 5 percent premium to its $12.81 Friday closing price. This is a sweetened bid for the fresh fruits and vegetable business, up from the $12 per share Chairman and CEO David Murdock offered in June.

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    Struggling smartphone maker BlackBerry will consider selling itself.

    BlackBerry weighs putting itself up for sale

    Struggling smartphone maker BlackBerry will consider selling itself.The company said Monday that its board has formed a special committee to explore “strategic alternatives” in hopes of boosting the adoption of its BlackBerry 10 smartphone.

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    Wood Dale-based AAR to open aircraft maintenance facility in Louisiana

    AAR in Wood Dale has signed an agreement with the Chennault International Airport Authority to open its sixth North American aircraft maintenance, repair and overhaul facility in Lake Charles, La., at the Chennault International Airport.

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    Navistar, Cummins reach milestone of 10,000 orders

    Lisle-baed Navistar today announced it has secured more than 10,000 orders for International Trucks powered by the Cummins ISX15 engine and Cummins SCR aftertreatment system.The announcement comes seven months after the reintroduction of the industry leading truck and engine combination.

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    Mettawa’s Grainger July sales increase 4 percent

    Mettawa-based W.W. Grainger said daily sales in July increased 4 percent over the same time last year.The increase included 5 percentage points from volume, 1 percentage point from price and 1 percentage point from acquisitions, partially offset by a 1 percentage point decline from unfavorable foreign exchange, 1 percentage point decline from lower sales of seasonal products and a 1 percentage point decline from the timing of the July 4th holiday in the United States.

  •  
    “Disney Infinity: The Toy Box.”

    Disney prepares a toy offensive with ‘Infinity’

    With cartoony posters plastering the walls and toy figures standing at attention on nearly every flat surface, a once ordinary conference room on Disney’s Glendale campus has been transformed into the colorful war room for “Disney Infinity,” the ambitious project from the company’s interactive division that combines real-life toy figures with virtual worlds.

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    Mari Torres, 39, in her office in Springfield, Va. Each year, consumers return about $264 billion worth of merchandise, almost nine percent of total sales, according to industry estimates, but many people are not aware that some of their returns are being monitored at stores that outsource information on shoppers who return merchandise to a third-party company.

    Retailers keeping tabs on consumers’ return habits

    It’s not just the government that might be keeping tabs on you. Many retailers are tracking you, too — or at least your merchandise returns. The companies say it’s all in the name of security and fighting fraud. They want to be able to identify chronic returners or gangs of thieves trying to make off with high-end products that are returned later for store credit.

  •  
    The average U.S. price of a gallon of gasoline has fallen about 8 cents over the past two weeks.

    U.S. gas prices drop 8 cents over past 2 weeks

    The average U.S. price of a gallon of gasoline has fallen about 8 cents over the past two weeks. The Lundberg Survey of gas prices released Sunday says the price of a gallon of regular is $3.60. Midgrade costs an average of $3.78 a gallon, and premium is $3.92.

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    Who will read the business book you’re writing?

    There are two reasons to write a business book, according to Small Business Columnist Jim Kendall. He explores those reasons.

  •  
    Mir Joffrey, M.D.

    ‘Too many people mistake owning a business with owning a job’
    Mir Joffrey, M.D., owner of Lift Body Center in Schaumburg, discusses his small business and the challenges of a small business owner.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Tater tots, whether homemade or frozen, are a filling side dish or can be used in casseroles as well.

    Frugal living: Homemade tater tots for kids and adults

    There’s something youthful about tater tots. They’re typically purchased frozen, then cooked and served with burgers, hot dogs or sloppy joes. Some families enjoy tater tot casserole, too Tater tots probably don’t make the cut as a go-to potato side dish in your meal rotation. But what if you made them yourself? Sure, it takes a bit of work, but it’s cheaper than frozen, and it might even become a delicious new option your entire family can enjoy.

  •  
    The film “In A World ...” is the directorial debut for writer-actress-director Lake Bell.

    Lake Bell and her voice-over obsession

    Since she was a little girl putting on nightly shows to stave off bedtime and using her father’s Dictaphone to stealthily record interesting accents, Lake Bell has been fascinated by voices. In her new film, “In a World ...,” Bell finally realizes her long-held obsession, playing an aspiring voice-over artist trying to make it in a male-dominated industry. The film is also the directorial debut for Bell, the 34-year-old actress of TV shows such as “Boston Legal,” films like “No Strings Attached” and, increasingly, comedy like Rob Corddry’s “Children’s Hospital.”

  •  
    Keith West-Harrison, co-owner of Miss Celie’s Spa in Albuquerque, gets ready for an event celebrating the premiere of AMC television series “Breaking Bad’s” final season. The show was filmed in Albuquerque.

    Albuquerque hopes ‘Breaking Bad’ ending a start

    Throughout the filming of AMC hit television series “Breaking Bad” in Albuquerque, interest in the Southwestern city from tourists has grown and local businesses have sought to cash in. But “Breaking Bad” started its final season Sunday, and Albuquerque shops and tourist attractions are trying to take advantage of the popular show’s last moments before the series fades from memory.

  •  
    “Hidden Order” by Brad Thor

    Conspiracies abound in ‘Hidden Order’

    An organization more secretive than the FBI, the CIA or the NSA takes center stage in Brad Thor’s latest adventure featuring former Secret Service agent Scot Harvath. Harvath, now an operative for a clandestine government agency, receives a call from his superiors to attend a meeting at the Federal Reserve in Washington, D.C. The Fed chairman plans to retire, and a list of five candidates to replace him has been leaked. All the candidates disappear, and it appears that an enemy bent on destroying the U.S. economy is responsible.

  •  
    Sheri Hole outside her home in Muncie, Ind. Hole’s husband, Jeff, committed suicide in 2001. Since his death, Hole has become very active in the community in terms of bringing attention to suicide prevention and mental health.

    Muncie woman works to ease pain, stigma of suicide

    The sight of two police officers walking toward her front door on June 30, 2001, told Sheri Hole all she needed to know about her missing husband. The imprint of Jeff’s gun clear on her mind, she realized she couldn’t meet the officers at the door. She couldn’t hear them say it — suicide. “I was in shock, really,” she said. “My mother had been with me and she met the officers before they got to the door. I heard one of them say, ‘he’s gone’ and I didn’t know what to do.

  •  
    Having a positive relationship with your teacher is key to staying on track.

    Teachers give advice about starting off right

    Having taught at Edison Middle School in Wheaton for 16 years, Heather Gordon has seen the same story play out many times at the beginning of the school year. “The first few weeks, students are excited to be back,” she said. “And then it starts to wear off.” The transition back into the school year is especially difficult for middle school students, educators say. A desk can seem like a prison cell after three months running around outside and playing video games at home. Students often tend to have a hard time finding motivation to read and do math again.

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    A newly built sign marking Elvis Presley Boulevard sits at the intersection of the boulevard and Brooks Road in Memphis. The boulevard, which runs right in front of Graceland, Presley’s longtime Memphis home, is undergoing a $43 million infrastructure improvement project that officials hope will please tourists and improve the quality of life of the residents of the Whitehaven community.

    Improvements in store for the Road to Graceland

    The road to Graceland is not a pretty sight. At least not yet. Elvis Presley Boulevard leads hundreds of thousands of visitors each year to Graceland, the late rock ’n’ roll icon’s Memphis mansion, and to the exhibits across the street. Tourists exit off Interstate 55 and cruise through a mile’s worth of empty businesses, vacant lots, crooked utility poles, crumbling sidewalks, poor lighting and drab landscaping. Fast-food joints and gas stations are the main options for eating nearest to Graceland. Businesses such as used-car dealerships and auto-parts stores also are part of the mix. Lodging options are not plentiful: The highest-quality chain hotels in the immediate area are an EconoLodge and a Days Inn.

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    Matt Damon stars in “Elysium,” which topped the weekend box office with $30.5 million, according to studio estimates Sunday, enough to beat three newcomers, including the Jennifer Aniston comedy “We’re the Millers.”

    ‘Elysium’ tops box office with $30.5 million

    The dystopian science-fiction thriller “Elysium” topped the weekend box office with $30.5 million, according to studio estimates Sunday, enough to beat three newcomers, including the Jennifer Aniston comedy “We’re the Millers.” Sony’s “Elysium,” directed by Neill Blomkamp and starring Matt Damon, opened in line with expectations, but still debuted somewhat modestly for a $115 million action film.

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    Eustace Conway rests on a wooden sledge in front of the horse barn at his Turtle Island Preserve in Triplett, N.C. People come from all over the world to learn natural living and how to go off-grid, but local officials ordered the place closed over health and safety concerns.

    Reality TV meets real world, ‘Mountain Man’ style

    The way Eustace Conway sees it, there’s the natural world, as exemplified by his Turtle Island Preserve in the Blue Ridge Mountains. And then there’s the “plastic, imitation” world that most other humans inhabit. But the border between the two has always been porous — uncomfortably so these days. When Conway — known today as a star of the History Channel reality show “Mountain Men” — bought his first 107 acres in 1987, his vision for Turtle Island was as “a tiny bowl in the earth, intact and natural, surrounded by pavement and highways.” People peering inside from nearby ridges would see “a pristine and green example of what the whole world once looked like.”

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    As baby boomers age, more people are encountering hearing problems.

    Boomers battle age, work-related hearing loss

    When baby boomers were coming along — blasting not only most traditions set by generations before them, but their music too — they probably didn’t think they might some day need hearing aids just to have a casual chat. Now, with the eldest of the boomers this year turning 67, they are among the millions who need help hearing. And whether playing music too loudly in their younger years has anything to do with their hearing loss now is not as much of an issue as how hearing loss affects one’s lifestyle and the cost of hearing aids.

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    Billie Jean King will be the first sports figure to be profiled on PBS’ “American Masters.”

    Billie Jean King talks life ahead of PBS profile

    Billie Jean King said last week that she couldn’t have revealed herself as being gay in the 1970s because it would have damaged the fledgling women’s professional tennis tour. King became the first prominent female athlete to come out as gay in 1981 after her partner filed a palimony lawsuit against her. “I don’t think it would have helped the situation. I think it would have hurt us more because we were just getting started,” she told a Television Critics Association session.

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    Courtesy of PBS Elizabeth McGovern as Lady Grantham, left, Hugh Bonneville as Lord Grantham, Dan Stevens as Matthew Crawley, Penelope Wilton as Isobel Crawley, Allen Leech as Tom Branson, Jim Carter as Mr. Carson, and Phyllis Logan as Mrs. Hughes, from the TV series, “Downton Abbey.”

    Lady Mary copes with grief in new ‘Downton’ season

    Lady Mary will be mired in grief as season four of “Downton Abbey” begins, mourning the loss of her husband, Matthew. But a string of suitors awaits when she’s ready to live again, said Michelle Dockery, who plays Mary in the hit drama that will return to PBS’ “Masterpiece” next January. “She has more than one love interest,” Dockery said. “She’s kind of slowly throughout the series coming back to real life, and of course it’s important for her to eventually move on.”

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    Getting enough sleep can help you make the right choice when it comes to healthy foods.

    Your health: A link between sleep and obesity?
    Learn how getting enough sleep can help you make the right decisions with the food you eat. Also, a new book takes a closer look at the underrated placenta. Often discarded as an afterthought of afterbirth, the placenta, which links mother and child during pregnancy, serves important health functions. In “Life’s Vital Link,” Y.W. Loke takes a closer look at this little-understood organ.

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    New research has explored the link between dental health and diseases in the body.

    Sick mouths may play a role in other diseases

    Bacteria-laden mouths and bleeding gums are giving medical researchers plenty to think about. Turns out gum disease is associated with a greater risk of developing diabetes, heart disease and even pregnancy complications. And a recently released study found evidence that bacteria linked to gingivitis traveled to brains afflicted by Alzheimer’s disease, hinting at a role in dementia. As the latest research deepens scientists’ understanding of the link between dental health and disease, the potential implications are coming into focus.

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    Aspirin benefit tied to gene variant, study says

    Aspirin’s benefit in thwarting colon cancer is driven by a gene mutation that makes tumor cells less sensitive to the drug’s effects, according to a study that may lead to personalized prevention strategies. Developing colon cancer with a mutation of the gene BRAF was similar for both regular aspirin users and non-users, according to research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Regular aspirin users had a 27 percent reduced risk of developing cancer without the mutation compared with those who didn’t regularly take the drug, the study found.

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    Design experts advise families to reserve a 10-percent contigency fund for unexpected expenses and unplanned upgrades.

    Carefully plan a project budget to get the results you want

    You've developed a wish list for your ideal kitchen, bathroom or master bedroom. You've gleaned inspiration from magazines, the web and cable TV, forming a vision complete with your dream cabinets and favorite flooring. But before you get carried away, it's essential to tackle the more daunting task of budgeting.

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    Replacement of both knees at once is good option for some

    I have severe osteoarthritis in both knees. Should I have both knees replaced at one time, or separately?

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    A group of re-enactors eat together at a Revolutionary War camp site.

    Families travel back in time for ‘good, clean’ fun

    Keith Gill leads a double life. In one life, he’s the director of museum operations at the First Division Museum at Cantigny Park in Wheaton. A family man, he lives with his wife and two children in a suburban home in Wheaton.

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    “Pretty Little Liars” star Lucy Hale arrives at the Teen Choice Awards at the Gibson Amphitheater on Sunday in Los Angeles.

    Images: Teen Choice Awards
    Stars of the big and small screen turned out for the Teen Choice Awards on Sunday night.

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    A nearly complete Roadster Shop chassis with new suspension, brakes and wheels installed.

    Best car restorations start with a strong foundation

    When it comes to vehicle restorations, the frame is a foundation upon which all is rebuilt. Two area experts, Phil Gerber and Jeff Schwartz, know all about this largely unseen — but nonetheless vital — part of the process. Gerber is vice president of sales and marketing for Roadster Shop in Mundelein. Schwartz owns Schwartz Performance in Woodstock.

Discuss

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    How a true democracy operates

    Columnists Steven and Cokie Roberts: The Voting Rights Act is weaker but still standing, and the administration is right to use every power it has left to protect the essence of “true democracy.”

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    America’s bubble of complacency

    Columnist Michael Gerson: The impending replacement of the chairman of the Federal Reserve has taken on elements of a political campaign, with members of Congress endorsing candidates and financial bloggers strafing rival monetary camps. One half expects to see ads go up in Iowa: “Janet Yellen: Inflation’s best friend,” or “Larry Summers: In your heart you know he’s skeptical of quantitative easing.” This spectacle should not be allowed to distract from a reality indifferent to the views (or gender) of the next chairman: We are reaching the limits of monetary policy. And few know what lies beyond it.

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    To have or have not — a baby

    Columnist Kathleen Parker: The media-created mommy wars haven’t just jumped the shark and entered the realm of “Sharknado.” Where women once debated ways to balance family-and-career — a hyphenated oxymoron if ever there was one — they’re now clashing over whether having babies is really all that. To bear children or not — that is the only question left to those with first-world problems.

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    Inspiring story about a life saved
    A Hanover Park letter to the editor: What an amazing story about Addison police officer Maria Reyes saving the life of a man who had a heart attack. The article had me in tears, especially reading about the wife’s reaction to her husband’s behavior to know something was wrong.

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    Immigration reform can improve nation
    A Lindenhurst letter to the editor: Immigration reform is a jobs issue as well as a social issue.

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    Be safe with alcohol at Elgin fests
    An Elgin letter to the editor: It would appear that a conflict of interest exists between trying to get downtown Elgin’s activities portrayed in the light most favorable to attract lots of people and the severe financial consequences of lawyer’s fees, court costs, etc., necessitated by an arrest for DUI.

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    Immigration reform appreciated
    An Aurora letter to the editor: I would like to thank President Obama, Majority Leader Sen. Harry Reid, and all other Democratic leaders for immigration reform

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    Piece-by-piece approach best on immigration
    A Wheaton letter to the editor:

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